Podcasts about abcs

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Standard set of letters that represent phonemes of a spoken language

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  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about abcs

Purpose FULL Women
210 - Diagnosing Spending Habits with Jessica Wallace

Purpose FULL Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 12:38


Jessica Wallace B.A., J.D., M.B.A., PhD Candidate is an expert in personal finance and macroeconomics. She helps people understand the ABCs of finance and how to make money to benefit you long-term.

FatGuyRadioShow
The ABCs of Me

FatGuyRadioShow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:41


A Kohls time warp. Gone TV shows. My kids just like me. Bad TV church producer. No rate hikes for content lackers. 

Meet Me in Taipei
Episode 67: “Shits” ABCs Receive

Meet Me in Taipei

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:53


To continue episode 65, we want to talk about the downsides of being an Asian American back in Taiwan. Tune in to find our stories!

Medicine For Good
What COVID 'Long-Haulers' Deal With | Dr. Linda Geng

Medicine For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 37:46


The COVID-19 pandemic has affected millions of people not physically, and mentally, but also in their day-to-day life. It has also affected the global economy and led to a dramatic loss of human life worldwide. The virus has spread so fast that it destroys the body's immune system causing different symptoms most especially to those who are already suffering from comorbidities.Fortunately, after a year of living with the fear of getting infected, the vaccines were created and have been disseminated globally to prevent infections and counter severe COVID-19 cases. However, some who were infected by the virus continue to experience persistent symptoms of COVID-19 infection. In this episode, the co-director of Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome (PACS) clinic at Stanford Healthcare medical center, Dr. Linda Geng, joins us to share what POST-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome is and what its long-haulers deal with. This episode features discussions on the predictors of the syndrome and how to prevent and treat Long COVID. Listen to Episode 34 to learn more.Memorable Quotes:Let your patients be your book and learn from them. - Dr. Julietta GabiolaLong COVID lasts at least four weeks to three months. - Dr. Linda GengVaccines at this point are our best-known tool and a facilitator to help prevent long COVID. - Dr. Linda GengAbout the Guests:Dr. Linda Geng is an internist focusing on puzzling conditions and director of a team-based diagnostic second opinion clinic called “Consultative Medicine.” During the pandemic, it became clear that many people with COVID-19 had lingering puzzling and complex symptoms after their initial infection, so Dr. Geng joined forces with a multidisciplinary group of physicians to build the PACS program here at Stanford to tackle this challenging public health problem and advance the care of patients with persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection. Currently, Dr. Geng is co-director of the Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome (PACS) clinic at Stanford Healthcare medical center.About the Host:Dr. Jette Gabiola is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the President & CEO of ABCs for Global Health. Click here for her full profile or read her full interview here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Value Adds Value!
The ABCs of Inspired Teaching: Authenticity

Value Adds Value!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:05


So we have been slowly letting the cat out of the bag that we are getting set to publish our first book this spring titled THE ABCs OF INSPIRED TEACHING. It is a collection of words that will help teachers breathe life into their craft and their students. The first word in the ABCs is AUTHENTICITY. We believe that this is the mother of all virtues when it comes to inspired teaching. What we are sharing with you in the original recording we did to rough draft the book. We recorded each word, transcribed the conversation, then built the book out from there. We hope you enjoy the conversation and forgive the stuffed nose Kyle had. More information on the ABCs to come at the start of 2022!! Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/valueaddsvalue/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/itskylekrueger/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/its.wil.law.iii/?hl=en Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/itskylekrueger https://twitter.com/its_wil_law_iii Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/valueaddsvalue Check out our Youtube Channel! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ7hVS9BqW0OFOO5SFKxydA The views expressed on this podcast are our own and do not reflect the views of any education agency, district, or school. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/valueaddsvalue/support

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Is Alzheimer's Preventable? The Power Of A Personalized Medicine Approach with Dr. Richard Isaacson

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 83:55


This episode is brought to you by Essentia, BiOptimizers, and Joovv.There are so many simple steps we can take every single day to strengthen our brains and reduce the risk for Alzheimer's. Considering that this disease starts in the brain 20 to 30 years before the first signs of memory loss, we should all be thinking about prevention. Today, I'm so excited to welcome Dr. Richard Isaacson to talk about taking care of the brain in a whole new way. Dr. Richard Isaacson serves as Director of the Center for Brain Health and Director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic (APC) at Florida Atlantic University's Schmidt College of Medicine. He previously served as Director of the APC at the Weill Cornell Memory Disorders Program, Assistant Dean of Faculty Development, and Associate Professor of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine & NewYork-Presbyterian. He remains as Adjunct Associate Professor of Neurology in the Department of Neurology at Weill Cornell.This episode is brought to you by Essentia, BiOptimizers, and Joovv.It's the perfect time to try Essentia, since they're having their biggest Black Friday sale of the year. You can get 25% off plus 2 free pillows and an extra $100 off a queen, king, or California king mattress at learn.myessentia.com/drmarkhyman.For the entire month of November, BiOptimizers is offering up to 10% off every order and access to over $200 in free gifts including books and other great products. Just use the code HYMAN10 at magbreakthrough.com/hyman.For a limited time, Joovv is offering $50 off your first order with the code FARMACY at Joovv.com/FARMACY. Some exclusions apply.Here are more of the details from our interview (audio version / Apple Subscriber version): What you can do today to prevent Alzheimer's disease (8:40 / 4:02)Using food as medicine to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease (12:17 / 8:13)ABCs of Alzheimer's prevention management (17:47 / 14:15) Tracking your sleep, exercise, blood sugar, and more for brain health (22:48 / 19:12)Eating and fasting for cognitive health (25:02 / 21:32)Approaching Alzheimer's as a systemic disease that affects the brain, not a brain disease (34:13 / 28:52) Challenges to applying preventative Alzheimer's research in patient care (43:08 / 39:09)Is Alzheimer's reversible? (51:32 / 46:06) Blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, belly fat, and Alzheimer's disease (58:33 / 53:10) Hopeful Alzheimer's patient cases (1:12:05 / 1:04:40) Support Dr. Isaacson's Alzheimer's prevention work at fauf.fau.edu/alzp. Get access to his free Brain Health Course at faumedicine.org/alz/course and learn more at faumedicine.org/alz. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Team Chat Podcast: A Video Game Podcast
Our Video Game ABCs - Volume 1 - Team Chat Podcast Episode 257

Team Chat Podcast: A Video Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 67:15


We're kicking off a new series where we list a video game that we can think of for each letter of the alphabet and share why that game stands out to us. Could be we just started playing, could be we love the game, or it could be because we hate it! Check out volume one! LINKS: Subscribe: - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi14dFb-OyPcOS2pt4ZKP7g?sub_confirmation=1) - Podcast services: (https://teamchatpodcast.com/where-to-listen/) Join our Discord (https://discord.gg/jkh48jk) Support the show and get perks! (https://www.patreon.com/teamchatpodcast) Follow TCP on social media: - Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TeamChatPodcast/) - Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/teamchatpodcast/) - Twitter (https://twitter.com/TeamChatPodcast) Follow the hosts: - Jerrett (https://twitter.com/jtwilson) - Mogan (https://twitter.com/MoganATX)

YAP - Young and Profiting
#YAPSnacks: The ABCs to a Better Career

YAP - Young and Profiting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 31:28


Are you feeling lost looking for a new career path?  Maybe you're feeling stuck in your current job? The YAP team is here to tell you that it's okay to feel this way!  Today on YAP Snacks, Hala will talk about how to start your journey to a better career while sharing tips and tricks from professionals that we've spoken to in previous episodes. Knowing that career change is possible is only the first step. But, how do you know what profession or career path is right for you? It's so easy to become stagnant in a job or career you're not really happy with and miss out on a dream job without even realizing it. And you don't need to be in business for yourself to feel like you are following the right career path! There are so many companies large and small out there that can be the perfect fit for you! The YAP team has broken down the best advice that we could find on this topic to bring to you the ABCs to A Better Career!  This episode is sponsored by Eight Sleep and Jordan Harbinger   Social Media:   Follow YAP on IG: www.instagram.com/youngandprofiting Reach out to Hala directly at Hala@YoungandProfiting.com Follow Hala on Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/htaha/ Follow Hala on Instagram: www.instagram.com/yapwithhala Follow Hala on ClubHouse: @halataha Check out our website to meet the team, view show notes and transcripts: www.youngandprofiting.com

Pray
Eli Crane - Legacy - “Sinners in Need”

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 11:48


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.“All of us have a God sized hole in our hearts, and we're trying to fill it with everything under the sun but God.”

Pray
Overview of Eli Crane's Life, Leadership, and Legacy

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 17:35


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.

Pray
Eli Crane - Leadership - “A Motivating Environment”

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 16:15


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.“Calm breeds calm, fear breeds fear, and motivation breeds motivation.”

Pray
Eli Crane - Life - “Springs of Life”

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 20:28


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.“I no longer saw my life as my own, but I saw my life as bought and paid for.”

Pray
This week on PRAY: Eli Crane

Pray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 2:13


Eli Crane is a man of faith, a husband, a father, a veteran and an entrepreneur. Eli joined the Navy the week after 9/11. He Spent 8 years as a Navy SEAL. After 5 deployments in the Navy, three to Iraq, he decided to turn the page. You might have seen him and his wife Jen on ABCs hit show Shark Tank where they successfully landed a deal with Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary. Eli is also a brand ambassador for Sig Sauer firearms and was a member of the ACVBA (advisory committee veteran business affairs) in Washington, DC. He loves raising awareness about Veteran issues and regularly engages in conservative thought leadership through social media. Eli, his wife of 15 years, and their two daughters reside in Tucson, Arizona where together they run Bottle Breacher and raise their family. Most recently Eli has decided to run for US Congress in his home state, Arizona District 1. Eli is an America First candidate and has the courage and leadership skills necessary to keep America free and prosperous.

Class Dismissed
The ABCs of Empathy and how it can make you a stronger educator

Class Dismissed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 45:49


In K-12 education, there's a strong push for STEM education. It's for good reason, math and science are important. But where should social-emotional learning rank? Psychiatrist Helen Riess, MD, believes we're in a society that's ill-equipped to talk about emotion and feelings. Riess thinks we need more than just information in this world to succeed. She believes we need to be taught how to have difficult conversations. We need to engage with people who are not like us. For Riess, teaching with empathy in the classroom is crucial. So important, she dedicated a chapter in her book just for teachers. Riess, a psychiatrist and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, authored “The Empathy Effect: Seven Neuroscience-Based Keys for Transforming the Way We Live, Love, Work, and Connect Across Differences" Her book, which is supported by research, answers whether or not empathy is an innate quality. Can it be taught? Or is it just something we're born with? She also offers tips on how we can develop into a more empathetic person. “Empathy is not one thing, says Riess. “It's actually a capacity to perceive and understand and know to some degree what experiences another person is experiencing.” When Riess talks about empathy, she's speaking about capacity for perception. Empathy in the classroom For a student to be motivated, they need to see that the teacher recognizes them as unique individuals, says Riess. There's nothing more powerful than making meaningful eye contact with students. To show I see you and that you're not just looking at a blur of faces, says Riess. Riess suggests that educators should register each student's eye color in their mind. Don't say the eye color out loud, but take time to really look at a person's eyes' unique color. She says it will build a connection with the individual. She also suggests teachers should silently “name the affect” when working with students. Affect is a scientific term for emotion. There's a well-known phrase, “if you can name it, you can tame it,” says Riess. “If you can name that somebody looks confused. You're probably going to be a little more conscious of trying to clear up confusion than if you just look at someone's face and don't try to name what emotion you're seeing.” Riess also suggests that everyone should learn the ABC of empathy Acknowledge – when you're in a difficult situation Breathe – take a deep breath. Gives a pause from the trigger to the response. Curiosity – as soon as we move to judgment there really is no open door left to show empathy. But if we say ‘I'd like to understand why you did that.' Once the person is listened to and heard, you might get to a deeper level. To learn more from Riess, listen to Episode 208 of the Class Dismissed Podcast on your favorite podcast app or iTunes. All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2020.

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition
Nutrient Density, Ketosis and Chronic Inflammation with Dr. Cheryl Burdette

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 55:54


How does a FREE 90-day supply of Paleovalley Turmeric Complex sound? Turmeric is one of the best supplements you can take to keep inflammation under control, support your brain, gut, and skin, all while keeping you healthy and strong.  Winning is easy, just go to ratemypodcast.com/jockers. Leave a review, and send a screenshot or confirmation of the review to assistance@drjockers.com to be entered to win. When you leave a review, you help us reach more people and impact more lives - so thanks so much for doing that. Winners will be announced and contacted on November 30th and will receive a 90 day supply of the Paleovalley Turmeric Complex, so hurry and visit ratemypodcast.com/jockers today!   Today's episode is proudly sponsored by Paleovalley and its Essential C Complex. Not only does this immunity-boosting product have the three most potent sources of Vitamin C on the planet, but it also gives you 750% of the daily recommended dose -- exactly the amount your immune system needs to stay in top shape. Hurry and grab yours from Paleovalley.com and be sure to use code JOCKERS at checkout for an extra 15% off!     Don't you just love the taste of summer and wish you could bask in it forever? Today's episode is sponsored by Island Bliss, a refreshing tropical drink that will soon become your daily dose of sunshine! This “not bitter, just deliciously refreshing” green juice is packed with an energy-boosting formula to help you perform your best from sunrise to sunset and even beyond. Each scoop contains 30-plus plant extracts, all organic and sourced from all over the world, to support gut health and promote a balanced microbiome. Visit https://earthechofoods.com/ and use code JOCKERS for 15% off.   One of the most sought-after experts in naturopathy, Dr. Cheryl Burdette, joins Dr. Jockers to talk about the importance of holistic diagnosis when it comes to treating chronic illnesses. She reminds us that the mind and body are not separate entities that require separate treatments. They are purposefully connected hence they should be treated together. One important factor she highlighted in this episode is the role of inflammation in our state of health. Learn how inflammation relates to the uptrend of chronic illnesses and the lifestyle change we can switch to that can mitigate the risk of chronic diseases.   “If we're going to influence root cause change, then teaching the brain to do things more accurately makes a lot of sense.” - Dr. Cheryl Burdette   Subscribe to the podcast on: Apple Podcast Stitcher Spotify PodBean TuneIn Radio   In This Episode:   - Unleash the most powerful tool we have handy. It is the key influence to EVERY positive change you can achieve health-wise.   - Look at how every system intertwines by using a naturopathy lens, especially when resolving health issues.   - Why future doctors – and other medical practitioners – should first become experts in the ABCs of inflammation.   - 5 core processes that can treat almost all diagnoses when they get the chance to work together.   - Major symptoms that alert you when chronic inflammation is ON FIRE.    - Leverage the ketogenic diet and its freed-up ketones to help dial down inflammation.    - Empower the key nutrients your body needs to get you to a state where you can exercise and pursue a diet that promotes better health.   Resources:   - Essential C Complex – Use Code JOCKERS for 15% off   - Island Bliss – Use Code JOCKERS for 15% off   - Free 90-day supply of Paleovalley Turmeric Complex when you rate our podcast!   Connect with Dr. Cheryl Burdette:   - LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-american-academy-of-anti-aging-medicine-a4m-   - Website – https://www.a4m.com/certifications.html   - Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/a4mconferences/   - Twitter – https://twitter.com/A4MEvents   - Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/redefiningmedicine/   Connect with Dr. Jockers:   - Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/drjockers/   - Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/DrDavidJockers   - YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/djockers   - Website – https://drjockers.com/   - If you are interested in being a guest on the show, we would love to hear from you! Please contact us here! - https://drjockers.com/join-us-dr-jockers-functional-nutrition-podcast/

Meet Me in Taipei
Episode 65: Benefits ABCs receive in Taiwan

Meet Me in Taipei

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 24:16


Many have assumed Western culture leads a hedonistic lifestyles in Asia, which has brought to our attention and we want to share with everyone the benefits that we received as an Asian American in Taiwan.

Drilled
The ABCs of Oil | Katie Worth on the State of Climate Education in the U.S.

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 18:23


Reporter Katie Worth has been researching climate education in the U.S. for years and that research forms the basis of her new book Miseducation. In this interview we delve into what she found.

The REAL David Knight Show
Thr 4Nov21 Life Insurance Benefits DENIED to Unvaccinated / EMP & Off Grid Preparation

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 181:37


The next step to punish unvaccinated — deny life insurance benefits if they die with a positive PCR test and are unvaccinated INTERVIEW: Jeff Yago, author "The ABCs of EMP: A Practical Guide to Both Understanding and Surviving an EMP" on off-grid power and protection Coming for the kids — the propaganda beings with Pfizer ads, mainstream and government media pushing jabs on kids “to protect grandma”, “to have freedom”, to be a “superhero” that “protects the community”.  Not just 5 yr olds, they're coming for PREGNANT WOMEN Miniature vials and needles — Trump Kool-Aid has been manufactured already for every single child in USA Dems so unpopular in NEW JERSEY that top ranking legislator loses to trucker who spent $153 — wait — here's some MORE votes, the Dem wins! FBI caught hiding evidence that would show Rittenhouse innocent — a longstanding pattern of FBI behavior Washington Post attacks non-partisan group that exposed the hideous beagle experiments, to defend Fauci.  There's a “party” that transcends Democrats & Republicans TOPICS by TIMECODE 3:28 Trucker spent $153 and defeated NJ Senate President — or did he? Progressive Democrats say the problem with the Dem losses was that the party wasn't radical enough. And Biden denies the reports of a negotiated amount of $900,000 per couple for illegal aliens separated at the border 15:00 Kissinger and Eric Schmidt (Google) write an op-ed piece about AI 22:56 LGBT cancel mob — demands you cheer male homecoming “queen” but demands you cancel Chris Pratt for his vaguely Christian sentiments from 2018. They say he is stealing Italian heritage by doing the voice of Mario (Super Mario) and Garfield in animated productions 38:23 FBI has been hiding video that shows Kyle Rittenhouse acted in self-defense.  A long established pattern of behavior for the FBI 50:10 A great resource for learning how to get more self-reliant, especially in food — the ultimate way to rebel against the system that's trying to enslave you 1:00:43 INTERVIEW: Understanding & Surviving an EMP. Jeff Yago, author "The ABCs of EMP: A Practical Guide to Both Understanding and Surviving an EMP” and off-grid power and protection  1:49:49 Kinder Jabs: CNN Says Just in Time for Kwanza. It's festive! It's for “superheroes”, by “superheroes”. Full spectrum propaganda for the cult audience.  If you're 11 yrs, 11 months you get 1/3 dose.  One month later, at 12, you get full adult dose.  And don't forget pregnant woman — too many are skipping the jab! 2:32:39 FDA approved blot clot drug for children (for clotting condition that was rare before the injections) as Pfizer was already manufacturing and stockpiling “kiddy doses” of the injection 2:43:15  Death Benefits Removed If Unvaxed Die with Positive PCR Test. New York, Massachusetts city have already focused on this novel punishment for the unjabbed. But woman fired for refusal to violate her religious beliefs on abortion has finally prevailed in court after 5 yrs — a WARNING to companies and governments that they will eventually pay 2:52:41  Washington Post Defends Fauci Against Puppy Torture. They had previously praised the group that exposed his pointless cruelty but now the whistleblowing group becomes a target to save Fauci   Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

The David Knight Show
Thr 4Nov21 Life Insurance Benefits DENIED to Unvaccinated / EMP & Off Grid Preparation

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 181:38


* The next step to punish unvaccinated — deny life insurance benefits if they die with a positive PCR test and are unvaccinated* INTERVIEW: Jeff Yago, author "The ABCs of EMP: A Practical Guide to Both Understanding and Surviving an EMP" on off-grid power and protection* Coming for the kids — the propaganda beings with Pfizer ads, mainstream and government media pushing jabs on kids “to protect grandma”, “to have freedom”, to be a “superhero” that “protects the community”. Not just 5 yr olds, they're coming for PREGNANT WOMEN* Miniature vials and needles — Trump Kool-Aid has been manufactured already for every single child in USA* Dems so unpopular in NEW JERSEY that top ranking legislator loses to trucker who spent $153 — wait — here's some MORE votes, the Dem wins!* FBI caught hiding evidence that would show Rittenhouse innocent — a longstanding pattern of FBI behavior* Washington Post attacks non-partisan group that exposed the hideous beagle experiments, to defend Fauci. There's a “party” that transcends Democrats & RepublicansFind out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Medicine For Good
Obesity Medications: What's the Best Drug Therapy for You? | Dr. Marilyn McGowan

Medicine For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 25:34


In previous episodes, we've discussed the health consequences of obesity, its lifestyle modifications, and surgical options to counter this medical condition The primary job of every physician is to enable patients to have quality of life and low mortality. Lifestyle modification and healthy eating habits are not enough to help you lose weight. You should know that there are medications taken in conjunction with obesity treatment and they can also be linked to different comorbidities like osteoarthritis, PCOS, hypertension, diabetes, and sleep apnea that will most likely put you at life-threatening risk.If you are among countless others who have been struggling with obesity or if you know someone who needs help battling it, this episode cant help, guide and inform you on certain medications to choose fromToday's episode features Dr. Marilyn McGowan who graciously discusses the drug therapies for obesity that work to decrease appetite, slow down the digestion, help the pancreas work better, and many other benefits. We discuss the different medications and go further into their generic names, side effects, and price point. Listen in to know which drug therapy fits you best.Before taking any of the medications discussed, make sure that you consult with your doctor first and be knowledgeable about their contraindications and side effects. Let's jump right into Episode 33!Memorable Quotes:Persevere to achieve what you want because it really would improve the quality of life and will prevent all other consequences of obesity. - Dr. Julieta GabiolaThe safest, most tolerated, and best obesity medication for you is the one prescribed by your doctor. - Dr. Marilyn McGowanWe can do all the medications in the world, but it needs to be working very closely with diet, exercise, and lifestyle modification. - Dr. Marilyn McGowanWork with your doctor to know what medication really fits you. - Dr. Marilyn McGowanAbout the Guests:Dr. Marilyn McGowan is a 2nd-year Internal Medicine Resident at Stanford University. She is interested in primary care, particularly the treatment of chronic diseases, and in helping her patients achieve their health goals. Her hobbies are playing music, getting outside, or visiting her family on their farm in Northern California. About the Host:Dr. Jette Gabiola is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the President & CEO of ABCs for Global Health. Click here for her full profile or read her full interview here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

In It: Raising Kids with Learning and Attention Issues

What's an IEP? And why are there so many confusing acronyms in special education? In this episode, host Gretchen Vierstra gets answers to common questions about Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) from co-host Amanda Morin and their colleague Andrew Lee, a special education legal expert. Andrew and Amanda explain the basics of IEPs — starting with “How do kids even get one?” They also break down the meanings of special education terms like PLOP and answer questions about IEPs from the Understood community.Understood is a nonprofit and social impact organization dedicated to shaping a world where the 1 in 5 people who learn and think differently can thrive. Learn more about In It and all our podcasts at u.org/podcasts. Copyright © 2021 Understood for All, Inc. All rights reserved.

Voices In My Head (The Official Podcast of Rick Lee James)
Episode 439 - William Willimon - The ABCs of Christian Faith

Voices In My Head (The Official Podcast of Rick Lee James)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 33:56


Dr. William Willimon Bestselling author, popular preacher and teacher, Will Willimon, has just published one of his liveliest books, God Turned Toward Us: The ABCs of the Christian Faith. “The challenge of the Christian life is learning to talk Christian. Somebody has got to tell us, give us the words that open the door to the faith called Christian,” says Will in his introduction. The book takes terms like Atonement, Christ, Incarnation, Justice, Creed and speaks about them in wonderfully accessible ways. The vocabulary begins with an essay on, Abortion, and runs all the way to Zacchaeus. Will's signature humor and mischievousness comes through, along with his truth-telling witness to the theological riches of the Christian faith. Bishop Kenneth Carder calls this a “sometimes jarring, always interesting, consistently insightful, and persistently provocative invitation to ‘talk the talk and walk the walk' of Christian discipleship.” Whether a new or longstanding Christian, God Turned Toward Us is sure to enliven your faith. Dr. William Willimon currently serves as Professor of the Practice of Christian Ministry at Duke Divinity School and oversees the Doctor of Ministry program there. Will has served as Bishop for the United Methodist Church in northern Alabama for eight years. A prolific author and preacher, Will continues to serve the Church by offering an unapologetic attempt to articulate the language of the Christian faith on the page and in various pulpits around the country. https://willwillimon.com/about/

My Business On Purpose
528: A Four-Step Process To Annual Business Planning

My Business On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 8:49


We have massive expectations at the end of a year headed off into the wild optimism of what a new year might bring... new products, new opportunities, new revenue goals. And then we look up and it's March...June...August... and we do it all over again, hoping that we'll take it more seriously next year, but never stopping to make the time to give next year the pre-planned attention that it both needs and deserves. It would be silly to show up to an event and the organizer welcomes you with this statement, “although this date snuck up on us and we just sort of woke up to the reality that you all were coming, we're hoping to make this a great event and are glad that you are here... so let's make the best of it!” You would be infuriated and frustrated.  All of the time, attention, and investment it took for you to attend that event; and the event organizer treats it as “not a big deal” that they are not prepared.  This is how many of us live out our year to year, on the year-end treadmill that methodically and non-dramatically waltzes us into a new year hoping it will be better, but knowing that we did not put in the pre-planned work to ensure that better will happen. How can we ensure that we take advantage of the freshness of a new year and launch into an optimistic twelve months, having laid the groundwork aligned with a vision of what we see? Here are four steps to building an annual business plan. First, you must make time to plan.      “I just can't find the time... or don't have the time.” We all have the time, but you will never make the time if you don't first go and find the time to make. We all have time, and we all have a choice in how we spend that time.   SPEND time. Time is a non-renewable currency.  Money is renewable.  Time is not. You have a finite amount of time, which makes the value of that currency wildly expensive.  The tasks that you constantly get caught in, are they worth the value of the currency of your time. You have the time... you must now make the time you have to prioritize preparing for the time that is coming. Make the time to plan.  Schedule it in your calendar.  Communicate it with your team and your clients and customers.  YES!  They will appreciate your intentionality. Second, spend the first part of your annual business plan on the vision of your business. There are three elements that will provide clarity in your vision, so you and everyone else knows where the business is headed. Remember, wisdom tells us that where there is no vision, people scatter.  So let's follow the ancient Jewish wisdom to write the vision down so those who read it may run.  You should have a written vision detailing the snapshot of the future of your business. With that vision should also come an annual letter that brings clarity to yourself, your team, and your stakeholders and friends. The best example of an annual letter is the 1997 Amazon Shareholder Letter from the pen of Jeff Bezos.  It's powerful and filled with vision. Write an annual letter each year, so you have a vision template of what is coming, along with a chronicle of what has been. It's powerful to go back and read what you were thinking back then. Third, you should spend the second part of your annual business plan on the financial preparation of your business. Every business will be served well by subdividing their bank accounts so that the revenue that flows in may be allotted to its appropriate destination (profit, cost of goods and materials, taxes, compensation, and operating). Financial planning comes with time spent on subdividing the infrastructure that holds your cash. Also, every business ought to have a simple dashboard that tracks the ABCs of the business; cash Accounts, Bookkeeping (receivables, payables, etc.), and Customer metrics (leads, touchpoints, views, etc.). No business is complete without a simple budget.  SIMPLE! A best practice is to go back and review the last few years of your business profit and loss statements to review the cost codes and categories.  Evaluate your various expense categories, update where necessary, and then begin to apply anticipated dollar projections to each one based on the vision of the business and where you see it headed in the coming year. The fourth step of a proper annual business plan is our own personal preparation. How is your personal estate setup?  Do you have the legal instruments in place you should have; written agreements, contracts, powers of attorneys, will(s) and trust(s)? Have you met with an Attorney to go over a list of legal instruments that will help protect you and your business in the coming year? The same holds true for insurance?  Are you overinsured or underinsured?  Have you had an insurance advisor walk you through your insurance options, needs, and future realities? Personal preparation culminates with an exercise we call the Financial Barn.  A storied exchange took place between a sage and a wealthy man.  The wealthy man was bragging about the growth of his farm and how the yield on his crops grew exponentially requiring him to either put it to use, give it away, or to build bigger and bigger storage facilities. The man decided to increase his real estate portfolio with more storage barns where the produce would sit.  In his mind, he thought, “I'll have plenty so I can eat, drink, and be merry.” The sage responded, “you fool, tonight you will die... and what will happen to your stuff” (my paraphrase).   It is not wrong to save and store....and it is also not wise to hoard up and build bigger and bigger barns to hold more and more stuff.   A Proverb says, “in the blink of an eye wealth disappears, for it will sprout wings and fly away like an eagle” (Proverbs 23:5). A Financial Barn simply outlines the size of your “barn” for the upcoming year, and anything more than that is given away or sold off.  It's a powerful exercise of generosity, contentment, and taking care of what we have. With these four steps of an annual business plan, you make the time, cast the vision, set the budget, and ensure the integrity of the business that you are building. Owning a business is a powerful gift and a burdensome responsibility.  We must treat it as both.

Drilled
The ABCs of Big Oil | So... What Do We Do About This?

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:19


Over the last five episodes we've tracked how long the fossil fuel industry has been investing in schools, why, and what impact it's had. In this episode, we look at what can be done, and who's trying to do it.

Transforming Education: Leadership Lessons
Mastermind with Daniel Bauer

Transforming Education: Leadership Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 31:14


Mastermind with Daniel BauerDaniel Bauer is an unorthodox Ruckus Maker who has mentored thousands of school leaders through his Better Leaders Better Schools blog, books, podcasts, and powerful coaching experiences. In this episode, we discuss his latest book Mastermind: Unlocking Talent Within Every School Leader. He shares valuable resources for leaders like the ABCs of a mastermind group and the gift of developing self-awareness and emotional intelligence.Resources:betterleadersbetterschools.comlinkedin.com/in/danielevanbauertwitter.com/alienearbudinstagram.com/alienearbudMastermind: Unlocking Talent Within Every School LeaderBook Recommendations:Courage is Calling: Fortune Favors the Brave, Ryan Holliday

Self-Evident and Forgotten
S2E3 - In the News October 2021

Self-Evident and Forgotten

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 72:27


Stanton, Kristi, and Cody cut to the heart of the latest in the world. In this episode, the trio cover the ABCs of October. The Talbian are becoming a government, China is more aggressive with Taiwan, supply chains are a mess thanks to the government, Congress is itching to regulate Facebook, and Hollywood actors still don't know anything about guns. Self-Evident and Forgotten is a podcast on the truths of liberty and odd opinions. We explore the beautiful ideas often forgotten today that have given life to a free, peaceful, and prosperous society. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter! @sef_pod Intro/Outro Music Written By S.L.J. Kalmeijer, Evert Zeevalkink Performed By Kristian Leo Produced By Kristian Leo License Code: VXMG1UMTOVNNOMRG Support Self-Evident and Forgotten by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/self-evident-and-forgotten Find out more at https://self-evident-and-forgotten.pinecast.co

The Wise Investor Group - Baird
The ABCs of Third Quarter Earnings

The Wise Investor Group - Baird

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 13:56


Today, Chase looks at sentiment data which could power the market through the end of the year, along with the third-quarter earnings data, as the market makes new highs after a tough September.

REC Experience
Step by Step Checklist when buying a pre-construction condor home

REC Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 37:13


We're in luck! Jas Takhar and Laura Stewart are here to give us a very important crash course on creating long term wealth with Pre-Construction Investing. These are the ABCs of Pre-Construction. Everything an investor needs to know is in this episode... Why and How to invest? What are the best locations in which to invest? Why Buy Where You Ride is the new Location Location Location. They identify the biggest mistakes that investors make and explain how REC removes the friction for all investors, new and experienced. And much much more. Don't miss this one!

Drilled
The ABCs of Big Oil | Ben Franta Talks to Us About Big Oil on Campus

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:21


Bringing you our entire interview with Stanford researcher Ben Franta on fossil fuel influence at universities because it was just too good not to share.

Get to Know TRICARE
Get to Know TRICARE: Learning the ABCs—and Ds—of Medicare

Get to Know TRICARE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


To qualify for TRICARE For Life, you only need Medicare Parts A and B. But Medicare offers other options. Tune in to learn more about Medicare Parts A and B—as well as other parts of Medicare, like Parts C and D. Guest: Lennya Bonivento, Health Systems Analyst, Benefit Education and Research Team, Defense Health Agency

Soultiful
Get Seen Online Everywhere. The ABCs of Visibility with special guest, Lisa Simone Richards

Soultiful

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 56:31


Get Seen Online Everywhere. The ABCs of Visibility with special guest, Lisa Simone Richards #podcast, #workathome, #virtualassistant #VAbusiness owner Join us for the VA World Conference 2022 https://vaworldconference.com/ The Group You've been searching for!! We are women of color with VA businesses. Come through sis if you have a VA biz or want to start a VA biz: https://www.facebook.com/groups/vaslearning Connect with today's guest: Lisa Simone Richards www.lisasimonerichards.com Social Media Follow IG: @lisasimonerichards FB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/buildyourauthorityonline For Questions or if you want to be on the show send an email to: Chat@soultiful.com Connect with the Soultiful hosts: Nakia Dawn Whitaker Woody Website: kissvirtualservices.com IG: @keepitsupersimpleva FB: keepitsupersimpleva Toya Glenn Website: goblackink.com FB: goblackink Latoya Williams Website: ayotal.com IG: @ayotal_services FB: facebook.com/ayotal.services Janet Jack IG: @ksssolutions FB: KSSSolutionssSubscribe to Soultiful Weekly Show on Soundwise

Nomad Futurist
Making Meaningful Connections

Nomad Futurist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 16:46


Jane Hsieh finds meaningful connections everywhere — among different groups and generations of people, as well as connections between art, fashion, industrial design, engineering, marketing, sales, and customers around the world.   In this inspiring #NomadFuturist podcast, recorded at Data Center World 2021, Hsieh shares her journey to becoming Sr. Director of Sales for Aligned Data Centers and a member of the AFCOM GenNext Advisory Board — a story that reveals her great resilience, passion for acquiring knowledge, and ability to connect the dots. Hsieh learned early on how to adapt to new environments when she entered middle school at age thirteen as a non-English speaking immigrant from Taiwan.  “It was a difficult transition starting middle school when you don't even know your ABCs.”  Hsieh soon added English to her roster of languages — her native Taiwanese, Mandarin Chinese and Japanese. She later added French and Brazilian Portuguese to the list. Based on her interest in languages and global trade, it was natural for Hsieh to pursue studies in International Relations at the University of California, Davis. After graduation, Hsieh had a job in place as a fashion/textile global buyer for a department store chain, but the financial meltdown of 2008 impacted her position. She pivoted and went to work at Power Management IC where she started in sales support. She then transitioned into industrial computing, unified communications in the cloud, and ultimately, building white spaces for IT infrastructure.  Hsieh shares the “Aha” moment she had during her first customer meeting where she watched as an engineer created a line drawing to illustrate a series of voltage step-downs.  “That completely opened my mind. Of my God, this is a piece of art! …The thought of being able to connect people's ideas from an engineering perspective and then transitioning to the simpler version for the sales and marketing teams… seeing the value in that, for any product that technology is involved in.” Hsieh is excited about the newest developments in 5G and IoT.  She is also a big proponent of networking, highlighting the importance of connecting with global customers who are looking to have conversation and collaboration, as well as the need to increase communication within and across the whole critical infrastructure ecosystem. “There have to be more ways that we can connect. I encourage all of us to go to conventions or to even reach out to peers and ask a simple question ‘How are you doing? and start with that. Because we are all looking for meaningful connections.” Hsieh's advice for the next generation: “Don't be afraid to reach out. Stay curious and stay hungry.” Jane Hsieh is a technology professional with 11+ years of strategic business development and channel sales leadership experience in the mission-critical infrastructure and unified communications sectors. Her experience working closely with international customers and partners, coupled with an in-depth understanding of global markets and best business practices, enable her to specialize in addressing complex technology issues with best of class solutions. She is a member of the AFCOM GenNext Advisory Board, and a long-time participant of Infrastructure Masons, honored by iMason's IM100. As Sr. Director of Sales for Aligned, Jane is responsible for strategic account development within the enterprise sector. In addition to cultivating loyal, long-term professional relationships, she develops and executes go-to-market strategies and drives overall loyalty for the Aligned brand. Jane holds a Bachelor of Art, International Relations with a focus on World Trade from the University of California, Davis and Business Economics from Fudan University of Shanghai, China. Outside of work, Jane enjoys family time and traveling to learn new languages, taste new cuisines, and expand her perspective. She...

Church of Hope
The ABCs of Living on Empty

Church of Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 33:56


Enjoy this week's message as Pastor Rod speaks on how your emptiness is an opportunity for God to fill you up and work a miracle.

Drilled
The ABCs of Big Oil | Ep 4: We're Going Streaking

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:57


We're wrapping up our series with Earther this week, with a look at how fossil fuel companies influence curricula and research at the university level. (Also working on a bonus episode on solutions to this problem, stay tuned for that!)

Pastor Scott Webb - Webb Ministries
ABCs of Faith Part 20 - Main Series

Pastor Scott Webb - Webb Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


Message from Scott Webb on October 15, 2021

Greater Than Code
254: Transitioning Into Tech with Danielle Thompson

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 51:28


01:17 - Danielle's Superpower: Empathy & Communication 01:56 - Going From the Hospitality Industry => Tech * @CodeSchoolQA (https://twitter.com/codeschoolqa) / twitch.tv/thejonanshow (https://www.twitch.tv/thejonanshow) 04:58 - Education Technology (https://tech.ed.gov/) (EdTech) * Disruption = Reinvention 07:18 - Anthropology + Tech / Working With People * Anticipating Needs 10:25 - Making Education Fun + Inclusive * Cultural Relevance * Revamping Outdated Curriculum * Connecting With Kids 16:18 - Transitioning Into Tech 27:57 - Resources * Learnhowtoprogram.com (https://www.learnhowtoprogram.com/introduction-to-programming/getting-started-at-epicodus/learn-how-to-program) * Documentation * YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/) * Community * #TechTwitter (https://twitter.com/search?q=%23TechTwitter&src=typed_query&f=live) * Virtual Coffee (https://virtualcoffee.io/) * Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/) 32:39 - @CodeSchoolQA (https://twitter.com/codeschoolqa) / twitch.tv/thejonanshow (https://www.twitch.tv/thejonanshow) 34:08 - The Streaming Revolution * New Opportunities For Connection * Hybrid Events * Introvert Inclusive * Accessibility * Reaching New Markets 39:45 - Making Tech Safe, Secure, and Protected * Greater Than Code Episode 252: Designing For Safety with Eva PenzeyMoog (https://www.greaterthancode.com/designing-for-safety) 44:03 - Advice For New Devs: Work on Technical Things Sooner Reflections: Mandy: The secret in tech is that nobody knows what they're doing! Danielle: Ask questions and lean into community. Tech needs you. Arty: Don't be afraid to reach out to community members for help. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: ARTY: Hi, everyone. Welcome to Episode 254 of Greater Than Code. I am Arty Starr and I'm here with my fabulous co-host, Mandy Moore. MANDY: Hey, everyone! It's Mandy Moore and I'm here with our guest today, Danielle Thompson. Danielle is a newly minted software engineer working in the education technology sphere of the nonprofit world, after making a major career change from working in hospitality and events for many years. As a code school graduate herself, she loves to help demystify tech for others with non-traditional backgrounds and works to open doors into tech with her friends at Code School Q&A, weekly on Wednesday nights at around 7:00 PM Pacific at twitch.tv/thejonanshow. Outside of work, she can typically be found with a nose buried in a book, hanging out with her doggo, and making delicious craft beverages. Welcome to the show, Danielle! DANIELLE: Thanks so much for having me, Mandy and Arty! MANDY: Awesome. It's great for you to be here. So before we get into the meat of our conversation, we always ask our guests the standard question of what is your superpower and how did you acquire it? DANIELLE: Totally. I think that my superpower is a combination of empathy and communication. I think I came by both pretty naturally—popped right out of my mom having both, I'm assuming. But both have definitely been amplified over the years by all sorts of experiences and hardships and just keep working to make them even more of a superpower. MANDY: That's really great. So I want to know about before we dive into your experiences as a new developer, I wanted to know about how you came into technology from your career change in hospitality, because I did the same thing. I was a waitress when my daughter was born 10 years ago and I was working for about a year before I was able to walk out. It was Mother's Day, my boss was being a complete jerk to me, and I was making enough money at that point that I just said, “You know what? I don't need this. I quit,” and I started my career in tech full-time. So I'm curious about your journey as well. DANIELLE: Yeah. Obviously, COVID has happened in the last couple of years and that was one of the major factors in me getting to this point of leaving hospitality and getting into tech. But I had already kind of been thinking about what comes next. I've been a manager for a few years and was trying to figure out how else I could grow and what new things I can learn and challenge myself with. And outside of ownership, which is a major headache, there wasn't really much that I could push further into, within hospitality. So when COVID happened and I lost my job because I was working as an events and bar manager for a local catering company, it was pretty obvious that things were not going to be coming back for the hospitality industry anytime soon and I needed to figure something else out then. And so, I started looking into different returning to education opportunities because I actually have an anthropology degree, of all helpful things that I could have gotten a degree in. But I found a code school in Portland, Oregon and jumped on that within a few months of COVID hitting to the full-time track and connected with a number of my cohort mates that we started doing the Code School Q&A on Twitch with the director of developer relations at New Relic and have been doing that for almost a year now and have officially made it in the industry as a software developer, too in the last few months. So you can do it, you can get into tech. [laughs] It's pretty funny, too because the type of job that I ended up getting is in education and technology sphere and I actually had a job in ed tech about a decade ago when I was still in college and had a remote job working with some family friends that got me hooked up with their company. And here I am doing something a little bit more in-depth technically than I was doing a decade ago, but it's funny how things come full circle. ARTY: Well, education in particular is something that also really needs some reinvention and innovation and with all the disruption, where do you see that area going? Just curious. DANIELLE: Yeah, absolutely. I feel that a lot of the changes that we've seen in COVID with remote work being such a prominent thing now and people wanting more balanced, more time with their family, more time with their critters, more time just not being miserable and commutes and stuff. I think that that's going to have a really long-term effect on how education happens and trying to make education more quality as well. I think it's really rad what the company I do works for. Our whole mission is to work to make education in America more equitable. So we do that by working very hard to work with experts in the curriculum sphere that ensure that our curriculum materials are as inclusive and culturally relevant as possible, that they are representative of a large and diverse group of people, and they even do a ton of anti-racism work as well and work to embed that within our internal and external culture, as well as the products that we create. So I hope that our company will continue to grow and make changes in the education world in America in general, because I think what we're doing is really, really, really important. ARTY: Definitely important and with all the change and stuff happening, I'm expecting some new and cool and exciting things that do make things better. One of the upsides of lots of disruption is it's an opportunity for us to sit back and rethink how things could be. DANIELLE: Yeah. ARTY: And one of the benefits of not being entrenched in the existing fields of the way things have been is it's also an opportunity to look at all the stuff we're doing with a fresh set of eyes from outside of that existing world and bring some new fresh insights to tech. Maybe my anthropology degree will come in handy in some different sorts of ways. I imagine some of those skills that you learned in that have some applicability in tech as well. Have you found your degree helpful in other ways? DANIELLE: It's funny. I think I ended up using my anthropology degree as a bartender far more than I ever would have as an actual anthropologist. That whole study of humans thing is something that is directly translatable to working with people no matter what field you're in. I feel that both my anthropology degree and my many years of hospitality experience have all led to a specific skillset that is very different from a lot of people that come into tech with more traditional backgrounds especially folks that go to college and get computer science degrees, and then they go to the tech industry and that's all they've ever known. I've known so many other experiences outside of that and my ability to think about what other people need and want, to be able to respond to that, and embed that in all of the work that I do as an engineer to really be thinking about the user and the people that are interacting with whatever I'm building and even just thinking about working on a team and how I have so many communication skills built up from what I've been doing for work in hospitality for many years. I think that it definitely gives me a very specific and unique way of moving through the world and way of being an engineer as well. That anthropologist hat definitely comes into play sometimes thinking about like, “Oh, like how do all of these dots connect?” and like, “How does this change over time and how do you see people like doing things differently now?” It's a definitely a fun lens to carry with me. MANDY: Yeah. Having been done hospitality, I'm just shaking my head because – [laughter] I know I've brought so many skills from being in that world for 10, 15 years at one point. DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: Just the way you talk to people and interact with teams and anticipate what other people need before they even know what they need, that's definitely a skill. DANIELLE: Yeah, definitely. I think that whole anticipating needs thing, too, it's like it can be both an internal and external benefit where you can think both about who you're building products for and also who you're building products with, and how best to communicate within teams, especially having management experience. That is definitely at the forefront of my brain a lot of the time, but then also thinking about like, “How can I make the best experience for somebody else that's actually going to be using this? How can I make this easy and intuitive and fun?” Especially within education, have to make sure that things are fun and interesting targeting kids that are K-12; it has to be meaningful, impactful, interesting, and engaging. MANDY: So how do you do that? What are some ways that you and your company make education fun for young kids? DANIELLE: I think I'm still figuring that out. We have many curriculum products that I'm still just touching for the first time, or haven't even looked at it yet and so, there's lots of fun, new things to discover. But I think the types of people that we bring on to work at my company, they're all experts in their field and renowned for the work that they do and so, I think that the quality of people that we bring into work with us and the kind of commitment that they have to work towards making education better and more inclusive, that is incredibly important. And how they also do an immense amount of work to make not just inclusivity a part of the major formula, but also that they work to make things culturally relevant. So like, thinking about how to tell stories to kids that actually means something to them today. I don't know, a weird example is thinking about some outdated curriculum that's talking about using a landline for a phone, or something. Kids are like, ‘What's that?” Actually integrating modern things like cell phones and things like that into the curriculum where kids actually touch that and use that every single day so it means something to them. Whereas, outdated curriculum that is just some story to them. It doesn't have tangible meaning. Being able to bring that into materials is really important to keeping things engaging and also, relevant and fun. MANDY: So the time when little Tommy was walking to the Xerox machine. DANIELLE: [chuckles] Yes, yes. MANDY: Somebody brought up a Xerox machine the other day. DANIELLE: Oh wow. MANDY: My goodness. DANIELLE: [laughs] Yeah, definitely. But I think it's just a constant looking at how we do things, and making improvements and making real connection with the people that are actually using our products to use. That both means working with teachers and getting a better understanding of what is helpful to them, what makes things easier for them, what helps them bring better quality curriculum to their classrooms? But then I think it's also connecting more directly with those kids that are engaging with our curriculum, too and figuring out what works and doesn't work for as many parties as possible. I think that's the anthropologist hat coming on again like, how can we bring as many people to the table as possible on the expert side, on the academic side, on the teacher side, on the student side? And even working to bring families to the table, too and looking at how families interact and not just parents, because it's really important to know that kids don't have just parents that are taking care of them—sometimes it's grandparents, sometimes it's foster families. And really thinking about a wider range of who is around these kids, and how to get them onboard and make things easy for them to interact. ARTY: It seems like getting into tech and these new tech skills that you've learned are also relevant in figuring out how to teach kids tech because we've got this new generation of kids coming into the world and learning how to code becomes more like learning how to read and write is fundamental skills move forward in the future. Are there ways that some of the things that you've learned through your own tech experiences you can see application for in education? DANIELLE: Absolutely. From what I've been seeing, I feel like there are a lot more resources out there for teaching kids how to code and teaching them more things about technology. I think that's amazing and should totally keep happening. I think having been a bit more focused on adults in my own outreach for helping people find their ways into tech I might be a bit more acquainted with reaching out to those folks. But I'm sure that that intersection of being in education for K-12 students and this passion that I have of helping to find their way into tech, or build more technical skills because they are skills that are so transferable in many industries. I'm in education, but I have a technical job. So there's lots of ways that those technical skills can be incredibly valuable and frankly, life-changing. The amount of opportunity and even just financial stability that can be found within tech is one of the main reasons that brought me to this industry and has really been a life-changing opportunity. It has opened so many doors already and I'm just like three months into my first developer job. Even before I was ever actually officially an engineer, I was able to find community and able to find an outlet for helping others and outreach to immediately turn around and hold a handout to try to help others make their way into tech as well. I hope to continue doing that work in more meaningful and impactful ways over time, and have wider and wider reach as well. ARTY: You had mentioned earlier about some of the difficulties of getting into tech and some of the challenges with finding resources and things that you were specifically missing when you actually showed up on the job. I'm curious, what was your experience like going through coding bootcamp and what were some of the gaps that you experienced that once you got on the job, you were like, “Oh, I didn't learn that.” DANIELLE: Yeah, definitely. Coding bootcamp was an incredibly grueling experience for me personally. I was on a full-time track six-month program and [chuckles] not having much technical experience whatsoever outside of editing my Myspace profile back when that was a thing and having [laughs] about a decade ago doing some basic HTML, CSS editing and maintenance for the company that I worked for an ed tech originally. That was what I was working with when I started coding bootcamp. So it was a real hard learning curve and a very fast-paced program for me to just dive into headfirst. My poor partner was like, “I basically didn't see you for six months. You were just a basement dweller at your computer constantly.” I would literally get out of bed, roll myself downstairs, get to my computer with a cup of tea in hand, and I would stay there until easily 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00 every night just trying to keep my head above water. But a few months in, things started to click and I wasn't fighting with all of these computer puzzles [chuckles] trying to do this. Like, I always feel like learning coding languages is a combination of algebra and a foreign language. So at a certain point, my brain just started getting into that better and things started making sense. That was a very exciting moment where I got much less miserable [chuckles] in my code school experience and in the pace at which I had to move to keep my grades up and everything. But the gap in between finishing code school and actually getting that first job is also another often-grueling process. There's so many jobs open in the tech industry, but basically, it's mid-level and above. It's like, I think two-thirds of the industry positions that are available are for mid to senior roles versus one-third of roles that are for junior associates. That is a big struggle, especially if you're not able to lean into community and building real connections, just sending applications out to the ether and never even hearing a peep back from companies. I think that whole experience, it's really hard for yourself esteem, especially having put in many months around the clock of work towards this new career that you've been told that you can get, that you can achieve. It's almost as much as a process getting that first developer job as it is to actually build those tech skills. I think one thing that is so important to stress in that in-between time is to lean into community, to connect with as many people as you can that are already in tech, even if they don't exactly have a developer job. Like, talk to anybody that will let you talk to them—talk to people in QA, talk to developers, talk to managers, talk to project managers. That was one of the things that I felt I needed to do early on in my coding experience to really have a better understanding of what was even an option for me of getting into tech and what could all these different jobs look like, and then making that transition to actually getting the first job. Yay, hooray for first jobs and being employed again. But I think one of the things that has been most striking in that change for me is going from this incredibly grueling pace. 8:00 in the morning, or so until 10:00 plus at night, non-stop coding for the most part, and then going to a 9:00 to 5:00 job where I can also make my own hours and I can take appointments as I need to. Like, I can go and get a haircut if that's something on my schedule and it's cool. As long as I'm getting my work done and showing up and contributing to my team, things are fine. So that transition of like, “Wait, I don't have to be at my computer a 1,000% of the time?” [laughs] and the pace at which you learn things, too is just much slower because you can have balance. That transition of feeling like you're not doing enough because you're so used to this hefty schedule, that's been a major transition for me. I think also coming from hospitality, too where you have to be there in person and oftentimes, somebody is going to call out sick at least every other week, or so. So you might be working like a shift and a half, or a double. There isn't a lot of balance in the service industry, especially now with COVID adding so many extra layers of complication to how that job works. Being able to just be like, “I need to go make a doctor's appointment,” and can just do that. It's like, “Okay, cool. Just put it on the calendar. You don't really need to tell me. As long as it's on the calendar, that's great.” [laughs] That transition has also been very strange. And I think maybe just the trauma of [chuckles] working in hospitality and not being able to just be a human sometimes and now all of a sudden, I'm like, “Oh, I'm a human and that's allowed? Okay.” Still have to check in with my boss frequently about like, “You sure it's okay? You sure it's okay that I'm a human, right? Yeah.” [laughs] MANDY: [chuckles] That was one of the things that I really loved coming into tech was the scheduling, open schedule, making my own hours. DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: And you're right, it was very strange at first. When I was waitressing, it was just always a go, go, go kind of thing and you had to be there, you had to be on, and if you didn't have tables, if you had time to lean, you had time to clean. DANIELLE: [chuckles] Yeah. Always be closing. You know, ABCs. [laughs] MANDY: So yeah, sometimes I still find myself on a random Thursday. I'll have my work done and I'll just be sitting here and I'm like, “Why are you sitting at your computer? Go do something, then check it and if there's stuff there –” Like, you don't have to have your ass in the seat from 9:00 to 5:00, or 8:00 to 4:00. You don't have to sit here for 8 hours and just stare at your inbox waiting for work. It's totally asynchronous and it's totally okay. I find myself having to give myself permission to leave my desk and just go and do something and work that asynchronous schedule. So tech is a really big blessing when it comes to that. DANIELLE: I totally agree. I think also, not being neurotypical myself, I have ADHD, and so, being able to actually allow my brain to work in the way that is best for how my brain just naturally operates. Like, I can sit at my desk and fidget constantly, and it's not going to bother anybody because I work from home, [chuckles] or I can shift between sitting and standing and sitting on my bed, or sitting on my stool and just move at my desk as much as I need to. I can also step away and go clean some dishes if that's what's making noise in my brain. I can go and take my dog on a walk and get some fresh air. That whole shift of having balance and being able to be empowered to advocate for what I need and how I learn and people are like, “Yeah, cool. Let's do that.” I think that's also very much a part of the company that I work for and the ethos that we have, which is all about making education better. So why wouldn't that also translate to the staff and how can we help you learn? It's such a wonderful thing to be a part of a team that's super invested in how I learn and helping me learn. I think another thing that was a big, strange thing about my transition into tech was I ended up getting a junior engineer role in a tech stack that I hadn't worked with, which is pretty common from what I've heard from mid engineer on. Because once you have some of the foundational building blocks of a handful of programming languages and some of those computer science foundations, you can pick up most programming languages. But it's not so common as a junior engineer to get that opportunity to work with a full tech stack that you haven't really worked with before. So that was another big transition like, “All right, you trust me time to figure this out.” ARTY: So it sounds like you walked into another big learning curve with your new job, too. It sounds like you were also in a much more supportive culture environment with respect to learning and things, too. What was the ramp-up experience like at your new company? DANIELLE: In some ways, I still kind of feel like I'm in ramp-up mode. I'm about three months in. But because we have so much of our product that is built around very specific curriculum components, that has very specific contextual knowledge, it's just going to be a process to figure out which projects have what information and have certain numbers of records, and are tied to certain standards that are required in different states and for common core versus for some of the states that we work with, what that looks like. But figuring out a whole new tech stack was and continues to be a very interesting challenge. I have to remind myself when I have gaps in my knowledge that it's actually to switch gears back into learning mode, that that is a thing that's supported and encouraged even. I even have little sticky notes on my desk that say, “Start with what you know, not what you don't know,” and that tension of when I reached the end of what I know and then going and finding maybe not necessarily the right, or correct resources, because there's so much out there that's good. That can be helpful. I think it's more about finding something that does work with how my brain learns things and being cognizant of how I learn. But also, remembering to dig into that fate that is being a developer, which is constant learning and ever-growing evolution of how we do things, and what things we do within the sphere of the developer. So I've signed up for perpetual learning and that's pretty great. MANDY: What are your favorite resources that you used and continue to use as you're still learning, and finding community, and things like that? DANIELLE: Yeah. I have certainly continued to lean on the curriculum for my school. It's online and it's free and that's rad. It's learnhowtoprogram.com. It's all put on online from Epicodus in the Portland area. Anybody can access it and that's wonderful. I'm a big fan of really great resources being available for free and making that more accessible. So continuing to use platforms that have that kind of ethos in mind is pretty great in my opinion. Reading the documentation is another great way to keep learning what you need to learn and sometimes documentation can be kind of dry, especially as a new developer, you don't always know what exactly it is that you're looking for. So being able to parse through documentation and figure out what's most important, but then also filling in the gaps of some of the things that you don't yet know, or understand with YouTube videos, or deeper dives into like, what does this one specific term mean? I don't know, let's go find out and plugging in some of those gaps is really helpful. I think figuring out how you learn, too whether that be very hands-on, whether that be visually, whether that be with audio, getting lots of repetition in; it's super helpful to lean into whatever works best for your brain for learning. I think perhaps even more important than digging into resources that are online is lean into community. I really can't say it enough, build community. If you work with Ruby, like I work with Ruby, build community within the Ruby community. Connect to people online, get on Twitter, connect to tech Twitter, follow different people that work with the languages and the tech stack that you work with, and join places like The Virtual Coffee and other really rad developer spaces that are meant to help you find the answers that you need and to maybe do it in a way that's a little less arduous because you're with people that are like, “Yes, happy helper.” Like, “How can I make things easier for you?” It seems like a much easier way to go through tech when you can do it with others and remember, that there are human resources out there for you, too. MANDY: You also had mentioned that you were connecting with folks over Twitch. DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: Can you tell us a little more about that? DANIELLE: Absolutely. So a friend of mine in my Epicodus cohort, she reached out to the director of developer relations that had done a lunchtime chat with us at one point and she was like, “I don't know what I'm doing. I am so stressed out. I don't know if I can actually finish this school and let alone finish school, but actually make it as a developer and I have questions. Do you have some time for some answers?” And he was like, “Yeah, do you want to actually do this online on Twitch? And how about you bring a couple of friends and let's just ask lots of questions and I'm going to record it?” She reached out to me and another friend of mine and here we are many months later still answering questions online about how to get into tech and what even are some of these things that we're talking about technically, or let's look at other roles outside of just developer, or engineer, that you can get into. So that has been an ongoing theme of how can I help others? How can I help provide community for people that might not have been as lucky as I have been to already have a preexisting community with many of my friends and my partner that were in tech? How can I help create that advantage for others and how can I help reach more people and help them understand what their options are and connect them to the people that need to know to get jobs? I think Code School Q&A, we are super, super excited about open doors for people to whether that be better knowledge, whether that be real human connection; what's most important to us is just supporting people as they are making transitions into the industry like we've been doing over this last year and a half. MANDY: So what is the Code School Q&A look like when you join? Walk me through it if I were to show up, what would I get? DANIELLE: Absolutely. So there's generally four of us on the stream and we ask a handful of questions, whether that be from our own experiences of like, “Okay, I'm a developer now and I've got some questions about some of these transitions that I am experiencing.” But we also lean into the audience as well and see what kind of questions they have, whether that be folks that are still in code school, or folks that are thinking about maybe potentially going back to school, whether that be computer science in a university setting, or bootcamp, or even self-taught people. We even have a number of folks that are already in their careers, too that are there to reach out and chat and provide additional feedback and support. So I really feel like it's a bunch of friends just getting together on Wednesdays and that group of friends just keeps building and expanding. It is very much like a support group, but it's also fun. Like, our first question of the day is what are you drinking and how are you doing? Because we all hang out and chat, and drink while we're talking about how to get into tech and definitely try to make it as fun as we can and crack jokes and interrupt one another and it's a good fun time, but helping people is what's most important. MANDY: And this is all live? Unedited? DANIELLE: All live. Unedited. Yes, yes, and 7:00 PM-ish AV is a whole beast in and of itself. I just had to set up a Twitch stream for the first time in this whole time of streaming over the last year. I've been writing my princess pass and just shown up [chuckles] for every Twitch stream and now I know how much goes into that. I still had probably another few hours of set up to get past just a minimum viable product of we need to be online on the interwebs and you need to be able to hear and see me. Got there, but it's a whole thing. MANDY: Twitch is certainly interrupting the industry, I believe. DANIELLE: [inaudible]. MANDY: Especially since the pandemic. All of a sudden everyone's on Twitch. We're doing conferences live, we're doing like – how do you feel about the whole Twitch revolution and how is it different from how people traditionally came and connected in tech? DANIELLE: Yeah. Having been in events myself—that was part of what my role was within hospitality—I personally really love that there's now this whole new opportunity for connection. I think it also makes connection way more accessible because folks that were already living some kind of quarantine life because of autoimmune disorders, or disabilities, or whatever that looks like, they couldn't easily make it to those conferences and now they have a way to connect with those conferences because of hybrid events. I think it's a really rad innovation that we're seeing and it's a really wonderful way to even just as an introvert. I'm like, “I don't have to leave my house to be able to see my friends and have a good time? Yes! I am super interested in this.” I can – [overtalk] MANDY: [inaudible]. DANIELLE: Yeah. I can hang out with my dog and give him scritches whenever I want, and still see my friends and build community within tech. Heck yes. Very interested in this. I think that accessibility feature that it provides is just, it's really wonderful to know that more people can become a part of tech communities because there's now this whole online outlet for folks that couldn't otherwise afford a flight to get halfway across the country to make it to this conference, or couldn't afford to get in the conference. There's lots of ways that just makes things more accessible. MANDY: Do you think it's going to continue much beyond the pandemic? Like, do you think when it's all over, we're just going to be like, “Oh, we're back to conferences,” or do you think this is going to continue to the streaming and the slack chats and the live Q&As and things like that. Do you think that's going to continue? DANIELLE: I hope so and I think so. I think that even just from a business sense, you can tap into whole new markets by having this addition of hybrid events. You can reach a whole new subset of markets and I think quite frankly, it'd be kind of foolish to not take advantage of the new ways that we've figured out that we can still have meaningful and authentic community. [chuckles] There's definitely a way to monetize that and I'm sure plenty of people out there doing it, but I think it's also given voice to people that couldn't previously access those spaces and now they're like, “Don't take this away. This is community. This is this is what I've built,” and I think people are going to be willing to fight for that and I think that companies will see the business benefit of continuing to do both. ARTY: So anthropology question then. [laughs] DANIELLE: Great. ARTY: How do you think this will affect us as a society of connecting more virtually instead of in-person in that we're significantly more isolated now than we were before, too in terms of in-person connection? How do you think that's going to affect us? DANIELLE: One of the first things that comes to mind is infrastructure has to change. I think that support for higher speed internet across the states across the world has become much more of a priority that is striking to people, especially thinking about kids having to figure out how to do online school. All of a sudden, when COVID first hit, some kids didn't have access to the internet, let alone a computer, or a tablet, or a phone that they could go to class and do their homework on. So I think that we're going to be forced to make technology and the internet more accessible by building better infrastructure to support those things and I think it's only a matter of time before there is better social support for getting technology in the hands of kids, especially, but getting them devices. Like, I know there are a number of initiatives out there that are giving small grants and stuff for people to be able to get computers, or tablets, or whatever and I think that we're going to just keep seeing more of that. Hopefully, fingers crossed because it's super important to be able to keep connection moving and I think keep moving our society in the right direction. ARTY: So do you have any concerns about that as well as how –? We all get plugged in and are affected and in not so good ways, too. On the flip side of that, where do you see things going? DANIELLE: My partner is in InfoSec. He is a security person. So that's definitely my first thought like, how do we keep the things that are most important to us and that are now online? How do we keep those things secure and safe and protected? Figuring out how to fill the gaps that are inherent within the security industry right now of there's just not enough bodies to fill all the jobs and build all of the security that needs to be built and maintain those things. That's going to be a whole new ball game that tech has to figure out and it's going to take a lot of manpower to make sure that we can protect people and protect the things that are most important to them, and even just protect those communities, too. Make sure that those communities can continue to thrive and also, be carefully moderated and curated so that there is safety for people to interact; that there is less bullying happening online, that there is less hate crimes that are being perpetuated online. Creating safe spaces for people and providing agency for them online is a whole new ball game when we're not even really that great at doing so in real life, in-person. There are a lot of groups that are going to have to fight harder to be heard, to be seen, to feel safe, and I think that's just an ongoing thing that we need to work at being better at. ARTY: So we need ways to improve the connectivity community stuff and then also, need ways as we do those things to create safety in our communities. DANIELLE: Absolutely. MANDY: Yeah, we just had a really great discussion with Eva PenzeyMoog about two episodes ago. She wrote the book Design for Safety and it was an excellent, excellent conversation about ways that as designers and engineers, we should be building our infrastructure safe from the beginning and not just going back – [overtalk] DANIELLE: Yeah. MANDY: And doing it after the fact, but realizing who the most vulnerable people are and protecting them from the get-go. DANIELLE: Yeah, absolutely. I think that's actually something that my company works really hard to do while we're designing our curriculum products is designing from the most vulnerable within our communities and using that as a starting point for how we build things and how we continue to maintain them. Because if you can keep the folks that are most vulnerable in mind, more people are actually going to be allowed to be safe, allowed to have agency, and allowed to grow. It's a far more inclusive space when we can think about the folks that don't always have access, or don't always have safety, or don't always have agency and designing with those people in mind first. MANDY: And that's how we'll end up filling all these empty seats right now that are available in tech – [overtalk] DANIELLE: Exactly. MANDY: Is by not eliminating these people, designing a safe environment from the start, and attracting different kinds of people into tech because tech needs more diversity. DANIELLE: Tech needs more diversity. Yeah, absolutely and I think that's one of the reasons why I keep doing Code School Q&A is because I want to see more people that look like me in tech. I want to see more people that don't look like me in tech. I'm very excited to bring as many people to the table as possible because I think that's when we also get the most creative and innovative. When more tool sets are brought to the table, more diverse experiences are brought to the table, we build far more robust systems, products, and things just get better when we have more differences from which to pull and more experiences from which to learn. MANDY: As we said in the beginning, you're a fairly new developer. So I wanted to ask you the question: what was one thing you wish you knew, that you know now, that you would have known back then? If you could give Danielle advice a year ago, what advice would that have been? DANIELLE: I think that advice would have been to start actually working on technical things sooner; to start digging into the educational materials that were provided for me for free before I ever started school. I think that actually digging into those materials and having the courage to not just wait until I was in a classroom setting to be able to interact with coding languages and learning how to program, I would have had such a less fraught time getting through school and giving myself the opportunity to get a bit of a head start and more of a foundation before just diving in head first and hoping that I kept my head above water. But I think also, again, leaning into community and not being afraid to ask for help, not being afraid to advocate for myself because it took me a good 2 and a half months before a really felt like I could speak up and say what I needed. That's 2 months of time that I could have been getting more of what I needed, getting more help learning faster and more efficiently, and just being less miserable in the early stages of learning and entirely new skillsets. So don't be afraid to ask for help. Don't be afraid to advocate for yourself. I think especially as a woman coming into a technical space, there is some extra fears of not looking like I could do this, or not feeling like I belonged not knowing what I was doing. But the thing to remember was that nobody knew what they were doing; we were all figuring it out together in that school program. Being the one to be like, “Hold up, this is not making any sense to me. Can we start this over again? Can we dig into what's happening here?” Often times, other people were like, “Oh, I'm so grateful you said something because I also don't know what's going on.” MANDY: Well, with that, I think that's an amazing thing to end on and we can move over to reflections, which I can go and start off with right away is that's the secret. Like, nobody knows what we're doing in tech. DANIELLE: [laughs] Nobody knows, no. [laughs] MANDY: Nobody knows. DANIELLE: Nobody knows yet. MANDY: That's the secret. Ask questions. Lean on your community. There are so many people out there. I know you mentioned tech Twitter, #techTwitter. There are so many nice amazing people that will have your back if you just put those questions out there and even say, “Hey, tech twitter, anybody free? Do you want to pair?” They'll be like, “Yeah, let's hop on for an hour, or two,” and especially right now is when people aren't really doing much again. [chuckles] People are out there. So again, it's a secret. Nobody knows. DANIELLE: [laughs] Yeah. I think I am totally on board with your reflections for the day lean into community and don't be afraid to ask questions. I think it's so important to know that tech needs you. Whoever you are, tech needs you and whatever valuable skillset you bring to the table, whatever diverse experiences you bring to the table, it's needed. You need more people that aren't traditional and whatever that looks like. There is space and there is need for you. I think come and ask your questions at Code School on Wednesdays. We need generally every Wednesday, 7:00 PM Pacific time. We are happy to answer your questions and help connect you to the people if we don't know answers because none of us totally know the right answer most of the time. MANDY: And how can people do that work? What's the URL? DANIELLE: Yeah. Come visit us at twitch.tv/thejonanshow. We also have Code School Q&A is participating in Oktoberfest, too. So you can find us on GitHub by looking up the Oktoberfest hashtag tag and you can find us on Twitter at Code School Q&A as well. MANDY: Awesome. ARTY: I just wanted to add that a little bit with lean into community, I was thinking about Mandy, when you were mentioning your story, when I was learning electron new technology I didn't know. I had this code base that I had to learn. I didn't know what was going on, I was frustrated, I couldn't get anything working, and then I tweeted and asked for someone to pair with me. Lo and behold, some random person from the internet was like, “Sure! I'd be happy to help! Let's meet up air on this,” and I managed to get over the major hurdles I had with getting my environment to set up and getting unstuck, figured out how to run the debugging tools, and all those things really happened as a consequence of nothing afraid to reach out. Even when you might feel like you're struggling with these things alone, there really is a community out there and people that are willing to jump in and help and I think that's really great cool thing. MANDY: All right, well with that, I think we're pretty set to wrap up. If you want to join us you are in Slack. Danielle will receive an invitation to join us as well in our Slack community. It is a Patreon where you can fudge to support us monetarily on a monthly basis. However, if you're not comfortable with that, or do not want to, you can DM anyone of the panelists and we will get you in there for free. So with that, I want to thank you, Danielle, for coming on the show. DANIELLE: Thanks so much for having me for a great conversation. MANDY: Awesome, and we'll see everyone next week. Special Guest: Danielle Thompson.

Drilled
The ABCs of Big Oil | Ep 3: High School

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 27:52


In the third episode of our mini-series with Earther, we head to high school, where the fossil fuel industry's efforts to shape Americans' thinking on economics and policy really ramps up.

Pastor Scott Webb - Webb Ministries
ABCs of Faith Part 18 - Main Series

Pastor Scott Webb - Webb Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 27:44


Message from Scott Webb on October 8, 2021

Insurance AUM Journal
Commercial Mortgage Loans: the ABCs of CML

Insurance AUM Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


Stewart: Welcome to another addition of the Insurance AUM Journal podcast. My name is Stewart Foley, I’ll be your host. And today we have Lynette Pineda from Securian Asset Management. Lynette, welcome. Lynette: Thank you, Stewart. It’s great to talk to you today. Stewart: We’re thrilled to have you on. You’re talking about a very … Commercial Mortgage Loans: the ABCs of CML Read More »

20/20 MONEY
The AOA changed their disability and life insurance group plan...here's what you need to know

20/20 MONEY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 39:59


Welcome to this episode of 20/20 Money! On this episode, we'll provide a brief refresher on the important components of long term disability, talk about the differences between short and long term disability (and why I will usually not recommend you purchase short term disability policies), and provide an update on the group disability insurance plan offered through the AOA. As a reminder, you can get all the information discussed in today's conversation by visiting our website at integratedpwm.com and clicking on the Learning Center. While there, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter and you can also set up a 20-30min Triage conversation to learn a little bit more about how we help ODs around the country reduce their tax bill, proactively manage cash flow, and make prudent investment decisions or check out any number of additional free resources like our eBooks, blog posts, and on-demand webinars.   If you're interested in having your question and your voice featured on the 20/20 Money podcast, you can submit it here. You can either include your name or submit anonymously. Please keep your questions short and to the point. Sometimes writing it down beforehand can help.   Episode 42: The ABCs and 123s of Disability Insurance Get a quote for DI through Physician Financial Services AOA DI Application Page ————————————————————————————— Please rate and subscribe to 20/20 Money on these platforms Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Stitcher  ————————————————————————————— For past episodes of 20/20 Money with full companion show notes, please check out our episode archive here!

Say Podcast and Die!
Episode 66 - The Haunted School (Goosebumps #59)

Say Podcast and Die!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 69:17


Andy and Alyssa read Goosebumps #59: The Haunted School. They talk makeup, bison, strange architectural choices, Welcome to Night Vale, My Friend Dahmer (film, 2017), Ray Bradbury's "All Summer in a Day" (1954), the Derry sewer system, Abducted in Plain Sight (2017), cats in horror, Titane (2021), The Wizard of Oz (1939), cultists, Lovecraft Country (2020), Call of Cthulu (video game, 2018), In the Earth (2021), scary elevators, Hellevator (2015-2016), The Lift (1983), Down (aka Shaft, 2001), Paternoster lifts, color gone wrong, The Color Out of Space (2019, based on 1927 H.P. Lovecraft story), Ray Bradbury's "The Long Rain" (1950), Pleasantville (1998), mid-century school horror, My So-Called Life's "Halloween" episode (1994), Buffy the Vampire Slayer's "I Only Have Eyes for You" episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1998), Two-Sentence Horror's "Elliot" episode (2021), being changed by an unfamiliar environment, Jeff VanderMeer's Southern Reach Trilogy (2014), the Strugatsky brothers' Roadside Picnic (1972), creepy and feral children, Village of the Damned (1960), Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book (2008), children menacing other children, Stephen King's 'Salem's Lot (1975), William Golding's Lord of the Flies (1954), Mama (2013), Stranger Things, Rick and Morty's "ABCs of Beth" episode (2017), the invisible hand of the market, Stendhal's The Red and the Black (1830), and Goosebumps as post-Cold War literature. // Music by Haunted Corpse // Follow @saypodanddie on Twitter and Instagram, and get in touch at saypodanddie@gmail.com 

Medicine For Good
How Compassion Can Be Your Best Weapon as a Healthcare Provider | Dr. Gabiola's Interview with G Diaries

Medicine For Good

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 10:51


“When healthcare providers take the time to make human connections that help end suffering, patient outcomes improve and medical costs decrease.” - Dr. Stephen TrzeciakHealthcare providers are in the front line of patients acquiring chronic illnesses, diseases, or viruses. They are the ones having exceptionally close contact with different life-threatening cases. But do you ever wonder why these healthcare providers keep choosing to serve people? That is because of compassion. Compassion is one of, if not the most important virtues in medicine. Dr. Julieta Gabiola shares her story in her recent interview with G Diaries, hosted by Michelle Andrea Arville and Ernie Lopez, on how she was able to start her non-profit organization called ABCs for Global Health which was created to find practical solutions to health problems of disadvantaged and unserved communities. She shares the accomplishments of the organization and how they provide healthcare to people who are often marginalized and unable to afford medical care for themselves. ABCs for Global Health uses their medical mobile clinics to visit the barangays to treat, prevent, educate, and research acute and chronic diseases.As Alek Wek would say, “True beauty is born through our actions and aspirations and in the kindness we offer to others”. This beauty is special in a way that it changes lives, lifts people up, and makes the world a better place. If you are also willing to extend your helping hands and share your blessings, the ABCs for Global Health are accepting donations so we can help more underserved communities with their health problems. Listen to this episode to know more about ABCs for Global Health.Memorable Quotes:It's heartwarming to see patients who used to have uncontrolled BP are now managed as well as patients whom I've seen with complications have recovered and are back to work. - Dr. Arthur Gallo I believe in helping each other to make it together. - Dr. Jette GabiolaIt is rare to see people with a heart for the people, so it is important for everyone to have a heart of service. - Dr. Jette GabiolaAbout the Guests:Dr. Jette Gabiola is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the President & CEO of ABCs for Global Health. Click here for her full profile or read her full interview here.Dr. Arthur Gallo is a Chief Medical Officer and one of Dr. Gabiola's partners in ABCs for Global Health in the Philippines.About the Host:ABS-CBN CPI (Creative Program, Inc.) President Ernie Lopez and Michelle Andrea Arville are newly-wed couples who are hosting the 8th season of G Diaries - Changing the World Together. Click here for their background.About ABC's for Global Health:ABCs for Global Health is a non-profit organization dedicated to finding practical​ solutions to the health problems of disadvantaged and underserved communities. Their programs include telemedicine, research on nutrition and healthcare, and disaster response.Visit these links if you'd like to support either by volunteering or sharing your resources:Get InvolvedDonate See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Drilled
The ABCs of Big Oil | Ep 2: Elementary School

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 23:22


Since the 1920s, oil companies have been creating music, activities, coloring books, comic books, movies and more to shape how American kids think about society, the economy, and the environment. Today, we look at their efforts in elementary school. Read more: www.earther.com

Straight A Nursing
The ABCs of DIC: Episode 173

Straight A Nursing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 30:20


Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a consumption coagulopathy that can be devastating for your patient. In this episode, learn the pathophysiology of DIC, how to recognize it, and what we do to address it (hopefully before it results in life-threatening hemorrhage). As a bonus, there are a few PodQuiz questions at the end to test your understanding. If you love quizzing in this way, then check out my private podcast, Study Sesh! For show notes and references, view the article here.

Mitch Jackson's Podcast
The ABCs of NFTs for Creators, Buyers, Sellers, and Investors

Mitch Jackson's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 53:19


What is an NFT? If you're an artist, creator, buyer, seller or investor, what do you need to know about non fungible tokens (NFTs) and how do they relate to business, blockchain, cryptocurrency and your life? Attorneys Mitch Jackson and Ira Rothken share answers to the 10 most important questions you need to know about NFTs.  Find out how NFTs relate to who you are and what you're doing in the digital business world. Learn what you should be paying attention to in the NFT space over the next 3-5 years. More at https://streaming.lawyer #nft #blockchain 

The Vintage RPG Podcast
The Dungeon Alphabet

The Vintage RPG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 17:59


Time to practice our ABCs! This week on the Vintage RPG Podcast, we're taking a look at Goodman Games' series of alphabet sourcebooks: The Dungeon Alphabet, The Monster Alphabet and The Cthulhu Alphabet. These are system agnostic design tools, full to brimming with random tables and amazing art, all aimed at helping you stoke your imagination to make cool things for your players. A must for every GM's shelf. * * * Here's the current discount code from our pals at Noble Knight! Use LEGENDS at checkout online or in the store to get 10% off your order, from now till November 19!  Hang out with us on the Vintage RPG Discord! If  you dig what we do, join us on the Vintage RPG Patreon for more roleplaying fun and surprises! Patrons keep us going! Like, Rate, Subscribe and Review the Vintage RPG Podcast! Available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Spotify, YouTube and your favorite podcast clients. Send questions, comments or corrections to info@vintagerpg.com. Follow Vintage RPG on Instagram, Tumblr and Facebook. Learn more at the Vintage RPG FAQ. Follow Stu Horvath, John McGuire, VintageRPG and Unwinnable on Twitter. Intro music by George Collazo. The Vintage RPG illustration is by Shafer Brown. Follow him on Twitter. Tune in next week for the next episode. Until then, may the dice always roll in your favor!

Education On Fire - Sharing creative and inspiring learning in our schools
222: Mastermind: Unlocking the Potential Within Every School Leader with Daniel Bauer

Education On Fire - Sharing creative and inspiring learning in our schools

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 42:00


Daniel Bauer is an unorthodox Ruckus Maker who has mentored thousands of school leaders through his blogs, books, podcasts, and powerful coaching experiences. His new book, The Mastermind: Unlocking the Potential Within Every School Leader introduces a proprietary process called the ABCs of powerful professional development™ which is changing the landscape of how school leaders experience professional development. Website https://betterleadersbetterschools.com (https://betterleadersbetterschools.com) Social Media Information https://twitter.com/alienearbud https://www.linkedin.com/in/danielevanbauer/ https://www.instagram.com/alienearbud/ Show Sponsor The National Association for Primary Education speaks for young children and all who live and work with them. Get a FREE e-copy of their professional journal at https://nape.org.uk/journal (nape.org.uk/journal) https://frstre.com/go/?a=100059-6a3612&s=1971853-ecdb80&p_affiliate.referral_code=marktaylor12 (Listen to Mark's audio course ) https://frstre.com/go/?a=100059-6a3612&s=1971853-ecdb80&p_affiliate.referral_code=marktaylor12 (10 Pieces of Advice You'd Like to Have as a Child) Support this podcast

Drilled
The ABCs of Big Oil | Ep 1: First Day of School

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 38:03


Fossil fuel companies didn't start infiltrating schools when climate change appeared on the scene, they were there shaping the minds of future citizens for decades before then. The industry has been laying the groundwork for inaction on climate since long before this crisis reared its ugly head, limiting how Americans are allowed to think about the environment and the economy. In this first episode of our new miniseries with Earther, Dharna Noor and Amy Westervelt look at how Big Oil first got into the education game, and why it worked so well.

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know
ABCs in Europe: Abnormally Big Cats

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 62:01


For decades, people across the United Kingdom have been reporting something strange: enormous, cat-like beasts popping up on the edges of cities, only to disappear without a trace. In today's episode, the guys dive into one of the strangest cryptid tales of the modern day -- ABCs, the Abnormally Big Cats of Europe. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Drilled
Drilled + Earther Present: The ABCs of Big Oil

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 3:26


In this collaboration with Earther, we look at the fossil fuel industry's influence in school—not just in shaping our understanding of environmental problems, but also in narrowing the spectrum of solutions we're allowed to consider. Earther reporter Dharna Noor co-hosts, and we'll be bringing you a four-part series over the next several weeks. Subscribe so you won't miss it! And make sure to check out the Earther site for complementary posts and web bonuses.