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The Leading Voices in Food
What Food Policy Advocates Can Learn from Tobacco Industry Strategies

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:43


This is "The Leading Voices in Food" podcast but today we're speaking with a leading voice in tobacco control. "How come," you might ask, "why?" So I believe for many years that the parallels between the tobacco industry and food industry practices are nothing short of stunning, and that our field would do very well to learn lessons learned from the pioneers in the tobacco wars. Our guest today is Dr. Kenneth Warner, Distinguished Emeritus Professor and former Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. Ken's research focuses on the economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Interview Summary   So Ken, you and I have a long history, and I thought it might be instructive to mention just a little bit of it because you really helped shape some of the ways I think about addressing food policy. So I first became familiar with your work long before I met you in person, when I was teaching classes at Yale. I was assigning papers you wrote on tobacco control and I was especially interested in work that you'd done on tobacco taxes. It really gave me the idea of pushing ahead with food-related taxes. Then finally I got a chance to meet you in person at a meeting that was hosted by the first President George Bush in Kennebunkport, Maine, on cancer control. You and I got to talking about similarities between the tobacco industry behavior and the way the food industry was behaving. We were both struck by the similarities. That led us to write a paper together that was published in 2009 in "The Milbank Quarterly." And I have to say, of all the papers I've published over my career, this was one of my favorites because I really enjoyed working with you. I learned a ton from it, and it really, I thought, made some very important points. And I'd just like to mention the title of that paper because it pretty much summarizes what it found. So the title was, "The Perils of Ignoring History: Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food?" In my mind, the playbooks are still very similar, and that's why it's really interesting to talk to you today, get a little sense of what's happening more recently, and importantly, think about what lessons are learned from tobacco control. I wanted to bring up one thing from that paper that I always found fascinating, which was the discussion about something called "The Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers." Could you describe what that was and what role you think it played in history?   Sure. Just to give you some context for it, the first two major papers that implicated smoking in lung cancer were published in major medical journals in 1950. In December of 1952 there was an article in the "Reader's Digest," which incidentally was the only major magazine that did not accept cigarette advertising, that was entitled, "Cancer by the Carton." And this was the American public's first real exposure to the risks associated with smoking, and it led to a two-year decline in cigarette smoking, a very sharp decline, something that was unprecedented in the history of the cigarette. Following that there was some research published on mice and cancer. And needless to say, the tobacco industry was getting pretty nervous about this. So the executives of all the major tobacco firms met in New York City in December of 1953, and they collaborated on what became a public relations strategy, which drove their behavior for many years thereafter. The first thing they did was to publish "A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers" in January of 1954. This "Frank Statement" was published in over 400 magazines and newspapers, and it reached an estimated audience of some 80 million Americans, which would be a very good percentage of all Americans in those years. And they talked about the fact that there was this evidence out there, but they said, "We feel it is in the public interest," this is a quote, "to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of this research." Then they went on to say, and I quote again, "We accept an interest in people's health as a basic responsibility, paramount to every other consideration in our business. We believe the products we make are not injurious to health and," and this is the kicker, "we always have and always will cooperate closely with those whose task it is to safeguard the public health," end quote. They went on to say that they would support research on smoking and health, and, of course, that they would always be the good guys in this story. This was designed as part of a strategy to obfuscate, to deceive the public, basically, to lie about what they already knew about the health hazards associated with smoking. And it was essentially a first very public step in a campaign that, one could argue, in many ways has persisted ever since, although, obviously, now the tobacco companies admit that they're killing their customers and they admit that smoking causes cancer and heart disease and lung disease and so on. But that was kind of the beginning of the strategy that drove their behavior for decades.   You know, that was one of the issues we raised in our paper. How similar were the big food companies in talking about concern for the health of their customers, planting doubt with the science, pledging to make changes that were in the interest of public health, agreeing to collaborate with public health officials? All those things played out in the food arena as well. And that's just one of many places where the food industry behave very, very similar to what the tobacco industry has done. But boy, is it interesting to hear that particular anecdote and to learn of the cynical behavior of the industry. So fast forward from there, and you think about the tobacco industry executives testifying before Congress that nicotine wasn't addictive, and you have that same process playing out many years later. These similarities are really remarkable.   So let's talk about your work and some of the issues that I think apply to the food area, and let's talk about taxes at the beginning. So I worked for years on the issue of soda taxes, and these taxes now exist in more than 50 countries around the world and in a number of major cities in the US, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Oakland. And these taxes have been shown to have really positive effects, and they seem to be growing around the world. And I'd like to understand what you see as the overall findings from the work on tobacco taxes. But before we do that, you have a very interesting story to tell about how the tobacco control community responded when you first began speaking about taxes. It turns out to be taxes on tobacco have had whopping effects. But what was the initial reaction to people in that field?   Yeah, it is kind of an interesting story. So around 1980, when I first started writing and talking about tobacco taxation as a method of reducing smoking, I used to have public health audiences booing me. If they had rotten tomatoes with them, they would have been throwing them.   You know, Ken, it's hard to imagine because now these taxes are completely routine and accepted.   Yes, they're not only routine and accepted, they are a first principle of tobacco control. They are enshrined in the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. So they really are kind of the first thing we turn to because we know that they work. We know that they reduce smoking.   But let me give you a story about how I learned that this is not only a phenomenon with people smoking. It's a phenomenon with people using all other drugs, and it turns out it's a trans-species law, the Law of Demand. And that law says, basically, that if you increase price, the demand for the commodity will decrease. Well, in the beginning, the public health audiences believed two things. They believed that smokers were so addicted that they would not be affected by price, so it was ridiculous to even think about it. And they said, you have to have intrinsic motivators to get people to quit smoking. They have to care about their kids. They want to see their kids grow up, their spouses, and so on, and not extrinsic forces like a tax. So those were their two objections. So the story that I think is really kind of fun. I was on a plane flying to a small conference in Kansas City. This is sometime in the early '80s. And I happened to be seated next to Jack Henningfield, who is probably the preeminent psychopharmacologist dealing with nicotine, maybe in the world. And we were talking about price response, the fact that cigarette taxes work. And he said, "You know, I've got something I want to show you here." And he pulled out some what are called response cost curves from the psychology literature. And this is where you take a laboratory animal, in this instance addicted to narcotics or other addictive substances, and you give them a challenge to get their drugs. So first, I should note that these animals are so addicted that if they're given the choice between food and their drug, they will choose their drug, and they will in fact end up dying because they place a preference for the drug over food. But it turns out that when you increase the price of the drug to them, they decrease the amount that they consume. So what do I mean by that? If they have to push a lever, a bar, a certain number of times to get a dose of their drug, and you raise the number of bar pushes per dose, they will dose themselves with fewer doses. I took a look at these curves, and basically, a response cost curve for these lab animals is essentially a demand curve as we economists see it. And I calculated the price elasticity of demand, which is our standard measure of the responsiveness to price. And it turns out that addicted laboratory rats have essentially the same price elasticity of demand, the same price responsiveness that human beings do to cigarettes.   That's an absolutely fascinating story. And, you know, I know Jack, and have admired his work, as you have, and it's amazing to think about that conversation on a plane, and what sort of scientific work it led to, and how that, in turn, found its way into policies that exist around the world. So tell us then about tobacco taxes, and how high do they have to be in order to affect consumption in an appreciable way, and have they worked in reducing tobacco use, and what's your overall take on that?   So we have, quite literally, hundreds of studies in countries around the world, and we know a lot but we don't know everything. So we don't know, for example, if there's a particular price above which, you know, nobody will use the product. We don't have even really good data suggesting of, you know, what's the minimum increase in price that you have to have to have a noticeable impact. Overall, the literature suggests that if you increase the price of cigarettes by 10%, you will decrease the quantity demanded by 3 to 4%. Now, what this means is that roughly half of that decreased demand reflects decreases in the number of cigarettes that continuing smokers use, while the other half represents decreases in smoking, people quitting or kids not starting. So the demand is what we call price inelastic. The price change itself is larger, proportionately, than the decrease in consumption. But that decrease in consumption is still substantial and it's enough to have a large impact.   Now, cigarette prices vary all over the world, and cigarette prices vary primarily because of taxation differences. So if you go to the Scandinavian countries, you'll find that a pack of cigarettes will run $15 or more. If you go to Australia, you're looking at $30 or more a pack. In the US, currently, we're looking at an average price in the range of about 7 to $8. In some jurisdictions, like New York City, it's $10 or more. But the prices in the US are actually relatively low among the more developed nations in the world. Any tax increase will have an impact but obviously the larger tax increases will have larger impacts. And there's some good and bad news in tobacco taxation, particularly in a country like ours, and this is, again, true for most of the developed world. Smoking is now concentrated in marginalized populations. I'm talking about low socioeconomic groups, the LGBTQ community, and racial minorities, in particular. If you think of this as an economic phenomenon, when you raise the price on cigarettes, you're going to hit the worst-off economically segments of the population hard. That's the bad news. The good news is that those people, precisely because they are poor, tend to be much more price responsive than high-income smokers, and more of them will quit. So we have this problem that the tax is regressive, it imposes a larger burden on the poor, but the health effect is progressive. It will reduce the gap between the rich and poor in terms of smoking rates. And of great importance, there's an enormous gap between the rich and poor in this country in life expectancy, and as much as half of that may be differences in smoking rates.   Ken, there's a hundred follow-up questions I could ask, and I find this discussion absolutely fascinating. One thing that came into my mind was that some years ago I looked at the relationship of taxes, state by state in the US, and rates of disease like lung cancer and heart disease. And there was plenty of data because there was a huge range in tobacco taxes. Places like New York and Rhode Island had very high taxes, and the tobacco Southern states, like North Carolina, had very low taxes. But what's the sort of recent take on that, and the relationship between taxes and actual disease?   Well, it's still true. And there are, in fact, what you suggest, the southeastern block of tobacco states have unusually low rates of taxation. And I haven't seen any recent data but one presumes that they are suffering more from smoking-related diseases because their smoking rates are higher. I mean, that has to be true. So I don't know that we have any particularly good data recently, but there have been studies that clearly relate tobacco or cigarette prices to health outcomes associated with smoking.   I'm assuming US scientists have played a prominent role in producing the literature showing the negative health consequences of using cigarettes, and yet you said the United States has relatively low taxes compared to other developed countries. Why, do you think?   I think we're going to get into a very philosophical discussion about the US right here. It has to do with individual responsibility. We know for sure that the initial reason the taxes were so low was that the tobacco block was so influential in the Senate, particularly in the days when Jesse Helms, the senator from North Carolina, was in the Senate. He was the most feared senator by the other senators, and if you wanted to get anything done for your cause, you had to go along with his cause, which was keeping cigarette prices low and doing everything they could to support smoking. So there's clearly been a built-in bias in the Senate, and basically in the Congress as a whole, against tobacco policy. You see a huge variation from state to state in tobacco policies, and it's reflective of basically their political leanings in general.   You brought up this issue of personal responsibility, and boy, does that apply in the food area. You know, the food companies are saying: if you have one sugar beverage every once in a while, it's not going to be harmful. And it's not use of the products but it is overuse of the products. Thereby saying, it's not corporate responsibility we're talking about here, it's personal responsibility. That same argument was made by the tobacco industry, wasn't it?   It was. They would be less inclined to do that today, for a couple of reasons. One is that we know that even low levels of smoking are harmful and indeed cause many of the diseases that we were referring to earlier. And I think all the companies have now admitted publicly that smoking does cause all of these diseases that we've long known it causes. And all of them are claiming that they would like to move away from a society with smoking to one that has alternative products that would give people choices and ways to get their nicotine without exposing themselves to so much risk. I mean, we have to remember, the fact that cigarettes kill their consumers is a real drawback as far as the industry is concerned because they're losing a lot of their consumers, you know, 10, 20 years before they normally would, and they have to deal with all these lawsuits. So it's unfortunate for them. Having said that, cigarettes are the goose that lays the golden egg. They cost very little to manufacture. The industry is sufficiently oligopolistic that the profits are enormous, and their profitability has continued even while smoking has dropped rather precipitously ever since the mid-1960s.   Is that because the markets outside the US have been growing?   They certainly have helped. Although now, and this is only true within the last few years, the aggregate cigarette sales in the world are declining. They've actually started dropping. So we were seeing a relatively stable situation as smoking decreased in the developed world and was rising in the developing world. The only place now where we're seeing increases in smoking are areas in Africa, which, by the way, is the one place in the world where we might be able to forego the tobacco epidemic because smoking rates are still quite low in most of the countries, not all of them, and also parts of the Middle East. But elsewhere we've been seeing smoking declining all over the world. That doesn't mean the profits have to drop because one thing that the companies can do, is, they can raise their prices. Now, if prices go up because of taxes that hurts the companies. But if they raise their own prices because demand is inelastic, what that means is that the percentage increase in the price is larger than the percentage decline in the demand for cigarettes. So they're actually adding to their profitability by doing that. They've always played this very interesting game for years of keeping price below what we would think to be the profit-maximizing price. And I think the reason for that has to do with addiction because they know that they have to have what are called replacement smokers, kids coming in to take the place of the smokers who are dying or quitting. And for years, I think, they kept their prices down because they didn't want to discourage young people from smoking. Now, I think they see the writing on the wall. Smoking is declining very rapidly. Smoking prevalence, which was 45% in the mid, early-1960s, is now a little over 12% in the US, and I think they're raising their prices with the understanding that they want to take as much advantage of the opportunity with the addicted smokers, the adults, as they possibly can, even though smoking among kids is becoming vanishingly small.   I think of so many parallels with the soda taxes that now exists in a number of places, and the companies have responded somewhat differently. And perhaps it's the level of addiction issue that kicks in here, and the need to have replacement customers. Maybe that's another key difference. But with the soda taxes, the companies have not increased prices beyond the level of the tax. You know, to delight of public health experts, the companies have tended to pass along the entire tax so the companies are not eating that difference in order to keep prices the same. Higher tax gets reflected in the ultimate price that they charge, but they're not increasing prices beyond that. Do you think it might be the addiction issue that's different here?   I don't know. I mean, that certainly could be an element of it. The other thing is that they're manufacturing other drinks that are being used in place of some of the sodas. So they've got waters, they've got juices. I mean, obviously these sugary juices are no better, but they do make other products. They make the diet drinks. And to the extent that they can find substitutes for those products within their own companies, it may be that they're content to allow people to make those substitutions.   Interesting comment. The results so far on the soda tax suggest that the most common substitution as people drink less soda, is water, which is of course better than a lot of the alternatives that people might be consuming, so that's a bit of really good news. Even though the companies do sell water, Coke and Pepsi have Aquafina and Dasani, for example, they face a basic problem. Number one is that these companies are the biggest sellers of sugary beverages but not bottled water. That happens to be Nestle. So if people migrate to bottled water, they're likely to migrate from the big companies, like Coke and Pepsi, to Nestle. Also, people tend not to be very brand-loyal to water. They tend to buy whatever is on sale or whatever they find available to them, and that creates a problem for these companies like Coke and Pepsi that do rely on brand loyalty for their marketing. So it's very interesting. And also, I wonder, based on the research on food and addiction, if the companies don't take a hit if people switch from full sugar beverages even to diet beverages that they might sell because there wouldn't be as much addictive potential, and therefore the customers wouldn't have to have as much just to keep the habit going. So it's really interesting to think this through.   That's certainly very plausible. The whole thing would also depend on the price elasticity of demand for sodas, and specifically for the brands that they're concerned about. If there is greater elasticity there than what we observe for cigarettes, then raising those prices aren't necessarily going to help them all that much.   You mentioned that the elasticity estimates for tobacco suggested that a 10% increase in price led to a 3 to 4% reduction in consumption, and the numbers are even more positive in the case of the sugar beverages, where if you get a 10%, 15% increase in price, you end up with 10, 15% reduction in consumption. So that's good news in the food arena.   That's good news but it also means that they can't do as easily what the tobacco industry can do, which is to raise their prices and expect to see profits rise. Because if they're losing as much in sales as they're gaining in price, it's no win.   So Ken, let's talk about product formulation because you mentioned that earlier, and this is a really interesting issue that, again, connects tobacco and food products. So you think about the tobacco companies mainly selling cigarettes, but now there's vaping, there's cigarettes with things like menthol and other flavors, or low-fat foods, or artificial sweeteners. The list of product reformulations in order to attract customers goes on and on and on. So I know a controversial topic in your field has been e-cigarettes. Can you explain what these are?   E-cigarettes have been around now for about a decade, let's say. Basically, they're devices that allow people to inhale nicotine and other substances, but the purpose is to give them their nicotine without combustion. And we know that the major problem associated with smoking is the products of combustion. There's 7,000 chemical compounds in cigarette smoke. 70 of them are known human carcinogens, causes of cancer in humans. Many of them are cardiotoxic. They cause lung disease and so on. The e-cigarettes have about two orders of magnitude fewer toxins in their emissions than do cigarettes. And it turns out that the amount of the comparable toxins, when they are in fact comparable, that you find in the e-cigarette emissions is much lower, usually a 10th to a 400th, of what you find in cigarette smoke.   So logically, and based on a fair body of evidence at this point, vaping, use of e-cigarettes to get nicotine, is substantially less dangerous than is cigarette smoking. However, the controversy here is incredible. This is the most divisive issue that I have witnessed in my 45 years of working in the tobacco control field. It has torn the field asunder. The mainstream of public health, and by that I'm including governmental agencies, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Truth Initiative, the American Cancer Society, heart and lung associations, all of mainstream public health is strongly opposed to e-cigarettes, and for one reason. They're concerned about kids' uptake of e-cigarettes, which has been substantial. It's been decreasing the last couple of years, but it has been substantial. And there are a number of things they're concerned about in that regard, and they're completely ignoring the fact that there's pretty good evidence that e-cigarettes are increasing smoking cessation for a subset of smokers. And a number of us on the science side of this, believe that the net effect of e-cigarettes is beneficial, that it's actually, possibly, a tool to add to the armamentarium of things like cigarette taxation, like smoke-free workplaces, like restrictions on advertising, and that it will help a group of inveterate smokers, those who either can't quit nicotine or don't want to, to move to a less dangerous alternative to smoking. I am not saying that e-cigarettes have no risk associated with them. They almost certainly do. But it is substantially lower.   Now, historically, this is divisive within the field in part because all of the earlier attempts at, quote-unquote, tobacco harm reduction have been produced by the major cigarette companies, and they've been fraudulent. So cigarette filters were manufactured and sold, starting in the 1950s, in response to the scare that I referred to earlier about cancer. And they were sold with a message that the filters block the dangerous stuff but let the flavor through. And people bought this. That decrease in smoking in the early 1950s reversed, smoking went up sharply, as sales of filtered cigarettes went up. By the way, the first successful filtered cigarette was Kent, and it used what it referred to as the miracle Micronite filter. Well, that miracle Micronite filter turns out to have been made of asbestos. And there are lawsuits continuing to the present day by workers in the factories that made the filter tips for Kent cigarettes, who themselves ended up with lung cancer or other diseases due to the asbestos. Then came low-tar and nicotine cigarettes, and we actually have ample evidence from the documents that had been revealed by lawsuits, that the industry knew that this was a public relations device. It was not a harm reduction device. And in fact, because people believed that low-tar and nicotine cigarettes were less dangerous, it's likely that it actually increased the toll of smoking because people who would have quit, switched to low-tar and nicotine cigarettes instead. So there's some pretty awful history here that makes people legitimately concerned about alternative products. A critical element of this story is that the alternative products, in this case, the e-cigarettes were introduced by non-cigarette, non-tobacco companies, and their goal was to replace smoking. Now the major companies are all making their own e-cigarettes as well because they have to do it from a defensive point of view, but basically they don't have any great interest in slowing up the sale of cigarettes. They want to benefit from that as long as they can.   So I should know the answer to this but I don't, but are e-cigarettes taxed? And wouldn't it be optimal to tax e-cigarettes but less than regular cigarettes so you discourage use of both but discourage the use of regular cigarettes more?   That is very insightful. Two colleagues and I actually published a paper saying that in 2015 in "The New England Journal of Medicine," that we should be taxing e-cigarettes modestly, the reason being that we want to discourage kids from using them, and kids are far more price-sensitive than our adults. Kids have a very elastic response to cigarette prices. Adults do not, and in particular, older adults have even lower price responsiveness. So yes, there should be some taxation of e-cigarettes to discourage youth use of it but that taxation should be dramatically lower than the taxation of cigarettes. Some states are now taxing e-cigarettes. Not all of them. The federal government is actually looking into a proposal to double the tax, the federal tax, on cigarettes, which would take it up to $2.01 a pack, and at the same time, to establish an equivalent tax, similar to the $2 tax, on all vaping products. This would be a disaster because it would definitely discourage kids from vaping, but it would also discourage adults from using e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking, and the most addicted, the inveterate smokers, those are the ones that need these alternatives. So that's a bad policy proposal. A much better one would be to increase the cigarette tax by more than a dollar, raise it to 3 or $4 or something, and impose a modest tax on e-cigarettes. This would discourage people from smoking, both adults and kids, but especially kids. It would discourage kids from using e-cigarettes but it would create a price differential that would encourage the inveterate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. Now, part of the problem, and this has gotten worse over time, is that the American public believes that e-cigarettes, that vaping, is as dangerous and even maybe more dangerous than cigarette smoking. Nothing could be further from the truth but so far the mainstream of public health has sold that message to the public, and the public, including smokers, believe it.   That's a fascinating story about how the public health field might be getting in its own way with this.   And maybe doing damage to public health.   So let's loop back a little bit to the behavior of the tobacco industry. So in 2017, the Phillip Morris Company funded and launched an organization called Foundation for a Smoke-Free World. So I think, hmm, a tobacco company saying they want less smoking, and one could view this with pretty high cynicism but what do you think about it?   I've always shared your sense of cynicism about it. There's an interesting anecdote related to this. The individual who negotiated the deal by which Phillip Morris offered $1 billion over a 12-year period to establish this foundation, that individual was the main actor in the World Health Organization during the development of the global treaty on tobacco control, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also became director of the organization and served in that capacity until just the other day. He has stepped down from being director. But let me give you a little context for it. Philip Morris International that needs to be distinguished from Altria and Philip Morris Domestic, but Philip Morris International sells the leading brand of what is known as heated tobacco products, HTPs. These are products that actually have tobacco in them. E-cigarettes have no tobacco in them but these products actually have tobacco in them. But instead of burning the tobacco, they heat it. They volatilize it, and the nicotine is inhaled. Like e-cigarettes, they appear to be substantially less dangerous than smoking, although it's not clear that they're as less dangerous as, than, e-cigarettes. But they're produced only by the major cigarette companies. Philip Morris is now selling these products successfully in many countries, many cities around the world. While they actually have the authorization to sell an older version of the product in the US, it's not very popular at this point. But in Japan, over the last four years there's been a drop in cigarettes sold of about a third at the same time that there's been this great increase in the use of these heated tobacco products manufactured by Philip Morris International and by Japan Tobacco. They have a product called Ploom. Philip Morris' product is called IQOS, I-Q-O-S, which, I was told, originally stood for I Quit Ordinary Smoking. So they are the leader of the theme song that the industry is singing these days about how they want a smoke-free world and they want to move toward one. But the only way they're ever going to do that, willingly, is if they can sell other products like these heated tobacco products and make large sums of money on them. Philip Morris has a good start at that. They claim that about a third of their revenue now is coming from IQOS, this heated tobacco product.   So whether that foundation ultimately has beneficial effects or not, forget corporate beneficial effects but on the public good, would pretty much depend on who's choosing to use these e-cigarettes, I'm imagining. That if it's people switching from normal cigarettes to them, or using them instead of normal cigarettes, it's one thing. But if they're recruiting new people who otherwise wouldn't smoke, then it would be a bad thing. So how do you think that'll all play out?   That's actually a critically important question, Kelly. And one of the great concerns that the opposition to e-cigarettes has, is that they're addicting lots of kids to nicotine, and that many of them will go on to smoke, and that that will reverse the progress that we made on smoking. Now, it turns out that there is no evidence to support the latter contention. And in fact, there's evidence to the contrary. I think it's entirely possible that some kids who would not have touched a cigarette otherwise are vaping and then trying cigarettes in the future. Whether they become regular smokers, remains to be seen. But I think there certainly are some kids like that. But what we do know is that the rate of smoking among kids, what we call current smoking, and smoking among kids means that they've had at least one puff on a cigarette in the last 30 days, that number has plummeted over the last quarter century, and, and this is the interesting thing, it has gone down at its fastest rate precisely during the period in which vaping has been popular among kids.   So one theory is that vaping is displacing smoking to some extent. That kids who would've smoked are vaping instead. It's a very complicated area and we don't know the answer. Among adults who vape, and they are relatively few in number except for very young adults, we observe mostly dual use, but the question is how much of this is a transition to vaping only, and then, maybe, a transition to nothing after that. In the UK, where vaping has been advertised by the health organizations as a way to quit smoking, and they have encouraged its use, and they use it in their smoking cessation clinics, and you'll even find it in hospitals, in the UK we have seen that more than half of the people who have quit smoking by using e-cigarettes have also quit vaping. So it is no longer the case in the UK that a majority of the people who vape are also currently smoking.   In the US, the data have been moving in that direction but it's still a majority who are dual users rather than vaping only. But we have evidence of four or five completely different kinds of studies, commercial data, other products in other countries, that all lead to the conclusion that vaping is already increasing the rate of smoking cessation in the US and in the UK by probably 10 to 15%. That's a hard thing to see in the data but it is something that, if you dig into the data, you will see it, and as I say, we see it all over the place. Let me give you one example of the tobacco harm reduction story that's fabulous. 40 to 50 years ago, large numbers of Swedish males started using a smokeless tobacco product called snus, S-N-U-S. It's a relatively low nitrosamine product, nitrosamine being a carcinogenic element, and they substituted it for cigarettes largely because cigarette taxes were going way up and there weren't any significant taxes on snus. So what you observe today, some three, four decades or more later, is that Swedish males have the lowest male smoking rate of any country in Europe, and maybe in the world. They do not have a low tobacco use rate. Their tobacco use rate is pretty typical but it consists mostly of snus. And they also have by far the lowest rate of tobacco-related diseases, like lung cancer, of men in all of the European Union countries, and the second lowest is typically a rate twice or more that of what you see in the Swedish males. Swedish females, who did not quit smoking in large numbers and did not take up snus until fairly recently, have rates of lung cancer and other diseases that are average or above-average for the European Union. So that's a great example of tobacco harm reduction in action, and it's one that's been around now, as I say, for decades.   Ken, this is a remarkable history and you're just bringing it alive beautifully. But let me ask you one final question. So given that you've been working in this field for more than four decades now, and have really been a pioneer, a leader, a warrior, and a hero, all those things could be applied to you and your work, if I asked you to sum up what's been learned from all these decades of work on tobacco, what would you say?   There are a lot of lesson. Certainly, we have learned specific kinds of interventions that really matter. You and I spoke about tax at some length. That's the preeminent one. Smoke-free workplaces, including smoke-free restaurants and bars, have not only themselves had a direct impact on health but have also set the tone for a more smoke-free society. So we have seen quite dramatic changes. I mentioned we're going from a 45% rate of smoking for the nation as a whole down to a little over 12%. That, however, has taken us six to seven decades. So it's kind of a good news, bad news story. It's a very complicated area. Tobacco control was ranked by CDC as one of the 10 most important public health measures of the 20th century, and also the first decade of the 21st century. And I think that's completely legitimate, and it is something about which all of us who care about public health can feel very proud about. The problem still remains. It is an enormous problem, as you alluded earlier, in many parts of the developing world, the low- and middle-income countries, and it's a growing problem in some of those countries, and it's just not going to disappear real fast. The lesson that I've taken most recently has been a discouraging one, and that's how divisive our field has become. We really have a chasm between the people who are opposed to tobacco harm reduction and those who are supportive of it. They're good people on both sides, they believe what they're saying, but they can't talk to each other civilly at this point. I hope that that will not become the case for those of you who are fighting the good fight in dealing with unhealthy foods.   Bio   Kenneth E. Warner is the Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Public Health and Dean Emeritus at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. A member of the faculty from 1972-2017, he served as Dean from 2005-2010. Presented in over 275 professional publications, Dr. Warner's research has focused on economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Dr. Warner served as the World Bank's representative to negotiations on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO's first global health treaty. He also served as the Senior Scientific Editor of the 25th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. From 2004-2005 he was President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT). He currently serves on the FDA's Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. In 1996 Dr. Warner was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Surgeon General's Medallion, the Luther Terry Award for Exemplary Achievement in Tobacco Control, and the Doll-Wynder Award from SRNT. Dr. Warner earned his AB from Dartmouth College and MPhil and PhD in economics from Yale University.  

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

Don’t Give Up on Testicular Cancer
Be Vocal - From Testicular Cancer to Volleyball Championshps to Giving Back

Don’t Give Up on Testicular Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 21:05


Owen McAndrews is a testicular cancer survivor, athlete, and experienced fundraiser for cancer. Diagnosed in high school with testicular cancer and during volleyball championships, Owen continued playing volleyball then and during college, where his team won championships in 2014 and 2015. Giving back became part of his life as an active participant in Movember and the American Cancer Society. Owen is a Solutions Engineer for Sprout Social in Seattle and leads a team to support clients and their social communication strategies. Listen to Don't Give Up on Testicular Cancer, a podcast from the Max Mallory Foundation. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=60247613)

Haunted Attraction Network
Haunted Attraction Industry News for Nov 23rd

Haunted Attraction Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 7:38


The House of Four Scythes Haunted Attraction raised $40,000 for the American Cancer Society this Halloween season; Home Haunter Dan Earls donated over 1,500 pounds of food to local food banks; Overall Costume & Accessory sales increased 4% this year; LA County avoided a post-Halloween COVID surge; The Krewe of Krampus drive-through parade returns for 2021 on December 4th; "A Christmas Nightmare" comes to The Dent Schoolhouse December 10th-11th; Season's Screamings tickets now on sale; A new dark ride is coming to Monterey Bay, California; The Recreational Fear Lab researches the benefits of scary play; the new horror film "Autumn Road" centers on a haunted attraction. Read more: https://mailchi.mp/hauntedattractionnetwork.com/haunt-industry-news-nov-22

RunChats with @RonRunsNYC
Grace Plassche - Embracing the Grind With Gratitude; 1st Time Marathoner & Aspiring Doctor | RunChats Ep.60

RunChats with @RonRunsNYC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 107:26


I met Grace Plassche exiting the 50th NYC Marathon finish line, where she was beaming with that first-time marathon finisher glow and had just rocked an AMAZING 3:28 debut marathon! Grace ran in honor of her Grandmother—who passed from Cancer in 2019—and had her initials on her sneakers and could feel her out there on the course when things got really hard. Running and fundraising for the American Cancer Society made things even more meaningful. Grace comes from a super close-knit, supportive family and is grounded in gratitude. She's an aspiring doctor/surgeon and I'm excited to follow her amazing journey. We discuss: -Youth activities: dance, soccer, basketball, lacrosse, travel LAX in middle school, being coached by her dad, bonding moments, finding a passion -Receiving a scholarship to Brown University for D1 Lacrosse, invaluable learnings, team bonds, workload, time management, overcoming obstacles, leadership, finding her voice, becoming a team captain during her senior year -Mentors: From Pro-Activity PT & Gym, Eric Eisenhart and Chris Gahagan; Kristen Prendergast, "one of my greatest role models as an amazing marathoner, doctor, and mom of three;" Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum, who "helped me realize the magnitude of my passion for medicine and set in motion the path I am on now" -Being part of a strong team in both sports and medicine -A full breakdown of her race and the incredible on course support she received from family & friends (who were EVERYWHERE) -Her career path and community service I'm so excited to share Grace's inspiring first-time marathoners journey and I hope you all enjoy this convo as much as we did! If you enjoy the episode, it would mean the world to me if you would rate the podcast or write a review and share feedback wherever you get your podcast groove on. Connect With Grace: Instagram: @grace_plassche Connect With Ron: Personal Instagram: @ronrunsnyc Podcast Instagram: @runchats_with_ronrunsnyc Facebook: https://fb.me/runchats Website: https://ronrunsnyc.com ---- Produced by: David Margittai | In Post Media Website: https://www.inpostmedia.com Email: david@inpostmedia.com Social: @_margittai © 2021 Ron Romano

Frankly Speaking About Family Medicine
Primary HPV Testing Alone for Cervical Cancer Screening: a Review of Recent Guideline Updates - Frankly Speaking Ep 251

Frankly Speaking About Family Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 9:03


Credits: 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™   CME/CE Information and Claim Credit: https://www.pri-med.com/online-education/podcast/frankly-speaking-cme-251   Overview: Primary care providers should be up to date on the changes to the guidelines for cervical cancer screening to be able to guide patients in shared decision-making about health maintenance. Join us to review the recent changes to cervical cancer screening guidelines as recommended by the American Cancer Society.   Episode resource links: Cervical Cancer Screening: Updated Guidelines from the American Cancer Society. Am Fam Physician. 2021 Sep; 104(2):314-315. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Updated cervical cancer screening guidelines. Practice advisory. April 2021. Accessed September 30, 2021. https://www.acog.org/clinical/clinical-guidance/practice-advisory/articles/2021/04/updated-cervical-cancer-screening-guidelines Fontham, ETH, Wolf, AMD, Church, TR, et al. Cervical Cancer Screening for Individuals at Average Risk: 2020 Guideline Update from the American Cancer Society. CA Cancer J Clin. 2020. https://doi.org/10.3322/caac.21628. Guest: Jillian Joseph, MPAS, PA-C   Music Credit: Richard Onorato

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Living as a prostate cancer survivor

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 15:40


Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men, but thanks to improvements in detection and treatment, the likelihood of surviving the diagnosis is good. Both the five-year and the 10-year survival rates for all stages of prostate cancer are 98%, according to the American Cancer Society. As a result, there more than 3.1 million men in the U.S. have been diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point. Living after a cancer diagnosis is often called "survivorship." The survivorship experience is different for every cancer survivor, but it's possible to predict some of what the survivor might experience based on the type of cancer. For example, both prostate cancer and its treatment can cause urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction."I think survivorship is just a critical issue in prostate cancer management," says Dr. Matthew Tollefson, a Mayo Clinic urologist. "The location of the prostate is a factor, so many men are concerned about urinary function and sexual function, and to some extent bowel function, because these are all in the the general region of the prostate." After treatment, men may be hesitant to discuss their side effects or be self-conscious about sharing their feelings and worries. Health care providers can help."It's absolutely critical to have that discussion with your doctor, says Dr. Tollefson. "We have effective treatments to manage almost all the side effects that can come up, whether they be issues with body composition, or sexual function or urinary control. It's important to understand that that these are common things and recognize that your physician has likely heard this from many people before and really is well-equipped to help manage and get through some of the issues that that do arise."On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Tollefson discusses what men can expect after treatment for prostate cancer and how they can improve their quality of life going forward.

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 74 - Breast Cancer Screening

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:51


Episode 74: Breast Cancer Screening. Salwa and Veronic discuss who, how, and when to screen for breast cancer. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine was authorized for use in children 5-11 years of age.Introduction: Pediatric COVID-19 VaccinesBy Lam Chau, MS3, Ross University School of MedicineOn November 2nd, 2021, the CDC endorsed a unanimous recommendation to allow the use of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 5-11 years of age. The White House has secured 28 million pediatric doses of the Pfizer vaccine, enough to cover every child ages 5-11 within the United States without cost. The official CDC recommendation is that all children aged 5 and older get vaccinated, regardless of past infection history. The Pfizer vaccine for children is given in two doses, 3 weeks apart.Individuals older than 12 are given a 30-microgram dose, while pediatric individuals are given a 10-microgram dose. For extra precaution, the pediatric vaccine vials are being shipped with a unique orange cap to clearly distinguish itself from higher dose vaccines. Clinical trials with the lower dose vaccine demonstrated a strong antibody response and a prevention rate of symptomatic COVID-19 of 90%. The reported side effects were minimal, and no serious adverse events or myocarditis were reported during the trials. The vaccination of children cannot be understated. The benefits go well beyond just the physiological processes of vaccination. It will foster a safer environment for our children and help improve their emotional and social development. While there is still a lot to be done to end the pandemic, this recent announcement is an enormous step in the right direction in returning to normalcy. This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. ___________________________Breast Cancer.   By Salwa Sadiqali, MS3, Ross University Medical School; Veronica Phung, MS3, Ross University School of Medicine; and Hector Arreaza, MD.   Salwa: Welcome back from Spooky season! Did you see all the flyers and advertisements about Breast cancer awareness last month? Veronica: I did! It's because October was breast cancer awareness month.Salwa: And spooky season, and of course pumpkin spice season! I got my dose of pumpkin spice this morning. Well, every morning to be exact, Starbucks is my second home. What do you know about breast cancer? Veronica: Well...breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. And, fun fact, I know that Angelina Jolie had an increased risk of breast cancer, so she had surgery to remove them.Arreaza: I remember it being all over the news back in 2013. It caused “The Angelina Effect.” There was an increase in people searching about breast cancer on the internet. Let's dive into this topic a bit more. What exactly is breast cancer?Salwa: It's a process in which normal cells of the breast start growing too quickly, out of control. It can happen in males too, but it's much rarer.Veronica: And there are different types of breast cancers that originate from the different types of tissue in the breast. There's ductal carcinoma, lobular, inflammatory, Paget's, and phyllodes to name a few. Salwa: Not only are there different types of breast cancers, but some can also be hereditary meaning mutated genetic information is passed on from generation to generation.Arreaza: That's what happened with Angelina Jolie. She had a BRCA1 gene mutation. Veronica: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are the most common causes of hereditary breast cancer. Normally, the BRCA gene helps make proteins that repair damaged DNA. When this gene is mutated, it can't make those proteins, so damaged DNA stays damaged. But this only makes up 5-10% of all breast cancers.Salwa: Exactly! Here's an interesting fact, women of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage are at a much higher risk of developing a BRCA mutation. There are several other genes that are also linked to hereditary breast cancer. But those genes aren't that common. Non-hereditary breast cancers are much more common - they make up about 85% of breast cancers. Arreaza: Ok so you two gave us a lot of good information, but do you know how to screen for breast cancer?Salwa: When and how often you screen depends on which guidelines your physician is following. Generally, you'll get a mammogram, basically an X Ray of the breast. Veronica: The US Preventative Screening Task Force or USPSTF is a panel of experts that uses medicine-based evidence to make screening and vaccination guidelines. These guidelines are reviewed and updated yearly. For breast cancer, the USPSTF recommends women ages 50-74 have a mammogram every other year. Salwa: The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists recommends mammograms starting at the age of 40 and repeating the test every year or every other year. While the American Cancer Society recommends annual mammograms from 40 to 54 years of age and then every other year for women 55 years or older. Veronica: Dr. Arreaza, you see a lot of patients and I'm sure you've referred plenty of them for breast cancer screening. How do you decide which guidelines to follow? Arreaza: When you have a patient between 40-50 years old, you have an opportunity to talk about screening, and make a shared decision. The USPSTF recommends that women with a personal or family history of breast, ovarian, tubal, or peritoneal cancer or an ancestry associated with BRCA1/2 gene mutation be screened with an appropriate brief familial risk assessment tool. Women with a positive result on the risk assessment tool should receive genetic counseling and, if indicated after counseling, genetic testing.Some instruments use to assess the need for BRCA mutation screening include Ontario Family History Assessment Tool, Manchester Scoring System, Referral Screening Tool, Pedigree Assessment Tool, 7-Question Family History Screening Tool, International Breast Cancer Intervention Study instrument (Tyrer-Cuzick).Salwa: What about the self-breast exams? I remember those were recommended all the time.Veronica: That's a great question! Current research suggests that doing a self-breast exam doesn't necessarily help detect tumors early – whether cancerous or not. And, sometimes, while doing self-breast exams you may feel a lump that's actually normal breast tissue and it may cause unnecessary anxiety. That being said, you should always know how your breasts normally look - as in are they symmetrical, how the nipples look, how the skin normally looks. And of course, if you notice any changes or have any concerns, please visit your primary care provider. Arreaza: Breast awareness. The USPSTF recommends that clinicians offer to prescribe risk-reducing medications, such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, or aromatase inhibitors, to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer and at low risk for adverse medication effects.Salwa: As medical students, we have the opportunity to work with different departments in the hospital. I'm currently doing my surgery rotation and Veronica completed hers in September. As part of the rotation, we had the opportunity to work at the Breast Clinic with Dr. Snyder. We saw a lot of patients from CSV because their PCPs were screening them for breast cancer and all those women were able to get the higher level of care they needed. Find available resources in your community for free screening mammograms. For example, Cancer Detection Program/Every Woman Counts by Clinica Sierra Vista.____________________________Now we conclude our episode number 74 “Breast Cancer Screening.” October was breast cancer awareness month, but it is not too late to remind everyone of the need to screen for breast cancer. Whether you follow the American Cancer Society, the USPSTF or the ACOG guidelines, just do not forget to screen. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Lam Chau, Salwa Sadiqali, and Veronica Phung. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week! _____________________References:AAFP Signs Off on Pediatric COVID-19 Vaccine Recommendations, American Academy of Family Physicians, November 3, 2021. https://www.aafp.org/news/health-of-the-public/20211103covidvaccchildren.html?%20cid=DM63464&bid=188450701 ACS Breast Cancer Early Detection Recommendations. American Cancer Society. (n.d.). Retrieved October 11, 2021, from https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/screening-tests-and-early-detection/american-cancer-society-recommendations-for-the-early-detection-of-breast-cancer.html. Basu, N.N., Hodson, J., Chatterjee, S. et al. The Angelina Jolie effect: Contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy trends in patients at increased risk of breast cancer. Sci Rep 11, 2847 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82654-x Breast cancer information and support. Breastcancer.org. (n.d.). Retrieved October 10, 2021, from https://www.breastcancer.org/. Breast cancer: Screening. Recommendation: Breast Cancer: Screening | United States Preventive Services Taskforce. (2016, January 11). Retrieved October 10, 2021, from https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/breast-cancer-screening.  Practice Bulletin Number 179: Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Screening in Average-Risk Women. (2017). Obstetrics and gynecology, 130(1), e1–e16. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002158 

Brands, Beats & Bytes
Album 3 Track 15 – Irma Shrivastava, CMO, Strategic Marketing and Business Executive

Brands, Beats & Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 96:10


Album 3 Track 15 – Irma Shrivastava, CMO, Strategic Marketing and Business Executive, previously SVP, Marketing and Alliances with American Cancer Society and Vice President US Marketing, The McDonald's Division with The Coco-Cola Company. Irma brings her experience within the corporate and nonprofit sector to our virtual building this week with lessons and stories we can all learn from. A few takeaways:  People and relationships matter, whether in the corporate or nonprofit sector It's important for companies and people to recognize that it's about the brand, not the product. Trusting your instinct will lead you down the right path or a path of learning and growth. When you are happy outside of work, joy spreads into your work. 

The Bubble Lounge
LIVE from The Cattle Barons Ball 2021

The Bubble Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 34:18


Dallas doubled down and raised some serious money for the American Cancer Society at this year's Cattle Baron's Ball.  On this episode, we take you on a behind the scenes journey to meet all of the people who make the magic happen.A big Congratulations to co-chairs Diana Hamilton and Heather Randall, and the entire team of incredible women who put on this successful event and once again showing us that Dallas is one of the most philanthropic cites in the country! 

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast
Episode 6 - Innovation and Insurance with Shruti Kothari

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 35:45


Nakin, Freddy and Joe sit down live in San Diego before their presentation at MGMA to bring in the sixth episode of BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast. The team speaks to Shruti Kothari on Innovation and Insurance, Shruti is the Director of Strategic Initiatives at Blue Shield of California. Throughout her career, Shruti has had stops as a health educator, in venture capital and at a prominent healthcare provider. She discusses how her experience working in county hospitals highlighted the disparities within healthcare and why she decided to jump into the healthcare space to try and make a change. Shruti shares great perspective on what early careerists should think of when they are looking to pursue a new opportunity, start a new organization/company and what she learned from working in the Venture Capital space. Additionally, Shruti shares how striking statistics in early seed funding compounded by events that affected the entire nation, moved her to elevate the voices of women of color and call attention to the staggering low number of executives who are women of color. Shruti Kothari – Blue Shield of California Shruti Kothari is a healthcare transformation advocate. She leads Industry Initiatives for Blue Shield of California, focusing on industry alignment, collaboration, and policy movement that drives the change needed to scale BSC's Innovation and transformation agenda. Prior to BSC, Shruti led Strategic Engagement for Kaiser Permanente's venture capital fund, integrating early-stage startups into the Kaiser Permanente ecosystem. She also worked as an early-stage startup operator for Honor, healthcare system quality improvement leader for Kaiser Permanente, and a health educator and community mobilizer for the American Cancer Society. Shruti is on the board for Family Caregiver Alliance, as well as an Advisor for the End Well Foundation. She is the founder of Women of Community which engages in advocacy efforts to increase representation of Women of Color in healthcare leadership. You can follow Women of Community (WOC) on Instagram and LinkedIn. The crew asked Shruti the following questions: Serving as Director of Industry Initiatives, Health Care Reform at Blue Shield of California. What does your work entail? In your career you made a couple of stops at Kaiser, first as a principal in the continuum of care experience and later as the director of KP Ventures. What was your experience like each time and what brought you back? You founded an organization called Women of Community. What was the genesis of the organization and how do you see its role moving forward? Outside of your day job and WOC, you also serve as a board member for the Family Caregiver Alliance, an advisor to End Well, and a steering committee member at Scale Health. How did you get involved with these organizations and how has working with each helped you evolve as a healthcare leader? If you didn't work in healthcare, what job would you be doing now? Your work thus far has been wide ranging, what are you most proud of in your career? What was the hardest part of moving from one organization (where you had a lot of success) to another? Talking with Nakin – Merck Antiviral COVID-19 Treatment Nakin speaks with the group about a new treatment by Merck to reduce the risk of hospitalization and death once an individual has contracted the COVID-19. The groups discuss the effect of introducing an antiviral treatment for COVID-19 into the mix of current treatment options and what that means for patients here in the United States along with the rest of the world. We'd be interested to know from our listeners how they view the ongoing dynamic of the availability of vaccines and treatment options for COVID-19. Would you be willing to take a pill to treat the effect from COVID-19? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/byob-health/message

ACS Research - TheoryLab
What causes small cell lung cancer growth and resistance?

ACS Research - TheoryLab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 28:46


Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women in the United States and worldwide. Small cell lung cancer comprises 15-17% of lung cancer cases, and it is the most aggressive subtype of lung cancer, growing rapidly and spreading to other organs quickly. Luke Hoeppner, PhD, received American Cancer Society funding to test whether therapeutically targeting a specific molecular pathway inhibits small cell lung cancer growth. Dr. Hoeppner's lab was the first to report that activation of this particular pathway, called dopamine signaling, inhibits other forms of lung cancer growth. By therapeutically altering the dopamine signaling pathway, he hopes to inhibit small cell lung cancer progression and drug resistance, facilitating further advancement to new treatments. For more information about lung cancer, visit https://www.cancer.org/cancer/lung-cancer.html. Luke Hoeppner, PhD, is Assistant Professor and leader of the Cancer Biology research section at The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota. 5:09 – What is small cell lung cancer? What vital statistics about it should we know? 5:57 –What is the standard therapy for small cell lung cancer patients? 8:13 – Why is it so hard to treat? 10:04 – “Another way to put it is…” 13:59 – Why drug resistance is such an important area of research for small cell lung cancer 15:42 – “We're trying to focus on understanding what in particular small cell lung cancer cells are doing to evade chemotherapy, and is there a combination treatment that we could add to chemotherapy that would prevent (resistance)?” 16:18 – On his lab's novel approach to combatting resistance 24:17 – What are the therapeutic implications? 25:05 – Why he's optimistic about this line of research 26:31 – On how American Cancer Society funding has impacted his research 27:18 – A message he'd like to share with cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers

On The air
The Occupational Therapy Assistant as a Collaborative Partner and a Leader (Episode 121)

On The air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 41:49


Kimberly Kearney, COTA/L, has been an occupational therapy practitioner since 2003. She has worked in Skilled Nursing, Rehab, Memory Care, Acute Care, Home Health, Community Health, and Early Intervention settings. Most recently, Kim has been working in Home Health in Virginia. She has held licenses in Indiana, Florida, Colorado and now Virginia. Kim has been involved with AOTA serving on the Commission on Practice for over 5 years and assisted with the OTA Forum. She has also presented as a panel member at a few national conferences in these roles. She was involved with the topic of Driving and Community Mobility and worked with the ADED group in Colorado and presented at the Colorado OT Association Conference on the topic. Over the years, Kim has been happy to work with students in various aspects of their OT learning journey as a fieldwork educator. In addition, she views volunteering as a way of life after having worked with American Cancer Society, Girl Scouts, American Red Cross, the MS Society, Medical Reserve Corps, Make A Wish Foundation. She is an advocate for lifelong learning and enjoys a variety of challenges most recently exploring new occupations including meditative drumming, Cricut Maker projects, and solo camping in her teardrop trailer.Recommended resources:Everything is Figureoutable - book by Marie Forleo - https://www.amazon.com/Everything-Figureoutable-Marie-Forleo/dp/0525534997How to Get Involved (AOTA website) - including a link to update your COOL Profile - https://www.aota.org/Education-Careers/Students/Get-Involved.aspxOT-OTA Collaboration in Education - https://www.aota.org/-/media/Corporate/Files/Secure/Governance/RA/Minutes/RA%20Fall%20Online%202017%20Meeting/Importance-of-Collaborative-OT-OTA-Intraprofessional-Education-in-OT-Curricula-FINAL.pdf Guidelines for Supervision in OT Services - https://www.aota.org/-/media/Corporate/Files/Advocacy/State/Resources/Supervision/MSRSOTA.pdfGirl Camper website - https://girlcamper.com/Connect with Kim: Email: OTKimberly@gmail.comIG: @OTKimberlyTwitter: @OTKimberly

Buffalo Nerd Sports Podcast
Off the Beat with Ryan Talbot

Buffalo Nerd Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 30:08


This week on the show, I am joined by Ryan Talbot of the Shout Podcast, https://www.newyorkupstate.com/buffalo-bills,https://www.syracuse.com. To get things going, Ryan chose to highlight the American Cancer Society as our week's charity.  After some thoughts on the Bills and Dolphins game, we get into what to expect as we head to Jacksonville this weekend. A look at the offense, defense, and what we believe should be a victory for the Bills.  As we close things out, we chat about the outlook in the AFC and what the road looks like for the Bills. Make sure you are following all of Ryan's work and tuning into the Shout Podcast. Head to www.buffalowdown.com for all things Bills, and www.thebuffalonerd.com for all things NERD, and of course, GO BILLS! Support the show: https://www.thebuffalonerd.com/donations/support/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ASCO Daily News
Tackling the Increasing Incidence of Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:09


Dr. Mohamed Salem, gastrointestinal medical oncologist at the Levine Cancer Institute at Atrium Health in North Carolina, tells guest host Dr. John Sweetenham, associate director of clinical affairs at the UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, about the disturbing rise of early-onset colorectal cancer, the impact of socioeconomic disparities on patient outcomes and potential interventions to improve detection.   Transcript Dr. John Sweetenham: Hello, I'm John Sweetenham, the associate director of Clinical Affairs at UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center and guest host of the ASCO Daily News podcast today. I'm delighted to welcome Dr. Mohamed Salem, a gastrointestinal medical oncologist at the Levine Cancer Institute at Atrium Health in North Carolina. Dr. Salem is going to be discussing with us the disturbing rise in early onset colorectal cancer and the impact of socioeconomic disparities on patient outcomes and potential interventions to increase screening, particularly in younger populations. Mohamed, many thanks for joining us on the podcast today. Dr. Mohamed Salem: Thank you, Dr. Sweetenham for the kind invitation. And I have to tell you, I'm very grateful for this invitation to cover this topic. And also, thanks to the ASCO Daily News team for shedding the light on this. Dr. John Sweetenham: Great. Before we start, I should mention that my guest and I have no conflicts of interest relating to the topic today. Full disclosures of all guests on the ASCO Daily News podcast are available on our transcripts at ASCO.org/podcast. Mohamed, low socioeconomic status has been associated with worse survival in patients with colorectal cancer, otherwise known as CRC. But there hasn't been as much focus on the impact of socioeconomic status for those patients who have early onset colorectal cancer and, specifically, I guess, we mean by that, those patients who develop this condition in early adulthood. Of course, it's quite well known, generally, that adolescents and young adult patients who develop various types of cancer appear to have worse outcomes than both their childhood and their adult counterparts. Your study, published in The Oncologist, looked at the impact of sociodemographic disparities and insurance status on survival of patients with early onset colorectal cancer and, maybe not surprisingly, in some respects, based on experience in other diseases, demonstrated worse outcomes. Could you talk to us a little about the data in your study and how that might inform programs to improve early detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer? Dr. Mohamed Salem: Sure. As you mentioned, Dr. Sweetenham, there are two problems. A socioeconomic problem, which is, by itself, a huge challenge we are facing as a community. On the other hand, two, this colorectal cancer problem in younger adults is another issue that we have been facing now for maybe a decade or two. Rebecca Siegel just published a paper a couple of years ago showed that the increased incidence of [colorectal] cancer in adults, it's on the rise. And it brings many challenges to this population in terms of the diagnosis, their care, and their outcome. But when you couple this with the challenge that socioeconomic status impact on the outcome of our patient, this becomes a very, very complicated problem. So, our group wanted to look not only on the impact of socioeconomic status, but the impact on that problem on patients with early onset colorectal cancer and see how complicated this will be to their outcome. We examined more than 30,000 patients, and we chose the cutoff [at age] 40. Early onset definition could vary a little bit, so you have 40, you have 45, some people think even 50, but we choose 40 just because we wanted to focus on the very young group. We utilized National Cancer Database and we obviously thank them for giving us access to this data. And we tried to look at the impact of socioeconomic status, and it was stunning. We found that survival decreased with the decrease of socioeconomic status. So, the patient who carried the best survival was those with highest socioeconomic status and then the lower SES goes, the worse is their survival outcomes. And also, not just survival. We found that if you have low socioeconomic status, you are more likely to have stage III or IV tumors, which is, as you know, more advanced cancer, you're more likely to have node-positive disease, and also, you're more likely to present with stage IV colon cancer. So, just to highlight how impactful the socioeconomic status or factor in the presentation in disease and the outcome, and not only this one. We will also looked at insurance status. It was very clear that patients with no insurance or Medicaid, they do much worse. They had the higher risk of mortality compared to patients with commercial private insurance. And you have to wonder having this issue with being young adult and having a cancer and then having no insurance, have no means to access care. That's something, as you mentioned, perhaps we could, as a community, look into it and try to remove those barriers, to hopefully improve the patient outcome. Dr. John Sweetenham: Yeah, one of the things that struck me from looking at your paper was the fact that stage to stage, age for age. If patients had insurance, it did mediate some of the adverse prognostic effects of socioeconomic status, if I read the paper correctly, which does suggest to me that part of the problem at least is access to care. Would you agree with that? Dr. Mohamed Salem: I totally agree, 100%. And it's also interesting that we even looked at multiple angles. We looked at uninsured, by itself. We looked at Medicaid insurance. We looked at private versus not private. And it doesn't matter how we look at it, and adjusting for all other co-founders and stage, insurance status played a significant role on the impact of survival for those patients. Dr. John Sweetenham: Very interesting that I think that there are several other studies in other diseases which are beginning to show very similar emerging patterns. Just moving on from that a little, I think remarkable numbers that stood out from the studies which you cite in your article in The Oncologist is that 2015 study by Bailey et al. which was predicting that, by 2030, the incidence rates will have increased really quite substantially. And for the younger age group, those aged 20 to 34, the estimate was at a 90% increase in incidence. And for those in the 35 to 49 year age group, the suggestion was that incidence rates would increase by almost 28%, so I think there are a couple of questions that I have regarding that. The numbers are pretty sobering. Can you talk to us a little bit about what we know about the factors that are driving this increase in incidence? Dr. Mohamed Salem: Sure. I do agree with you, Dr. Sweetenham. I think this are very alarming numbers and very alarming phenomena. I'm sure you remember when we're in medical school and fellowship, we used to think colorectal cancer is a disease of older people. Unfortunately, now, we're seeing younger patients getting this. Not the age of 50 or 40 or 30 as you mentioned, even 20 years old. My youngest patient is 17-years-old. And it's not uncommon for me to see patients who are like 20-21 years old coming with this disease. There are many risk factors for colorectal cancer, as you know, obesity, diabetes, tobacco, alcohol, exercise, and other genetics and hereditary reasons. But the truth is that many of those patients come to our clinic are fit. They eat well, they don't smoke, they don't drink, so it appears there is something else going on. And there are many theories going into this, but the truth is that we're actually not sure 100% what are the exact reason for that rise in incidence among young adults. Some people think microbiome might have a role here. Some people think obesity, as I mentioned, has more impact on younger people than older people, but I think also is this is an area of research now. And we hope they'll continue to look into this and try to identify the exact reason why this is happening. But I also wanted to touch base a little bit about an important issue, because the paper you cited, both the American Cancer Society and the task force took the screening or issued recommendations regarding the screening to be from [age] 50 to go now to 45. We used to have a screening recommendation at age of 50 for average risk. Now, as of 2018, the American Cancer Society said you should be screened at 45, and most recently, the task force said the same thing. However, if you think about it, our study looked at patients who are [age] 40. So, the change in the screening really is not going to impact them, because it's still not even at the age of screening and, therefore, education, outreach and educating our patients, our population about the risk and the symptoms and signs of this disease is extremely important  because it makes a huge difference if the cancer gets detected at stage I, which most of the prime surgery is enough and 99% of patients or more than 90% of patients would be cured and don't even need anything besides surgery, versus, as I mentioned, when they start to come into the office with stage IV disease. Now, it's a totally different story and totally different outcome. Dr. John Sweetenham: Yeah, and I guess one of the other questions, the whole screening strategy issue is obviously a very big issue right now and I guess somewhat controversial as well. But I think it's true to say, and if I'm wrong, I stand corrected, that in general, compliance with screening as a whole tends to diminish with age. So, I'm sure, for all kinds of reasons, many of which may be kind of socioeconomic, financially-related, younger individuals are less likely to get screened, either because of insurance or what other issues they may have. And so, I wonder as age goes down, and I'd make the assumption that it may be true, that compliance with screening protocols also goes down. It'll be interesting to speculate on what are going to be useful interventions, particularly in that very young age group, might lead to earlier detection of colorectal cancer in, let's say, a 22-year-old. It can be a difficult issue to unravel, I think. Dr. Mohamed Salem: I totally agree. I think it gets very complicated very quickly because, one, as you mentioned, access to care and coverage and being able to afford this is one issue. But also, if you think about it from logistics, younger people need to work. Maybe they have kids, they need to take care of them. They already have a busy schedule and busy life going on to begin with. So, for them, to take the time off and start to do this office visit takes away time from them, so it affects the compliance. So, hopefully, more awareness and more recognition and encouraging each other to take a day off and just go to get screened might actually result in life saving. Also, I would like to say something important. Most of us, as physicians, when we see an older patient with rectal bleeding, for example, we always think about, OK, maybe he has colon cancer, maybe she has colon cancer. But we don't think the same way when we see a 25 year-old old bleed. So, I think, as a family doctor or somebody who is a medical doctor that will actually seeing that patient, the threshold should be lowered for symptoms and also for early referral. And the other thing I would like to encourage your viewer is that none of us would be excited and happy to talk to their loved one or their friend about his or her old habits as having their rear bleeding, abdominal colics, or so on, and so forth. But sometimes, those symptoms are the symptoms because of colon cancer. I always say, you know your bodies are best, so if you thinks there's something wrong, don't be embarrassed to talk about that. You have to share those symptoms with your family doctor, or at least your loved one to get an advice and get evaluated. And this gets complicated among minorities, because somehow there is a shame in this. And I think looking for safe environment, community network, as you mentioned at the beginning, easy access to medical care is crucial. You're not going to be able to get screened if you don't have the bus ticket to get to the center to be screened there. The last thing I would just like to stress also, if I may, most people think a screening is connected to colonoscopy, which is partially true, but colonoscopy is not the only way patients can get screened. There are many, many other ways that people can get screened including stool tests that you can do at home and send it to your doctor. So, colonoscopy is not the only way you can get screened. You can also discuss with your family doctor or even loved one about other means that you can get screened. Dr. John Sweetenham: Yeah, I think that's a really important point, and it raises another question actually, which may be difficult to answer in this specific age group. But I just wonder, in general terms, whether you can make any comments about how much ground do you think we may have lost during the pandemic in terms of delayed screening and delayed diagnosis. Are you are you seeing evidence of that in the literature or in your own practice and your own institution now? Dr. Mohamed Salem: I think that's a pretty important question. I would say yes to both. Last year, there was data showing that colorectal cancer cases declined. All of us know nothing had change. I mean, the cases are the same out there. It's just not been diagnosed yet because most hospitals obviously, including ours, and many, many other hospitals throughout the country were trying to survive the COVID-19 pandemic, and that got a lot of patients to be delayed for screening. Many patients didn't feel comfortable going to the hospital to get either their colonoscopy or even to the family doctor visit, and so on, and so forth. So, I think this delay in the detection of the cancer. The cancer did not didn't appear. It just was not detected yet. And the risk of that, as I mentioned earlier, the more time passed without intervention, if someone has a cancer, that means more advanced stage. It goes from stage I to II and III and IV with time, and with that, the survival and outcomes get worse. So, that also brings another point that we think, it's that younger patient has more aggressive disease. I think there is some data about that. But also, I wonder if is this really more aggressive disease or just delayed in diagnosis. When you go to your family doctor or even get it checked then they say they're having rectal bleeding. This could be, yes, because of hemorrhoid, but also, it could be because of colon cancer. And I'm not saying everyone with rectal bleeding has colon cancer, but I'm saying that could be one of the reasons. And I would say you really have to seek medical advice if you have symptoms because, again, early detection is the best part about this, and it really saves lives and it changes a lot of things. So, yes, it's a pandemic. It had definitely, no doubt, impact on the colorectal cancer care. And I would predict is that we're going to start seeing more and more patients with more advanced disease in the coming months and years. Dr. John Sweetenham: Yeah, that's an alarming prediction. Of course, taken in conjunction with the other prediction that we mentioned earlier from the study by Bailey et al., it really should give us cause for concern. And I think, maybe my final question to you would be, given what you've just said, plus those data in somewhat dire predictions for 2030, what do we need to do now to prevent that prediction from Bailey et al. from coming true, do you think, if there's anything we can do at this stage? Dr. Mohamed Salem: I think that's a very complex question. But I think, the way I think about this, every one of us, as an individual and organization and even in government and political entity, we really have a role to play. As an individual, I would say, as I mentioned before, you know your body well, so I always say this phrase, 'If you feel something, say something.' This could be a life changing behavior. So, if you feel like there's something wrong with you, please don't be embarrassed to share this. Talk to your family doctor, talk to your friend, and seek medical advice. As a community, we have to encourage each other to share this information, to teach each other certain habits that might help early detection. And if you are at risk, please go ahead and get screened. As I mentioned, colonoscopy is one mean, but there are many others. As an institution, I think raising awareness is important. I think providing easy access to care, that's also very important. And from the government and political entity, I think looking at those people with diversity and disparity, and people with no insurance, people who need special support and need to get help, I think we should have a community program out there. Some help out there, whether this comes through insurance, means, or other programs that we need to look at. And I think this might have some impact on our ability to detect this cancer early on. I always say, which, I think maybe some people might think is an exaggerated statement, but no one really should die from colorectal cancer. Because again, if you detect the cancer early, minimal care should take care of that. The problem happens when we don't detect it early and the patient presents with stage III or IV disease. Dr. John Sweetenham: Yeah, so it's kind of a multifaceted approach, everything from the personal right through to the political aspect is involved in what we all need to do to contribute to this. So, I really appreciate your time today and sharing your insights, and congratulations on the study, which, I think, highlighted actually not just one, but several really important issues in this kind of growing incidence of colorectal cancer and what appeared to be growing disparities as well. Thanks so much for joining me on the podcast today. I hope that you continue to make an impact on these disturbing trends in the years to come. Dr. Mohamed Salem: Thank you, Dr. Sweetenham, for having me, and it's a pleasure to be with you tonight. Dr. John Sweetenham: And thank you also to our listeners for your time today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate and review us wherever you get your podcasts.   Disclosures:  Dr. John Sweetenham: None disclosed.  Dr. Mohamed Salem: Consulting or Advisory Role: Taiho Pharmaceutical, Exelixis, Bristol-Myers Squibb Speakers' Bureau: Genentech/Roche, Taiho Pharmaceutical   Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

BS Free MD with Drs. May and Tim Hindmarsh
#44: The Original “C” Word

BS Free MD with Drs. May and Tim Hindmarsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 60:07


What killed 600 K men and women in 2020?  Nope not Covid. Even in 2020, the second leading cause of death behind heart disease is Cancer.  Sadly everyone has forgotten about the original C word. With the pandemic, Cancer screenings plummeted and people have lost focus on their true health risks.  While breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and prostate cancer is the most common in men, the number one cancer killer is still lung cancer. Most people don't even know that there IS screening available & recommended for those at high risk. Today we cover the current and updated cancer screening recommendations & summarize the gold standard recommendations from the USPSTF ( US Preventive Services Task Force) While the pandemic may have you concerned, don't let it distract you from prioritizing your health. Do your cancer screenings! Hey and don't forget to check out the Marriage and Money, MD Conference November 15-17 with us and 18 other great speakers!  https://marriageandmoneymd.heysummit.com/?sc=OwbrBw4f&ac=VN88YDpK  Sponsor: Our sponsor this month is Locumstory. Visit www.financialresidency.com/locumstory to see if a locum tenens assignment is right for you.  Resources: Marriage and Money, MD Conference: Join us November 15-17 for 3 days of great information, 18 different speakers and awesome content! Click on the link below and please share with a friend!  https://marriageandmoneymd.heysummit.com/?sc=OwbrBw4f&ac=VN88YDpK  American Cancer Society:  https://www.cancer.org/healthy/find-cancer-early/cancer-screening-during-covid-19-pandemic.html USPSTF Cancer Screening recommendations: https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/search_results?searchterm=Cancer CDC Cancer Screening Guidelines:  https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/prevention/screening.htm Apps fo USPSTF: https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/apps/ Our Advice! Everything in this podcast is for educational purposes only. It does not constitute the practice of medicine and we are not providing medical advice. No Physician-patient relationship is formed and anything discussed in this podcast does not represent the views of our employers.  The Fine Print! All opinions expressed by the hosts or  guests in this episode are solely their opinion and are not to be used as specific medical advice.  The hosts,  May and Tim Hindmarsh MD, BS Free MD LLC, or any affiliates thereof are not under any obligation to update or correct any information provided in this episode. The guest's statements and opinions are subject to change without notice. Thanks for joining us! You are the reason we are here.  If you have questions, reach out to us at doc@bsfreemd.com or find Tim and I on Facebook and IG. Please check out our every growing website as well at  bsfreemd.com (no www)  GET SOCIAL WITH US! Instagram:: https://www.instagram.com/bsfreemd/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bsfree

Beyond Social Media: The Marketing, Advertising & Public Relations Podcast

During episode 365, host B.L. Ochman interviews Drew Simon, founder of the Crypto Altruism community. They discuss the thousands of ways that cryptocurrency and the blockchain are being used for global social impact. Among the topics we cover in this interview: - Major charities including American Cancer Society, UNICEF, Save the Children and hundreds of others are using the blockchain and crypto currency for global projects. - Mainstream media's false narrative about the blockchain and crypto - How crypto is revolutionizing charity fundraising Video, Show Notes & Links: https://beyondsocialmediashow.com/365 Connect with the show on social media Subscribe to the weekly eNewsletter

Lessons in Orthopaedic Leadership: An AOA Podcast
Out of the OR, Into the C-Suite: Laura Forese, MD, MPH

Lessons in Orthopaedic Leadership: An AOA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 30:13


Laura Forese, MD, MPH, joins the AOA Lessons in Orthopaedic Leadership to discuss what orthopaedic leadership looks like from the C-Suite. About Dr. Forese: Dr. Forese is the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of NewYork-Presbyterian, one of the nation's most comprehensive, integrated academic healthcare systems. The only hospital in the country affiliated with two top-ranked medical schools, Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons and Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is consistently recognized as a top 10 hospital in the nation and the #1 hospital in New York by U.S. News and World Report, as well as a best place to work by Forbes, Fortune, and Glassdoor. Dr. Forese has ultimate operational responsibility for the NewYork-Presbyterian enterprise, including 10 hospital campuses, 200 primary and specialty care clinics and medical groups, more than 45,000 employees and affiliated physicians, and more than $9 billion in revenue. Her transparent and reassuring leadership as COO, including providing near daily video reports to the NYP workforce during the COVID-19 emergency, has been an important element of NYP's efficacy in confronting the pandemic. Under Dr. Forese's leadership, NewYork-Presbyterian launched an innovative suite of digital health services called NYP OnDemand, implemented groundbreaking employee programs for paid parental leave and respite care, and achieved significant gains in patient satisfaction scores as well as employee engagement and front-line empowerment by focusing on building a culture of respect. As President of the NewYork-Presbyterian Regional Hospital Network, Dr. Forese expanded the organization's presence in Westchester County, Queens and Brooklyn, bringing high-quality community hospitals into the network, and she established the NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Groups to expand NewYork-Presbyterian's primary and specialty care throughout the region. Among Dr. Forese's top priorities and accomplishments is the regionalization and standardization of financial, operational, and clinical practices across the enterprise so that every patient receives the same exceptional standard of care no matter where they go in the NewYork-Presbyterian system. Active in multiple healthcare and civic organizations, Dr. Forese chairs the hospital board of the NIH Clinical Research Hospital in Bethesda, MD; she is also a Trustee of Princeton University, a board member of the Mother Cabrini Health Foundation and of LiveOnNY, and previously served on the board of a healthcare related public company.  She has been named among the 100 most influential people in healthcare nationally, the top 25 women leaders, and the 50 most influential physician executives each by Modern Healthcare magazine. Dr. Forese has also been named among the 50 most powerful women in New York by Crain's Business, and has been honored as Mother of the Year by the American Cancer Society.    An orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Forese graduated summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Princeton University and Alpha Omega Alpha from Columbia College of Physicians & Surgeons, and she holds a management degree from Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health.   She is married to Dr. Robert Downey, a thoracic surgeon and they have 3 adult children.

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 179: Learn How to Educate Patients During Immunotherapy

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 43:23


ONS member Kristi Orbaugh, RN, MSN, RNP, AOCN®, nurse practitioner for Community Hospital Oncology Physicians in Indianapolis, IN, and member of the Central Indiana ONS Chapter, joins Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, to discuss patient education prior to and during immunotherapy. This is a continued conversation from a previous episode that discussed findings from an ONS focus group that Orbaugh facilitated in August 2021; we've linked that in the episode notes. This podcast episode is supported by an educational grant from AstraZeneca. ONS is solely responsible for the criteria, objectives, content, quality, and scientific integrity of its programs and publications.  Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod  Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0  Episode Notes  Check out these resources from today's episode:   NCPD contact hours are not available for this episode.  Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 172: Address Knowledge Gaps in Evidence-Based Precision Medicine Care  Previous Oncology Nursing Podcast episodes on immunotherapy  ONS Voice article: New Patient Education Formats Help Nurses Connect Patients to Individualized Resources  ONS Voice article: Patient Education Is Critical to Managing irAEs for Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors  ONS Voice article: Tailored Education Improves Patient Satisfaction and Comprehension  ONS course bundle: Immuno-Oncology for the Oncology Nurse Case Studies  Immuno-Oncology Learning Library  American Cancer Society patient education resources   ASCO patient education materials  National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines on managing immunotherapy-related toxicities  To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities.   To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org. 

The T-Side Podcast
S3, Track 4: An 80's Halloween

The T-Side Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 18:20


Halloween in the 80's was the best!  At least Tawnya thinks so.  From the movies to the characters, to the songs, everything was iconic.  Well maybe not those plastic costumes and masks. Lol October is also the awareness month for both Breast Cancer and Domestic Violence. She shares some information about male breast cancer and the contact information for the National Domestic Violence Hotline. What are some of your favorite Halloween memories growing up? Do you still dress up?  Leave a comment and let her know. She would love to see them.  Tag her in your Halloween photos using #thetsidepodcast so she can shout you out.     Connect with Tawnya IG and Twitter: @t_sidepodcast FB: @thetsidepodcast website: www.thetsidepodcast.com    Theme Song: A Nightmare on my Street by Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince National Domestic Violence Hotline: https://www.thehotline.org/  Call: 1.800.799.SAFE(7233) Text START to 88788 American Cancer Society: https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer-in-men.html    BetterHelp - Visit https://betterhelp.com/tside  and join over one million people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional.  Special offer for T-Side listeners...get 10% off your first month at https://betterhelp.com/tside     Music Credit: Freestylah by Alexander Nakarada Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4745-freestylah  License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 

Meldon Law & Friends
Episode 53 – Kyle Jayne Stone & Charles Rickie

Meldon Law & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 60:27


Today on Meldon Law & Friends, we're joined first by the Sr. Development Manager for the American Cancer Society, Kyle Jayne Stone. Kyle Stone was a volunteer with the American Cancer Society for 7 years prior to hiring and now manages all local ACS events, including Relay for Life, Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, & Real Men Wear Pink. She'll tell us more about all the upcoming events in Central Florida and how you can get involved. Then, we're joined by the Director of Marketing & Community Relations for Meldon Law, Charles Rickie! Charles was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, is a father, and has a passion for ALL things marketing. He'll tell us more about his background, a podcast he does, what led him to Meldon Law, and more!

20-Minute Health Talk
Breast cancer survivorship: beginning at diagnosis

20-Minute Health Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 21:20


Thanks to improvements in breast cancer screening and treatment, more than 80 percent of patients will beat the disease. But, survivorship comes with its own health challenges — something  health professionals and patients need to start planning for at diagnosis, says Catherine Alfano, PhD, an international leader in cancer survivorship and rehabilitation. She joins medical oncologist Jennifer Ligibel, MD, and integrative health and wellness coach Deborah McElligott, NP, to discuss the challenges of implementing this approach; the issues cancer survivors face; and balancing the benefits and long-term risks of cancer treatments.  Chapters: 00:01 - Survivorship starts at diagnosis 01:20 - What is survivorship? 03:24 - Cancer care and lifestyle changes 05:27 - American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 07:15 - Getting survivorship right 08:40 - Cancer treatments: balancing benefits and risks 09:09 - Integrative medicine programs 11:34 - Tai chi health benefits 12:21 - Cancer care and integrative health 14:03 - Cancer research and personalized care 15:18 - What is a learning health system? 16:01 - Breast cancer survivor 18:34 - Racial disparities in survivorship 19:36 - Support from faith-based communities Meet the experts Catherine Alfano, Ph.D., is vice president of cancer care management and research at the Northwell Health Cancer Institute, and associate director for the Institute of Health System Science at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. She also co-chairs the American Society of Clinical Oncology's clinical guidelines on nutrition, physical activity, and weight management for treatment in cancer patients. Previously, she served as vice president for survivorship at the American Cancer Society; and before that as deputy director of the office of cancer survivorship at the National Cancer Institute. Jennifer Ligibel, MD, is a medical oncologist and director of the Leonard P. Zakim Center for Integrative Therapies and Healthy Living at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. She also co-chairs the American Society of Clinical Oncology's clinical guidelines on nutrition, physical activity, and weight management for treatment in cancer patients. Deborah McElligott, DNP, is a holistic nurse practitioner, as well as an integrative health and wellness coach at the Center for Wellness and Integrative Medicine at the Katz Institute for Women's Health.

TJ Trout
NM Making Strides

TJ Trout

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 16:05


Tom Toaski of the American Cancer Society and NM Making Strides has details on their next event on News Radio KKOB

Louisiana Ladies
American Cancer Society - Best Dressed Ball

Louisiana Ladies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 62:49


We are so excited for today's episode with Kerri and Michelle from American Cancer Society! They are such a joy to talk to and are doing such amazing volunteer work in Baton Rouge. We had so much fun chatting about the upcoming Best Dressed Ball on Friday, October 29th. Get ready to get inspired with these lovely ladies. Thanks for joining us!Jan Marini Skin Care Management System - Normal to Combination (5 piece - $374 Value) - DermstoreCatch up on Louisiana Ladies on Apple Podcasts and Spotify!Follow Louisiana Ladies on Instagram and FacebookWanna chat? Email louisianaladiespodcast@gmail.com. 

Around H-Town
Around H-town - American Cancer Society - 10-24-21

Around H-Town

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 7:35


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys
2021 Breast Cancer Awareness Month with Joy Keys

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 32:00


October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month Special Guest: Natasha Coleman, MPH is the Senior Director of Cancer Control Strategic Partnerships for the American Cancer Society, Inc. Northeast Region. Natasha provides strategic direction to a team of cancer control managers who oversee a portfolio of integrated health systems, primary care networks and state health system partnerships.  The team is responsible for the implementation of evidence-based strategies to address the cancer burden and advance cancer control priorities. Natasha joined the American Cancer Society in 2001 and held previous roles as the health educator for Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of NJ.  She received her graduate degree from Rutgers University, School of Public Health and her undergraduate degree from Rutgers University in biological sciences.  

CEO SECRETS
#20 in the Inc500 Fastest Growing Companies in America (2021): From Wall Street Banker to Healthwear Innovator with Chaitenya Razdan, Founder and CEO at Care + Wear

CEO SECRETS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 37:19


Hello everyone and welcome back to CEO Secrets. Our special guest for today was listed as part of the 100 Most Intriguing Entrepreneurs by Goldman Sachs in 2015, became one of the Rising stars: 90 healthcare leaders under 40 in 2018, and belonged to the Top 40 under 40 Leaders in Minority Health in 2020. His company, a leading provider of innovative healthwear, achieved 14,000% growth over the past 36 months and this has secured them the 20th spot on the top 500 fastest growing companies in the country. Let's welcome to the show, the Founder and CEO at Care + Wear, Chaitenya (Chat) Razdan. Prior to starting Care + Wear, Chat Razdan was an investment banker at Goldman and Sachs and a strategy consultant at Kearney. While his professional background is not directly related to healthcare, it was his experience with having loved ones who were diagnosed with cancer and were told to wear socks over their PICC lines that led him to recognize the growing need to bring innovation and design to the healthcare industry. In 2014, Chat decided to build a company that will provide healthwear that is focused on creating positive and effective healing experiences for patients everywhere. Today, Chat has worked in partnership with leading hospitals, patients, and clinicians to create Care+Wear's clothing and accessories. The company has also collaborated with sports leagues, brands, schools, and foundations such as MLB, the NBA, Oscar de la Renta, Parsons School of Design, March of Dimes, American Cancer Society, and Stand Up 2 Cancer. Chat wanted to make sure to get the right people in the room with him to design and develop all of their products. Let us hear from Chat as he shares his journey on how he started his business and how he helped it grow its revenue by 14,000% in just 3 years. Top Takeaways: 01:08 How Care + Wear came about 03:59 The 3 P's to success 09:11 What Care + Wear does on the marketing side to increase sales exponentially 12:33 Chat's absolute marketing tactic must-have 14:55 A good marketing strategy to spend money on 16:30 What does the value checklist look like for Care + Wear 21:56 Chat's insight on influencer marketing 23:11 Tactical things Chat would've changed in their early year to grow even faster 30:08 Chat's biggest failure and what he learned from it To get in touch with Chat Razdan, go to: https://www.careandwear.com/ Email: wecare@careandwear.com LinkedIn: ChaitenyaRazdan

Enjoy The Walk Podcast
3.48 - Rory & Rickie, The Show We Couldn't Tune In To

Enjoy The Walk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 62:26


All Time Pairing Throwing Us Back To The Future. With one catch. We couldn't watch it. Well, the front 9 that is. And most of the back9 too. We dive into what was an incredibly fun Weekend @ The CJ Cup watching two generational greats battle it out down the stretch in McIlroy & Fowler while young blood Colin Morikawa threw his hat in the race early going -8 through his first 11 holes! We also FINALLY get into some college golf chatter. We talk who's Hot & Who's not in the men's & women's side of college golf as well as some "tiger-esque" happenings out at Stanford's golf program right now. As Always, if you enjoyed today's show, please share it with a golf Phanatic like yourself, it would mean the world! & Tell them to smash that SUBSCRIBE button! "Birdies For The Boobies" Is LIVE on our website with 15% of all proceeds being donated to The American Cancer Society towards research for ending Breast Cancer! Be A Part Of A Great Cause! www.enjoythewalkpod.com #enjoythewalk #enjoythewalkpod #birdiesfortheboobies #makegolfcoveragenotsuckagain --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/enjoythewalkpod/support

Getting There With Goz
Andrew Williams Gets To SiriusXM

Getting There With Goz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:05


Andrew Williams of SiriusXM joins Goz to share his career journey Topics include Deciding to attend UAlbany over other broadcasting schools Landing his first professional job How he ended up at ESPN Albany Interviewing and securing a job with SiriusXM Daily job responsibilites The future of soccer in the USA and the potential future jobs for audio producers Best advice to land a job at SiriusXM Gozilla Media's First Bus Trip thanks to Johnstone Supply in Troy Johnstone Supply Kicks Cancer! Johnstone Supply in Troy and Gozilla Media will be supporting "Pink Month". All proceeds from the trip will be donated to the American Cancer Society. Sign up NOW to be a part of the Bus Trip -https://gozillamedia.com/johnstone-ualbany-trip

Shock Your Potential
Hello Gorgeous! - Kim Becker

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 25:54


“There's something so fulfilling about being able to help other people.” Kim Becker Most business leaders find that helping others in whichever capacity comes as a natural extension of their responsibilities. Similarly, studies and history show that giving back and helping others has a common positive outcome for people. Our guest today, Kim Becker, is a businesswoman who found her passion in community service, and she says it is all about finding that one thing that you feel you ought to do and incorporating it into your daily routine. Kim Becker is a motivational and inspirational speaker and an award-winning author of two books about beauty, cancer and the amazing scope of the human spirit. Kim is a dynamic communicator with an incredible story of faith, hope and service to others, and the founder of Hello Gorgeous! of HOPE, Inc., a non-profit organization that provides Red-Carpet Experiences for women battling all cancers across the United State. Kim has been a business owner and national educator for more than 30 years. Through her many experiences in the for-profit and non-profit business worlds, Kim has become a businesswoman, fundraiser, event planner, educator, public speaker, author and the face of Hello Gorgeous! Kim received the Mom`s Choice Award for her first book, “Hello Gorgeous!: A Journey of Faith, Love and Hope”. Kim received the 2011 Spirit of Women Award, an American Cancer Society 2014 Coaches Versus Cancer Inspirational Award, she received the prestigious George H. W. Bush, Points of Light award in 2015 and in 2019 Kim received the Shero Award from Zeta Phi Beta Society. In today's episode, Kim will talk about her journey that led to the birth of Hello Gorgeous! and the impact it is making in the community. Listen in! Social media handles: https://www.facebook.com/kim.scanlanbecker https://www.facebook.com/HelloGorgeousIN/?ref=pages_you_manage https://www.facebook.com/Kim-Becker-Inspires-2039277739522480/?ref=pages_you_manage https://www.linkedin.com/in/kibecker/   I am a hairdresser and owned a salon and my late husband had a degree in pre-Columbian archaeology from Purdue University. [4:25] In the beginning, I was a hairdresser and my dream was always to open a salon. [4:38] When we started talking about opening a salon, my husband suggested that call the salon ‘Hello gorgeous,' and I said that's the stupidest thing I've ever heard. [4:45] We opened a salon and owned it for 10 years and did not call it ‘Hello gorgeous' but ‘Cheveu,' which meant hair in French. [5:07] The whole time that I own the salon, I always felt that there was just something that was missing. [5:13] I remodeled the salon and we grew from one station to seven stations and outgrew from 1000 square feet and went to 3000 square feet with 17 stylists and massage therapists and receptionists. [5:33] That still didn't fulfil that emptiness I was feeling and I thought what maybe I needed was to work on myself. [5:45] I started training at all these places and there was still this emptiness that I was feeling. [5:51] Mike and I had the conversations about something more we should be doing and one day all of a sudden it felt in my heart. [6:02] We needed to have a mobile Day Spa that caters to cancer patients to treat them during a time where they don't feel very special. [6:23] I pitched this idea to him about this beautiful mobile Day Spa and that we were going to it for free and suggested to call it ‘Hello gorgeous.' [6:58] Part of the program that we do is in-person makeovers and considering that most women are often selfless, we try to make sure that we surprise them. [10:20] It is usually a nomination process where each of the women is nominated by family and friends and then we show up unannounced and give a head to toe makeover. [10:55] I never promise to make them look like Miss America, but I try to make her look normal and so that they can participate in your everyday life [12:04] We've been doing this almost 16 years and so I don't know whether I ever realize the impact and the ripple effect. [12:44] When she's smiling, everybody else smiles around her and so it's not just her that we help. It's all the other people that surround her. [13:05] I've had to change my verbiage to how can I support you because when you ask a different question, you elicit a different response. [14:38] Commercial break. [16:46] There is a ripple effect as far as the work that we do with the women. [19:07] I worked with a life coach for a really long time and she always talks about your areas of genius and that I can't be good at everything but I can be good at some things. [19:20] There are things that other people are really good at that I'm not good at but I can use those talents and their time to help me further my mission. [19:29] I've had to kind of narrow down to my areas of genius and had people come forward and help because they want to be a part of something bigger than themselves. [19:37] One of the things that we do is we have a salon affiliate program where I found salon owners to train them to create the ‘Hello Gorgeous' experience. [20:06] I like to tell business owners and business people that one of the things that they should do is team up with nonprofits. [21:12] I did find that as soon as we open the salon affiliates across the United States, that's what made them stand out in their community. [21:54] If you could do anything in the whole wide world that you wanted to do, and you didn't have to get paid to do it, what would it be? [22:38] Find out what that is and if you're not doing it in your daily work, find out what would feed that in you and find a nonprofit that's already doing that and go help them. [22:45] There's something so fulfilling about being able to help other people. [24:25] If you have a something that you feel like you're supposed to be doing, even if you don't feel like you're qualified to do it, go ahead and do it. [24:32] …………………..….. TopDog Learning Group, LLC is a leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA but with “TopDoggers” (aka consultants) throughout North America and beyond. They focus on training programs (both virtual and face-to-face), keynotes and “lunch and learns,” group and 1:1 coaching, and off-the-shelf solutions. One such solution is their Masterclass on The Top 3 Strategies to be Resilient in Times of Change. This thoughtful self-paced online training will guide you through three tactics you can immediately use to—not just survive—but thrive when change comes at you. Use the code RESIL50OFF for 50% off the program! Just go to https://bit.ly/3a5mIS6 and enter the code RESIL50OFF, in all capitals, to redeem your 50% off coupon. The link and code will be available in our show notes for easy access.      

The Voice Of Health
TO SUPPLEMENT OR NOT TO SUPPLEMENT (PART 2 OF 2)

The Voice Of Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 54:50


We conclude our two-part series we began last week on the importance of supplementation. In this episode, we talk about:--How the symptoms of aging are actually nutritional deficiencies, making supplementation especially necessary for older people.--Why children are in need of additional supplementation.--That your chance of surviving Cancer increases by 50% if you are not anemic. Plus, how anti-cholesterol statin drugs decrease your CoQ10 levels...which causes heart problems the drugs are supposed to prevent.--How the American Cancer Society says that 60% of all Cancers are caused by nutritional deficiencies.--The link between nutritional deficiency during pregnancy with postpartum depression and eclampsia.--How every addict suffers from severe nutritional deficiencies and are in need of supplementation in order to be restored to health.--Why 80% of all girls involved in school athletics are Iron deficient. And the incredible story of how Dr. Prather helped an entire girls cross-country team to win the state title with Iron supplementation!--The importance of not guessing when it comes to a patient's supplementation by doing proper lab tests such as bloodwork, hair analysis, and stool testing.--Why Dr. Prather uses a technology called Electrodermal Screening (EDS) to help provide accurate individual recommendations about which supplements will work best for a patient and give them "the most bang for the buck".--How often someone should be checked for their nutritional health and supplementation needs.—Plus, you'll hear all about the new Stasis Supplements Sleep and Relaxation Package from Holistic Integration. www.TheVoiceOfHealthRadio.com

Style by Mary Michele
33. Kim Becker (Hello Gorgeous) on Restoring Beauty through Breast Cancer

Style by Mary Michele

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 34:21


In this interview we'll discuss  Finding your purpose  The power of seeing yourself as beautiful  Beauty/style is a powerful tool for transformation  How Kim has trained salons around the country to give treatments to cancer patients  Why you need a power outfit Kim Becker is a motivational and inspirational speaker and an award-winning author of two books about beauty, cancer and the amazing scope of the human spirit.  Kim is a dynamic communicator with an incredible story of faith, hope and service to others, and the Co-Founder of Hello Gorgeous! of HOPE, Inc., a non-profit organization that restores the beauty that cancer steals. Kim has been a business owner and national educator for more than 30 years.  Through her many experiences in the for-profit and non-profit business worlds, Kim has become a business woman, fundraiser, event planner, educator, public speaker, Podcast host and the face of Hello Gorgeous!  Kim received the Mom`s Choice Award for her first book, “Hello Gorgeous!: A Journey of Faith, Love and Hope”. Kim received the 2011 Spirit of Women award, the American Cancer Society 2014 Coaches Verses Cancer Inspirational Award, she received the prestigious George H. W. Bush, Points of Light award in 2015 and in 2019 Kim received the Shero Award from Zeta Phi Beta Society Be sure to share this with a friend! And don't forget to leave a review. Merci.�� Make a donation to Hello Gorgeous! https://www.hellogorgeous.org/donate Listen to the Hello Gorgeous podcast: https://www.hellogorgeous.org/radio-show Buy the Book – ‘the ‘what to expect when you have breast cancer' book that all women battling this disease need - https://www.hellogorgeous.org/our-book https://www.facebook.com/HelloGorgeousIN/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/kibecker/ Visit the site: www.hellogorgeous.org  Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hellogorgeousin/ I want to personally invite you to join me for my Fr*ee MasterClass ‘How to Find Your Fabulous Fall Colors' on Thursday, October 7 th at 8pm ET. Sign up here: https://sfschoolofstyle.com/fall-color-webinar-sign-up1632492051624 Follow my own personal style journey on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/stylebymarymichele Shop our boutique https://www.instagram.com/shopstylefinder/ For more style inspiration and support, come join us over in the SF School of Style (https://sfschoolofstyle.com/join49186980) and let's take your style to new heights! You'll be the first to hear when the doors open. Want personal assistance? Work with me! Grab a spot on my calendar and let's chat! https://calendly.com/marymichelenidiffer Join in the fun in our StyleFinder VIP Facebook Group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/stylefindervipgroup)

The Broad-Cast
Broad-Cast Ep. 295.5 - The Making Strides Walk

The Broad-Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 2:50


Just a quick reminder for everyone to join the KISW team this Saturday October 16th at Gasworks Park as we raise money and awareness for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer through the American Cancer Society! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Well Women Healthy Lifestyle Podcast
#144 Breast Self Exam: Why You Need To Exam Your Breast & How To Do It At Home

Well Women Healthy Lifestyle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:38


Breast health is an essential part of a woman's well-being. Your breasts go through many changes throughout your life, from puberty to pregnancy, to the perimenopause and post-menopausal stages. Many of these changes are related to hormones and their varying levels, but some changes may not be normal and can be a cause of concern. Millions of women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. In 2021, an estimated 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 49,290 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer according to the American Cancer Society. That means 1:8 women will be diagnosed. Now let's look at it worldwide: In 2020, there were 2.3 million women diagnosed with breast cancer and 685,000 deaths globally. As of the end of 2020, there were 7.8 million women alive who were diagnosed with breast cancer in the past 5 years, making it the world's most prevalent cancer. In the United States alone, breast cancer has already surpassed lung cancer as being the most diagnosed type of cancer.Experts alike emphatically state that the most important factor affecting a successful outcome in treating breast cancer is early detection.Breast Self Exams also known as (BSE) can be one of those early detection measures.So, today's episode is all about giving you the information you need to know to be your #1 self-care advocate when it comes to your breast health.Send me a DM on the gram @wellwomennetworkAre you subscribed to my podcast? If you're not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don't want you to miss an episode. I'm adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you're not subscribed there's a good chance you'll miss out on those. Click here to subscribe in iTunes!Now if you're feeling the extra love, I would be really grateful if you left me a review over on iTunes, too. Those reviews help other people find my podcast and they're also fun for me to go in and read and then highlight you on a future episode. Just click here to review , select "Ratings and Reviews" and "Write a Review" and let me know what your favorite part of the podcast is.Also, join us on Facebook at our Facebook group here! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

R.O.G. Return on Generosity
53. Kyle Coon - Accessible Voices

R.O.G. Return on Generosity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:58


53. Kyle Coon - Accessible Voices “There's always a path forward. There's never a wall that you come to and it's just impossible to get through. If you can't go straight through, the obstacle or barrier in your way, then there's a way around it, or maybe, you just have to climb up and over it."    Guest Info: Kyle Coon lost his sight at the age of six  after a battle with Retinoblastoma—cancer of the eye. However, not having sight has not stopped him from pursuing vision. Since then he has become a competitive rock climber, downhill skier, runner and triathlete. As a young child, Kyle was shown how to embrace his adversity by world-class blind athlete Erik Weihenmayer who encouraged him to live life to the fullest. Kyle took Weihenmayer's advice to heart and began pursuing a life of adventure. In 2006, he hiked the Ankascocha Trail into Machu Picchu. In 2007, he summited Mt. Kilimanjaro at the age of 15. After graduating from the University of Central Florida with a degree in Communication, he became an endurance athlete competing in numerous marathons and triathlons. In 2018, he was a member of the first team of tandem cyclists with all blind or visually impaired stokers (person on the back of a tandem bike) to complete Race Across America—the world's toughest bicycle race—racing from Oceanside, Calif to Annapolis, Md in seven days 15 hours. Later in 2018, at Ironman Arizona, Kyle became the first totally blind person to complete an Ironman branded Triathlon (2.4 mi swim, 112 mi bike, 26.2 mi run) in under 11 hours. He continues to push himself physically and mentally as he now pursues his goal of representing the USA at the 2020 Paralympics in the sport of Triathlon. As a young man, Kyle has spoken to major organizations about his adversity and triumphs including various Rotary Clubs in Florida and Taiwan, the International Association of Refrigerated Warehousing, and The American Cancer Society. He has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show and in Backpacker and Triathlete magazines. Losing sight has only served as a base for Kyle's ability to master his ambitions despite his inability to see them. Inspiring those with similar challenges and sharing a few laughs along the way has become his trademark. Drawing upon his experiences as a totally blind person and adventure athlete, he demonstrates the importance of vision, commitment and courage to pursuing an “Eyeronvision” and embracing the adversity along our life's journey. While he wasn't the first blind person to climb a mountain, run a marathon or compete in a triathlon, his goal is to be one of the best and ensure he isn't the last.   Favorite Quote: "Make good choices." — Ann Marie Coon "It's our attitude that allows us to learn from mistakes and that in turn enables one to be great beyond imagination." — Steve Coon R.O.G. Takeaway Tips: Accomplishing can feel like a "false summit". Achieve your goal. Enjoy the view. Set your sights on the next one to stay motivated. We all can have vision that isn't quantified by sight. Honor your vision. Embrace it. Be relentless in pursuit of your vision. Prioritize and give your best energy to the actions that lead you toward the realization of it. Make good choices. Make good choices. What are you willing to stop doing? What are will you start doing? What will you continue doing?  Resources: KyleCoon.com Kyle on Facebook (KyleCoonSpeaks) Kyle on Twitter (@Kyle_Coon) Kyle on Instagram (@EyeronKyle) "Discovering a Life Without Limits" by Kyle Coon Team USA - Kyle Coon NoBarriersUSA.org JAN - Job Accommodation Network NoBarriersUSA.org Kyle's profile on TeamUSA.org Kyle's Interview in Trail Runner Magazine Kyle on USA Today - "Athletes with visual impairments, blindness bike across America to inspire others" Orlando Sentinel - "Blind triathlete from Orlando prepares for first Ironman" Kyle's Interview with Orlando Sentinel Central Florida's News13's - "Blind climber inspires others to overcome obstacles" ABC Nightline's story on "Global Explorer's Leading the Way Program" ABC World News' "Person of the Week - Erik Weihenmayer" (leader of Kyle's first international hiking trip) Denver's 9 News - "Blind Colorado athlete sets Ironman record" Credits: Kyle Coon, Sheep Jam Productions, Host Shannon Cassidy

For the People
Yale Child Study Center - Dan Cosgrove Animal Shelter - Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

For the People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 55:23


You've been hearing about it on 'For the People' and today we're going to provide all the background on two clinical trials going on right now at the Anxiety and Mood Disorders Program at the Yale Child Study Center. If you have or know of a child or teen suffering from anxiety, participation in one of these trials may provide relief, so stay tuned. Then we'll hear about a grassroots effort to support the Dan Cosgrove Animal Shelter. We'll meet the person in charge of the shelter, and the organizer of an family-friendly benefit called Mullets For Mutts - to learn how you can get involved. And since it's National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we'll close with a breast cancer survivor representing the American Cancer Society, cluing you in on the upcoming Making Strides Against Breast Cancer event coming up October 17 in Westport.

Gwinnett Business Radio
Real Men Wear Pink of Atlanta

Gwinnett Business Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


This special episode of “Gwinnett Business Radio” highlights the Real Men Wear Pink of Atlanta campaign to raise awareness and funds to support the American Cancer Society’s mission to save lives. #PINKOUT Distinguished Guests (you can click on the honoree’s name to make a donation): Bill Floor, RICOH (Co-Chair) Bruce Nelson, Hytech (Co-Chair) Michael Jones, […] The post Real Men Wear Pink of Atlanta appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

Business RadioX ® Network
Real Men Wear Pink of Atlanta

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


This special episode of “Gwinnett Business Radio” highlights the Real Men Wear Pink of Atlanta campaign to raise awareness and funds to support the American Cancer Society’s mission to save lives. #PINKOUT Distinguished Guests (you can click on the honoree’s name to make a donation): Bill Floor, RICOH (Co-Chair) Bruce Nelson, Hytech (Co-Chair) Michael Jones, […]

ACS Research - TheoryLab
Improving our understanding of risk factors for breast cancer sub-types

ACS Research - TheoryLab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 37:37


According to American Cancer Society researchers, in the United States in 2021, there will be an estimated 281,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed in women.* Finding breast cancer early and getting state-of-the-art cancer treatment are the most important strategies to prevent deaths from breast cancer. Breast cancer that's found early, when it's small and has not spread, is easier to treat successfully. Getting regular screening tests is the most reliable way to find breast cancer early. The American Cancer Society has screening guidelines for women at average risk of breast cancer, and for those at high risk for breast cancer: https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/screening-tests-and-early-detection/american-cancer-society-recommendations-for-the-early-detection-of-breast-cancer.html. Two breast cancer researchers joined the podcast to discuss screening for the early detection of breast cancer. Anne Marie McCarthy, PhD is a cancer epidemiologist and assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine. She is the recipient of an American Cancer Society Research Scholar Grant to fund her research into “A Precision Medicine Approach to Breast Cancer Early Detection.” Lauren Teras, PhD, is a senior scientific director of epidemiology research in the Population Science team at the American Cancer Society. 7:43 – Important things to know about breast cancer risk 9:55 – Why mammography is recommended for all women - “Any woman that has breasts should think about screening for breast cancer with mammography on a regular basis” 12:50 – But mammography screening isn't necessarily enough for all women 18:26 – On the challenges of mammography screening and aggressive cancers 23:21 – On the association of breast density with cancer risk 26:48 – Women who could benefit from more intensive screening 29:46 – On being the best advocate for yourself (What do recommendations and high-risk categories mean for an individual?) 34:45 – A message for breast cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers 35:56 – The impact of American Cancer Society funding on Dr. McCarthy's research * https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/annual-cancer-facts-and-figures/2021/cancer-facts-and-figures-2021.pdf

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
Mobile Mornings Friday 10-08-21 - 32nd Annual American Cancer Society's Chili Cook-Off

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 4:43


ICYMI: Suzannah Weeks Senior Development Manager at American Cancer Society talked to Dan Brennan and Dalton Orwig during Mobile Mornings about the 32nd Annual American Cancer Society's Chili Cook-Off.  The event will be on Saturday October 9th at Canal Place - between Broad St & Washington Ave.  Hear their conversation here:  https://acsmobile.ejoinme.org/mobilechilicookoff

Buffalo Nerd Sports Podcast
Week 5 Preview with Sal Capaccio Buffalo Bills Beat and Sideline Reporter

Buffalo Nerd Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 27:57


This week on the Nerd we talk to Sal Capaccio: the Beat and Game Day Sideline Reporter at the Buffalo Bills Radio Network and host at WGR 550 Sports Radio, as well as host of the SalSports....and Stuff Podcast.   Our featured charity this week is the American Cancer Society's Real Men Wear Pink campaign. Real Men Wear Pink gives men an opportunity to have a role in the fight against breast cancer. Community leaders around the nation use the power of pink to raise awareness and money for the American Cancer Society's breast cancer initiatives, including innovative research, patient services, and education around screenings and risk reduction.   We talk about Sals' involvement with Real Men Wear Pink as well as the American Cancer Society's Coaches vs Cancer initiative. We then go into detail on the recent Buffalo Bills vs Houston Texans match, discuss Jordan Poyer and Jon Feliciano's injuries, and the Daryl Williams - Spencer Brown swap. He gives us his take on the Bill's defense's performance, their chances against the Kansas City Chiefs, and we go into the importance of the Bill's run game. We talk Bills' defense and Tre'Davious White's performance against Brandin Cooks, and Sal gives us his thoughts on how Tre'Davious White will be positioned against Kansas City.   We talk Matt Milano being swapped out for A.J. Klein, the Bill's previous tight end weakness, whether the Bills can stop The Chief's Patrick Mahomes, and our takes on Dawson Knox's and A.J. Epenesa's performance to date. We wrap up with his take on the current state of the AFC - is this the way things will be for the year?   LINKS AND RESOURCES   Featured Charity:   Real Men Wear Pink - American Cancer Society: https://www.cancer.org/involved/fundraise/real-men-wear-pink.html Coaches vs Cancer: https://www.cancer.org/our-partners/coaches-vs-cancer.html   Sal's Fundraiser: https://secure.acsevents.org/site/STR/?fr_id=100921&pg=personal&px=51422146 Venmo: @SalSports Cameo: https://www.cameo.com/salsports   Sal Capaccio Twitter: https://twitter.com/SalSports   WGR 550 Sports Radio: https://www.audacy.com/wgr550#/questions Buffalo Bills Radio Network: https://www.buffalobills.com/audio/radio-network SalSports....and Stuff Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/salsports-and-stuff/id1263713944   The Buffalo Nerd Website: https://www.thebuffalonerd.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/thebuffalonerd YouTube: https://youtu.be/qafh6d6vFzA Buffalo Nerd Gives: https://www.thebuffalonerd.com/donations/support/   Use the code “BUFFALONERD” to get a bonus with you sign up with our sponsor BetUS: https://www.betus.com.pa/join/   Support the show: https://www.thebuffalonerd.com/donations/support/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gym Closet (A Krave Gym Podcast)
TGC 157 - Cancer Conversations with Power Partner: American Cancer Society

The Gym Closet (A Krave Gym Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:13


Did you know that 1 in 3 people will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime!?! That's crazy! This season our goal is to encourage all of our athletes to be proactive about their health and scheduling appointments! Whether it's getting cancer screenings, getting your teeth cleaned, scheduling your annual exam, asking questions on family history of cancer. The sooner cancer is diagnosed, the higher the probability rate of survival! On this episode we have an awesome interview with Krista from the American Cancer Society. We discuss when the recommended age to start getting screenings is, how to be an advocate for yourself, how to volunteer for the American Cancer Society, what the Krave Community donations will be going towards and tons more!!!!  If you have more questions for Krista email her here: krista.walsh@cancer.org Check out cancer screening recommendations & FAQs here: https://www.cancer.org/healthy/find-c...Register for the MORE THAN PINK 5K & 1 MILE WALK HERE: https://kraveathlete.comKrave Gym Started the movement LIVE LIKE AT ATHLETE.  At Krave Gym our goal is to inspire our athletes to achieve things they once thought were impossible BOTH in the gym and in life. Our TEAM Training Sessions are proven to be more energizing, motivating, and keep you accountable. We might be at different places in our fitness journey, but we are all in it together.  Remember, You're An Athlete, Live Like It!!!To book your free training visit our website at http://kravegym.com/the-right-fit-for...FOLLOW US ▹BLOG ‣ www.kravegym.blogGEAR ‣ www.kraveathlete.comINSTAGRAM ‣ @kravegymFACEBOOK ‣ http://facebook.com/kravegym​​​​​​​​​​​TWITTER ‣ @kravegymPODCAST ‣ The Gym Closet http://TheGymCloset.buzzsprout.com​​Support the show (http://www.kravegym.com)

Failing Awesomely
48. Are Our Actions Glorifying God? // Alcohol and The Church with Ericka Andersen

Failing Awesomely

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 64:11


Welcome to the Failing Awesomely Podcast! I am your host Lindsey Garcia: wife, mama, singer, breast cancer survivor, sober gal, and podcaster. It's October! This means it's Breast Cancer Awareness month and Sober October, which I'm excited to be participating in spreading the love and being active in both this year. I'm running 35 miles this month for Pennsylvania's 35 Mile Breast Cancer Challenge run by the American Cancer Society. If you would like to donate, click on the link below. Thank you so much for your generosity in helping to find a cure for Breast Cancer. Donate Here: https://www.facebook.com/donate/173789764871148/10159546063383281/ For Sober October, I'm teaming up with Christian author and Recovery Advocate, Caroline Beidler, for our 7 Day Recovery Reset! One message a day from us sent right to your inbox. We'll highlight some tips, reflections and prayers that you can do this month to give your life and recovery a boost. To sign up, visit: brightstoryshine.com In today's episode, I was honored to have Christian author and podcaster, Ericka Andersen, on the show. Recently, Ericka shared her thoughts on Alcohol and The Church on her instagram and I loved her thoughtful insight on the topic and wanted to dive in a little deeper with her. Ericka is a wife and mama of two kiddos, ages 5 and 3. She is the author of Leaving Cloud 9 and has also been published in the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. She is the host of the Worth Your Time podcast and you can find her over on IG loving on and encouraging people in their walk of faith, motherhood, and sobriety. Ericka's website: erickaandersen.com Leaving Cloud 9: https://www.amazon.com/Leaving-Cloud-Resurrected-Poverty-Illness/dp/1400208270/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=leaving+cloud+9&qid=1633489159&sr=8-1 Ericka's IG: @ericka_andersen Worth Your Time Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/worth-your-time/id1443576278 Lindsey's website: lindseygarcia.com Lindsey's IG: @lindseyhgarcia // @failingawesomely // @janesdaughters Email: failingawesomelypodcast@gmail.com

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - In Conversation with Dr. Otis Brawley (Part 2)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 19:40


In the second edition of this two-part Oncology, Etc. episode, hosts Dr. Patrick Loehrer (Indiana University) and Dr. David Johnson (University of Texas) continue their conversation with Dr. Otis Brawley, a distinguished professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins and former Executive Vice President of the American Cancer Society. Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts | Additional resources: elearning.asco.org | Contact Us Air Date: 10/5/2021   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. [MUSIC PLAYING] DAVID JOHNSON: Welcome back to Oncology, Etc, and our second segment of our conversation with Otis Brawley, professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medical School and the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Pat, I don't know about you, but Otis is a very impressive man, and he had a lot of really interesting things to say about his career development, family, et cetera in the first segment. This second segment, we're going to get to hear more about his time at the ACS. What were your thoughts about segment one? PATRICK LOEHRER: Well, I loved talking to Otis, and you too, Dave. Parenthetically, Otis once told me in a dinner conversation we had that he felt like Forrest Gump, and I can identify with that. Where over the field, our field of oncology over the last several decades, we've met some incredibly wonderful people, and we've been lucky to be part of the history. The three of us, I think, do have a deep sense of the historical context of oncology. This is a young field, and there's just some extraordinary people, many of them real true heroes, and Otis has his figure on the pulse of that. DAVID JOHNSON: Yeah, that's why he's been in some of the right places at the right time, and we'll hear more about that in this segment coming up now. PATRICK LOEHRER: Now Otis has had a career in many different areas, including ODAC, the NCI, the ACS, now at Hopkins. So let's hear a little bit more about Dr. Brawley's experience at the American Cancer Society and particularly with his experience with the former CEO, John Seffrin. DAVID JOHNSON: Sounds great. [MUSIC PLAYING] OTIS BRAWLEY: John and I had a wonderful run at the American Cancer Society. Got to do a lot of things. Got to testify for the Affordable Care Act. Got to do some of the science to actually argue that the Affordable Care Act would help. And I was fortunate enough to be there long enough to do some of the science to show that the Affordable Care Act is helping. DAVID JOHNSON: Yeah, I mean actually all of the things you accomplished at the ACS are truly amazing. Let me ask you, just on a personal level, what did you like most about that job, and then what did you like least about that job? [LAUGHTER] OTIS BRAWLEY: I like the fact-- there were a lot of things I liked about that job. There were a couple hundred scientists and scientific support people that you got to work with. And I used to always say, I do politics so you can do science. And what I used to like the most, every Wednesday afternoon that I was in town, I would walk around just to watch those people think. I used to joke around and say, I'm just walking around to see who came to work today. But I really enjoyed watching them work and watching them think, and that was fun. Another fun aspect of the job was people used to call and ask a little bit about the disease that they are a family member would have. And sitting down with them on the phone in those days-- we didn't have Zoom-- and talking to them through their disease. Not necessarily giving them advice on what to do in terms of treatment, but helping them understand the biology of the disease or connecting them with someone who was good in their disease. And I happen to, by the way, have sent some patients to both of you guys. That was a lot of fun. Then the other thing, of course, was the fact that you could actually influence policy and fix things. I'll never forget sitting across from Terry Branstad, then the governor of Iowa, and convincing him that the right thing to do is to raise the excise tax on tobacco in Iowa. Being able to see that you're effective and to see that you're positively influencing things. The bad side, some of the politics. I didn't necessarily like how some of the money was being raised or where they were raising money from. I think that you have to have a certain standard in terms of where you accept money. And we always had that tension with the fundraisers. But it's also true-- and I will give them a nod-- you can't do the fun things unless you raise money. So I really truly enjoyed my time at the American Cancer Society. And by the way, a shout out to Karen Knudsen, who is the CEO running the American Cancer Society now. And I'm fully committed to helping the ACS and helping Karen be successful. DAVID JOHNSON: One of the things I read-- I think I read this that you had said that one of your proudest accomplishments was revising the ACS screening guidelines. Tell us just a little bit about that. OTIS BRAWLEY: Yeah, going all the way back to the early 1990s, I started realizing that a lot of these guidelines for screening, or back then, this is before the NCCN guidelines for treatment even, that were published by various organizations, including the American Cancer Society. We're almost the equivalent of-- get the impression that in the 1960s, it would have been a smoke-filled room. But you gather a bunch of people into a room, and they come up with, this is what we should be doing. Indeed, the American Cancer Society in 1991 endorsed annual PSA screening for prostate cancer based purely on getting a group of primarily urologists into a room, and that's what they came up with. There was very little review of the science. There really was no science at that time except the science to show that PSA screening found cancer. There were no studies to show that led to men benefiting in that they didn't die. Indeed, in 1991, there was no study to show that treatment of early prostate cancer saved lives. The study to show treatment of prostate cancer saves lives was first published in 2003, and the radiation saves lives in 1997, 1998. Surgery saves lives in 2003 and screening has a small effect published in 2009. But they started recommending it in 1991 in this almost smoke-filled room kind of atmosphere. When I got to the American Cancer Society, I started an effort, and we involved people from the National Academy of Medicine, we involved people from the NCCN, from the American Urological Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American College of Physicians. And we got together in that almost smoke-filled room again, but the idea was, how do you make responsible guidelines? And we wrote that up into a paper guide widely accepted by all of the organizations, and it involves a review of the literature that is commissioned by someone. And they spend a long time reviewing the literature and writing a literature review. And then you have a group of experts from various fields to include epidemiology and screening, social work, someone who's had the disease. Not just the surgeons and medical oncologists who treat the disease but some population scientists as well. They sit down and they reveal all of the scientific data, and then they start coming up with, we recommend this. And then they rank how strong that recommendation is based on the data. We published this in 2013 in The Journal of the American Medical Association. I do think that was important, you're right. That's Otis trying to bring his policy and his belief in orthodox approach to science and bring it all together. PATRICK LOEHRER: So let me reflect a little bit more on something. There is a book that I also just recently read by Dax-Devlon Ross, and it's a book entitled, Letters to my White Male Friends, and it was a fascinating read to me. You have this public persona and professional persona of being an outstanding physician, clinician, public speaker. But what we the three of us have never really had the conversation today is we have much more interest now in DEI. One of our other speakers talked about the fact that there's a tax that is placed upon underrepresented minorities and academics. They are all expected to be on committees. They have to be doing different things. And so the things that they love to do, they can't do it because they have to represent their race or their gender or their ethnicity. OTIS BRAWLEY: I have been blessed and fortunate. There are problems, and there are huge burdens that Black doctors, and women doctors by the way, have to carry. I have been fortunate that I have skated through without a lot of that burden. Maybe it has to do with oncology, but I will tell you that I have been helped by so many doctors, men and women, predominantly white, but some Asian, Muslim, Jewish, Christian. I don't know if it's oncology is selective of people who want to give folks a fair shake and really believe in mentoring and finding a protege and promoting their career. I have been incredibly, incredibly fortunate. Now that I say that, there are doctors, minority doctors and women, who don't have the benefits and don't have the fortunes that I have had, and we all have to be careful for that. As I said early on, John Altman told me that I will thank him by getting more Blacks and women into the old boys club. And so that was his realizing that there is a-- or there was a problem. I think there still is a problem in terms of diversity. Now I have seen personally some of the problem more outside of oncology in some of the other specialties. More in internal medicine and surgery, for example. By the way, there are also some benefit. I did well in medical school in third and fourth year in medical school at the University of Chicago because there were a group of Black nurses who were held that I wasn't going to fail. The nurses took me under their wing and taught me how to draw blood, how to pass a swan. The first code I ever called, there was a nurse standing behind me with the check off list. And so there are some advantages to being Black as well. But there are some disadvantages. I've been very fortunate. My advice to Black physicians is to keep an open mind and seek out the folks in medicine who truly do want to help you and truly do want to mentor you. And for the folks who are not minority or not women in medicine, I say, try to keep an open mind and try to help everybody equally. PATRICK LOEHRER: Thank you. DAVID JOHNSON: I want to go back to your book for a moment. And again, for those who've not read it, I would encourage them to do. So it's a really honest book, I think, well-written. You made a comment in there-- I want to make sure I quote it near correctly. You said that improvement in our health care system must be a bottom up process. What do you mean by "bottom up?" OTIS BRAWLEY: Well, much of it is driven by demand from patients and other folks. The name of the book was, How We Do Harm. And the synopsis is there are bunch of people who are harmed because they don't get the care that they need. And there's a bunch of people who are harmed because they get too much medicine and too much care. And they rob those resources away from the folks who don't get care at the same time that they're harmed by being overtreated, getting treatments that they don't need. The other thing, if I can add, in American health care, we don't stress risk reduction enough. I used to call it "prevention." Some of the survivors convince me to stress "activities to reduce risk of disease." We don't do a lot in this country in terms of diet and exercise. We try to do some work somewhat successfully on tobacco avoidance. We need to teach people how to be healthy. And if I were czar of medicine in the United States, I would try to make sure that everybody had a health coach. Many of us go to the gym and we have a trainer. We need trainers to teach us how to be healthy and how to do the right things to stay healthy. That's part of the bottom up. And in terms of costs you know my last paper that I published from the American Cancer Society, I published purposefully, this is my last paper. Ahmedin Jemal who's a wonderful epidemiologist who I happen to have worked with when I was at the National Cancer Institute and again later in my career at the American Cancer Society, I pushed Ahmedin-- he publishes these papers, and we estimate x number of people are going to be diagnosed with breast cancer and y number are going to die. He and I had talked for a long time about how college education reduces risk of cancer death dramatically. If you give a college education to a Black man, his risk of death from cancer goes down to less than the average risk for a white American. There's something about giving people college education that prevents cancer death. I simply challenged Ahmedin, calculate for me how many people in the United States would die if everybody had the risk of death of college-educated Americans. And he came back with of the 600,000 people who die in any given year, 132,000 would not die if they had all the things from prevention through screening, diagnosis, and treatment that college-educated people. Just think about that-- 132,000. Then I started trying to figure out what drug prevents 132,000 deaths per year? And I couldn't think of one until recently, and it happens to be the coronavirus vaccine. Which ironically has shown itself to be the greatest drug ever created in all of medicine. But in cancer, there's no breakthrough drug that is more effective than just simply getting every human being the care from risk reduction and prevention all the way through treatment that every human being ought to be getting. The solution to some of that starts with fixing third grade and teaching kids about exercise, about proper diet. PATRICK LOEHRER: We're going to have to wind things up here. But real quickly, a book you would recommend? OTIS BRAWLEY: Skip Trump, who's someone that we all know, wonderful guy used to run Roswell Park Cancer Center, just published a book actually it's coming out in September called, Centers of the Cancer Universe, A Half Century of Progress Against Cancer. I got a preprint of that, and it is a great book. It talks about what we've learned in oncology over the last 50 years since Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act. Keep in mind, he declared war on cancer on December 23, 1971. So we have an anniversary coming up in December. PATRICK LOEHRER: I want to close. Another book, I read the autobiography of Frederick Douglass. It's a wonderful read. It really is good. There were some endorsements at the end of this book, and one of them was written by a Benjamin Brawley, who wrote this review in a book called, The Negro in Literature and Art in 1921. And Benjamin Brawley was writing this about Frederick Douglass, but I would like to have you just reflect a moment. I think he was writing it about you, and I'm just going to read this. He basically said, at the time of his death in 1895, Douglass had won for himself a place of unique distinction. Large of heart and of mind, he was interested in every forward movement for his people, but his charity embraced all men in all races. His mutation was international, and today, many of his speeches are found to be the standard works of oratory. I think if your great, great grandfather were here today, he would be so incredibly proud of his protege, Otis. And it's such a privilege and pleasure to have you join us today on Oncology, Etc. Thank you so much. OTIS BRAWLEY: Thank you. And thank both of you for all the help you've given me over the years DAVID JOHNSON: Great pleasure having you today, Otis. I want to also thank all of our listeners for tuning in to Oncology, Etc. This is an ASCO educational podcast. We really are here to talk about anything and everything. So we're looking for ideas. Please, if you have any suggestions, feel free to email us at education@ASCO.org. Thanks again, and remember, Pat has a face for podcasts. [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER: Thank you for listening to this week's episode of the ASCO e-learning weekly podcasts. To make us part of your weekly routine, click Subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive e-learning center at elearning.asco.org.

X's and Bro's with Sean Baligian
Monday, October 4, 2021 | Live from the American Cancer Society Golf Outing at Oakland Hills

X's and Bro's with Sean Baligian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 31:00


Monday, October 4, 2021 | Live from the American Cancer Society Golf Outing at Oakland Hills by Michigan Sports Network

America: Changed Forever
CBS News Special: America Changed Forever 10/1

America: Changed Forever

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 50:57


On this week's "America Changed Forever," the battle against cancer in the face of a pandemic, Host Jeff Pegues speaks with the American Cancer Society's Dr. William Cance. American Society of Clinical Oncology's Dr. Julie Gralow, and CNN National Correspondent Rene Marsh who lost her 2 year son to brain cancer. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Kara's Lipstick Diary
E1:15 | Think Pink | Susie Ulloa | Kara's Lipstick Diary

Kara's Lipstick Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 29:20


October 1st is the start of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  This month holds a very dear place in my heart because 5 years my dear friend Alanna lost her battle with breast cancer during this month.  To honor her legacy in 2019 I got involved with the local branch of American Cancer Society to see what I could do to help.Susie Ulloa is a breast cancer survivor that I've gotten know over the years.  She has taken what she went through and now helps others battling breast cancer.  I asked her to be a guest on the show to talk about her story of cancer and what she does to help those who battling now.  EPISODE 15 COCKTAIL RECIPE | Empress 751.5 oz Empress 1908 Gin (very important to get this brand for the magic to happen)3/4 oz Fresh lemon juice1/2 oz simple syrupSparkling WineGarnish with Fancy Sprinkle edible glitterFor all the latest contests and happening behind the scenes:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Karas-Lipsti... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/karaslipsti...To view the antics subscribe to the YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE2P...#karaslipstickdiary​ #breastcancer #breastcancerawareness #cancersucksABOUT KARA'S LIPSTICK DIARYKara Winslow is freelance on location makeup artist based in Florida that has worked in the entertainment and wedding/event industries for over 25 years.  She spent over a decade doing work at HSN both on camera and behinds the scenes for a cosmetic company.  After several years of being away from being on camera she decided to launch her podcast.  

Studio CMO
061 | The Anatomy of a Powerhouse Marketing Team | Tarah Bryan | HealthCatalyst | Studio CMO

Studio CMO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 40:09


Your marketing team. Where would your company be without them? Where would you? A good marketing team is made up of a diverse group of people with a variety of talents, soft skills, expertise, and an X factor which, for your vision, only you can define. How do you find the right people, assimilate them into your culture, and keep them motivated to perform their best work? About Our Guest   Tarah Neujahr Bryan, MAJMC, joined Health Catalyst in 2013 and has served as Editorial Director and Vice President of Marketing; she is currently the Senior Vice President of Marketing and a member of the Health Catalyst leadership team. She brings a breadth of marketing and communications experience to her current role. Prior to joining Health Catalyst, Tarah served as the Marketing Communications Director and Foundation Executive Director at a community hospital, managed at an advertising agency, was the Editor and Operations Manager at an archaeology firm, and provided triage assistance and patient admissions at a Level-II Trauma Center. She has a Master of Arts in Journalism and Mass Communications from the University of Nebraska and a Bachelor of Arts from Montana State University-Billings. Tarah volunteers with Intermountain Therapy Animals and has done pro-bono communications work for the American Cancer Society, Wings Cancer Foundation, and many other non-profit organizations. Show Notes A Quick History of HealthCatalyst's Growth: 2008: Founded Funding Rounds Jan 8, 2013, Series B Mar 1, 2013, Series B Jan 27, 2014, Series C Mar 17, 2015, Series D Feb 29, 2016, Series E Oct 13, 2017, Series E Feb 8, 2019, Debt Financing Feb 8, 2019, Series F Jun 1, 2019, Venture Round 2013: Content Marketing Began 2015: "Practiced being Public" 2019: IPO We keep education of the industry and ensuring good care at the forefront of our mission. Our mission is to transform healthcare. And for us, that means partnerships. We produce educational pieces with customers and peers. We explore partnerships wherever our technology can actually work with another. —Tarah Neujahr Bryan Building a Rock Star Marketing Team Kill the silos. Because silos can kill you. Tarah knocked down as many as she could and moved the culture to think of marketing initiatives. as an integrated effort. Build working groups. HealthCatalyst has six teams: Marketing Operations: Tech Stack and Analytics Marketing Response: Inbound Digital Marketing: Website, social, content, and design Field Marketing: Sales enablement Business Unit: Events including their user conference, Healthcare Analytics Summit Communications Team: PR, media relations, investor relations Create layers of communication—weekly stand-ups with team leads and then weekly working group stand-ups as well. Create a framework for transparency and idea-swapping. Tarah uses the process of "Thorn, Bud, Rose" which has been used by everyone from sororities to family dinner tables to unpack what's behind the scenes. This process has given her team new places of connection and members of the team relate better to one another and find ways to support and encourage each other throughout each week. She equates the words as follows: Thorn: One thing that sucks about your week Bud: One thing that you're learning about Rose: One thing you're excited about Deploy the right tech stack Salesforce and Pardot Visible - attribution and following the buyer journey Basecamp - Team communication Smartsheet - Triblio - ABM Data visualization using HealthCatalyst's own tools The three most important aspects Tarah looks for. innew team members are smart, hard-working, and humble. Internal marketing is almost as important as external marketing. — Tarah Neujahr Bryan Links Mentioned on This Episode Some of the 260 case studies Tarah referred to: Analytics Enables Identification of Opportunities to Improve Value and Accountable Care Organization Performance Quality Improvement in Healthcare: An ACO Palliative Care Case Study Changing Healthcare Using Data: A Case Study of One Small Health System's Odyssey To Achieve Material Improvements Job openings at HealthCatalyst Article by Tarah: COVID-19 Data and Analytics: Survey Reveals Long- and Short-Term Healthcare Industry Impact 20 Reasons Why Virtual Events are Better than Live

Christian CEO Podcast with Kelly Baader
Running a Nonprofit Like a Business

Christian CEO Podcast with Kelly Baader

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 42:13


#141: Did you know that regardless if you are running a nonprofit or a for-profit business/organization, the mindset and the steps to either fundraise or get clients to buy your program is the same? Surprising, right? However, running either a for or nonprofit is very similar, and we can learn a lot from each other. Today's guest, Mary Valloni, is a fundraising coach, trainer, and author, who helps nonprofit and ministry leaders raise more funds and have more freedom. Mary is the former Development Director for Special Olympics, the ALS Association, and the American Cancer Society. With over 20 years of fundraising experience, she has coached thousands of individuals and organizations through her proven 7-step process. Mary is the award-winning author of the book, Fundraising Freedom, the co-founder of Fully Funded Academy, and co-host of the Fully Funded Podcast. This episode covers what to look for to make sure that a charity or cause you want to financially invest in is legitimate, why regardless which sector you are in, the #1 thing is to make sure that your message is clearly defined and Mary's signature 7 step process to fundraising freedom (also applicable for businesses preparing their programs/services to sell). This episode is jam-packed full of great ideas, so let's get to it!  Learn Why Nonprofits and For-profits are Actually Similar ... [03:11] Mary's journey from college to working for nonprofits to becoming a consultant [06:31] What is fundraising? [09:02] How to tell if a charity or cause is legitimate and their financial records [14:06] #1 thing for both non and for profits is to have clear messaging [16:13] Mary's 7 steps to fundraising freedom [27:07] Why giving money to a charity is a partnership and not just a donation [34:49] Why both sides need each other - not all of us can serve in the ministry and not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur Important Links & Mentions in this episode:https://maryvalloni.com/ (Mary's Website) https://www.fullyfundedacademy.com/ (Fully Funded Academy) https://www.fullyfundedacademy.com/podcast (Fully Funded Podcast) https://amzn.to/3tRzcW5 (Mary's Book: Fundraising Freedom: 7 Steps to Build & Sustain Your Next Campaign) https://www.powerofoneframework.com/masterclass (Power of One Framework Masterclass) https://kellybaader.com/review (Subscribe + Review on iTunes) https://kellybaader.com/Spotify (Subscribe + Listen on Spotify)     Remember, YOU Matter! See you in the next episode. 

The Fit in Faith Podcast
A Spark of Brand Strategy with Brad Caldwell

The Fit in Faith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 64:11


Brad and I have been in the same sphere for a while, but we came together due to our higher callings. This podcast unpacks who he is and how he serves in his business. He lets us look into his soul and his heart for God and his business. If you are looking to tell your story and create a brand, Brad is sure to be one you want to check out. Enjoy!