Podcasts about aids

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Spectrum of conditions caused by HIV infection

  • 6,976PODCASTS
  • 11,814EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 30, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about aids

    Show all podcasts related to aids

    Latest podcast episodes about aids

    IMRU Radio
    IMRU 220620

    IMRU Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 56:06


    IMRU RADIO 220620: Pride Special #03 (The Plague Years) = AIDS Field Reports (Pacifica & IMRU) + Dr. Michael Gottleib (Discovered HIV, co-founded AmFar) + Richard Berkowitz (Author, “Stayin' Alive: The Invention of Safe Sex") + Cleve Jones (conceived the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt) + Sean Strub (founded POZ magazine, ACT UP New York activist, Author of "Body Counts: A Memoir of Politics, Sex, AIDS, and Survival") + David France (documentarian, "How to Survive a Plague") + Bob Dallmeyer (Activist, Poet). --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/imruradio/message

    Coming Out with Lauren & Nicole
    Episode 205: Linda Riley

    Coming Out with Lauren & Nicole

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 54:51


    We're capping off a fantastic Pride Month with the publisher of DIVA, the world's largest LGBTQIA+ magazine for female-identifying and non-binary people! DIVA has been around since 1994, but Linda Riley became the title's first ever lesbian owner in 2015. She shares the story of how she came out to her mother at fifteen and was offered the choice of "psychiatry" (aka electroshock therapy), or leaving home. Linda promptly left home and school, and what followed were years of her finding and building her queer community; not only in her native London, but also in San Francisco during the AIDS crisis. She describes how activism was intertwined with queer social life in the '80s, and how she ultimately ended up in the magazine industry. Plus, Linda talks trans allyship, founding Lesbian Visibility Week, and her Twitter beef with JK Rowling!Follow DIVA on Twitter and Instagram at @divamagazine, and follow Linda individually on Instagram at @diversityriley, and on Twitter at @lindariley8 (where you can help her fight any future Twitter battles!). Also, as Linda mentioned, DIVA will soon be changing over to a new URL, but for now, check them out and subscribe at https://divamag.co.uk/!

    Liberty Tree
    Like God is Rubbing My Tummy

    Liberty Tree

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 83:03


    Kelly and Matt talk about the constitution, an uneducated populace, the Vax causing Aids, and an unfortunate boating accident all while trying hard not to quote lines from the award winning movie Brain Candy. As always, if you like what we're doing, let us know on your podcast app by leaving a review.  And, check out our website for the best subversive shirts, flip-flops, and coffee mugs your money can still buy at libertytreelifestyle.com we have Fuck Your CBDC shirts in stock and ready to ship. Wanna support the show?  Go to https://www.patreon.com/libertytree and become a member of the Liberty Tree Social Club    

    TNT Radio
    Yuriy Boyechko on The James Breslo Show - 28 June 2022

    TNT Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 55:19


    GUEST OVERVIEW: Yuriy Boyechko is the founder and president of Hope For Ukraine Inc, a non-profit that serves individuals and families of the poorest communities in the Ukraine. Yuriy was born in Ukraine in 1982. When Yuriy was 6, his father - a protestant bishop - was arrested and sentenced to 3 years in prison for being a preacher. When Yuriy graduated high school, he moved to the U.S. to attend Bible college, eventually graduating from Regent University in 2005 with an MA in Media Communication. In 2016, Hope For Ukraine was founded with the goal to raise awareness for voices not heard in Ukraine - especially children affected by HIV and AIDS. Providing medical care for children with disabilities as well as food and clothing for families that live in extreme poverty is a lifetime commitment for Yuriy and his wife Tatyana.

    20-Minute Health Talk
    Injectable PrEP: Adding choice to HIV prevention

    20-Minute Health Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 22:40


      An estimated 38,000 Americans are diagnosed with HIV annually. An important tool in the effort to end the ongoing epidemic is an injectable form of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the first option to prevent HIV that does not involve taking a daily pill. The injectable form of the drug received FDA approval in late 2021 and has begun to hit the market. This is Part 2 of our conversation (Recorded May 16, 2022) with a panel of experts specializing in the HIV treatment and prevention. They discuss the benefits and what people at risk for HIV should know, challenges of implementation among providers and more.  The panel includes:  David Rosenthal, DO, PhD, medical director for the Center for Young Adult, Adolescent and Pediatric HIV. Demetre Daskalakis, MD, director of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Charles Gonzalez, MD, medical director for the New York State Department of Health's AIDS Institute More from the experts Dr. Rosenthal talks strengthening HIV prevention with PrEP and expanding the four key strategies to end AIDS by 2030.

    Closer Look with Rose Scott
    HIV activists work to spread the word about testing

    Closer Look with Rose Scott

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 52:06


    Today is National HIV Testing Day. This year's theme is “HIV Testing is self-care.” Tammy Kinney, an HIV/AIDS activist and the founder of Rural Women in Action, and Jenetter Richburg, the director of client services at AID Atlanta, discuss several topics, including prevention, testing and treatment.We then revisit Rose's 2017 conversation with Billy Howard. The famed Atlanta photographer recounts stories from some of the dying AIDS patients he photographed in the 1980s.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    88Nine: Community Stories
    Be Seen Episode 6: How did Wisconsin respond to HIV and AIDS?

    88Nine: Community Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 34:54


    We hear from two leaders of vital organizations in Wisconsin's response: Sue Dietz, the original co-founder of AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin, and Mark Behar, the co-founder of Milwaukee's first LGBTQ clinic, BESTD. We also hear how today's front line community health leaders are navigating HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment.PrEP facts:https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html

    Sophia's Choice, a Golden Girls Podcast
    Sophia's Choice, a Golden Girls Podcast Season 5, Episode 19, “72 Hours”

    Sophia's Choice, a Golden Girls Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 85:03


    Allen, Ski, and Brent recap and review Season 5, Episode 19, “72 Hours."  Rose finds out that she might have AIDS and hilarity ensues.  Can the girls help Rose get through the agonizing wait for test results?  Can Sophia get past her biases to give Rose the support that she needs?  Does anybody care about saving the wetlands?!?  Listen now to find out! 

    Stay Grounded with Raj Jana
    237. Stephan “Steve” Little: Changing The World With A Mantra

    Stay Grounded with Raj Jana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 46:58


    “You have the power to manifest anything you want, you just have to put it out there. If you can put it out there and feel it as if it's occurred, it's on its way, it's going to happen.”My conversation with Steve Little - AKA “The Activator” was the catalyst for some amplified personal growth this month. Steve is the CEO and managing partner of Zero Limits Ventures, a M&A advisory, investment banking, and consulting firm. Steve has been an entrepreneur for 45 years. He sold his first business when he was just 15 for $250k. Since then, Steve has architectured 6 nine-figure tech exits and led the M&A teams for 9 tech acquisitions. Steve is also massively purpose-driven who generously gives his time and money to a wide range of global initiatives including Younglife Africa (which you'll hear about in the episode). What I loved most about Steve is the way he integrates energetics into the way he operates in business. Steve reminded me that there are unconscious forces that create our reality every day. As you'll hear in the episode, Steve takes ownership of his own energetic blueprint by continuously doing the inner work to clear his system of what's no longer aligned. “So my experience has been: the clearer I can be, the easier this is.”Tune in now to hear Steve and I explore: Steve's story of supporting AIDS orphans in Africa. Working with the foremost authority of the Hoʻoponopono ancient Hawaiian healing method. Self-forgiveness. Cleaning up what's within you. How to create your dream life on a piece of paper. Finding the balance between leaning back & leaning in. Why you need to continue to seek. What Steve does when things aren't working. The Starbucks story of universal timing. And more…“Inspiration is the universe's pathway to communicate to you.”I love meeting people who are so bold about the role that energy and spiritual conviction play in creation. In this episode, Steve shares some of the practices that have allowed him to co-create with the universe along with stories that provide proof that the universe is always communicating with you. Be sure to listen out for the conversation about efforting. It's towards the end of the episode. It's one of the most potent things I've heard for a while and it's set me up for a strong month. (I'll share more in my June reflection episode). Contact Info:About SteveLinkedInTwitter We thrive on your feedback, so if you've enjoyed this show, please rate us and leave us a review. And don't forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode again. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Enlighten: Uplift & Inspire
    Episode 215 Anna Msowoya Keys, Maloto Founder

    Enlighten: Uplift & Inspire

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 75:57


    I am re-releasing my 2018 conversation with Anna Msowoya Keys, to highlight Anna and the incredible work she continues to do through Maloto, the non-profit, community based program to feed, educate and empower the children and women of Malawi, Africa. The community of Mzuzu, in particular, was devastated by the AIDS epidemic in the early 2000s, when Anna was first compelled to respond to the hunger of orphaned children. I volunteered with Maloto for 2 weeks in 2013 with 4 friends and we experienced, first-hand Anna's powerful dedication and the widespread positive impact she has made. All the incredible people Anna has gathered to support her keeps expanding, so more and more lives are enriched. I was delighted to recently bump into Anna and her husband, John Keys just after Maloto's annual NYC Gala last month, which inspired me to once again shine light on her important, meaningful work. I marvel at all the ways Maloto continues to develop and grow. In fact, my cousin, Josh Finn, who was also a guest on my podcast, and the master artisan who has designed and built exquisite furniture all over our home, is in Malawi now, overseeing the woodworking vocational program he started for the teens and young adults. Here's to honoring Anna and her dream team! Check out the links below for Maloto's website and Josh's project. Enjoy the podcast! Links: www.maloto.org www.joshfinn.com Josh Finn's Trade School in Malawi Woodworking tools for Mzuzu Academy

    Black Information Network Daily
    BIN - Daily Podcast. June 17, 2022

    Black Information Network Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 14:59


    National HIV Testing Day is an annual date earmarked to encourage people across the United States to get tested, learn their status, and if necessary, start a treatment program. Dr. Laura Cheever, associate administrator for the HIV/AIDS Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, joins Host Ramses Ja on today's podcast to talk about National HIV Testing Day, the Ryan White program, and HIV/AIDS awareness in the Black community. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Book Vs Movie Podcast
    The Boys in the Band (1970) & (2020) Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Matt Bomer, Mart Crowley, & William Friedkin

    Book Vs Movie Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 67:54


    Book Vs. Movie: The Boys in the Band The 1968 Play Vs. the 1970 & the 2020 FilmsThe Margos love the celebrate Pride Month and in the past, we have covered Fried Green Tomatoes, Love, Simon, and Call Me by Your Name among other titles. This time are covering a play that made a splash when it premiered off-Broadway in April 1968. The Mart Crowley story, The Boys in the Band, revolved around several gay men as they navigate life pre-Stonewall New York City. It went on to play over 1000 performances (always off-Broadway because that is how Edward Albee wanted it) and was first adapted into a film directed by William Friedkin. Friedkin, who needed a hit at the time, hired the entire cast for the film and created a work that is remembered for being a milestone in queer cinema. Set in an apartment in Manhattan, a group of homosexual men gathers ostensibly to celebrate the birthday of one of their friends. Instead, the event becomes a tightly wound confrontation between the haves and have-nots. The beautiful and those that live a lie. It's at times off-putting, verbose, profane, funny, and sad. The original (1970) cast lost many members to AIDS in the 80s & 90s which adds to the melancholy of a current viewing. The 2020 Netflix version features an all-openly gay cast including Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Matt Bomer, Andrew Rannells, and Charlie Carver who play the same characters set in 1968 but with an updated script by Crowley and Ned Martel. It's produced by Ryan Murphy, Martel, and director Joe Mantello. Between the original play and the 2020 adaptation--which did we like more?In this ep the Margos discuss:The interesting life of writer Mart CrowleyLife in the homosexual community in 1968The 1970 cast: Kenneth Nelson (Michael,) Leonard Frey (Harold,) Cliff Gorman (Emory,) Laurence Luckinbill (Hank,) Frederick Combs (Donald,) Keith Prentice (Larry,) Robert la Tourneaux (Cowboy Tex,) Reuben Greene (Bernard,) Peter White (Alan,) and Maud Adams as a model. The 2020 cast: Jim Parsons (Michael,) Zachary Quinto (Harold,) Matt Bomer (Donald,) Andrew Rannells (Larry,) Charlie Carvery (Cowboy,) Robin de Jesus (Emory,) Brian Hutchinson (Alan,) Michael Benjamin Washington (Bernard,) and Tuc Watkins as Hank. Clips used:“Harold” arrives (1970)The Boys in the Band trailerHarold confronts Michael Tuc calls Larry Donald and Michael at the endMusic by Herb Albert and the Tijuana BrassBook Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts. Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.comEmail us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.comMargo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine

    CNS
    [podcast] The Hero Lies In You (episode-1): Ms Dorothy Solomon

    CNS

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


    The Hero Lies In You - a special CNS series - salutes extraordinary lives of those who inspire us. This episode features Ms Dorothy Solomon who is in conversation with CNS founder and Executive Director Ms Shobha Shukla. Born in 1929, Ms Dorothy Solomon lives by the dictum of her father's last words spoken to her when she was barely 10 years old: “We want something, and God ordains something else. God's will prevails. Never get perturbed in life”. She defeated Covid-19, and even at age 92, tatting (making lace by hand) and doing embroidery are part of her daily routine. Listen to more of her (extra)ordinary life. Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.

    Let's Talk Death! ... a HealGrief® program
    Let's Talk Death with Zander Masser

    Let's Talk Death! ... a HealGrief® program

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 25:20


    In this episode, Zander shares how going through his father's photos created a new relationship with his father, almost a co-dependency. For Zander to tell his father's legacy, he needs his father's photographs. And his father needs Zander to share his story.Zander Masser is an occupational therapist, husband, father, musician, and author of the narrative photography book Unburying My Father.Zander's father, Randy, contracted HIV from contaminated blood products to treat his hemophilia and died in 2000 from AIDS-related illnesses. Zander, at the time, a young fourteen-year-old boy. Twenty years later, Zander unburied ten thousand slides from Randy's career as a professional photographer, which prompted him to dig deeper into his father's life. What started as a photography project evolved into a transformative exploration of living with, and healing from, grief.Support the show

    Wisdom of Crowds
    Episode 103: The Secrets and Sorrows of Gay Washington

    Wisdom of Crowds

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 48:12


    Jamie Kirchick joins us to discuss the triumph and sorrow of the gay experience in the nation's capitol. This is the story of The Secret City, Kirchick's genre-defining and panoramic history of the gay men and women who served in the halls of power, all the while in constant fear that they would lose their jobs and perhaps even their lives. It got worse before it got better. We discuss how the national security state—born after World War II—both brought down immense suffering upon countless individuals (including in a string of shocking suicides), and helped shape the consciousness of the country as a whole. There was the red scare, but there was also the "pink scare," with fears of political perversion driving fears of sexual perversion and vice-versa. But was there progress in the end? The Reagan Administration, despite its homophobia and failures to act on AIDS, could also claim perhaps the largest number of gay political appointees up until that point in U.S. history. And then the closet began to open, so much so that it is difficult to imagine just how horrific it was mere decades ago for gays serving in government. But is this really "progress"—and does it mean we should be optimistic about America's future, despite everything? Required Reading: Secret City: The Hidden History of Gay Washington, by Jamie Kirchick. "The Long, Sordid History of the Gay Conspiracy," by Jamie Kirchick (New York Magazine). "The Struggle for Gay Rights is Over," by Jamie Kirchick (The Atlantic). Notes on Camp, by Susan Sontag. Virtually Normal: An Argument About Homosexuality, by Andrew Sullivan. Masha Gessen on Judith Butler (New Yorker).

    Star Trek Stuff: Enterprise
    S2E14: They Made Rick Berman Write About Aids LOL

    Star Trek Stuff: Enterprise

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 86:01


    Viacom made Rick Berman talk about gay stuff, so capitalism is good now. Meanwhile a foxy Phlox is trying to get Florida Man's panhandle. Recs: Ms. Marvel, Secrets of Playboy

    Spoilerpiece Theatre
    Episode #415: "Mad God" and "Wildhood"

    Spoilerpiece Theatre

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 51:35


    We have two movies to discuss this week! First, we cover Bretten Hannam's Two-Spirit Indigenous drama WILDHOOD (2:39), a road trip film coming to Hulu about two brothers, one of whom is searching for his long-lost birth mother. Along the way he finds himself by connecting with his heritage and comes out through a relationship with someone he meets along the way. Next is Phil Tippett's MAD GOD (22:52), an unsettling stop-motion-animated horror film on Shudder that's 30 years in the making. It's easy to describe visually, but hard to describe narratively. And in this week's Patreon exclusive audio, we talk about the winner of our Pride Month poll, Robin Campillo's drama 120 BPM, which chronicles the work ACT UP Paris did in the early 90s to fight the AIDS epidemic.

    Choose Your Struggle
    A Life of Advocacy with Larry D. Mass

    Choose Your Struggle

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 49:40


    Season 3, Episode 8A Life of Advocacy with Larry D. MassLarry D. Mass has been an advocate for the gay community for his entire adult life. From working with Larry Kramer at Act Up to writing an article that's now recognized as the first report on what would eventually become the AIDS crises, Larry is a hero to the advocate community. He's also written about what it's like to be a gay Jew and interestingly his love of Richard Wagner. Learn more about Larry at https://lawrencedmass.com/. *** There were audio issues with this interview if you're wondering why it sounds so disjointed in moments. Birthday Fundraiser Time! Reach out to sponsor the Worth Saving 'Gala' for $1,000, $3,000, or $5,000! Email Jay at Jay@JayShifman.com for more info. The Metro Philly 75 Power Women List: https://metrophiladelphia.com/power-lists/metro-philadelphia-power-women/As always, you can find everything you need, including our social media links, at our Campsite page: https://jay.campsite.bioLeave us a message for a chance to be played on the show and win a CYS schwag pack: https://podinbox.com/CYSReach out and let us know who you are and that you're listening at JayShifman.com or ChooseYourStruggle.comOne Last Celtics Game With William (Jay's tribute to his late Stepfather-In Law)Jay's Podcast Reviews (for GreatPods!)Jay and our good friends Savage Sisters are both finalists for the Best of Philly awards! To vote for Jay (which you can once a day until September) go to metrophillysbest.com/voting and under Arts and Entertainment scroll down to Philly Blogger. To vote for Savage Sisters, go to the same link and under Services you'll find the Not For Profit category. Thanks!Choose Your Struggle Presents: Made It, Season 1, Stay Savage dropped April 29th! Subscribe to Made It's stream! https://kite.link/choose-your-struggle-presents-made-itJay recently wrote an article for YES! Magazine: https://www.yesmagazine.org/issue/pleasure/2022/05/18/drugs-better-policy-help-reduce-overdosesLeave us a message for a chance to be played on the show and win a CYS schwag pack: https://podinbox.com/CYSToday's Good Egg: Support the birthday fundraiser and buy some merch!Looking for someone to wow your audience now that the world is reopening? My speaking calendar is open! If you're interested in bringing me to your campus, your community group, your organization or any other location to speak about Mental Health, Substance Misuse & Recovery, or Drug Use & Policy, reach out to me at Info@jayShifman.com. Tank Tops are in! You can see what they look like on the website (thanks to Jay's wife for modeling the women's cut). Reach out through the website to order. If you're looking for something a little less expensive, magnets are in too! Check them out on the website or Instagram. Patreon supporters get a discount so join Patreon!But that's not all! You can now buy even more merch! Check out our store on Teepublic at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/choose-your-struggle?ref_id=24308 for shirts, mugs, stickers, phone cases, baby onesies and much, much more!Support the Podcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ChooseYourStruggle Leave us an audio message to share feedback and have a chance to be played on the show: https://podinbox.com/CYS Review the Podcast: https://ReviewThisPodcast.com/Choose-Your-Struggle.Support the Podcast, a different way: https://podhero.com/401017-ikv.Learn more about the Shameless Podcast Network: https://www.shamelessnetwork.com/ Our Partner Bookshop (Support Local Book Stores and the Podcast in the Process!): https://bookshop.org/shop/CYS Our Partner Road Runner (Use Code CYS for 10% off): www.roadrunnerc ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

    Mayo Clinic Q&A
    The importance of HIV testing

    Mayo Clinic Q&A

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 19:37


    The COVID-19 pandemic has led people to delay testing and treatments for a variety of diseases and conditions. This includes HIV testing.During the pandemic, the number HIV diagnosis decline, but that decline is most attributed to declines in testing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Experts attribute this decline to less frequent visits to health centers, reduced outreach services, and shifting of public health staff to COVID-19 response activities. June 27 is National HIV Testing Day, a day to encourage people to get tested for HIV, know their status, and get linked to care and treatment.But who should be tested?"The CDC recommends that everyone over the age of 13 be tested for HIV at least once in their lifetime," says Dr. Stacey Rizza, an infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic. "This is endorsed by the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services and paid for by all private insurance companies. So no matter what your background is, if you've never been tested for HIV, you should get tested. And that's because many people with HIV have no idea they have it. They can be completely asymptomatic for a very long time and not only have the virus causing ill effects on themselves, but they're at risk of potentially transmitting it to others. We need to do a better job in the U.S., particularly as health care providers, to follow that recommendation, and to make sure that every adult has had an HIV test at least once in a lifetime." If HIV is not treated, it can lead to AIDS. But effective therapies can control HIV, which is why getting tested and seeking treatment is so important."We know now that if somebody is on effective HIV therapy, and the virus in their body is suppressed, it's not gone. But it's suppressed. Their risk of transmitting it to somebody else is close to zero," explains Dr. Rizza. "So if you just pause for a minute and think about that implication. That means if every human on planet Earth who had HIV were diagnosed, linked with health care, and on effective therapy, then HIV would be gone from the human race in one generation."Like many other areas of health care, health disparities play a significant role when it comes to testing, diagnosis and treatment of HIV. Those disparities have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Improving awareness and community outreach can help combat these disparities."It's the same old thing that works for every disease state," says Dr. Rizza. "Its education, engagement and role-modeling within the communities. That education is essential. And it needs to be done in the community. We can't wait for people to come to us, and then we'll teach them, we need to get into those worlds, with people who are leaders in those communities, and have ways to bring diagnosis, treatment and preventive measures to them." Dr. Rizza says disparities in diagnosing HIV face an additional challenge that some other diseases do not: stigma."It is just heartbreaking," says Dr. Rizza. "And the stigma that had been around HIV for a very long time is part of what prevents people from coming forward, from taking the initiatives to prevent the disease, to prevent the infection — and also to be diagnosed — out of fear of the answer. And, so, we also need those community leaders to help break down the stigma issue in addition to educating and bringing diagnosis and treatment closer to home."On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Rizza discusses the importance of HIV testing and improvements in therapies to treat HIV.

    Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
    Hour 3 | Jigsaw Nipple @ConwayShow

    Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:05


    Restaurants Surcharge to offset inflation / Credit cards // Nike makes a full exit out of Russia - McDonalds Dittos / Elephant Beer Scammers getting smarter texts and emails / Puzzle convention / Jigsaw nipple // Monkeypox / AIDS / Ayds / Beer

    Civic
    The Future of the AIDS Memorial Quilt

    Civic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:47


    The largest display of the AIDS Memorial Quilt in ten years took place in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park in June. Now the quilt is being taken on the road to the southern U.S., where new HIV infections and lower levels of treatment for those infected are the highest in the country. We also speak with the White House official overseeing the Biden Administration's response to the pandemic, after resources for HIV care were diverted to battling the COVID pandemic.

    Supertalk Eagle Hour
    John Miller, former director of football operations at USM talks about his company To The Top Collective which aids in image and likeness deals plus Patrick Magee from NOLA.com talks Saints football

    Supertalk Eagle Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 41:19


    Dedicated to Southern Miss sports! Weekdays 1 - 2 p.m. on select SuperTalk Mississippi stations. This show is a production of SuperTalk Mississippi Media. Learn more at SuperTalk.FM

    Orden de traslado
    Esas largas pestañas del SIDA local (Pedro Lemebel, en la voz de Amelia Bande)

    Orden de traslado

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 4:50


    Los funerales de una loca contagiada por el sida se han transformado en un evento social. Una exhibición de, modelos Calvin AIDS, recién estrenados, primorosamente escogidos, para despedir a la amiga como se lo merece, como nunca lo soñó en el dorado aeropuerto de «Nunca jamás». El estigma de la plaga, que en los ochenta hacía huir como ratas a las amigas, negando mil veces haber conocido a la occisa, Esa virulencia homofóbica que entonces mostraba cortejos de cuatro pelagatos acompañando un ataúd huacho. Un pobre cajón rodeado de familiares tolerantes y de alguna loca camuflada de temor bajo el anonimato de las gafas. Ahora es otra cosa mariposa. En los noventa, es el acontecimiento que concentra la atención de un público atento, esperando paciente el deceso para ponerse el modelito guardado especialmente para la premier luctuosa. Ahora la muerte sidada tiene clase y categoría. Cualquiera no se despide del mundo con ese glamour hollywoodense que se llevó a Hudson, Perkins, Nureyev y Fassbinder. Cualquiera no ostenta ese look de manchas leopardas, ese tatuaje sidado que no se destiñe, fíjate. Por eso el adiós-AIDS es inolvidable en su fulgor momentáneo. Es un encuentro de pestañas quebradas y risitas tu-tú contenidas por la emoción. Es el esperado momento de homenajear a la finada luciendo esa faz pálida, como neogótica. Con mucha ojera violácea, haciendo juego con el discreto pañuelito que va a enjugar la única lágrima, en el único momento de tirar la única rosa, no, mejor el único pétalo, sobre el terso ataúd. De esta forma, las locas engalanadas con el drama han hecho de su muerte un tablao flamenco, una pasarela de la moda que se burla del sórdido ritual funerario. Más bien, revierten la compasión que pesa como un juicio pecaminoso sobre el sida homosexual, lo transforman en alegoría. Con sus destellos coligüillos, amortiguan el duelo, lo colorean, lo refulgen, lo descargan de esa fetidez piadosa. Lo relucen con la ópera comediante le su llanto. Y nadie sabe si esa lágrima de diamante que rueda por su mejilla es auténtica. Nadie pondría en duda esa amarga gota escenográfica, que brilla lentejuela en el ojo de la última escena. Esas manos apenas temblorosas, que van midiendo cada pésame, cada condolencia, como si tomaran las medidas de un traje de noche. Como si cada gesto de pena fuera hilvanado en una basta de contención, en pliegues de dolor, que se ajustan al teatro mortuorio con los alfileres de la complicidad maricueca. El sepelio de una loca sidada es para filmarlo. Acuden al evento las amigas revoltosas que tratan de amarrarse las trenzas con cintas de nerviosa seriedad. Un poco preocupadas, miran el reloj, pensando que la lista corre rápido. «Hoy por ti, mañana por mí», es el responso. Nadie sabe quién tiene pasaje de ida en el Boeing Z.A.Z, vuelo siete cero positivo. Ninguna puede reírse tanto. Menos esa flaca cabello de ángel que hizo el teatro del desmayo en el cementerio, y sus quejidos de perra asmática partían el alma. Menos ella, que antes de sellar el cajón, como al descuido, le echó adentro cigarros y fósforos porque su amiga no podía dormir sin fumar.

    IDEA Collider
    Sick Money: The Truth About The Global Pharmaceutical Industry With Billy Kenber

    IDEA Collider

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 58:06


    Welcome to another fantastic episode of the IDEA Collider│Pharma Book Club series with your host Mike Rea. Today we are joined by Billy Kenber, an investigative journalist at “The Times.” He talks about his journey to writing his book ‘Sick Money' and the content in the book.Additionally, he talks about the pharmaceutical industry's social contract with patients and how its distortion has led to pharmaceutical greed. Moreover, he shares how the culture within the pharmaceutical industry has changed, why drug companies overprice the drugs, and what can be done to regulate drug pricing. Tune in! During this episode, you will learn about; [00:22] Episode introduction[01:08] Meet our guest; Billy Kenber[01:22] His journey to writing his book ‘Sick Money'[03:28] What the book is about[06:11] How Concordia Pharmaceuticals & Valeant Pharmaceuticals companiesgrew quickly and gained a short-term monopoly, thus hiking the drug prices[10:40] What's the geographical scope of the pharmaceutical fraud[12:47] Pharmaceutical industry's social contract with patients and how its distortion has led to pharmaceutical greed[15:20] The first AIDS drug; AZT[18:30] A background of AZT drug high pricing and how it led to otherpharmaceutical companies raising their prices[22:47] How Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs) raise drug prices for patients[25:39] The 'Dirty Pharma' chapter in his book[28:45] Why drug companies overprice the drugs[29:17] How the culture within the pharmaceutical industry has changed[30:52] Pharmaceutical innovation after World War II; Antibiotics[35:29] mRNA vaccines in the COVID-19 pandemic[37:28] Effect of cultural changes in the pharmaceutical industry on the drugs weget and how Research and Development (R&D) is done[40:30] How cultural changes have affected orphan drugs and cancer drugs[46:30] What can be done to regulate drug pricing?[53:50] Recommended reading[56:00] How to connect with Billy Love the show? Follow, Rate, Review, Like, and Share! Let's Connect! Follow Billy Kenber on his;Website: https://www.billykenber.com/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/billykenber Linkt.ree: https://linktr.ee/billykenber To grab a copy of the ‘Sick Money' book: https://amzn.to/3N4XJPD More ProductsFollow Mike Rea on;Website: https://www.ideapharma.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ideapharma LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bigidea/To listen to more amazing podcast episodes: https://podcast.ideapharma.com/

    The Bay
    The Story Behind the National AIDS Memorial Grove in San Francisco

    The Bay

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 14:47


    The National AIDS Memorial Grove in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park is the nation's first and only federally designated memorial of those who have died of AIDS (though ironically, it doesn't receive federal funding.) The folks behind it say its existence is not just about remembering those who've died, but also the activism of the queer community who stepped up when the government wouldn't.  This story is part of the Bay Curious series "A Very Curious Walking Tour of Golden Gate Park." It originally aired on June 3, 2022.

    Great Moments in Weed History w/ Abdullah and Bean
    "Free Weed For Those in Need!"

    Great Moments in Weed History w/ Abdullah and Bean

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 55:48


    In 1996, Sweet Leaf Collective began bicycle-delivering donated cannabis to terminally-ill AIDS patients. By "running tight game," Sweetleaf's founder flew under the radar for decades while simultaneously expanding the operation to provide millions of dollars in free weed annually.  Abdullah and Bean share a sesh with "Sweet Leaf Joe" to hear his inspirational story firsthand, including tales of the countless people and communities he's been able to support along the way. EPISODE SPONSOR: LIFTED MADE Cannabis is meant to be shared, and our newest sponsor Lifted Made has found one of the most accessible ways to do it... with hemp-derived novel cannabinoids like Delta-8 THC, Delta-9, Delta-10, THC-O, HHC, CBN, CBG and more.  EPISODE ARCHIVE Visit our Great Moments in Weed History podcast feed for 70+ episodes of our classic format, and subscribe now to get a new weekly podcast every Weednesday. PATREON Please support Great Moments in Weed HIstory on Patreon. Supporters get exclusive access to video shows and seshes, plus access to cool rewards like a signed book or signature lighter. And it truly helps us make the best show possible. 

    Marked Safe: A Disaster Podcast
    If You're Alive, Raise Your Hand: Pulse Nightclub

    Marked Safe: A Disaster Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 62:29


    This week, a nightclub reviewer throws subtle shade, we remember our dead, something is bad, and we explore new organ donation possibilities.In respect to todays episode, please consider making a donation to the onePULSE foundation created by the owner of the Pulse Nightclub.“Our mission is to create and support a memorial that opens hearts, a museum that opens minds, educational programs that open eyes and legacy scholarships that open doors.”https://onepulsefoundation.org/donate/Content warnings: AIDS epidemic, homophobia, graphic description of mass scale gun violence, ISIS, terrorism, vague mention of murder-suicide in disaster relief.Links:https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/no-evidence-so-far-to-suggest-orlando-shooter-targeted-club-because-it-was-gay/2016/07/14/a7528674-4907-11e6-acbc-4d4870a079da_story.htmlhttps://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/13/us/last-call-at-orlando-club-and-then-the-shots-rang-out.htmlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulse_(nightclub)https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2016/06/12/pulse-more-than-just-another-gay-club/85785762/https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2016/06/orlando-gay-nightclub-massacre-lgbt-community-history/https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/06/13/more-than-just-another-gay-club-pulse-was-founded-in-her-brothers-memory-and-named-for-his-beating-heart/https://web.archive.org/web/20160617092046/http://nextmagazinefl.com/central-florida/the-pulse-of-orlandohttps://www.npr.org/2021/06/12/1005833482/5-years-later-1-pulse-shooting-survivor-remembers-the-tragic-nighthttps://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/18/us/pulse-nightclub-orlando-mass-shooting.htmlhttps://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/what-really-happened-night-pulse-n882571https://abcnews.go.com/US/alive-raise-hand-desperate-rescuer-pulse-nightclub/story?id=46797935https://metro.co.uk/2016/06/13/orlando-gunmans-dad-said-he-shouldnt-have-killed-gays-because-god-will-punish-them-instead-5941213/https://www.npr.org/2016/06/16/482322488/orlando-shooting-what-happened-updatehttps://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/15/us/orlando-shooting.htmlhttps://www.cbsnews.com/newyork/news/omar-mateen-gay-lover-speaks/https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/jun/14/orlando-shooter-omar-mateen-was-a-regular-at-nightclubhttps://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-orlando-nightclub-shooting-20160613-snap-story.htmlhttps://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36511778https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_nightclub_shootinghttps://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/orlando-shooter-reported-pulse-club-regular-patrons-article-1.2672445https://edition.cnn.com/2016/06/17/us/orlando-shooter-omar-mateen/https://www.huffpost.com/entry/noor-salman-pulse-massacre-wrong_n_5ac29ebae4b04646b6454dc2https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/4/5/17202026/pulse-shooting-lgbtq-trump-terror-hatehttps://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/blood-donations-skyrocket-gay-men-left-out-n592656https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/orlando-gunman-s-wife-noor-salman-accused-misleading-police-n707731https://people.com/crime/orlando-pulse-shooting-tributes-to-49-victims/

    The Best of Breakfast with Bongani Bingwa
    The end of private medical aids?

    The Best of Breakfast with Bongani Bingwa

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 9:29


    Executive Director at Concentric Alliance Brian Currin discussed the debate surrounding the idea of National Health Insurance as a way of providing quality medical care to as many people as possible, how the current bill is being interpreted, and the issues that need to be communicated in order to see how to bring parties together. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Muck Podcast
    Episode 129: That's the Situation | Larry Kramer and George Rekers

    The Muck Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 83:22


    Hillary and Tina cover AIDS activist Larry Kramer and anti-gay activist George Rekers. Hillary's Story Larry Kramer started his career as a writer. BUT when the government failed to act, he sounded the alarm on the AIDS crisis. Tina's Story George Rekers made a name for himself through his controversial theories and studies on homosexuality. BUT when he returns from vacation in 2010 with a young man in tow, he's got some explaining to do. Hillary's Story ACT UP "Larry--The WORD" (https://actupny.com/post-your-remembrances-of-larry-kramer/)--by Timothy Lunceford-Stevens Biography Larry Kramer Captured His Seemingly Hopeless Fight for HIV/AIDS Victims in 'The Normal Heart' (https://www.biography.com/news/larry-kramer-the-normal-heart)--by Rachel Chang Britannica Larry Kramer (https://www.britannica.com/biography/Larry-Kramer) Brooklyn Museum In Conversation: Larry Kramer and Jonathan Katz (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avITb-TZWOQ)--via YouTube History AIDS activists unfurl a giant condom over Senator Jesse Helms' home (https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/aids-activists-unfurl-giant-condom-senator-jesse-helms-home-act-up) Los Angeles Times Letters to the Editor: Larry Kramer, the gay community's ‘Old Testament figure wrapped in righteous fury' (https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-06-02/larry-kramer-the-gay-communitys-old-testament-prophet)--by Steve Martin Making Gay History Larry Kramer (https://makinggayhistory.com/podcast/larry-kramer/) The New Yorker The Benevolent Rage of Larry Kramer--by Michael Specter (https://www.newyorker.com/culture/postscript/the-benevolent-rage-of-larry-kramer) The New York Times Larry Kramer, Playwright and Outspoken AIDS Activist, Dies at 84 (https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/27/us/larry-kramer-dead.html)--by Daniel Lewis NPR Larry Kramer, Pioneering AIDS Activist And Writer, Dies At 84 (https://www.npr.org/2020/05/27/512714500/larry-kramer-pioneering-aids-activist-and-writer-dies-at-84) Vanity Fair In One of His Final Interviews Larry Kramer, 84 and Infirm, Still Roared (https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2020/05/in-one-of-his-final-interviews-larry-kramer-still-roared)--by Michael Shnayerson Wikimedia Larry Kramer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Kramer) Photos Larry Kramer (https://makinggayhistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/KRAMER-1-1989-Ph-Robert-Giard-NYPL.jpg)--by Robert Giard, via Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints, and Photographs at NYPL Larry Kramer at podium (https://ca-times.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/7743f1a/2147483647/strip/true/crop/2048x1270+0+0/resize/840x521!/format/webp/quality/90/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcalifornia-times-brightspot.s3.amazonaws.com%2F32%2F04%2F135df13ef3b9e68582093eca5bdc%2Fla-ca-cm-larry-kramer-20150628-002)--by Ellen Shub/HBO via Los Angeles Times Condom on Jesse Helms Home (https://scontent-mia3-2.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.18172-8/14231223_894749393990379_557753539184204595_o.jpg?_nc_cat=102&ccb=1-7&_nc_sid=9267fe&_nc_ohc=fdqSHeAMDAsAX-L8DQq&_nc_ht=scontent-mia3-2.xx&oh=00_AT_gCrElBXPrfENXFBbwbycWCJWux-m4lq3YVhEVyK54vA&oe=62D32155)--via LGBT_History Facebook Page Tina's Story ACLU HOWARD V. ARKANSAS - GEORGE REKERS FACT SHEET (https://www.aclu.org/other/howard-v-arkansas-george-rekers-fact-sheet) The Advocate Escort Revealed in Rekers Scandal (https://www.advocate.com/news/daily-news/2010/05/05/escort-rekers-scandal-revealed) BuzzFeed News George Alan Rekers' Rent-Boy Scandal (https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/expresident/george-alan-rekers-rent-boy-scandal)--by Jack Shepherd CNN Reporters find tragic story amid embarrassing scandal (http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/06/08/rekers.sissy.boy.experiment/index.html)--By Penn Bullock and Brandon K. Thorp Therapy to change 'feminine' boy created a troubled man, family says (http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/06/07/sissy.boy.experiment/)--by Scott Bronstein and Jessi Joseph Constantine Report Second "Rent Boy" Emerges in Prof. George Rekers (Family Research Council) Gay Sex Scandal (https://constantinereport.com/second-rent-boy-emerges-in-prof-george-rekers-family-research-council-gay-sex-scandal/) Daily News Anti-gay activist, Christian minister George Rekers caught in gay escort scandal resigns from NARTH (https://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/anti-gay-activist-christian-minister-george-rekers-caught-gay-escort-scandal-resigns-narth-article-1.449343)--By Michael Sheridan Dangerous Minds DR. GEORGE REKERS: AMERICAN MENGELE? (https://dangerousminds.net/comments/dr._george_rekers_american_mengele) Equality Florida Bill McCollum Still Paying for George Rekers (https://www.eqfl.org/how-rent-boy-scandal-brought-down-far-right-favorite) Falls Church News Press George Rekers Delusional Downfall Is A Familiar Tale (https://www.fcnp.com/2010/05/06/george-rekers-delusional-downfall-is-a-familiar-tale/)--by Wayne Besen GLADD "Ex-gay" group NARTH rebrands with dangerous mission (https://www.glaad.org/blog/ex-gay-group-narth-rebrands-dangerous-mission)--by By Joeli Katz Go Pride Chicago George Rekers steps down from ex-gay board (https://chicago.gopride.com/news/article.cfm/articleid/10574644) Miami New Times Christian right leader George Rekers takes vacation with "rent boy" (https://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/christian-right-leader-george-rekers-takes-vacation-with-rent-boy-6377933)--by PENN BULLOCK AND BRANDON K. THORP The New York Times Scandal Stirs Legal Questions in Anti-Gay Cases (https://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/us/19rekers.html)--by John Schwartz Newsweek Left Wing: When Gay Bashers Are Gay, Why Do People Just Mock and Turn Away? (https://www.newsweek.com/left-wing-when-gay-bashers-are-gay-why-do-people-just-mock-and-turn-away-214204)--BY EVE CONANT PFLAG Ex-Gay Leader's Male Escort: Actually, We Did Have Sex (https://pflag.com/focus-on-family-leader-scandal/)--by Rachel Slajda Queerty The Gay Rentboy Scandal That Should Sink Bigot Baptist Minister George Alan Rekers (https://www.queerty.com/the-gay-rentboy-scandal-that-should-sink-bigot-baptist-minister-george-alan-rekers-20100504) Sacramento Post (Gay Escort Scandal) George Rekers (a gay Tiger Woods?) Second Man has come forward (https://sacratomatovillepost.com/2010/05/11/gay-escort-scandal-george-rekers-a-gay-tiger-woods-second-man-has-come-forward/) Sun Sentinel Male escort says he gave 'sexual' massages to anti-gay leader (https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fl-xpm-2010-05-08-mi-rentboy-escort-i-gave-sexual-massa20100508-story.html)--By Steve Rothaus and The Miami Herald Think Progress How The Rekers ‘Rent Boy' Scandal Could Undermine Prop. 8 Supporters' Court Battle (https://archive.thinkprogress.org/how-the-rekers-rent-boy-scandal-could-undermine-prop-8-supporters-court-battle-3099987a55db/)--by AMANDA TERKEL Towleroad Florida AG Bill McCollum Paid George ‘Rentboy' Rekers $87,000 to Be Star Witness for State's Gay Adoption Ban (https://www.towleroad.com/2010/05/florida-ag-bill-mccollum-paid-george-rentboy-rekers-87000-to-be-star-witness-for-states-adoption-ban/)--by Andy Towle The Week Rekers rentboy scandal: The fallout continues (https://theweek.com/articles/494639/rekers-rentboy-scandal-fallout-continues) Wikipedia George Rekers (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Rekers) Howard v. Arkansas (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard_v._Arkansas#:~:text=Howard%2C%20367%20Ark.,housemates%20from%20being%20foster%20parents.) Photos George Rekers (https://www.advocate.com/sites/default/files/2012/04/25/roman_rekersx390.jpg)--screenshot via The Advocate Jo-Vanni Roman (https://www.advocate.com/sites/default/files/2012/04/25/roman_rekersx390.jpg)--screenshot via The Advocate Rekers caught at airport (http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2011/images/06/08/t1larg.rekers.thorp.jpg)--via CNN

    WILDsound: The Film Podcast
    June 19, 2022 - Screenwriter J.A. Brown (Christian Morris)

    WILDsound: The Film Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022


    A man dying of AIDS reunites with his best friend to clear his conscience of his promiscuous past, and to lay to rest the life-long secrets kept between them. Watch the winning screenplay reading: https://youtu.be/tR7flBsGO0s Conversation with winning screenwriter J.A. Brown on the writing of the screenplay. Go to the WILDsound TV app. You can sign up for the 7 day free trial at www.wildsound.ca (available on your streaming services and APPS). There is a DAILY film festival to watch, plus a selection of award winning films on the platform. Then it's only $3.99 per month. Subscribe to the podcast: https://twitter.com/wildsoundpod https://www.instagram.com/wildsoundpod/ https://www.facebook.com/wildsoundpod

    Hacks & Wonks
    Tyler Crone, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative

    Hacks & Wonks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 52:42


    On this midweek show, Crystal chats with Tyler Crone about her campaign for State Representative in the 36th Legislative District - why she decided to run, how the last legislative session went and her thoughts on addressing issues such as COVID response and recovery, public safety, drug decriminalization, housing affordability and zoning, homelessness and climate change. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Tyler at @electtylercrone.   Resources Campaign Website - Tyler Crone: https://www.electtylercrone.com/   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, I'm very happy to welcome Tyler Crone to the podcast, who is a candidate for the State Representative seat in the 36th legislative district. Thank you for joining us today. [00:00:48] Tyler Crone: Thank you so much, Crystal, for having me. I'm really delighted to be in conversation with you. [00:00:53] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. I'm very excited to have this conversation. And starting off, I'm wondering - what made you run? [00:01:00] Tyler Crone: That is the question - I never expected to run for office, I never expected to be a candidate. And yet having been part of the HIV movement and having been part of the HIV response, partnering with governments and the UN and the WHO to rise to the other health and social justice crisis of our time, I felt we could be doing better on COVID-19. And I was concerned and invested - as a parent, as a public health professional - that we needed a spotlight on COVID-19, that we were not through yet, and that that was something unique and extraordinary I had to offer at this moment - and that made me take a second look when my husband asked me if I was gonna run for the open seat. And the piece that really pushed me over the edge into saying - okay, I'm gonna do this, is that my middle daughter is trans, and the campaigns of hate and criminalization against kids like mine and families like my own across this country made it clear to me that the stakes were really high for states like Washington to lead. And I am proud and excited to be in it. And every day that I'm in it, the stakes become more clear. And I just thank you for the chance to be in conversation, to share a little bit more about what I'm hearing, what I'm learning, and what I'm thinking. Thank you. [00:02:22] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And so you talked about your background in global health, referencing the HIV movement. What is it that you feel from your background uniquely helps you be prepared to lead today? [00:02:40] Tyler Crone: So there are a couple of elements - one, of that pandemic response and recovery piece from HIV - if there's any roadmap for where we are and what happens next, it is HIV and AIDS. The other piece that that experience has provided me has been the opportunity to see what it looks like, and what leadership and durable solutions are when you partner with the most impacted communities. And it is that being on the front lines of the HIV movement, of seeing how activists - those who are living with HIV, impacted communities - came together with decision makers, policymakers, researchers, funders to transform the reality, right? To advance new medications, to take a whole-of-government approach - where we were thinking about the impacts and legacy of HIV on education, on gender equity, the impacts in association and connection to gender-based violence. There are so many ways in which HIV provides us a roadmap to understand how we have to innovate, how we have to reinforce our public health systems, and how we have to take a whole-of-society, whole-of-community approach to partnership so that we are building back with strength, we are reinforcing our public schools, we are reinforcing our public health infrastructure, and we're thinking holistically about what getting back to healthy means. [00:04:18] Crystal Fincher: There are still a lot of people frustrated at some commonalities with the HIV epidemic, and that right now, it seems like there's a lot of people largely ignoring it, that policy is no longer addressing it, that people have decided to be done and the pandemic is still going on. We just saw headlines today saying that hospitals are saying, "Mask Up," because hospitalizations are increasing, that this is still happening. Should we be doing more right now to be addressing COVID-19, to be protecting people from it. And in the role of a legislator, what would you work to have - what would you work to do to solve this? [00:05:02] Tyler Crone: So I've been thinking a lot about this this morning. Like you, Crystal, I am concerned that the United States of America is the outlier of wealthy nations in the amount of deaths and cases of COVID-19. I remember, over two years ago, when two mentors that I've worked with - Debbie Birx and Tony Fauci - estimated that the worst-case scenario is that we would have 200,000 people lost to COVID. The worst case scenario. And we have now reached a point in time where we have lost over a million people to COVID. Research coming out of the University of California San Francisco is suggesting that those whose jobs were deemed essential, who could not stay at home - died at twice the rate as their peers. We have not even begun to dress or prepare for what's happening in our long-term care facilities and our nursing homes. As we rev up, modelers are suggesting that we will see another surge with cold and flu season this winter, and that is deeply concerning to me. So what are we gonna do? And what could we do better? And what does this moment of opportunity present us? One, it is about reinforcing our public health infrastructure and leadership so that we have coherent messaging. It is about keeping and ensuring that we are surveilling what happens, we're tracking. Right now, we've closed down a lot of our mass testing sites. It's easier to access an at-home test, which is fantastic, a rapid at-home test, but when we test at home, that data doesn't go anywhere. So we don't know what we don't know. And I think that we need to be investing in and looking at those systems of surveillance as one strategy that's proactive. We need to do a very basic learning from what we did well, where we fell short, and how we get ready for what comes next. There are some simple strategies that this moment provides a really unique opportunity for, that would have a much greater impact around air quality. If we were investing in improving indoor air quality, we could be impacting cold and flu season, we could be helping those who have allergies, we could be taking toxins out of the air, as well as mitigating COVID-19. And the thing that's great about improving indoor air quality is that it doesn't require individual masking, it doesn't require each of us to take responsibility for our own health. It provides us a context of health and protection. So that indoor air quality piece is something that I would really be paying attention to, and that there was investment made available from the federal government for. Another piece that I would really pay attention to and a conversation we've not yet started is Long COVID, and how are we recovering from that and what is gonna be the impact of that on our healthcare system and on our communities? The estimates now, even if they're very small of one third to one fifth of the people who have had COVID will have long-term health impacts from that, that's a big problem. And we're not yet getting there of what we're going to do about. And I think that the last piece that I want to underscore here is that there are some really common-sense ways that we can be depoliticizing public health, that we can be ensuring we're up-to-date on access and availability and using the treatments that are available and the preventative tools such as vaccines and boosters, and that we should not be afraid to bring back layered mitigation measures, if and as necessary, to keep our economy open and to ensure our kids don't have any more disruption of school closures. So for example, I still wear my mask when I go grocery shopping, and my kids still wear their masks at school. And we are able to go about, still go out to dinner, still meet up with people, still be part of community. And I just hope that that conversation around COVID-19 is one in the public sphere, because the impacts of who gets disproportionately burdened are those who don't have insurance, are those who are working on the frontlines, are those who are vulnerable with cancer or who are elderly - let alone even talking about how overstretched our healthcare system is already, and how overstretched our nurses are and we're facing a major nursing shortage. [00:09:58] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, we are facing major shortages, so certainly addressing healthcare infrastructure needs, staffing needs are very important. Now we recently came out of a legislative session that - there were some great things that happened in that session. There were also some things that disappointed some folks. What was your evaluation of this past session? [00:10:21] Tyler Crone: I am so proud, as a Washingtonian and as a parent and as someone committed to public health, to see Washington State's leadership on gun safety. Gun violence is a public health emergency - just as we were talking about COVID-19 as a public health emergency, I think that gun safety is top of mind for families and for everyone in our state, as we look at the headlines and as we come through to the end of an intense school year. So I am pleased to see Washington State lead. I would like to see even more leadership and I will be excited to be a partner in that when I am elected and/or as a community advocate and a parent on the outside. I was really excited to see the investment and attention around mental health and school nurses. I know when I'm talking to teachers and principals, that it has been extraordinarily difficult for them to be frontline responders in school settings, it has been extraordinarily difficult for them to navigate the pandemic without school counselors. And now all of that isolation has exacerbated a crisis that we already knew existed - the mental health crisis facing our young people, our kids - and that is top of mind for parents. So that's a piece of the work that happened this past session that I'm excited to see and carry forward into the next. [00:11:53] Crystal Fincher: In that session, there were some rollbacks of some of the highly touted steps taken to increase accountability and transparency and public safety when it comes to law enforcement. Do you agree with the action that was taken this past session? [00:12:15] Tyler Crone: I'm deeply troubled by it. I have been in conversation with the elected officials in my district to better understand how public safety is upheld. I believe that we should all feel - we all deserve to feel safe and we all deserve to be safe. And I feel like I am ill-equipped to understand the nuances of why those decisions were taken. Because as an outside individual, it seems deeply troubling to roll back efforts to address police accountability, to address use of force. And what I see from families who have been impacted by police violence is that they don't see those actions addressing the kind of transparency and safety that they look for. So, I have been told by elected representatives in my district that those were important steps to ensure that local communities could make decisions that would make sense for them, that they were important steps to ensure that someone would come when you call 911. I feel ill-equipped to answer because I am - I want everybody to be safe, I want someone to call when I need help. And I know that communities who are Black and Brown are over-policed. I know that my transgender daughter feels afraid when she sees police, and I think that there has got to be a way that we can advance and uphold public safety, which is top of mind for my district, with accountability and with the deep structural systemic reforms that are needed. [00:14:09] Crystal Fincher: So would you have voted against rolling back those reforms? [00:14:14] Tyler Crone: I'm pretty sure I would have - yeah. I don't - I, again, I wasn't in it, I am not fully informed, but I would, I'm pretty sure I would've voted against rolling back those reforms. Yeah. [00:14:32] Crystal Fincher: We're also sitting here near another anniversary of the War on Drugs, which is largely - has been proven not to be effective. We have spent so much money and have invested so much in that approach, and have not received a return on it. Should possessing drugs be a crime, and should we be treating drug possession and use as a public health problem or a criminal problem? [00:15:06] Tyler Crone: So I wanna agree with you that the War on Drugs has been a failure. It has had incredible harmful impacts. I have worked - in my public health work in HIV sphere - utilizing a harm reduction framework and approach, and looking at issues from a human rights vantage point. I also am a parent and I see that my teen and her peers are inundated with substances that I am concerned about, that they are accessing things that - yeah, I'm alarmed by the substance use amongst my teens' peers. So how do we hold all of this all together? I am keen to learn more about the work that the ACLU - and the initiative and the coalition that they are leading. I have begun preliminary conversations with my friend, Michele Storms, to understand what this initiative is. My husband's organization, the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, I understand, is also part of the coalition to advance this work. And I'm eager to understand more - how we are not incentivizing substance use, we're not advancing the addiction crisis we face, but that we are addressing this as a human rights and public health concern, rather than an issue of criminalization - because criminalization lands us not with safe, healthy communities. [00:16:48] Crystal Fincher: So, is it fair to say that you are not in favor of criminalization and are exploring other avenues for intervention, or do you think that criminal intervention should be on the table? [00:17:07] Tyler Crone: I think it has to be a nuanced discussion, right? I think my first focus is on using a public health and human rights framework and using a harm reduction approach. I guess I would like to better understand - and this is where I'm on my learning journey as a person running for office - of what are we specifically talking about when we're criminalizing possession? 'Cause I do - it is not helping the person who is using substances and maybe struggling with addiction to criminalize them. It is an extremely costly approach that does not bring us back together and make us healthy and whole, and so I am very keen to learn more and understand those nuances because I - yes I don't think criminalization is an approach that works. [00:18:02] Crystal Fincher: Makes sense. Another thing that's top of mind for a lot of people is housing affordability and addressing people who are living out on the streets and getting them into housing. In specifically, in your role as a state legislator, what would you do to help both housing affordability and to get people off of the street? [00:18:30] Tyler Crone: This is a great question and I thank you for asking it. I was able to be in a conversation yesterday where I was learning more about the middle housing movement as a way to grow density, to strengthen livable, walkable, connected communities that have treelined streets and the amenities that we all love, and as a way to increase the housing stock across price points. So there are a number of different elements here to pull apart. And let me try to start, and maybe you can ask me some follow up questions if I go off-the-rails one way or the other. I believe housing is a human right. We currently do not have enough places for all of our unsheltered neighbors. We do not have enough staff to get people who are on the street into the places that we do have, and we don't fix a problem by moving people from place to place. We need to get people into housing. People need a roof over their head and a door so that they can sleep well at night, and so that they can get back on their feet. Part of addressing our crisis of unsheltered neighbors is also about incorporating and addressing the health, mental health, and addiction needs those communities might have - the behavioral health crisis they face. So that is a key priority of mine as a person who comes at this from a public health perspective. This loops back to not only do we need more housing for people at all price points, and particularly a place for everybody who is on the street to go to call home - we need to be making Seattle more livable, more accessible for everyone. And I think that we can do that with a lot of smarts, and a lot of planning, and more conversation. Because when I listen to my neighbors and I listen to the voters in this district, there is a shared understanding that families and people are getting priced out, that our housing stock shortage is a real problem for our businesses, that families want to live here and benefit from the ability to walk their kid to school, to have playgrounds, to walk their dogs, whatever it is. That seniors want to be able to retire and size down in the neighborhoods that they love, but they can't get out of their big homes 'cause they can't find someplace else to go. So there's a lot of need and a lot of consensus. The elements that I hear and that aligns with what I'm seeing that's been introduced before in the legislature - and what I was getting a more nuanced understanding around yesterday in the session I was part of, with an architect from Berkeley - is that this idea of smart density, of building up arterials, which is already underway is a shared value and source of consensus. The other idea that we need to be building on and building with is building up, in a thoughtful way, our secondary arterials. For example, in the neighborhood I live in - Queen Anne - Third Avenue West has bus connection all the way through it. We could be smartly changing the - building those areas up where we have bus connections, where we could be creating more housing across the price points that make our neighborhoods more inclusive - that enables us to have more great small businesses, more live and work options. And we can be doing so with planning and - yeah, I think that the missing middle piece is a really smart approach. I have heard a few concerns raised around some of the ways in which your land would be, the value of your house would be assessed of your property - based on its fullest potential use - that may make it hard for people who have larger lots to continue to stay in their lots. So we have to look at that and figure it out. But I see that middle housing piece as a thing that we can do with intention and with planning that creates vibrant, walkable, connected communities, where like I do - you walk to your grocery store, you walk your kid to school, you can walk to your providers, you can go pick up your dog food, you can drop your cat at the vet. And if we do that, we can start to tackle the housing crisis we face across the board, where we just don't have enough housing stock for everyone. I also think that as a state legislator, we have to be looking at this outside of Seattle too, right? We have to be taking a kind of regional approach to housing. [00:23:41] Crystal Fincher: So would you have voted for the missing middle bill that was not successful this past session? [00:23:48] Tyler Crone: So this is a piece that - I would like to understand why it failed, I would like to understand why the Seattle City Council has not worked to change zoning in some areas already. I think that the piece that before I'd say - yeah, hooray, I'll go for that - that I'd want to double check and dig in around more is this assessed value of my, of people's property and what that impact would be for our seniors being able to stay in their homes and what it would - for example, I finally, after renting for 15 years, my landlord died in a pandemic and I was finally able to secure my home that I had rented, which is a little fixer upper, off-market. Otherwise I would not have been able - my husband and I have had social justice careers - we would not be able to live in the part of Queen Anne that we do. But we have a nice lot, we have a nice front yard and a nice backyard, and it would be great to be able to put more units on it, but that takes resources, and complex regulation - navigating complex regulations that we can't, we're not in the position to do right now. But I would wanna know what the impact would be on our taxes, on our property taxes. Because I wouldn't wanna drive unintended consequences that would upend the fabric of our strong neighborhoods. [00:25:12] Crystal Fincher: Well, I guess one of the questions there - there are two things that were consistently brought up in opposition to that. On one hand, I think you probably heard a lot of reasons in the session that you were just in, about middle housing - how it is a necessary component of ensuring places stay affordable, preventing them from being more expensive, that supply needs to keep up with demand - when it doesn't do that, prices increase. And an area of tension is - well, should single-family, current single-family areas, be zoned more inclusively? Should we be looking at upzoning single-family areas? A lot of the people who live in those - well, I should not characterize that as a lot, 'cause polling actually tells an interesting story. There are some vocal people - a significant percentage, a significant number, even if the percentage is smaller - of people who are saying - no, I don't want to absorb any density, I don't want any change to my neighborhood, I don't want duplexes and triplexes coming in that fundamentally alters my neighborhood, and I don't like it. On the other side, we have a growing homelessness crisis that is being contributed to by people not being able to afford to stay in their housing, people feeling insecure in the housing that they are currently in. And if we want to keep our neighborhoods livable, there is going to have to be livable and affordable. There's going to have to be action taken soon. And if we're - we can talk about rent control, we can talk about a lot of other things - but one component that seems to be universally acknowledged is that we need to have housing to accommodate the people who are moving into these communities. So I guess starting from that point, would you - do you think we should be more inclusively zoning areas that to date have been, that are single-family areas? [00:27:26] Tyler Crone: So I live in a single-family neighborhood and I see that there are very smart ways that we could be doing more inclusive zoning - that doesn't need - I don't think these have to be necessarily opposed strategies. And this is - what it was so interesting about being part of this session yesterday - learning from other cities across the country, where they have done graduated zoning to create more inclusive zoning, to enable more density, but to do it in a smart way so that we keep - I think people are getting these ideas that more density necessarily means these gigantic buildings or really ripping apart their neighborhoods. What I saw yesterday were models from other cities across the country, where on arterials and secondary arterials that are connected to transportation, we could be inclusively zoning, to be creating more housing options that fit within the character of the neighborhood, but that enable us to have our grandma live next door, or have our teacher be able to live not a 45-minute commute from their public, from the school where they teach, that would enable the young couple to move in or a single professional, or would also - I was talking to a neighbor who is an architect, who lives in a single-family home in Queen Anne, and was saying - I really love the example of Europe, where they have built up that kind of density that doesn't disrupt a neighborhood, but where you can downsize into a smaller flat, and I could still be walkable in my community. So I do think we need to be looking at and changing some of our zoning, at the very minimum. That the housing piece is one that runs through so many issues that are top of mind right now. Climate, right? If we keep making it such that everybody has to have longer and longer commutes or that we're sprawling, we're not taking the climate action we need. We need smart density as a key component of our climate strategy. It is a piece of, as you were saying, addressing the crisis we have where we are not serving those who are on the street, who don't have a place to call home. And it is not enabling if we don't have housing stock for anyone - we're not able to get ahead of or address the homelessness crisis we face. And we've been saying we've been in crisis now for a very long time, nearly a decade. And we need to take that action. The piece that I wanna also bring in here, and this is where I'm interested to dig in with more community councils and be in conversations with neighbors, because I think that there are fears for what will happen that don't have to happen. We could be having these community conversations around what communities want, what they don't want, what the buildings could look like, how we could fit this in that would strengthen the fabric of our neighborhoods, not tear it apart. And one of the things I'm mindful of - I grew up in a city, Charleston, in South Carolina, where we had a lot of fear of change. And so what we ended up creating was a city that had such expensive housing that nobody could - no families could live there anymore, no older people could live there anymore. And we ended up with a city of beautiful homes that people came - wealthy people had as second homes to come visit - but we didn't have those thriving, healthy, safe, vibrant neighborhoods. And I think all of us in Seattle, pretty much, probably love our neighborhood. We love our corner coffee shop, we love getting to know who lives next door - and I am convinced that there has to be a way with conversation, planning, thought, care, and community engagement to get this done. I do have to flag up one of the pieces that came up in this discussion yesterday and that I'm seeing all around me in my neighborhood - is when a small house is bought, it's knocked down and there is a gigantic mansion put up, or really, really expensive town homes. And that's not solving our housing issues and that is not creating more attainable housing. [00:32:07] Crystal Fincher: Well, and it seems like part of that is - there aren't options to build anything in some areas but single-family homes - and true, that is not solving that. And so if more density was an option, that seems like it would be something there. And that at the end of the day, I mean that middle housing bill was stakeholdered, worked on and developed in consultation with developers, business leaders, community members, people from A to Z - unusually so - just to make sure that all of those viewpoints were heard and accepted. But at the end of the day, as with some issues, not everybody is going to agree. And yes, there are impacts that different groups feel - some positive, some negative. And so at the end of the day, you're left with some groups saying - this is key to us being able to remain in our neighborhoods, to age in place, to afford to live near where we work. We have other groups saying I'm afraid of what this may do to my property value, I'm afraid of the type of people who may be moving in the neighborhood, I'm afraid of what this could do in terms of taxation. And you are then in the position to weigh the pros and cons and to decide what brings a bigger benefit to the community. And so in that, I guess looking at the people who are centered in the conversation, or the ultimate or most pressing problem that you're looking to solve, is it appears that what's held this up is that people, usually on the more privileged end of the spectrum, do have concerns. Now, are those concerns wholly unfounded? No. And are those impacts made up? No. In some cases - in other cases - they have been, but there are different impacts. But I guess if the choice is between - hey, let's enable the possibility and have local governments do what they do and make sure that development happens in a way they feel is appropriate for their own city - and allow that possibility rather than not enable more development. How do you process that? [00:34:43] Tyler Crone: I think that there are examples from other cities and examples from inside Seattle that we could be drawing from to make a very compelling case to be growing our density, doing it with smart planning, holding - I love the trees in my neighborhood - holding the green and the gray infrastructure together. And enabling a lot more people to call my beloved neighborhood home. And I actually think, and call me an optimist, but when I start to dig into these details and I triangulate that with the conversations I'm having with real estate agents, with people who have lived here forever, with young people, all sorts of folks - I think we all really love the same things, we recognize the need, and there could be - there's some interesting examples. For example, in Magnolia, there's going to be a grocery - the Albertsons is going to be torn down - it's an older grocery store across from the community center and the pool. And the neighbors of that site worked together with developers - they're going to create a really innovative green building, which is going to be on the cutting edge of good environmental practice, it is going to have units across all the price points, it is going to vastly expand who can live in Magnolia and who can walk to the coffee shops and who can walk to their groceries and whatever, walk to school. And the community's really excited about it. So I think that if we were to do this, I'm still hopeful that with planning and community engagement and thought and care, we can get this done. I think that there has been anxiety perhaps, without necessarily understanding on all sides of what connected, livable, vibrant, more dense communities could look like. And I'm excited to be part of those conversations and figure out - do the hard work of making it work. [00:37:04] Crystal Fincher: Got it. That makes sense. And I guess you brought up a little bit before, but oftentimes we're in similar situations when we talk about addressing our climate crisis - both in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change, and in reducing the amount of pollutants that are in our communities. And in this state, as with a lot of other places, transportation is responsible for the majority of our emissions. And so when we talk about transportation packages, investments in more transit - and there was record investment in transit and mobility, which was great - something that was not so great is that there was also an increase in highway expansion, which a lot of people find challenges with and obviously creates more emissions and pollution. And so starting off, would you support further transportation packages that did include highway expansion? [00:38:13] Tyler Crone: So, what I am trying to do my research around is to understand what is the alternative to highway expansion. I'm terrified of driving in the Bay Area, I drove my kid from - who graduated Ballard High School - to UCLA, and it was terrifying with all those lanes. And then I do not like driving in LA - again, it gives me heart palpitations - so many lanes and it's like a game of Frogger. So I don't love the idea of expanding our highway lanes. I also love road trips. My family and I - we love going to national parks, we love going to small town America - we love a road trip and I know that there are parts of Washington State that are just terrible in terms of traffic. So I wanna better understand what are the alternatives that we are propping up to get people from place to place and to get goods from place to place that can take the pressure off our highways so that we don't expand them. I love the idea of high-speed rail - I'm not sure where that is today and that's something again - digging into. I love the train, but right now we can't take the train to Vancouver, correct? Isn't that rail line off? But anyway, that's another topic. I do not love the idea of paving over more, but I also see the traffic - yeah - [00:39:48] Crystal Fincher: Well, and giving that expanding highways doesn't actually improve traffic, it makes it worse. And there's been that misconception out there for a long time and planners, and especially recently, there've been a ton of articles and talks and discussions about that. And that, unfortunately adding lanes does not help traffic. But getting cars off of the road does help traffic. So with that, do you think that highway expansion is the right intervention for traffic? And I guess if it's not for traffic, is there a reason that you would have to vote for further highway expansion? [00:40:33] Tyler Crone: So I will say upfront that the ins and outs of the intricacies of this is something that I need to learn more about and be in more conversations, so I can be an informed legislator in this area. My instinct on what I have read to date and being a person who loves transit and loves being in cities, where you can get from place to place without ever getting in a car, a person who loves to walk everywhere and would prefer not to drive. I would love us to be looking at what are those ways we're getting people from place to place that don't require a car, what are the ways that we're getting goods from place to place that don't require our highways. And I remember when I first moved out here nearly 20 years ago, and that every car just had one person in it was shocking. Right? When you come from the East Coast where there is - you can take buses and you can take trains and everything is so connected. And I didn't really learn how to drive until I was almost 30. I think that there are a lot of models to look to where we could be better connected. I also, though - I wanna put in there one point that my kiddo, who takes the bus everywhere - it takes her an hour and a half to visit friends in another part of the city. We don't - our buses, our transit system - I think maybe for folks who don't, who haven't traveled as much in other cities or perhaps as much on the East Coast or in Europe, where you get on your trolley or your tram or your subway and you're getting places and you're going great big distances - I don't think, I don't know if folks necessarily understand that we don't yet have a transit system that is as efficient and as connected as it could be. I also am hearing from older folks - and this goes to a question that you've posed a bit before and a concern that is top of mind - that neighbors are feeling unsafe riding the bus. So that kind of public safety lens of what are we doing to care for people in crisis, care for people who need a place to call home, care for people who need services that we're failing to provide them - that is part of this as well. That's a kind of way off trajectory, but if we're getting more, if we want more people to be taking transit, it needs to be efficient. It needs to be connected and people need to be safe, to feel safe - I should say - riding it. [00:43:15] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. Do you - are you a bus rider? Do you take the bus to, as part of your commutes and travels? [00:43:22] Tyler Crone: I do a little bit. I do a little bit. I have not - I find it sometimes difficult, if I'm trying to get kids or groceries or dogs or what have you, to use public transit in this city as I would wish. I loved - I lived in New York City on the Upper West Side, in the 1990s, and I loved it. And I loved the subway - I would love for Seattle to be - it to be easier to get around our city, because I would love to use transit more regularly when I'm trying to get to - oftentimes, I'm trying to get to doctor's appointments that would just have an hour and a half bus commute to get to. So I end up driving the 20 minutes instead. [00:44:09] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. And I think - [00:44:12] Tyler Crone: I prefer to take transit. I don't like parking, either - I hate to park. [00:44:14] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, especially with that experience, does that color how you would invest or what you would prioritize given - you're in that situation, I've certainly experienced that situation - I think a lot of people think I would use the bus, I would like to use the bus, driving isn't exactly fun, it's a necessity, and parking can be downright miserable. If you could get from Point A to B without driving, that would be great - but that's directly related to the investments that we're making in transit, the money that's available out of the transportation budget - highway dollars competing with transit dollars. So I guess that kind of begins - [00:44:59] Tyler Crone: Oh yeah - I see your point. [00:45:01] Crystal Fincher: Does that translate into how we need to be looking at funding transit, what we need to be prioritizing, and providing an infrastructure that does make transit an appealing choice for people, an appealing way to get people out of their cars and address the transportation crisis, a way that doesn't force the expense of car ownership, and gas that's sky high right now, on people, and actually have an infrastructure that makes that a doable decision and an attractive decision rather than one that feels burdensome. [00:45:41] Tyler Crone: Absolutely. I absolutely would love better transit. I would love to be able to get around our city without ever having to park or get into my car. Also, speaking of our cars - our cars are like 17 years old and they're both about to die and this is not a time - when you have college tuition, running for office, and a used car is impossible to find and purchase, that you have to replace either of them. So I'm all - I love being able to get from place to place. It solves a lot of the challenges we face, and I think that I do think we need to keep a Yes, and... approach because people are gonna need their - until we're there, people are gonna need their cars to get around occasionally. But I do think we could do a much better job - and that's something that would work for families, it would work for - I keep meeting a lot of seniors who would love to never, they don't feel safe driving, they don't ever wanna be in a car driving, but they don't, they can't get all the places they need or they don't feel comfortable on the bus at this time. So I think part of how we also get - when you go to other cities and everybody takes the, like in New York, everybody takes the subway. The mayor takes the subway, the person who is selling things at a small bodega takes the subway, your kid, your 12 year old kid who's commuting to school takes the subway. Everybody takes the subway and it's a great unifier. It's a great way of having a very dense city function. And it's a - yeah, it's a smart choice. So I, yeah - I love, I would love to be more connected across the City. [00:47:26] Crystal Fincher: I guess as our time is coming to a close today, and as you're speaking to people who are trying to make up their minds about who they want to vote for in this 36th district race, for this open seat with no incumbent and a number of people running for this seat, what would you say about you and what differentiates you from your opponents? And how, what a voter would see that is different, what result would happen that is different that they would be able to see and feel in their lives with you elected as opposed to your opponents? [00:48:05] Tyler Crone: Absolutely. Thank you, Crystal, for this time to be in conversation and for this thoughtful question. There are a few different ways I would look at this question and answer it - of one that my style of leadership is from leading from behind, of creating space for others, and of centering those who are most impacted. I, the piece I have learned from my work in HIV and sexual reproductive health and rights is that when you ask those who are most impacted first, what their solutions, what their priorities are, what they want - when you listen and learn and ask questions first, you get to a much better result at the end. You get to a durable, structural solution. You come up with something that's transformative. And so I think that there is one piece of this that is about my leadership style, which is again from behind, of partnering, of building diverse, inclusive coalitions, of being - a colleague of mine called it a transparent collaborator - and being a convener of someone who brings - I'm not gonna have the answers for everything. And I shouldn't, that's not my job. My job is to bring people together, to bring, to build a big table, to bring diverse expertise around that table, to ensure that those who are most impacted or who have been most harmed or who have been most marginalized, whatever the issue is, are there hand-in-hand working toward the solution. I think that the other piece that I would really say differentiates me, or that I'm maybe I'll just say - instead of differentiating me, I'll just say that I'm super proud of. I'm super proud of having been on the frontlines of addressing some of the biggest and most complex challenges of our time. And I think that that experience from HIV where we had to build a new roadmap, we had to move the pharmaceutical industry to develop the drugs, we had to save lives, and we did - is something I'm super proud of and it's that sense of possibility, and I don't - no matter how big the challenge is, no matter how complex it is, I'm excited to dig in. And I think that the other piece that I would say is that human rights are my heart. And I see myself as a person who lives my values. And so particularly in this moment where we see the rollback of Roe v Wade, and we are gonna need more than ever to be thinking about reproductive choice and agency. When we see these campaigns of criminalization of kids like my own and those impacts on broad, more broadly on LGBTQI youth, my husband is an immigrant. These are the, some of the big fights of our day, where we need Washington State to continue to lead and be a shining beacon. And so that piece of what I've learned from the frontlines of rising to complex challenges, that piece of living my values and rising as a human rights advocate, and that piece of being a mom of three kids and having gotten the great joy and privilege of raising those kids across the neighborhoods of this district - are what set me apart. And I'm excited to partner with the constituents of the 36th to bring positive structural change and for a very, very bright future. And I thank you for this chance to be in dialogue, and I'm eager to continue the dialogue I am having with everyone who calls the 36th home. [00:51:58] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

    Ask The Nurses
    Ask The Nurses Episode 56

    Ask The Nurses

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 72:47


    Christie Korth MS, CHHC, AADP, AHHA, HHPChristie Korth is a Crohn's/Lyme disease survivor, award-winning author (The IBD Healing Plan and Recipe Book, Hunter House 2012; Ben Franklin Award 2013), certified health coach, and holistic nutritionist who found her way to health and wellness after nearly succumbing to a severe case of Crohn's disease. Korth is also board certified in Functional Neurology which she incorporates with nutrition; practicing multi subspecialties, including IBD, IBS, Infectious Disease, Neurobehavioral Disorders on the Spectrum (Autism and ADHD) andanything nutrition-related. She also specializes in working with kiddos who are picky eaters or problem feeders. After harnessing the power of nutrition and gaining her health back, Korth went on to be the CEO, founder, and director of Happy & Healthy Wellness Counseling, Inc based just outside of NYC. She studied at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Columbia University, and the Clayton College of Natural Health and is a certified holistic health practitioner with the American Association of Drugless Practitioners, The American Holistic Health Association, and The National Association of Nutrition Professionals. Korth is a Certified Health Counselor through Columbia University's Teacher's College. Christie is also certified as a Group Facilitator from Adelphi University. Christie is the Corporate Nutritionist for Brain Balance Achievement Centers, where she designs the nutrition protocol for franchises across the country and works with children on the spectrum. Christie is a nutrition expert for Dr. Oz's Sharecare.com and frequently contributes nutrition articles to Long Island Parent Magazine as well as other publications.  In 2013, after surviving a terminal diagnosis of Lyme Meningitis, Christietraveled the United States looking for answers. Since then, she has also specialized in Infectious disease and has spent extensive time studyingLyme and AIDS and curative/supportive methods for nutrition intervention. Her 5th publication; Cataclysmic Proportions of Lyme Disease and How to Fix It is due out in late 2022. Korth conducts lectures on Lyme and Crohn's all across the country.Order Christie's Bookhttps://amzn.to/3bdB6LESupport the show

    The Founder Hour
    Kenneth Cole | Fashion Designer and Founder of Kenneth Cole

    The Founder Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 65:36


    Kenneth Cole is an American fashion clothing designer, entrepreneur, and founder of the eponymous company and brand. He founded Kenneth Cole Productions in 1982, which designs men's and women's footwear, clothing, and accessories, and has been running the company ever since.Aside from his business, he has been openly involved in publicly supporting AIDS awareness and research throughout his career. In 2020, he launched The Mental Health Coalition to end the devastating stigma surrounding today's most prevalent public health crisis.We really enjoyed getting to know Kenneth and learning about his upbringing, how he started his brand, his key learnings and takeaways over 40 years, why he launched The Mental Health Coalition, and much more.SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER & STAY UPDATED > http://bit.ly/tfh-newsletterFOLLOW TFH ON INSTAGRAM > http://www.instagram.com/thefounderhourFOLLOW TFH ON TWITTER > http://www.twitter.com/thefounderhourINTERESTED IN BECOMING A SPONSOR? EMAIL US > partnerships@thefounderhour.com

    Und dann kam Punk
    76: Ranen (ABFALL, IMPRACTICABLE SYSTEM, BREAKIN THROUGH, HAMMERHEAD, SERPENT EATER, MORAST,...) - Und dann kam Punk

    Und dann kam Punk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 202:00


    Yuky & Jobst im Gespräch mit Ranen. Wir reden über grüne T-Shirts, Asche am Bass, Neuwied als ostdeutscheste Kleinstadt des Westens, Toxoplosma & Tarnfarbe, die Punks in den frühen 80ern, wasserstoff-gefärbte Blondinen, ein Radiofeature über Punk, die erste Toy Dolls LP aus dem Plattenladen Die Rille, die rote Ute, eine alternde Mod-Bootstour, Exploited aufm Walkman, Tarnfarbe in einem französischen Bistro, mit dem Linienbus zu Toxoplasma und dann im Wald sitzen, die extremen Kölner Punks, zu große Bundeswehrstiefel, Abfall mit Aids als Sänger, der Wegzug der NR Krachpunks, Schnorren als Sport, Chaos Z, Tape-Trading, "Deutschland, wir hassen Dich", Gang Green, Versuch eines Stagedives bei Negazione im Taunusstein, ein Punk-Festival mit Canalterror in Remagen, full blown straight edge, im Linienbus von Metaltypen ausgelacht werden, Dagegensein ist auch immer ein Form von Dabeisein, Hammerhead als Abgrenzung zur Posi-Szene, die Idee einer Bolt Thrower Cover-Band, mit Morast eher in der Metalszene, Minenfeld Blackmetal, ein Abo der Infopost führt zum frühen Musterungsbescheid, Zivildienst im Neuwieder Krankenhaus, hochpolitischer Anwalt der Entrechteten, Soziologie ist das Bassspielen des Studierens, fehlende Stressresilienz, neutral rüberkommen wollen, Motorrad als Midlife Crisis, was Punk eigentlich ist, das Sommermärchen 2004, Alu Ghobi, uvm.

    Thank You, Five
    Falsettos - Act 2

    Thank You, Five

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 60:16


    We finish Pride Month with act two (or three?) of Falsettos, the 2/3rds of the whole Marvin/In Trousers trilogy. Marvin and Whizzer have broken up. Marvin and Trina are planning Jason's bar mitzvah and tensions are high. And since this is about gay men in the 80s, AIDS is pretty prominent.

    The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer
    GA, AZ Republicans to testify on Trump's push to overturn election

    The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 38:32


    The January 6th select committee just revealed new details about its hearing tomorrow. Aids are promising more evidence that former President Trump was involved in a fake electorals plot as part of his bid to overturn the 2020 election results. Also, President Biden is considering a temporary pause in the federal gasoline tax as Americans look for relief from high prices. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

    Kelly and Wood Podcast
    Mullets, Marital Aids and Winstock

    Kelly and Wood Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 38:58


    Today we checked back in with Sara to see if she talked to her co-worker about her paycheck with Why Talk on Monday, Kelly couldn't stop laughing over something immature with the Trash Flash, plus Missed Connections and the We Fest Word Game!

    MacGuffin Podcast
    109 - Hustle

    MacGuffin Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 83:59


    This week we discuss the best and worst of Adam Sandler's acting/producing career and we review his latest basketball movie, Hustle. For our streaming homework, we talk about the 2012 documentary How to Survive a Plague, which covers the activism around the early years of the AIDS epidemic.   

    Talk Heathen
    Talk Heathen 06.25 06-19-2022 with Katy Montgomerie and Kenneth Leonard

    Talk Heathen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 99:11


    Welcome to Talk Heathen! Today host Katy Montgomerie is joined by the amazing Kenneth Leonard who will talk with callers who present a number of ideas to them for contemplation, and talk about wasp facts involving caterpillar AIDS. In light of Father's Day, who was the worst dad in the Bible? Abraham? Lot? Noah? Jephthah? How about Yahweh himself?First up is Davan in NE who argues the soul could potentially exist partly because of having out of body experiences, even though rationally he attributes these experiences to a dream. The idea of the soul as originally brought out by the texts is valid is his stance. How can any given experience be evidence for a soul if we know these things happen in the brain? Why would we use the “soul” label? Does the soul have some other component that is not part of the brain or body?Next is Teo from Croatia who wants to talk about the possibility of a heathen experiencing a Christian god. Would you agree that it is possible for people to imagine things that are logical and make sense? How do we tell the difference between experiencing a god and our imagination? Is it possible to believe things on faith that are not true? How do you know you have had an experience with a god and if it is true? Why should anybody believe that a god has manifested anywhere? Could your same reasoning prove a genie? If you can't prove something does not exist, does that mean you can prove that it does exist?Judy from IN has an insight that we are stardust because fluorine from another planet is connected to the fluoride in our body. Katy explains who things formed including large stars, nuclear fusion, and supernovas. Scientific claims need to be supported by evidence. Truth is valued differently in the scientific community than it is the Christian community. If we have a claim, we should be able to test that model.Tony in NY feels that atheism only works in the physical world and that money is a god that we worship. Does not believing in Santa Clause only work in the physical world? Money is real and has transactional value as currency. What is the evidence of there being a non-physical world? Why do you think that thoughts are not physical? What in money maps the claim that god exists? Is there anything that religion is essential for, and we could not achieve through secular means? As atheists, we are not saying religions do not exist. We are only saying it is possible to exist without religion.Chris in Scotland would like to know if it is possible to be moral without knowing how bad you can be. He wants to know if you can truly know the best without knowing the worst. Morals are not well defined. Without defining morals, this statement is as ridiculous as not running a marathon if you never had cancer. Can you climb Mt. Everest without making your bed?Thank you for joining us today and to the essential workers! We will see you next week!

    Our Body Politic
    Remembering Urvashi Vaid and Creating Liberation

    Our Body Politic

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 50:44


    This week, Our Body Politic honors politics and pride, featuring a past interview between Farai and the late intersectional activist, lawyer, educator and author Urvashi Vaid who led movements for a range of progressive issues, including AIDS advocacy, LGBT rights and prison reform. The pair discuss Vaid's legacy as a leading figure in social change and what it truly takes to change the lived experience of everyone— to achieve lived equality. Then in our series, “Our Body Politics Presents…” we feature the podcast Truth Be Told with host Tonya Mosley who interviews minister and writer Danté Stewart about how to cultivate “little experiments of liberation” while experiencing and navigating repetitive acts of American violence.

    What The Duck?!
    Koala AIDS (that's all we need!)

    What The Duck?!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 25:16


    How much more can the koala bear?  

    Bitch Talk
    Frameline Film Festival - Directors Bill Horner + Stacey Woelfel and featured subjects Pam Ling + Judd Winick of the documentary Keep the Cameras Rolling: The Pedro Zamora Way

    Bitch Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 17:21


    It's a pivotal moment in Bitch Talk herstory. We were able to "sit down" with Real World San Francisco cast members (and storytellers) Pam Ling and Judd Winick as well as directors Stacey Woefel and Bill Horner from the documentary Keep the Cameras Rolling: The Pedro Zamora Way.All of us at Bitch Talk were teenagers when this season of The Real World came out and it was a game changer. We were all affected by this season and knew deep down it was different. And, during San Francisco's Frameline Film Festival, you can see how an activist named Pedro Zamora changed the conversation about being a person who was  living with HIV and then subsequently dies of AIDS. We spoke with Stacey, Bill, Pam, and Judd  about why this film is coming out now, what they may have learned about Pedro that they didn't know while the doc was being made, landing a sit-down interview with President Bill Clinton, what it was like to know Pedro as a friend, how Pedro's family feels about the film, and so much more. It was and is an honor to have all of these folks on our show and to be able to talk about Pedro was healing. His presence was felt during this interview and we're moved to keep his memory and activism going -- even if it's just a small part.  We walked away from the interview knowing we need more Pedros in this world. --You can see Keep the Camera's Rolling: The Pedro Zamora Way at the Frameline Film Festival on June 20 at the Castro Theater and streaming online on June 24 - June 30--Follow Keep the Cameras Rolling on IG , Twitter ,  Facebook, and their websiteFollow Stacey Woelfel on IG, Twitter, and FacebookFollow Bill Horner on IG and FacebookFollow Judd Winick on IG, Twitter, Facebook and at his websiteFollow Pam Ling on IG--Thanks for listening and for your support! We couldn't have reached 600 episodes without your help! --Be well, stay safe, Black Lives Matter, AAPI Lives Matter, and thank you for being vaxxed and masked!--SUPPORT US HERE!Subscribe to our channel on YouTube for behind the scenes footage!Rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts!Visit our website! www.bitchtalkpodcast.comFollow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.Listen every other Thursday 9:30 - 10 am on BFF.FMPOWERED BY GO-TO Productions