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We are a world-leading authority on global security, political risk and military conflict. We were founded in 1958, and have offices in London, Washington, Singapore and Bahrain.

International Institute for Strategic Studies


    • Aug 31, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • monthly NEW EPISODES
    • 34m AVG DURATION
    • 93 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from Sounds Strategic

    Russia's invasion of Ukraine: six months on

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 48:28


    Since the start of Russia's war against Ukraine, the world has witnessed unprecedented sanctions against Russia, and military and humanitarian support for Ukraine against a backdrop of ongoing military campaigns and loss of civilian life. In this episode of Sounds Strategic, host Meia Nouwens is joined by four IISS experts to discuss the past six months, and what's next in terms of military operations, political strategies and economic sanctions. Meia Nouwens and IISS experts Dr Maria Shagina, Dr Nigel Gould-Davies, Franz-Stefan Gady and Henry Boyd discuss: The state of Russian and Ukrainian armed forces The impact of sanctions on the civilian and military sectors in Russia Eastern Europe and the role of Turkey Military aid the next six months Host and speakers:Meia Nouwens, IISS Senior Fellow for Chinese Defence Policy and Military Modernisation | Twitter: @MeiaNouwens | Meia Nouwens (iiss.org) Dr Maria Shagina, Diamond-Brown Research Fellow for Economic Sanctions, Standards and Strategy | Twitter: @maria_shagina | Maria Shagina (iiss.org) Dr Nigel Gould-Davies, Editor, Strategic Survey; Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia | Twitter: @Nigelgd1 | Dr Nigel Gould-Davies (iiss.org) Franz-Stefan Gady, Senior Fellow for Cyber, Space and Future Conflict | Twitter: @HoansSolo | Franz-Stefan Gady (iiss.org) Henry Boyd, Research Fellow for Defence and Military Analysis | Henry Boyd (iiss.org) We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts. Date of recording: 23 August 2022 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    NATO's new Strategic Concept

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 32:50


    NATO held its Madrid summit on 28-30 June 2022 against the backdrop of Russia's war of aggression against Ukraine and the signing of an accession protocol for Finland and Sweden to join the alliance. Podcast host Meia Nouwens is joined by IISS experts to discuss the adoption of the new Strategic Concept, its ambitions and challenges. Meia Nouwens and IISS experts Dr Bastian Giegerich, William Alberque, Dr Simona Soare and Fenella McGerty discuss: NATO's conventional force and tasks NATO's nuclear posture and arms control NATO's defence spending ambitions NATO's innovation efforts Host and speakers: Meia Nouwens, IISS Senior Fellow for Chinese Defence Policy and Military Modernisation | Twitter: @MeiaNouwens | Meia Nouwens (iiss.org) Dr Bastian Giegerich, Director of Defence and Military Analysis | Dr Bastian Giegerich (iiss.org) William Alberque, Director of Strategy, Technology, and Arms Control | Twitter: @walberque | William Alberque (iiss.org) Fenella McGerty, Senior Fellow for Defence Economics | Twitter: @FMcGerty | Fenella McGerty (iiss.org) Dr Simona Soare, Research Fellow for Defence and Military Analysis | Twitter: @Simona_Soare | Simona Soare (iiss.org) We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts. Date of recording: 12 July 2022 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2022: Reflections (part two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 30:41


    The IISS Shangri-La Dialogue was back with a bang earlier this month and underlined the prime importance of in-person defence diplomacy. In the second part of our reflections, guest host James Crabtree is joined by IISS colleagues Dr Lynn Kuok, Dr Euan Graham and Aaron Connelly to discuss Asia's premium defence summit and what stood out for them. Topics include: First plenary speech by Lloyd J. Austin III, Secretary of Defense, US US-China relations and Taiwan Australia, Pacific Islands and AUKUS European contribution to the IISS Shangri-La Dialogue with France and the Netherlands Southeast Asia and the armed conflict in Myanmar Guest host: James Crabtree | @jamescrabtree | James Crabtree (iiss.org) Speakers: Dr Lynn Kuok, Shangri-La Dialogue Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Security Editor, Asia-Pacific Regional Security Assessment | @LynnKuok | Lynn Kuok (iiss.org) Dr Euan Graham, Shangri-La Dialogue Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Security | @graham_euan | Dr Euan Graham (iiss.org) Aaron Connelly, Senior Fellow for Southeast Asian Politics and Foreign Policy | @ConnellyAL | Aaron Connelly (iiss.org) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2022: Reflections (part one)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:12


    The IISS Shangri-La Dialogue was back with a bang earlier this month and underlined the prime importance of in-person defence diplomacy. For the first time a crisis in Europe loomed large over Asia's premier security summit, which took place in Singapore on 10-12 June 2022. Guest host James Crabtree is joined by IISS colleagues William Alberque, Nigel Gould-Davies, Meia Nouwens and Yuka Koshino to share their expert opinions. Topics include: US-China relations and great-power competition Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the impact on Asia Keynote Address by Japan's Prime Minister Kishida Fumio and his administration's response to the war in Ukraine Arms control and non-proliferation Taiwan Guest host: James Crabtree | @jamescrabtree | James Crabtree (iiss.org) Speakers:   William Alberque, Director of Strategy, Technology, and Arms Control | @walberqueNigel Gould-Davies, Editor, Strategic Survey; Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia | @Nigelgd1 Meia Nouwens, IISS Senior Fellow for Chinese Defence Policy and Military Modernisation | @MeiaNouwens Yuka Koshino, Research Fellow for Security and Technology Policy | @YukaKoshino We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts. Date of recording: 22 June 2022 Shangri-La Dialogue 2022 transcripts and recorded sessions are available here: IISS Shangri-La Dialogue - Asia's premier defence summit Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    It's Back: IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2022

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 24:14


    It's back! Asia's premier security summit, the IISS Shangri-La Dialogue, will take place in Singapore on 10–12 June 2022. In this episode, guest host James Crabtree, Executive Director IISS-Asia, is joined by IISS colleagues Meia Nouwens, IISS Senior Fellow for Chinese Defence Policy and Military Modernisation, and Aaron Connelly, Senior Fellow for Southeast Asian Politics and Foreign Policy, to discuss themes and topics of the upcoming event. At a time of ever-greater focus on the geopolitical and defence dynamics of the Asia-Pacific, the importance of in-person debate among the region's key actors is greater than ever. The IISS Shangri-La Dialogue is a unique platform for such debate, enabling government ministers and senior officials, as well as business leaders and security experts, to come together to share fresh perspectives on Asia's developing security challenges.The focus of the episode's discussion will include:US-China relationsSoutheast Asia and regional securityThe impact of the war in UkraineEurope and the Indo-Pacific Guest host and speakers:James Crabtree | @jamescrabtree | James Crabtree (iiss.org)Aaron Connelly | @ConnellyAL | Aaron Connelly (iiss.org)Meia Nouwens | @meianouwens | Meia Nouwens (iiss.org) For more information about IISS Shangri-La Dialogue 2022 please visit our website The International Institute for Strategic Studies (iiss.org)Follow us on Twitter | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram | FacebookWe hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.​Date of recording: 31 May 2022​Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Russia's invasion of Ukraine: one month on

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 45:38


    Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February 2022 and it remains an ongoing war. In this new Sounds Strategic episode, host Meia Nouwens is joined by Dr Nigel Gould-Davies, William Alberque and Franz-Stefan Gady to discuss the conflict through military, economic and political lenses.Meia and her guests address some of the most pressing questions in the international security community, share their observations on past and future challenges, and offer their perspectives on some of the unprecedented developments.- Military operations and the performance of the Russian armed forces- Disinformation warfare- Russia's failed statecraft in Europe- Sanctions and their intended impact- Multinational response to the crisis- NATO, EU and minilateral alliances Speakers:Host: Meia Nouwens, Senior Fellow for Chinese Defence Policy and Military Modernisation | Twitter: @MeiaNouwens | Latest research: Meia Nouwens (iiss.org) Guests:Dr Nigel Gould-Davies, Editor, Strategic Survey; Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia | Twitter: @Nigelgd1 | Latest research: Dr Nigel Gould-Davies (iiss.org)William Alberque, Director of Strategy, Technology, and Arms Control | Twitter: @walberque | Latest research: William Alberque (iiss.org)Franz-Stefan Gady, Research Fellow for Cyber, Space and Future Conflict | Twitter: @HoansSolo | Latest research: Franz-Stefan Gady (iiss.org)We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.​Date of recording: 29 March 2022Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS. For more expert analysis and commentary visit https://www.iiss.org See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Europe in the Indo-Pacific: Common ground?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 45:34


    France, Germany, the UK, the Netherlands and the European Union have published Indo-Pacific strategies, all of which foresee a greater economic, political and security relationship with the region. Military engagement of European powers in the maritime domain has received significant attention in 2021, following the deployment of the US, UK and Netherlands navies in the Carrier Strike Group 2021 voyage, the deployment of the German frigate the Bayern, and a continued French naval presence in the region.   To discuss the realities, practicalities and prospects of European naval engagement in the Indo-Pacific region, host Meia Nouwens is joined by IISS experts Nick Childs, Euan Graham and Hugo Decis.  Topics include: Where can European navies best contribute to security in the Indo-Pacific region? How can European powers coordinate their engagement better? And how much has AUKUS derailed the possibility of collaboration between Europeans, the Americans and Australia in the future?   Guest speakers: Nick Childs, Senior Fellow for Naval Forces and Maritime Security Dr Euan Graham, Shangri-La Dialogue Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Security Hugo Decis, Research Analyst for Defence and Military Analysis ________________________________________________________________ We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts. Date of recording: 17 November 2021 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    IISS Manama Dialogue 2021: Reflections

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 39:03


    In this episode, host Meia Nouwens is joined by Sir Tom Beckett, Dr. Hasan al Hasan and Camille Lons to discuss the key themes from the 17th IISS Manama Dialogue, which was held in Bahrain From the 19th to the 21st of November 2021. The Manama Dialogue is an annual international security and regional diplomatic summit held in Bahrain that brings together high level representation from governments and stakeholders from across the Middle East and beyond. This year's event covered key regional security developments ranging from questions about the US security commitment to the region, the growing relationship between the Gulf and Asia, the cautious optimism around de-escalation efforts, the potential role of minilateral diplomacy in the region, and a renewed focus on the Red Sea as a geopolitical arena with its own unique dynamics. _________________________________________________________________We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on your favourite podcast platform. Date of recording: 25 November 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.To find out more, please visit https://www.iiss.org See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Strategic Survey 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 34:30


    From a cooperation deficit to the prospect of conflict over Taiwan, Strategic Survey 2021 outlines the wide array of challenges faced by the international rules-based order, and shows that great-power competition is becoming more prevalent and complex.To mark the launch of the annual flagship publication and discuss the main themes and topics, host Meia Nouwens is joined byDr Nigel Gould-Davies | Editor, Strategic Survey; Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia Nigel Inkster | Senior Adviser for Cyber Security and China Dr David Gordon | Senior Adviser for Geo-Economics and Strategy _________________________________________________________________We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts. Date of recording: 25 October 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.To find out more, please visit https://www.iiss.org See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Armed Conflict Survey 2021

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 39:47


    Despite the coronavirus pandemic, mobility restrictions and calls from the UN for a global ceasefire, the number of conflicts hit a record high in 2020, with more active conflicts than at any time since 1945. To mark the launch of The Armed Conflict Survey 2021, host Meia Nouwens is joined by some of the team behind the annual flagship report exploring the political, military and humanitarian impacts of active armed conflicts across the world. Whilst the world has been battling the coronavirus pandemic, a more familiar challenge has continued unabated – armed conflict. The coronavirus pandemic has caused huge economic damage and human suffering. This has added fuel to the fire of social and political instability, with a legacy that is likely to be felt for years to come. The Armed Conflict Survey raises important questions about how conflict is changing, who the main actors are and how conflicts can be resolved. It looks at new technologies and explores the trends and risks that are likely to shape conflict in the years ahead. To discuss these important topics, Meia Nouwens is joined by: Dr Irene Mia - Editor of the Armed Conflict Survey and Senior Fellow for Latin America and Conflict, Security and Development Dr Benjamin Petrini, Research Fellow for Conflict, Security and Development Dr Samir Puri, Senior Fellow in Urban Security and Hybrid Warfare _________________________________________________________________We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic.Date of recording: 13 September 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    IISS–Europe in Berlin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 37:43


    In this special episode of Sounds Strategic to mark the opening of the IISS–Europe office in Berlin, we meet key members of our new European research team. From great-power competition to state-led influence operations, and arms control to emerging and disruptive technologies, they explain how the IISS will bring a unique perspective to the European strategic debate. Joining host Meia Nouwens to discuss the strategic questions that the Institute's new European research agenda seeks to address are: Dr Ben Schreer, Executive Director, IISS–Europe; William Alberque, Director of Non-Proliferation and Nuclear Policy; Dr Simona Soare, Research Fellow for Defence and Military Analysis; and Thornike Gordadze, Senior Fellow for Statecraft and Influence Networks. As Ben explains, with IISS–Europe now fully open for business, the Institute is uniquely placed to facilitate a debate on key strategic questions in Germany and Europe as a whole, and between policymakers and industry alike. William, Simona and Thornike each explain the research themes that will dominate their work in the coming months, including arms control and non-proliferation initiatives, great-power competition, setting rules and norms for outer space and the cyber domain, the uses and challenges of emerging and disruptive technologies, and the changing, multidimensional influence operations of revisionist states. _________________________________________________________________ We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts. Date of recording: 31 August 2021 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Technology and security in urban landscapes

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 36:05


    In this episode, host Meia Nouwens is joined by Dr Samir Puri, IISS Senior Fellow in Urban Security and Hybrid Warfare, and Antônio Sampaio, Senior Analyst at the Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime, to discuss how technology impacts urban security and the democratic landscapes of cities. With over half of the world's population living in cities, new technologies, such as smart cities or surveillance tech, have increasingly been leveraged to make life in cities safer and more efficient. This includes leveraging technology to combat crime and terrorism, to respond to natural disasters or to improve the quality of life of citizens. New technologies are also starting to play an important role in political landscapes, for example by connecting people in protest movements. But these technologies can also be leveraged to other ends: to suppress protesters and restrict freedom of speech. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 13 August 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Belarus one year on

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 26:49


    In this Sounds Strategic episode, Meia Nouwens is joined by Dr Nigel Gould-Davies, Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia, Strategic Survey Editor and former ambassador to Minsk, to reflect on the protest movement in Belarus and Alexander Lukashenko's regime.One year after an implausible election result ignited mass protests across Belarus, Nigel joins Meia to discuss authoritarian leader Alexander Lukashenko's rule, the relationship between Putin's Russia and Lukashenko's Belarus, and why the 2020−21 protests became so widespread. Can Lukashenko, the autocratic president of Belarus since 1994, regain the legitimacy he has lost? And what is his standing within the country today? We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 5 August 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    40th Fullerton Lecture: US Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 26:28


    This special episode of Sounds Strategic explores the significance of the 40th Fullerton Lecture, which US Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III delivered on Tuesday 27 July 2021. Podcast host Meia Nouwens is joined by James Crabtree, Executive Director of IISS–Asia, Dr Euan Graham, Shangri-La Dialogue Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Security, and Aaron Connelly, Research Fellow in Southeast Asian Political Change and Foreign Policy. Secretary Austin's visit was the first to Southeast Asia by a member of US President Joe Biden's cabinet. In his Fullerton Lecture on ‘The imperative of partnership', the Secretary made the case for the United States' role as a reliable partner in helping nations in the Indo-Pacific make their own choices and ‘build back better' after COVID-19. Watch the recorded lecture on our website - The International Institute for Strategic Studies (iiss.org) _________________________________________________________________ We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts. Date of recording: 29 July 2021 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Chinese Communist Party at 100

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 33:07


    In this episode of Sounds Strategic, special guest host James Crabtree is joined by Meia Nouwens, Senior Fellow for Chinese Defence Policy and Military Modernisation, and Nigel Inkster, Senior Adviser for Cyber Security and China, to examine China's domestic and international outlook. As China marks the centenary of its ruling party, James, Meia and Nigel assess what this anniversary signifies for the Chinese Communist Party and how strong the party is today.James, Meia and Nigel also discuss why the centrality of the party is so important to President Xi Jinping, where the relationship between the CCP and the People's Liberation Army stands today, what to take away from Xi's anniversary speech and where the party goes from here._________________________________________________________________We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 21 July 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How does climate change impact global security?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 34:25


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by Ben Barry, Senior Fellow for Land Warfare, and Shiloh Fetzek, Associate Fellow for Conflict, Security and Development, to discuss the implications of climate change for global security and defence.With climate security rising on the global security agenda, Meia, Ben and Shiloh discuss the impact of climate change on the strategic environment, how existing security challenges are made worse by climate-related impacts and the importance of integrating climate change considerations into national and multilateral security plans. Exploring the challenges ahead for defence and security establishments, Meia, Ben and Shiloh also consider how NATO, the G7, the European Union and the United Nations Security Council have addressed climate risk, as well as Biden's climate agenda and the UK Ministry of Defence's climate change strategy.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 9th July 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Measuring state cyber power

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 38:52


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by Greg Austin, Senior Fellow for Cyber, Space and Future Conflict, and Franz-Stefan Gady, Research Fellow for Cyber, Space and Future Conflict, to discuss the findings of a new IISS report on cyber capabilities and national power. A new report by the IISS has assessed the cyber power of 15 states, placing them into three tiers of capability. Following the launch of this major two-year study, Meia, Greg and Franz-Stefan discuss how to define and measure cyber power and who comes out on top.Meia, Greg and Franz-Stefan discuss the categories used to assess each country's cyber capabilities in the report, including strategy and doctrine, governance, cyber-intelligence capability, cyber security and resilience, global leadership and offensive cyber capability. According to the qualitative framework developed by IISS researchers, the United States is the only country with world-leading strengths in all categories, with China placed in the second tier of cyber powers. Meia, Greg and Franz-Stefan go on to discuss the role of political culture, organisational relationships and governance models in shaping the relationship between cyber capabilities and how they are used by a state actor on the international stage, what we know about the operational activities of the US, Russia and China, how much cyber industrial strength matters, the impact of political stability and instability on the development of cyber capabilities and how middle powers can compete with great powers in cyberspace.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 24 June 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Latin America's engagement with external powers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 41:03


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by Irene Mia, Editor of the Armed Conflict Survey and Senior Fellow for Latin America and Conflict, Security and Development, and Amanda Lapo, Research Associate for Defence and Military Analysis, to discuss geopolitical developments in Latin America.How has the shifting global geopolitical environment impacted Latin America? Meia, Irene and Amanda examine geopolitical competition in Latin America and the region's engagement with external powers. Irene argues that the Latin American order is no longer unipolar, highlighting China's inroads in the region and growing importance as a regional commercial partner. She also notes the role of the United States and questions surrounding the level of engagement to be expected from the Biden administration, stressing the impact migration flows have had on US policy towards the region. Amanda talks about military-to-military engagement between China and the region, arguing that China is now the third largest regional player after the US and Russia. She explains that relationships between China and countries in South America in particular have become more formal in recent years.Meia, Irene and Amanda also discuss vaccine and military diplomacy in the region, the Pacific Alliance and the ongoing election cycle in Latin American countries. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 11 June 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The UK's naval presence in the Indo-Pacific

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 33:27


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by Nick Childs, Senior Fellow for Naval Forces and Maritime Security, to discuss the United Kingdom's naval ambitions in the Indo-Pacific.Following the First Sea Lord's Sea Power Conference on 19 May 2021, Meia and Nick reflect on the UK's Carrier Strike Group and its deployment to the Indo-Pacific region, discussing who the UK is looking to strengthen its relationships with, how China will react to the deployment and what the view from the region is more generally. Meia and Nick also discuss how the Royal Navy can help small and medium powers manage grey-zone threats in the region, as well as how it is going to balance commitments to the Indo-Pacific and the Euro-Atlantic regions. With its limited resources, how prominent will the Royal Navy's Indo-Pacific presence be in the near future?We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 26 May 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Asia's regional security order

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 38:19


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by James Crabtree, Executive Director of IISS–Asia, to discuss the trends and developments that have shaped political and security dynamics in Asia in the past year. Meia and James explore some of the major thematic issues that will be covered at the 19th Shangri-La Dialogue on 4−5 June, including US−China competition, regional-security architectures, and the contributions of regional and extra-regional middle powers to security in Asia. They also consider India's role in regional security and in the Quad, the situation in Myanmar and its implications for ASEAN, the Biden administration's policy towards China and how countries in the region view the involvement of the United States in the regional security order.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 11 May 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    What next for Suga's Japan?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 35:18


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by Robert Ward, IISS Japan Chair and Director of Geo-economics and Strategy, and Yuka Koshino, Research Fellow for Japanese Security and Defence Policy, to unpack the policy priorities and challenges on Japanese Prime Minister Suga's 2021 agenda.Ahead of the next IISS Shangri-La Dialogue in June, Meia, Robert and Yuka discuss Japan's domestic political environment and the challenges Prime Minister Suga Yoshihide's administration will need to tackle in 2021. As Robert and Yuka explain, the administration's focus areas include the coronavirus pandemic and the country's slow vaccine rollout, the upcoming Tokyo Olympics, the Liberal Democratic Party leadership race, and Japan's 2021 general election.Robert and Yuka also explore Prime Minister Suga's economic agenda and progress towards digitalisation, foreign and security policy priorities and goals, the role of the United States in Japan's Indo-Pacific vision, and the impact of COVID-19 on structural reform and Japan's thinking on economic security.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 29 April 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    NATO and artificial intelligence

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 37:28


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by Erica Pepe, Senior Coordinator for Research and Conflict, Security and Development Analyst, and Franz-Stefan Gady, Research Fellow for Cyber, Space and Future Conflict, to discuss NATO and AI.Meia, Erica and Franz-Stefan explore the motivations behind NATO's focus on artificial intelligence (AI) and the future potential of this technology for security and defence. What role can NATO play in setting standards for the military use of AI?Erica and Franz-Stefan also explain why AI is so prominent in national-security thinking, noting the progress of the technology as well as the potential risks, challenges and ethical concerns associated with it. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 8 April 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Reviving the Iran nuclear deal: prospects and challenges

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 32:58


    In this episode, Sounds Strategic host Meia Nouwens is joined by John Krzyzaniak, Research Analyst for Non-Proliferation and Nuclear Policy, and Timothy Wright, Research Analyst and Programme Administrator for Defence and Military Analysis, to discuss Iran, its missile-development programme and the JCPOA. With a new, Democrat-led administration in power, is the United States in a better position to make progress on the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and negotiations with Iran? Meia, John and Timothy discuss where the JCPOA stands now, the impact of domestic politics in both Iran and the US on bilateral negotiations, and how far the Biden administration is willing to go to revive the agreement. Meia, John and Tim also consider the status of Iran's missile-development programme and the strategies that are driving Tehran's investment in it. While noting that missiles are likely to be an ongoing focus for any negotiations between the US and Iran in the future, they argue that it is unrealistic to expect Iran to restrict its missile programme. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 30 March 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The changing defence-industrial landscape

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 32:57


    In this episode, podcast host Meia Nouwens is joined by Tom Waldwyn, Research Associate for Defence Procurement, and Haena Jo, Research Analyst for Defence and Military Analysis, to discuss the increasingly diversified landscape of defence industry and defence procurement. With successive governments in Turkey, South Korea, Brazil and Poland having invested heavily in their defence industries in recent years, could these countries soon provide greater competition for Western and Russian defence companies? While the big defence companies are still at the top of the pecking order, Tom and Haena explain that today's defence-industrial landscape is more diversified. Meia, Tom and Haena also discuss the export successes of other emerging defence-industrial nations, as well as the challenges they are facing. Drawing in particular on examples from Turkey, South Korea and the United Arab Emirates, they highlight the importance of politics and political will in driving defence-industrial growth, and they note the different approaches that emerging defence-industrial countries have taken to get where they are today.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 18 March 2021 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Fragility and global (dis)order: lessons from North Africa

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 45:43


    In this episode, podcast host Meia Nouwens is joined by Dr Benjamin Petrini, Research Fellow for Conflict, Security and Development, and Dr Umberto Profazio, Associate Fellow for Conflict, Security and Development, to reflect on the concept of fragility.Approaching the concept of fragility in a multidimensional way, Meia, Benjamin and Umberto examine the origins of the term, as well as the misconceptions often associated with it. Benjamin and Umberto explain what a fragile country is, highlighting that fragility is not limited to countries experiencing conflict. Explaining that fragility affects stability through several different and interrelated channels, Benjamin and Umberto highlight various dimensions of fragility, including technological transformations and rapid changes in society, poverty, migration and forced displacement, weak institutions, environmental pressures, economic challenges and demographic pressures. Meia, Benjamin and Umberto also discuss the impact of COVID-19 on fragility, stressing that the toll of the pandemic will be higher on fragile countries than more stable ones. Noting that more and more states are exerting their influence in fragile countries, Benjamin and Umberto conclude that fragility can now be viewed through the prism of foreign policy and geopolitics.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 5 March 2021 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Global defence developments: 2020 and beyond

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 40:37


    In this episode of Sounds Strategic, Meia Nouwens is joined by Fenella McGerty, Senior Fellow for Defence Economics, and Henry Boyd, Research Fellow for Defence and Military Analysis, to discuss the global defence developments identified in the latest edition of The Military Balance. To mark the publication of The Military Balance 2021, launching today (25 February 2021), Meia, Fenella and Henry discuss recent developments in defence policy, military capability and defence economics. Highlighting the implications of the coronavirus pandemic and the landmark 2020 election in the United States for defence policymakers and industry, Fenella and Henry explore the current trajectory of global and regional defence spending, including in the Asia-Pacific, the Middle East, Africa and Europe, and broader defence developments. Despite wider economic difficulties caused by the pandemic, the stronger growth in global defence spending that was achieved in 2019 was maintained in 2020, they explain. Meia, Fenella and Henry also discuss China's investment in R&D, the challenges of calculating Chinese defence spending, and the role of unmanned aerial vehicles in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. The Military Balance is the Institute's annual assessment of global military capabilities and defence economics. The 2021 edition includes updated data on the military organisations, equipment inventories and defence budgets of 171 countries; region-by-region analysis of major developments affecting defence policy, procurement and defence economics; and assessment of key trends in the land, sea and air domains, as well as in cyberspace. Order your copy on Amazon or Routledge.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 18 February 2021 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Security on the Korean Peninsula after Trump: a new era?

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 32:12


    In this episode, Meia Nouwens is joined by Dr Euan Graham, Shangri-La Dialogue Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Security, and Joseph Dempsey, Research Associate for Defence and Military Analysis, to examine recent developments on the Korean Peninsula, including the current state of the relationships between the two Koreas and the United States, as well as other countries in the region. In this episode, Meia, Euan and Joseph discuss the tumultuous relationships between the US and the two Koreas under former president Donald Trump, as well as how these relationships might evolve as President Joe Biden settles into the White House. The US−South Korea relationship is ‘badly in need of repair', explains Euan, highlighting that there is a serious risk of strategic divergence in national-security interests between the two countries. The panel also explores the challenges facing Moon Jae-in's presidency in its remaining years, noting that balancing relations with the US and regional neighbours will require a coherent national strategy. Joseph gives an overview of recent developments in North Korea's submarine-launched ballistic-missile programme, explaining why Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions are worrying. The panel also considers the fragile state of the North Korean economy and the impact of COVID-19 on the country, how China views recent developments on the Korean Peninsula, and what to watch out for in 2021.Date of recording: 3 February 2021 Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London. Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Democracy prevails: what next for the US at home and abroad?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 32:19


    In this episode, Meia Nouwens is joined by Dr Ben Rhode, Editor of The Adelphi Series and IISS Senior Fellow for Transatlantic Affairs, and Dr Kori Schake, Director of Foreign and Defense Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute and former IISS Deputy Director-General. Together, they reflect on the legacy of the Trump presidency and also look ahead at what to expect from President Biden's administration. Starting with the significance of Joe Biden being sworn in and the self-conscious attempt at the inauguration to project unity, the podcast panel discusses what it means for the US government to return to being ‘boring and competent'. Meia, Ben and Kori also consider what long-lasting effect the violent insurrection of 6 January 2021 will have on domestic policy, and the continuing challenges posed by right-wing and online radicalisation, as well as QAnon conspiracy theorists. The panel then explores what Trump's legacy means both for Biden's aim of ending the ‘uncivil war', as well as for the Republican Party. They end by discussing what effect Trump's legacy will have on US foreign policies and considering how Biden will use his first 100 days to signal his prioritisation between domestic and foreign priorities.Date of recording: 21 January 2021Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Dangerous Decade: Taiwan's security and crisis management

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2021 35:43


    In the first IISS Sounds Strategic podcast of 2021, to coincide with the audiobook release of Brendan Taylor's Adelphi Series publication Dangerous Decade: Taiwan's Security and Crisis Management, Meia Nouwens and Brendan discuss the geopolitical importance of Taiwan and the challenges it faces in the coming year and beyond.Starting with President Tsai Ing-Wen's re-election in January 2020 and her government's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic that won international praise, the discussion moves to look ahead to potential security crises facing Taiwan. Brendan identifies US-China rivalry as a potential flashpoint and argues, ‘perhaps controversially', that the next crisis brewing over Taiwan will be more serious than previous ones as the geopolitical status quo affecting Taiwan begins to fracture. Meia and Brendan go on to discuss why Taiwan is strategically important for China, the likelihood of reunification and independence, whether there will be a major change in US-Taiwan relations under President Biden's administration, Taiwan's international standing, and where Taiwan could take advantage of the US-China trade war. Date of recording: 18 December 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Et tu 2021? Assessing the geopolitical challenges of the coming year

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 48:00


    After an unprecedented year in world affairs, Meia Nouwens speaks with Sarah Raine, IISS Consulting Senior Fellow for Geopolitics and Strategy, and Dr Nigel Gould-Davies, Editor of IISS' Strategic Survey and Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia in this special end-of-year episode. Researchers from across the IISS contributed their thoughts on the key geopolitical and security challenges from 2020 that will likely continue far into 2021. Among these, Meia, Sarah and Nigel discuss the continuing decline of multilateralism and the rules-based international order, the challenge of growing extraterritoriality in the Middle East and elsewhere, as well as the future of the US–China rivalry during a Biden presidency. Despite the difficulties of 2020, both Nigel and Sarah end on some points of optimism that could improve international relations in the coming year.We hope you enjoyed this special episode of Sounds Strategic and from all of us at the IISS, we wish you have a safe and festive new year. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 17 December 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The potential for hybrid warfare in the Asia-Pacific

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2020 32:00


    In this episode, Meia Nouwens is joined by Dr Samir Puri, The IISS' new Senior Fellow for Hybrid Warfare, for a discussion about the concept of ‘hybrid warfare' and its potential applications in the Asia-Pacific. Having observed the realities of hybrid warfare in the Donbas region in eastern Ukraine, Samir highlights the differences between ‘grey zone' and ‘hybrid warfare' activities.Meia and Samir then explore the possible applications of hybrid warfare in the Asia-Pacific, with a particular focus on how China could expand its regional influence through hybrid strategies and tactics. Samir also predicts that grey zone activity will likely become an increasingly common feature in international affairs in the 2020s as the United States clashes with China's efforts to establish its own informal empire. As a result, Samir suggests Western powers may need to revisit their hybrid warfare capabilities in this new multi-polar world order. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 2 December 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Great power competition in the Middle East

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2020 40:55


    In this special episode of Sounds Strategic, recorded ahead of the IISS Manama Dialogue 2020, Sir Tom Beckett speaks with Hasan Alhasan and Camille Lons about the key geopolitical challenges the Middle East has faced in 2020. Hasan and Camille highlight the economic damage caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to countries across the Middle East and how the pandemic has worsened the humanitarian situation in many of the region's ongoing conflicts, from Yemen to Libya.They also assess the wider geopolitical implications of the recent Abraham Accords between Israel and several Gulf states and how ongoing US–China competition may impact regional politics in 2021. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 24 November 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    NATO's China challenge

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2020 35:47


    In this week's episode, Meia Nouwens speaks with Helena Legarda, Senior Analyst at Mercator Institute for China Studies, on NATO's evolving, and often complex, relationship with China. Meia and Helena trace the history of the relationship, from the early antagonism following the 1998 Belgrade bombing of the Chinese embassy, through several years of tentative cooperation in the early 2000s, to growing hostility in the late 2010s as China's global ambitions and capabilities expanded.Both Helena and Meia agree that 2019 was a critical turning point in NATO–China relations and explore why NATO, and the EU, may struggle in developing a coordinated and robust policy to confront the multi-faceted strategic challenge presented by a rising China.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 17 November 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Kyrgyzstan's political future: Ambassador Edil Baisalov

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2020 41:47


    Kyrgyzstan's parliamentary elections on 4 October threw the country into political crisis. Claims that the elections were rigged sparked mass popular protests on the streets of Bishkek, the capital, which led to the resignation of Kyrgyzstani president, Sooronbay Jeyenbekov, on 15 October.In this special episode of Sounds Strategic, Nigel Gould-Davies, IISS Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia, speaks with the Kyrgyzstan Ambassador to the UK, H.E. Edil Baisalov on what the recent political upheaval means for Kyrgyzstan and the possible paths forward for the country.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 19 October 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Biden's foreign-policy priorities in Russia, Eurasia and Latin America

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 36:27


    In the second part of our US election podcast, Meia Nouwens speaks with Nigel Gould-Davies, Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia, and Irene Mia, Senior Fellow for Latin America, on the policy challenges the incoming Biden administration will face in both Russia and Latin America.Nigel explains that the election of Biden will strengthen American resolve to counter Russian influence in Europe and elsewhere. Nigel predicts renewed US engagement in the ongoing crises in Ukraine and Belarus as part of the new administration's wider efforts to bolster democracy and human rights internationally. However, the maintenance of the New START agreement will likely be Biden's first priority once in office from 20 January 2020.Irene details the vast array of challenges President-elect Biden will face in Latin America, from political instability in Venezuela to continued immigration from Mexico and Central America. Irene raises concerns over possible political instability in the region, due to the devastation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to many Latin American economies. However, Irene also notes that the region offers opportunities for the new US administration to support local efforts to address these emerging crises.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 9 November 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Biden's foreign-policy priorities in China and the Middle East

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2020 33:25


    In this two-part episode, Meia Nouwens speaks with IISS experts on the foreign-policy priorities the incoming Biden administration will likely address over the next four years.In part one, Euan Graham, Senior Fellow for Asia-Pacific Security, discusses how leaders in the Asia-Pacific, including China, have reacted to the election result and the policy implications a Biden presidency may have. He foresees alliances making a welcome return to the region, but warns that domestic concerns over COVID-19 could limit US foreign-policy ambitions.John Raine, IISS Senior Adviser, focuses on the possible policy changes a Biden administration would introduce to the Middle East. He expects Biden will take a much different approach towards the Gulf states and recommit to defending human rights across the region. However, any US attempts at re-engagement with Iran and ongoing conflicts in the region may become hamstrung by political considerations back home.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 9 November 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Trump, Biden and the future of America

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2020 46:52


    The upcoming US presidential election between President Donald Trump and former vice president Joseph Biden may prove to be one of the most contentious in US history. In this episode, Dana Allin, Senior Fellow for US Foreign Policy and Transatlantic Affairs, and David Gordon, Senior Adviser for Geo-Economics and Strategy, discuss each candidate's prospects and how the Trump administration has impacted the United States' political system and international reputation.David and Dana agree that this election will prove pivotal for the future of America and its place in the world. They also discuss the policy implications of a two-term Trump presidency or a new Biden administration for US allies and adversaries alike. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 20 October 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Will there be a NEW START for arms control?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2020 44:50


    The collapse of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty last year increased concerns that the international architecture around arms control was weakening further. With other agreements up for renewal or under renewed scrutiny, what does the future hold for arms control between the US, Russia and China? In this week's episode, Meia Nouwens speaks with three IISS Missile Dialogue Initiative specialists on the current politics around arms control and the new technologies that risk complicating future arms-control efforts.Douglas Barrie and Timothy Wright from the IISS and Pavel Podvig from the UN Institute for Disarmament Research explain why it is such a critical time for arms control and the importance of agreements such as the Open Skies Treaty and the NEW Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty for regional and global stability. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 5 October 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    NATO and the US pivot to Asia

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 39:08


    The recent dispute between Greece and Turkey has again raised questions around the sustainability of the NATO Alliance. However, one of the Alliance's loudest critics in recent years has been US President Donald Trump, despite the United States' critical role within it. But are such criticisms political rhetoric or are they part of a wider strategic recalculation by the US as its national security concerns outside of Europe multiply?Meia Nouwens discusses this question with IISS–Americas Executive Director EJ Herold and Research Fellow Henry Boyd in this episode of Sounds Strategic. As Henry and EJ explain, there is increasing evidence that the US Department of Defense considers China, rather than a resurgent Russia, as its greatest strategic challenge for the foreseeable future. They also discuss how this rebalancing of US strategic priorities towards the Asia-Pacific will adversely affect the European member states of NATO, especially in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 22 September 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Policing in the developing world

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2020 40:01


    This week, Antonio Sampaio is joined by Ignacio Cano, Alice Hills and Tessa Diphoorn for a wide-ranging discussion on the challenges of policing in the developing world, with a particular focus on Brazil, Kenya and Somalia.Ignacio, Alice and Tessa each describe the different forms of policing in each country, from extreme militarisation in Rio de Janeiro to sporadic and limited policing in Somalia and Kenya. However, they all highlight how corruption, limited state capacity and domestic politics impact policing and undermine a state's willingness and ability to police in vulnerable and marginalised communities.They also examine how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted policing in recent months, as well as explore some of the positive signs in police reform coming out of Kenya.Dr Ignacio Cano is a member of the Laboratory of Violence at Rio de Janeiro State University and is currently visiting researcher at the Safety Lab in Cape Town, South Africa.Dr Alice Hills is Visiting Professor at the University of Leeds focusing on police development in sub-Saharan Africa and Somali security governance.Dr Tessa Diphoorn is Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands and is currently researching policing in Kenya. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 28 August 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Remembering the lessons of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2020 33:24


    On 6 and 9 August 1945, the US military bombed the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki using a weapon of unprecedented destructive capability, the atom bomb. These bombings marked the beginning of the nuclear age and remain the only use of a nuclear weapon in an active conflict.To commemorate the 75th anniversary of these events, Meia Nouwens is joined by Dana Allin, Senior Fellow for US Foreign Policy and Transatlantic Affairs, and Mark Fitzpatrick, Associate Fellow and former Executive Director of IISS–Americas, to discuss the legacy of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the lessons that are at risk of being forgotten today.They discuss the narrative around the use of the atom bomb, its impact on the national psyche of Japan and its role in creating the nuclear taboo and, eventually, the concept of nuclear deterrence through mutually assured destruction. Both Dana and Mark argue that it falls to today's leaders to remember the lessons of the past and to slow the recent erosion of nuclear arms controls.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 25 August 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ‘We're all diplomats now': managing political risk in the modern era

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2020 32:26


    In this week's episode of Sounds Strategic, Meia Nouwens is joined by John Raine, Senior Adviser for Geopolitical Due Diligence, and Dr Nigel Gould-Davies, Senior Fellow for Russia and Eurasia and Editor of the Strategic Survey, for a discussion on political risk and ‘corporate foreign policy'.The economic instability caused by the COVID-19 crisis, coupled with the intensifying geo-economic rivalry between the US and China, has increased economic instability and dampened corporate prospects globally. John and Nigel argue that these factors have increased the need for robust ‘foreign policy' among all public-facing organisations, from multinational corporations to universities. For them, good corporate foreign policy assesses, plans for and proactively addresses political risk in its many forms to better insulate companies and organisations from the highly politicised economic headwinds already gathering in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. John and Nigel also discuss the growing power of corporations within the international system and the underlying risks created by the intermingling of economic and defence concerns most clearly seen in the current US–China tech war.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 12 August 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How to understand China, its ambitions and potential

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2020 45:56


    To celebrate the 50th episode of Sounds Strategic, Robert Ward, Director of the Geo-economics and Strategy programme at the IISS, hosts Meia Nouwens and Nigel Inkster for a fascinating and wide-ranging conversation on China, its foreign-policy motivations and what its possible dominance in technology could mean for the West.In the episode, Meia and Nigel examine the limits of China's assertive, ‘wolf-warrior' approach to foreign affairs. They discuss whether China's recent behaviour is part of a grand strategic vision or simple opportunism at a time of increased international instability during the COVID-19 crisis.At the heart of Western concerns around Huawei is China's potential to dominate the tech sector in the future. Meia and Nigel both highlight the dangers of decoupling from China and instead stress the importance of effective engagement as a means to ensure the West's continued prosperity and to manage the political and economic challenge China represents in the 21st century.Meia and Nigel also discuss the possible futures of Taiwan and Hong Kong, the impact of COVID-19 on the political authority of President Xi Jinping and whether a possible Biden presidency could meaningfully change US–China relations.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 29 July 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Free to choose? How Southeast Asian nations view the US–China rivalry

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2020 24:21


    Following a special presentation by US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, Meia and Antônio speak with Research Fellow Aaron Connelly on how the United States' strategy towards Southeast Asia is viewed by Southeast Asian countries themselves. In the episode, Aaron explains why Secretary Esper's recent remarks may indicate US policymakers are moving away from large-scale multilateral initiatives and towards ‘minilateralism'. Aaron also explores why some Southeast Asian states stand by a policy of non-alignment, despite Beijing's heavy-handedness in recent years. In addition, Meia, Antônio and Aaron discuss how US Freedom of Navigation Operations (FONOPs) in the South China Sea have changed over the years, recent tensions within the US–Philippines relationship, and upcoming elections in Malaysia.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 22 July 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Future warfighting: placing doctrine before technology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2020 36:20


    With the return of great-power competition to the forefront of international affairs, there has been a renewed focus among the world's advanced militaries on what capabilities will be required to win or compete in possible conflicts in the future. In this week's episode, Franz-Stefan Gady joins Meia and Antônio to discuss the concepts that underpin debates around future warfighting, and why doctrinal and organisational considerations will play an equal, if not greater, role for military planners looking to prepare for the future.They also discuss the limits of ‘grey-zone' conflict, why authoritarian regimes may struggle to develop effective military organisational structures and how COVID-19 could impact military operations.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 15 July 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Divided we stand: the EU's domestic- and foreign-policy agenda

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2020 44:34


    Europe was already facing a host of complex geopolitical and economic challenges at the start of 2020, even before the COVID-19 crisis. In this week's episode, Meia is joined by Sarah Raine and Fabrice Pothier for a wide-ranging and in-depth discussion on how the EU's political agenda has been impacted by the pandemic and what issues remain at the forefront of its policy priorities.Domestically, the EU has experienced profound disruption because of COVID-19. Fabrice and Sarah examine how European states and the EU have responded to the crisis, as well as what this disruption means for Germany's presidency of the Council of the European Union. They also discuss the prospects and dynamics of upcoming UK–EU negotiations.The EU is also managing a busy foreign-policy portfolio. Fabrice and Sarah explore the EU's complex relationship with China, which is at once a ‘systemic rival' to the EU as well as its global ‘partner'. They also assess the state of transatlantic affairs, NATO and the possibility of French-led rapprochement with Russia. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 2 July 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    China's growing presence in the Gulf

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 31:14


    China has been expanding its economic and diplomatic reach in the Gulf for little over a decade, but should growing Gulf–China relations concern the United States? In this week's episode, Camille Lons speaks with Antônio and Meia on the dynamics of China's growing presence in the Gulf, how it has evolved in recent years and its limitations. At its core, China's interest in the Gulf remains primarily economic rather than security driven. As a result, Gulf states will continue to look to the US as the region's security guarantor. However, as Camille explains, the recent development of a Chinese base in Djibouti and increasing arms sales to the Gulf from China are significant additions in the Gulf–China relationship.Much will be determined by the post-COVID-19 recovery. Camille explains that the increasing diversity in China's energy mix may in turn weaken revenues in the Gulf. It is not yet clear how Belt and Road Initiative projects in the region will be affected, but, with increasing collaboration on high-technology projects, China's presence in the Gulf will likely continue to grow into the future.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 23 June 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Japan's delicate dance for influence in the Asia-Pacific

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2020 32:24


    Japan was already heading towards economic difficulties before the COVID-19 pandemic shut down the world's economy. How will Japan's economy fare in the post-COVID period? And will it affect the country's geostrategic and geo-economic ambitions? In this week's episode, Meia discusses these questions with Robert Ward and Yuka Koshino.Robert explains that Japan will likely experience a severe economic shock in the post-COVID period. This will likely have negative implications for the re-election prospects of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, but Robert asserts that Japan will seek to maintain its position as a counterbalance to China in the Asia-Pacific region.Yuka highlights the various defence concerns facing Japan, including an increasingly assertive China and a hostile regime in North Korea. She explains how Japan remains committed to the US alliance and engaged with regional and extra-regional partners.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 16 June 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The future of European defence spending in a post-COVID world

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 31:12


    The profound economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has led some to question the utility and necessity of traditional defence spending as a means of ensuring national security, especially in Europe. In this week's episode of Sounds Strategic, Antônio speaks with Bastian Giegerich and Fenella McGerty on why defence spending remains important and the implications of the COVID-19 crisis for European defence projects, NATO and the future of the transatlantic relationship.Fenella explains how this current economic crisis is fundamentally different compared to the financial crisis in 2008–09 and why its impact on defence spending will be more complex as a result. Bastian argues that effective defence spending will be critical for Europe in the post-COVID period and highlights the challenges the EU and NATO will face if the US becomes a less reliable ally in the defence of Europe at a time of heightened global competition. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 10 June 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Caught in shifting tides: ASEAN, Australia and the geopolitics of the South China Sea

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2020 55:12


    In this week's episode, Meia is joined by Lynn Kuok and Euan Graham for an in-depth discussion on what China's activity in the South China Sea means for ASEAN, Australia, the US and Europe, and whether such actions are indicative of shifting geopolitical power dynamics.Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, China has maintained a constant presence in the South China Sea, even encroaching on the Exclusive Economic Zones of several Southeast Asian countries, including Indonesia, Vietnam and Malaysia. Lynn explains the factors hindering ASEAN's ability to curtail such Chinese activity and Euan assesses how Australia is adapting its foreign relations in response to China's rising status within the international community.Meia, Lynn and Euan also consider the strategic implications of the new Chinese national security laws being imposed on Hong Kong and how they may impact China's policy towards Taiwan and its foreign policy more broadly.We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 4 June 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The end of US supremacy at sea? China and Russia's naval ambitions and how to counter them

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2020 31:24


    This week, Meia and Antônio are joined by Nick Childs, Senior Fellow for Naval Forces and Maritime Security, for a conversation on the increasingly contested realm of maritime security, how Russia and China are developing their naval capabilities, and what technologies could revolutionise defence affairs at sea in the near future.During the episode, Nick explains why the traditional naval supremacy the US and its allies have enjoyed in recent decades is now eroding, as Russia and China develop their own maritime capabilities, and what impact this may have on both US power projection and global security at sea.They also discuss the specific capabilities Russia and China are adding to their respective navies and why uninhabited systems may be the new frontier for naval competition. We hope you enjoy listening to the episode. Don't forget to follow, rate and subscribe to Sounds Strategic on wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.Date of recording: 2 June 2020Sounds Strategic is recorded and produced at the IISS in London.Theme music: ‘Safety in Numbers' by We Were Promised Jetpacks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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