Podcasts about Yemen

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Country on the Arabian Peninsula

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Latest podcast episodes about Yemen

ePub feed of Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship

Abstract: Latter-day Saint scholars generally agree that “the place called… Nahom,” where Ishmael was buried (1 Nephi 16:34) is identified as the Nihm tribal region in Yemen. Significantly, a funerary stela with the name y s1mʿʾl — the South Arabian equivalent of Ishmael — was found near the Nihm region and dated to ca. 6th […] The post An Ishmael Buried Near Nahom first appeared on The Interpreter Foundation.

Noticias ONU
Día de la Alimentación, elecciones en Venezuela, refugiados en Afganistán, hambre en Nigeria… Las noticias del viernes

Noticias ONU

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:39


El titular de la ONU advierte que el hambre, la subalimentación y la obesidad van en aumento. Las Naciones Unidas enviarán a Venezuela un Panel de Expertos Electorales para las próximas elecciones regionales y municipales. Piden agilizar los procedimientos de reunificación familiar para los afganos. Se necesitan 55 millones de dólares para alimentar a medio millón de nigerianos. La ONU solicita un alto el fuego en Yemen para asistir a 35.000 personas.  

UN News
News in Brief 15 October 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:03


Displaced in northeast Nigeria ‘knocking on door of starvation': WFP  Yemen ceasefire needed urgently to gain access to thousands in need  Rights experts lead tribute to slain French teacher Samuel Paty 

Inglês com Rhavi Carneiro
Fluency News #55

Inglês com Rhavi Carneiro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:16


What is up, everyone! Welcome to another episode of our podcast series, Fluency News! Here, you'll have the opportunity to train your listening skills and be up to date with what's happening in the world. We present you with some of the most important stories of the week, in English, and add snippets of explanations in Portuguese on what we think requires more attention. In today's episode, you'll hear about the oil spill that is threatening the lives of nine million people in Yemen. We'll also talk about Bolsonaro's decision to block the distribution of free sanitary pads and tampons for people in need and Ontario's decision and agreement to do the exact opposite. We'll also talk about the new treatment that might eradicate Lyme disease and a very peculiar lawsuit. Visit fluencytv.com to have access to more free content and check out our Instagram page, @fluencytvingles! We have a new episode of Fluency News every week, and we'll be waiting for you! This episode was written by Lívia Pond.

Newshour
Putin blames Europe for high gas prices

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:30


Russian President Vladimir Putin has denied allegations that Russia is using its control of gas supplies to Europe as a bargaining tool. During a wide-ranging television interview, Putin said it was Europe's failure to plan that was to blame for soaring gas prices. We get the reaction of a European MEP. Also in the programme: why France is reducing its military presence in Mali; and the huge, rusting oil tanker off Yemen which could blow up, or sink, at any moment and cause a catastrophe. Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin is seen on a screen as he delivers a speech at the Russian Energy Week International Forum in Moscow Credit: REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

Garage Logic
10/12 A dead ship, Phillips Cunningham is a liar, John Gruden, and a great story from Mora Mn

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 95:31


We discover a story about a so called dead ship off the coast of Yemen. The oil tanker holds 1 million barrels of oil and the vessel has fallen into extremely dangerous disrepair. Minneapolis city council rep Phillipe Cunningham now claims he was tricked into standing on a stage that said Defund the Police. Jason Whitlock asks did John Gruden merely violate the woke commandments? Johnny Heidt with guitar news.

Lock and Code
ExpressVPN made a choice, and so have I

Lock and Code

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 38:56


On September 14, the US Department of Justice announced that it had resolved an earlier investigation into an international cyber hacking campaign coming from the United Arab Emirates, called Project Raven, that has reportedly impacted hundreds of journalists, activists, and human rights defenders in Yemen, Iran, Turkey, and Qatar.  But in a bizarre twist, this tale of surveillance abroad tapered inwards into a tale of privacy at home, as one of the three men named by the DOJ is Daniel Gericke, the chief information officer at ExpressVPN. Which, as it just so happens, is the preferred VPN vendor of our host David Ruiz, who, as it just so happens, has spent much of his career explicitly fighting against government surveillance. And he has some thoughts on the whole thing. 

PICK UP THE SIX® Productions
#PUT6 ARCHIVE | PODCAST #1: CDR. KIRK LIPPOLD, USS COLE (ANNIVERSARY OF ATTACK ON 10/12/00)

PICK UP THE SIX® Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 45:45


RECORDED AND RELEASED ON FEBRUARY 18, 2021 AND PULLED FROM THE #PUT6 ARCHIVES ON 21-YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF THE ATTACK ON THE USS COLE (10/12/00). -- Before 9/11 there was 10/12. Kirk Lippold, US Navy (Ret.), was the Commander of the USS Cole on October 12th, 2000. This was roughly one year before the World Trade Center was destroyed in New York City, before the Pentagon was attacked, before the plane went down in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and before more than 3,000 people were killed at the hands of radical Islamic terrorists all on American soil. On October 12th, 2000 the USS Cole, while refueling in the port of Aden, Yemen was attacked. Some might say a precursor to 9/11. Men and women in the uniform of the United States Navy lost their lives. The moments immediately following the attack, and the subsequent days that exemplify picking up the six through service before self. Commander Lippold joined the podcast to talk about how his sailors truly lived for others in a moment of extreme crisis.

New Books in History
Ozan Ozavci, "Dangerous Gifts: Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:28


From Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the foreign interventions in the ongoing civil wars in Syria, Yemen, and Libya today, global empires or the so-called Great Powers have long assumed the responsibility to bring security in the Middle East.  The past two centuries have witnessed their numerous military occupations to 'liberate', 'secure' and 'educate' local populations. They staged first 'humanitarian' interventions in history and established hitherto unseen international and local security institutions.  Consulting fresh primary sources collected from some thirty archives in the Middle East, Russia, the United States, and Western Europe, Dangerous Gifts: : Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864 (Oxford University Press, 2021) revisits the late eighteenth and nineteenth century origins of these imperial security practices. It explicates how it all began.  Why did Great Power interventions in the Ottoman Levant tend to result in further turmoil and civil wars? Why has the region been embroiled in a paradox-an ever-increasing demand despite the increasing supply of security-ever since?  It embeds this highly pertinent genealogical history into an innovative and captivating narrative around the Eastern Question, emancipating the latter from the monopoly of Great Power politics, and foregrounding the experience of the Levantine actors.  It explores the gradual yet still forceful opening up of the latter's economies to global free trade, the asymmetrical implementation of international law in their perspective, and the secondary importance attached to their threat perceptions in a world where political and economic decisions were ultimately made through the filter of global imperial interests. Available via Open Access here. Ozan Ozavci is Assistant Professor of Transimperial History at Utrecht University, and associate member at the Centre d'Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques in Paris. Kirk Meighoo is Public Relations Officer for the United National Congress, the Official Opposition in Trinidad and Tobago. His career has spanned media, academia, and politics for three decades. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in World Affairs
Ozan Ozavci, "Dangerous Gifts: Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:28


From Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the foreign interventions in the ongoing civil wars in Syria, Yemen, and Libya today, global empires or the so-called Great Powers have long assumed the responsibility to bring security in the Middle East.  The past two centuries have witnessed their numerous military occupations to 'liberate', 'secure' and 'educate' local populations. They staged first 'humanitarian' interventions in history and established hitherto unseen international and local security institutions.  Consulting fresh primary sources collected from some thirty archives in the Middle East, Russia, the United States, and Western Europe, Dangerous Gifts: : Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864 (Oxford University Press, 2021) revisits the late eighteenth and nineteenth century origins of these imperial security practices. It explicates how it all began.  Why did Great Power interventions in the Ottoman Levant tend to result in further turmoil and civil wars? Why has the region been embroiled in a paradox-an ever-increasing demand despite the increasing supply of security-ever since?  It embeds this highly pertinent genealogical history into an innovative and captivating narrative around the Eastern Question, emancipating the latter from the monopoly of Great Power politics, and foregrounding the experience of the Levantine actors.  It explores the gradual yet still forceful opening up of the latter's economies to global free trade, the asymmetrical implementation of international law in their perspective, and the secondary importance attached to their threat perceptions in a world where political and economic decisions were ultimately made through the filter of global imperial interests. Available via Open Access here. Ozan Ozavci is Assistant Professor of Transimperial History at Utrecht University, and associate member at the Centre d'Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques in Paris. Kirk Meighoo is Public Relations Officer for the United National Congress, the Official Opposition in Trinidad and Tobago. His career has spanned media, academia, and politics for three decades. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Ozan Ozavci, "Dangerous Gifts: Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:28


From Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the foreign interventions in the ongoing civil wars in Syria, Yemen, and Libya today, global empires or the so-called Great Powers have long assumed the responsibility to bring security in the Middle East.  The past two centuries have witnessed their numerous military occupations to 'liberate', 'secure' and 'educate' local populations. They staged first 'humanitarian' interventions in history and established hitherto unseen international and local security institutions.  Consulting fresh primary sources collected from some thirty archives in the Middle East, Russia, the United States, and Western Europe, Dangerous Gifts: : Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864 (Oxford University Press, 2021) revisits the late eighteenth and nineteenth century origins of these imperial security practices. It explicates how it all began.  Why did Great Power interventions in the Ottoman Levant tend to result in further turmoil and civil wars? Why has the region been embroiled in a paradox-an ever-increasing demand despite the increasing supply of security-ever since?  It embeds this highly pertinent genealogical history into an innovative and captivating narrative around the Eastern Question, emancipating the latter from the monopoly of Great Power politics, and foregrounding the experience of the Levantine actors.  It explores the gradual yet still forceful opening up of the latter's economies to global free trade, the asymmetrical implementation of international law in their perspective, and the secondary importance attached to their threat perceptions in a world where political and economic decisions were ultimately made through the filter of global imperial interests. Available via Open Access here. Ozan Ozavci is Assistant Professor of Transimperial History at Utrecht University, and associate member at the Centre d'Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques in Paris. Kirk Meighoo is Public Relations Officer for the United National Congress, the Official Opposition in Trinidad and Tobago. His career has spanned media, academia, and politics for three decades. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books Network
Ozan Ozavci, "Dangerous Gifts: Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:28


From Napoleon Bonaparte's invasion of Egypt in 1798 to the foreign interventions in the ongoing civil wars in Syria, Yemen, and Libya today, global empires or the so-called Great Powers have long assumed the responsibility to bring security in the Middle East.  The past two centuries have witnessed their numerous military occupations to 'liberate', 'secure' and 'educate' local populations. They staged first 'humanitarian' interventions in history and established hitherto unseen international and local security institutions.  Consulting fresh primary sources collected from some thirty archives in the Middle East, Russia, the United States, and Western Europe, Dangerous Gifts: : Imperialism, Security, and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864 (Oxford University Press, 2021) revisits the late eighteenth and nineteenth century origins of these imperial security practices. It explicates how it all began.  Why did Great Power interventions in the Ottoman Levant tend to result in further turmoil and civil wars? Why has the region been embroiled in a paradox-an ever-increasing demand despite the increasing supply of security-ever since?  It embeds this highly pertinent genealogical history into an innovative and captivating narrative around the Eastern Question, emancipating the latter from the monopoly of Great Power politics, and foregrounding the experience of the Levantine actors.  It explores the gradual yet still forceful opening up of the latter's economies to global free trade, the asymmetrical implementation of international law in their perspective, and the secondary importance attached to their threat perceptions in a world where political and economic decisions were ultimately made through the filter of global imperial interests. Available via Open Access here. Ozan Ozavci is Assistant Professor of Transimperial History at Utrecht University, and associate member at the Centre d'Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques in Paris. Kirk Meighoo is Public Relations Officer for the United National Congress, the Official Opposition in Trinidad and Tobago. His career has spanned media, academia, and politics for three decades. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Simple English News Daily
Tuesday 12th October 2021. World News. Today: Yemen oil tanker. Pakistan PM attacks India. Iraq shia wins. Australians go outside. Ethiopia

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 7:52


World News in 7 minutes. Tuesday 12th October 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: Yemen oil tanker. Pakistan PM attacks India. Iraq shia wins. Australians go outside. Ethiopia army attacks. Burkina Faso assassination trial. Brazil Bolsonaro blocks tampons. Chile Piñera corruption. Austria new chancelor. Poland Pro EU protests. Greece robot postmen.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Around The Empire
Ep 237 Realignments in the Middle East & Africa feat Isa Blumi

Around The Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 66:57


Guest: Dr. Isa Blumi. This is a wide-ranging discussion about the political realignments in the Gulf states, new partnerships in the Middle East and Africa, Qatar's involvement in the withdrawal from Afghanistan, developments in Yemen, quiet military repurposing of strategic island of Socotra, the long and complicated exploitation of East Africa, the Red Sea region and Horn of Africa, the mass of military bases in Djbouti, the Turkey-Russia relationship and more. For those listening to the audio version of this podcast, we have added many maps and other visual enhancements to the video version that you might find helpful during some of this discussion so if you are interested you can find those versions on Youtube and Rokfin right now and other video platforms in the not too distant future.  Dr. Isa Blumi is an historian, an author and Professor of Global History, Islamic World, Ottoman Empire, Yemen, Albania. His most recent Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us about the World tells the story of the wars in Yemen but also “ultimately tells an even larger story of today's political economy of global capitalism, development, and the war on terror as disparate actors intersect in Arabia.”  He also authored the book Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939: Migration in a Post-Imperial World FOLLOW Isa Blumi @IsaBlumi and find his work at Google Scholar and his latest book at UCPress.edu.  Around the Empire aroundtheempire.com is listener supported, independent media. SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW on Rokfin rokfin.com/aroundtheempire, Patreon patreon.com/aroundtheempire, Paypal paypal.me/aroundtheempirepod, YouTube youtube.com/aroundtheempire, Spotify, iTunes, iHeart, Google Podcasts FOLLOW @aroundtheempire and @joanneleon.  Join us on TELEGRAM https://t.me/AroundtheEmpire Find everything on http://aroundtheempire.com  and linktr.ee/aroundtheempire Recorded on October 6, 2021. Music by Fluorescent Grey. Reference Links: Book: Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us about the World  

UN News
News in Brief 11 October 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 3:11


Yemen's future still fragile, warns senior aid official Deadly new Ebola virus outbreak confirmed in DR Congo Countries bear cross-border responsibility for harmful climate impacts, says UN Child Rights Committee 

Status/الوضع
Connections, Ep. 1: The Biden Administration and the Middle East with Noam Chomsky

Status/الوضع

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:26


In the inaugural episode of Connections, Jadaliyya co-editor Mouin Rabbani interviewed Noam Chomsky on March 17th, 2021 to discuss U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East under Biden. The interview examines the Biden administration's Middle East policies, explores elements of continuity and change in US policy towards the region after the Trump years, and discusses what recent developments regarding Iran, Yemen, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia portend for the coming years.  

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Noach - Join Geoffrey Stern, Rabbi Adam Mintz and Pastor Dumisani Washington of IBSI - Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel and Christians United For Israel for a live recording of a discussion on Clubhouse Friday October 8th with the Pastor regarding his book Zionism and the Black Church: Why Standing with Israel Will Be a Defining Issue for Christians of Color in the 21st Century. We follow a less traveled path down Noah's family tree. We discover the Biblical Mission of Africa and the bond between the Children of Shem and the Children of Ham. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/352058  Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 [To Reverend Dumisani Washington] Thank you so much for being with us. On on our clubhouse when you come up to the platform, we say first of all that you're coming up to the bimah [the podium or platform in a synagogue from which the Torah and Prophets are read from]. And then second of all, when we make you a presenter, we give you smicha... So that means that you are ordinated. So instead of Reverend, we'll call you Reb. Is that okay? Dumisani Washington  00:20 That sounds good to me. Sounds good, no problem. Geoffrey Stern  00:23 So anyway, welcome to Madlik. Madlik is every week at four o'clock, and we do record it and post it as a podcast on Sunday. And if you listen to it, and you'd like what you hear, feel free to share it and give us a few stars. And what we do is disruptive Torah. And what we mean by disruptive Torah is we look at the ancient text of the Torah, with maybe a new lens, or to see a new angle. And today, I'm delighted to say that we're not only looking at it through a new lens, but we're looking at it through another lens, a lens of a pastor, of a man of God, who we will learn about his mission. I heard about it on clubhouse one evening, I was scrolling, and I stumbled upon you Reverend, and you're on a mission and you see Judaism and you see Zionism from a whole new perspective. So I want to thank you for coming on. And I want to say that, as I told you, in my email that I sent you that you know, every week about Saturday on Shabbat, on Sunday, I start thinking about what I'm going to pick as a subject matter for the coming Madlik session. And I purchased your book maybe two months ago, and it was sitting by the side of my bed, and for some reason, and of course, I'm sure there are no coincidences in this world. I picked it up this Shabbat. And it starts with our portion of Noah, it starts by talking about the line less traveled by us Jews of Shem's son Ham. And I should say that nothing is written for no reason in the Bible. And when it gives you a genealogy, it's because of what comes in the future. And many of us Jews will look at the genealogy in Genesis 10. And focus on Shem... with Semites. And that's where the name comes from. And we go down that path, and your book starts. And of course, I should say that your book is called "Zionism and the Black Church, Why Standing with Israel will be a Defining issue for Christians of color in the 21st Century". And it begins by traveling down this path less taken, of Ham. Welcome to Madlik.  But if you could begin by touching upon our portion of the week, no off and and and discussing what you see in it, and maybe your mission. Dumisani Washington  03:06 Absolutely. And thank you, again, Rabbi for having me on. Yes, there are six chapters in "Zionism in the Black Church". And the first chapter is entitled The African Biblical Tie to Israel. And so we as I say, in the book started the beginning, right, we start at the beginning of the Scriptures, and so as you know, between the two portions of "Bereshi"  I believe whether the towards the end is when Noah was first introduced, but of course in "Noach" there's the explanation of the nations where all the nations of the earth come from, from Noah's three sons Shem, Ham, and Jafet. And so we recognize that in the Scriptures, it is said that Ham has four sons. And there's a couple of unique things as you know, you read the book, that the scriptures that in the law of Moses deals, Psalms and some of the prophets, there's a term that's given several times in the scripture about Ham's descendants harms the sentence differently, then either Jafet or Shem.  The land of Ham is actually something that's in the scriptures. And I don't know what that Hebrew word is ... "Aretz Ham" ... I never looked at that part of it, Rabbi but it talks about that, which is really interesting because there's not, to my knowledge, and I've kind of looked at for a little while, a similar rendering like the Land of Japhet or Land of Shem. Right? We're obviously the genealogy is there, right? But there's not the same thing that deals with the land and the peoples .... interesting and we've come to know that of the four sides of Hem, which are in order Kush, which you know, is where obviously the Hebrew for later on Ethiopia I believe is a Greek word, but from that region Mitzrayim, which is Egypt. Fut or Put which is Libya, and then Canaan, which is Canaan, right? So those four sons who come from him. But interestingly in the scriptures when it says land of Ham, it almost exclusively refers to Egypt and Ethiopia, what we would call today, Africa, right? This region. And again, you're talking about an antiquity these regions were much broader in size. And they are today if you look at the map today, you see Egypt as a small state and go down to the south, west, south east, and you'll see Ethiopia then you see Yemen, you see Kenya, well, obviously all those states weren't there that happened much later in modernity is particularly after the colonial period where those nations were carved up by a few states in Europe, and they were given certain names everything right, but these were regions in the Bible. And so Kush, the land of Kush, and the land of Mitzrayim, they're actually dealt with many, many times. Right? After the words obviously "Israel" and "Jerusalem". You have the word Ethiopia, I believe one of the Ethiopian scholar says some 54 times or something like that the word Ethiopia actually comes up in the Bible, obviously not as many times as Israel or Jerusalem but more than virtually any other nation other than Egypt. Right? So Egypt obviously that we know too. Africa plays a huge role in Israel's story right? The 430 years in slavery is in Africa, right? The Torah was received at Sinai: Africa. All these things happen in Africa. At some point God tells Jeremiah during the time of the impending doom, the exile that will happen at the hand of of Nebuchadnezzar and God says to to the Israelites to the Judeans, and "don't run down into Egypt, Egypt won't be able to save you." Why does he say that? Well, because historically the Israelites would go to Egypt when it until it got safer, right? For those Christians who may be on the call, you'll know that in the New Testament, Jesus, his parents take him down into Egypt because Herod's gonna kill him. Right? So there's this ongoing relationship between Ham and Shem, that's very intertwined. Moses, his wife, or his second wife, depending on how you interpret it....  Some of the sages. She's Ethiopian, right? She's kushite. So you have this interchangeable thing all the time, throughout the scriptures, but actually starts with the genealogy. And I'll say just one last thing, rabbis ..... we're opening up. This is also unfortunately, as I mentioned, the book as you know, the misnomer of the quote unquote, "Curse of Ham", as we know in the text, Ham is never cursed for what happens with Noah it is Canaan that is cursed. And he actually says, a curse that Canaan become a servant of servants shall he be, even though it was Ham who however you interpreted.... I've heard many different interpretations of "uncovered the nakedness he saw his father, naked," but somehow, for whatever reason, Noah cursed Canaan, not Ham.  Who is Canaan...  is one of him so's, his fourth son, as we know those who are listening, you may know that it is The Curse of Ham, quote, unquote, that has been used sadly, unfortunately, among many other things as a justification of the slavery of Africans. Right? That somehow, Africans are quote, unquote, "Cursed of Ham", therefore, the transatlantic slave trade, the trans Saharan slave trade, those things are somehow...  God prescribed these things in the Bible, the curse was making him black. That's why he's like all those things that are nowhere in the text whatsoever, right? skin color is not in the text. slavery as a descendant of Ham. None of those things are in the text. What's in the text? Is that Canaan is cursed for that? And so we start there, Rabbi, and from there trying to walk out this whole Israel Africa thing. Adam Mintz  08:47 First of all WOW... thank you so much. I just want to clarify in terms of color, I think that's a very interesting thing. It's very possible that in the biblical period, everybody was dark. Dumisani Washington  09:00 Yes, sir. I mentioned that in the book as well. But yes, sir. Yes, yeah. All right. Sorry, Adam Mintz  09:04 I didn't see that in your book. But that's important, you know, because a lot of people are caught up in this color thing. Did you know that there's a distinction, we don't know it for sure but it makes sense that everybody was dark in those periods. So that the difference in color was not significant. So when, when Moses marries goes to Ethiopia, maybe is king of Ethiopia, and marries an Ethiopian. And the idea is that he marries a foreigner. The fact that she's darker may or may not have been true.   Dumisani Washington  09:39 Yes, absolutely. No, thank you Rabbi. And I do touch on that, as well. We say in the terms in this modern term, even in my book, I use the term Christians of color and I don't usually use those terms just in when I'm speaking. I did it that way in the title so that it would be presented in a way that is going to deal with some provocative things but hopefully the people that they read it they'll see what I mean by that and if you're talking about the Israelite people, the Hebrew people they are what I call an afro Asiatic people. Israel is still at that at the point of where those two continents meet right Southwest Asia northeast Africa is landlocked with Egypt I tell people God opened up the Red Sea because he wanted to right ... He's big and bad and he can do what he wants to do but you can literally; I wouldn't recommend it obviously, but you could literally walk from Egypt to Israel and you always have been able to for 1000s of years that has always been the case and so you have a people that in terms of skin tone or whatever... Yes, absolutely, they would be what we would call today quote unquote people of color right and so unfortunately particularly in our country we all know race and colorism is such a huge topic and it's often so divisive and it's used in so many different ways and we know much of that goes back to whether slavery, Jim Crow, people being assigned work obviously based on how dark or light they are all of those things but the problem as you all know is that those things aren't in the Bible right? There's no God likes this person doesn't like this person, this person's dark this person's like, that type of thing. But again, that's what men do, we are fallen creatures, we read what we want to read into the text, and then we use it unfortunately, in a way that's not helpful. Let me just say and pause here, I can tell you that as a Christian pastor, over the years of my just delving into what we often call the Jewish roots of our faith, by studying Torah with rabbis and with other Jewish scholars, my faith has been more important to me than ever in that it helps me understand even more so right, what is the Hebrew in this word here? What do the sages say about that, that's been a fascinating journey for me, over the last 30 some odd years since I've been doing this particular work. Geoffrey Stern  11:58 So I just want to jump in, you said so many things. But there is in this verse that we are reading today, the word "ashkenaz", he was one of the children of of Shem, and you quote, an Ethiopian Rabbi named Ephraim Isaac, and this is a sample of some of the humor in your book or the sense of discovery. And somebody said to him, You don't look Jewish. And he said:, "Ethiopia is mentioned the Bible over 50 times, but Poland not once." And I feel like that was, that was a great line. And what it really talks to is our preconceptions, and your book, and your vision, and your mission breaks preconceptions of what it is to be a Jew, what the mission of a Jew is, but most importantly, what the relationship is between the Jewish people and the African people. And one of the things that you touched upon was the sense of Mitzraim and Kush , and in your book, you really talk about how many times they're interchangeable, because really, it is the same area and those of us who think about Mitzrayim, or Egypt, we focus on the Exodus story, we focus on the pharaoh story. But as you mentioned, the prophets later on, we're having to talk to the Jews about not going back, because ultimately, the experience in Egypt was always favorable, it was our neighbor, and it was our place of refuge. Abraham goes down there with Sarah twice, Jacob sends his kids down there during a time of famine. The relationship and the reference to a Ham and to Mitzrayim  and to Kush is a very positive one. And yes, it does say in our week's parsha of all of the children, it says, "b'artzetam v'goyehem" , that they have a special language, and they have a family and they have a land. So the fact that we are neighbors is so important in the biblical context. So I said if we were going to walk down this wonderful path, and I would love for a second to talk about your mission about reuniting our two peoples and some of the challenges that you have. Clearly you don't speak to groups like us very much, although I think that I'm going to have an opportunity later to say that I think you should, because there's so much that we can learn. But what is your mission? How did you discover it? And what are your challenges? Dumisani Washington  14:40 Well, I'll do it concise, just because I don't want to take up too much time to firstly touch as much as we can. I am the founder and CEO of an organization called The Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel. I started it in 2013 but for about nearly seven years, I was not as active I started it. I did a lot of touring and a lot of speaking throughout the United States, churches, sometimes synagogues as well. And with this mission, it was a mission that was really placed in my heart. Actually in 2012, my first trip to Israel, I went as a guest of Christians United for Israel, I would come later on to join the staff with CUFA. But I was a guest pastor, I knew some friends who were part of the organization. And the short version of that story was my first tip ever, I'm in Israel, I'm at the Western Wall of the kotel. And I have a very intense experience in which I feel although Africa and Israel were passions of mine already, but the fusing of those two things together and a real work in which we continue to strengthen the alliance between Israel and Africa. And then obviously, in the States in the black and Jewish community. And there and finished the first edition of the book now, what you have there Rabbi is the second edition. And we started this organization for that very purpose to do both of those things continue to strengthen the black Jewish relationship, and also the Israel Africa Alliance. And so the challenges have been probably more than any other thing disinformation, right? There's a lot of false information that's there, when it comes to those things that would seek to divide and separate when you're talking about whether Africa Israel, now we're talking about the modern state of Israel, obviously, the rebirth of Israel in 1948. Israel's close ties with African nations throughout the continent, starting especially with Golda Meir, the foreign minister, all the way up into the 70s, where you have, as I mentioned in the book, Israel has more embassies throughout Africa than any other nation other than the United States, African economy, some of them are thriving, a great deal. You have a lot of synergy between the African nations and Israel. And after the Yom Kippur War in 1973, like never before Israel's enemies target that relationship between Israel and its African neighbors for different reasons. One of those is voting in the United Nations, right? And that became very much of a challenge. So one of the greatest challenges is, is information. What we share in the book and when we do our organization, we teach what we call an organization "Authentic History” is really simply telling what happened, how did something [happen]. Whether we're talking about biblically, whether we're discussing the parsha or we're talking about historically, right? We're talking about what the relationship was, and is. Why those connections there? And I'll just give one quick example if you're talking about black Jewish synergy in the United States, not just Dr. King's relationship with Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel in the civil rights community, not that it happened, right? But why, what was that synergy about? Right? So we've delve into that. We share from the documents from the Rabbinical Assembly; Dr. King's most famous words regarding Israel that were recorded 10 days before he was killed, right, why? And as a pastor, what we call a prophetic moment. Why 10 days before he's taken from us, is he telling the black community in the world to stand with Israel with all of our mind and protect its right to exist? Why is he saying these things? What's so important about it. And even the generation before? Why was it a black and Jewish man who changed the trajectory of this nation, Booker T. Washington, and Julius Rosenwald; millions of now first and second generation, slave; free slaves, right? but who had no access to education, not in a broader sense, and why that synergy saw some 5400 Rosenwald schools built throughout the segregated south. We touch on those historical points, and we delve into why that black Jewish synergy has been so powerful for so many people for so long. So that is our mission to strengthen those ties, because we believe that there's a great future ahead. Geoffrey Stern  19:05 You did such amazing research. I mean, I can tell you I never knew that Herzl said about Africa, "that once I have witnessed the redemption of Israel, my people, I wish to assist in the redemption of the Africans." And that is taking a small quote out of a full paragraph where the histories of the two people are so similar. I mean, it comes to us as a pleasant surprise, these synergies but it shouldn't because both our peoples have really traversed and continue to reverse the same pathway. And you quote Marcus Garvey and even Malcolm X and William Dubois. Malcolm X says "Pan Africanism will do for the people of African descent all over the world, the same that Zionism has done for Jews. All over the world." there was a sincere admiration for this miracle of a people returning to its land, we were talking before you came on about this whole kind of image of an ark. And it reminds you of Odesyuss... and it reminds you of all of these stories of man going on this heroic journey to find their their roots to come back, gain, experience and come back to their homeland, to their Aretz.. On the one hand, your job should be very simple. I guess, like any other fights, the closer you are, the bigger the friction can be. And there's nothing bigger than the friction between brothers. But it's such a challenge to address, as you say the misinformation. Dumisani Washington  20:51 Absolutely. And this is, again, why that's our primary goal. And then as part of what our mission is, we have launched here just recently, an initiative called The PEACE initiative. And PEACE is an acronym for Plan for Education, Advocacy, and Community Engagement, and the short version of that, again: We recruit young, black American and African young people from certain cities throughout the United States, a group of them, they go to a 16 week study course having some of the same conversations we're having now, including the modern state of Israel, ancient Israel, the United Nations, all these things that intersect when it comes to the black Jewish relations, then they will travel to Israel for about 10 days, and returned to the cities from where they've been recruited, and be the hub of black Jewish synergy in their communities. We believe with our organization that one of the reasons for the synergy that we've seen in the past, whether it was at the turn of the century with Booker T Washington, and Julius Rosenwald, or the mid part of the century with Dr. King and Rabbi Heschel, right now we are in different challenges, there are challenges that face particularly the more vulnerable black communities. And we see that that synergy could really address so many issues, whether it's education, whether it's jobs, those types of things, they can be really be addressed in a very holistic way. And really harnessing that synergy between the black and the Jewish community. And this is what we are doing. An Israel advocacy that is also rooted in these communities. And it's amazing. We see already rabbis and black pastors are working together all over the country. So that continues to happen. But we want to highlight those things even more and go even further in meeting some of the challenges what we call MC ambassadors will be leading that in different cities across the country. Geoffrey Stern  22:02 That's amazing. I want to come back to this sense of self-discovery and pride. And we always talk about it from our own perspective. So if you're African American, you want to make sure that your children believe that black is beautiful, that they come from an amazing heritage to be proud of who they are. And if you're Jewish, you want the same thing. But it seems to me, and you kind of cage the question in this way, "Why standing with Israel will be a defining issue for Christians of color", when we as Jews can see ourselves in the black community as we did during the civil rights movement that redeems us. And that empowers us. And I think what you're saying, and I don't want to put words into your mouth, but the same thing works in reverse. That in a sense, when the African community can recognize in Israel, its own story. It also can find a part of itself. Is there any truth there? Dumisani Washington  23:50 I believe so Rabbi. I believe that that's exactly as a matter of fact, what we saw was the synergy. So let me use the example and go back to the early 1900s with Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald. The way that story happens, as you may know is that Booker T Washington writes his seminal book "Up From Slavery". Julius Rosenwald, who lives in Chicago at the time, is very active in his community. As a matter of fact, he was active, using his wealth; of those of you who don't know of Sears Roebuck fame, he is the one who took his company to this whole different level, economically and everything. And so with his wealth as a businessman, he's helping the Jews who are being persecuted in Russia. And one of his own testimony, I don't say this part of the book, but I kind of alluded to it, that here he is driving to work from the suburbs to where his factory is where his store is, and he's passing by throngs of black people who've left the South, right? looking for a better life, but they're living in very, very bad conditions, a lot of poverty and everything. And he says to himself, basically, if I'm going to do all of this to help Russian Jews right, way over the other side of the world, and I have this human crisis right here, where I live, I want to be able to do that and his, his Rabbi was Emile Hirsch, one of the founding members of the NAACP. Right? So his Rabbi encourages him. And we see this with our Jewish brothers and sisters all the time, see yourself, do help, do use your wealth, use your ability, right? To help. And so he reads Booker T. Washington's book he's taken with him, they begin to correspond. And Booker T. Washington says, Here's how you can help me I'm trying to build schools for my people who don't have access. And Rabbi to your point. Here is this man, this Jewish man who is very well aware of his history, he knows his People's History of persecution and struggle and triumph, right? Very much sees himself in that black story, and then he uses his ability. It's amazing even what he does; there's a Rosenwald film about Rosenwald schools, I believe his children were the ones who produced it. And they were saying that what he actually did was pretty ingenious, he put up a third of the money, the black community raised a third of the money, and then he challenged the broader white community to partner with them and bring the last third and that is how those Rosenwald Schools began.  Because what he wanted to do, he wanted to see people come together, he wanted to see them all work together. Even though Booker T. Washington passes away only three years into that, right, that venture continues on Julius Rosenwald goes and sits on the board of the Tuskegee college, Tuskegee University, right? There's this long connection that's there. So in that struggle, the black American community, and he connected with this black American leader, the one of the most prominent of the time, Booker T, Washington, and they, like I tell people, changed the world. Like, can we imagine what the United States would have been if you had those millions of now freed slaves, right? with no access, and particularly those who are living in the Jim Crow South, no access whatsoever to education, Would the Harlem Renaissance have become what it become, with the black Wall Street, whether it was in Tulsa, whether in Philadelphia, these things that explode because of the access to education to now these first and second generations of people coming out of slavery, right? So I believe that that's the case and which is why I'll say again, here today, some of those challenges are there, some of the challenges are different than they were, obviously 50, 60, 70, 80 years ago, but we believe in organization that those challenges can be met with that same amazing synergy between the black and the Jewish community. Geoffrey Stern  27:26 A lot of people would argue that the rift or the change of the relationship between the African American community and the Jewish community was when the Jews or Israel stopped being looked at as the David in the Goliath story and we won the Six Day War. And how do you ensure that the facts are told, but also as you climb out of the pit, and as you achieve your goals, you shouldn't be necessarily punished for being successful. Success is not a sin. It's an inspiration. But it seems to me that's one of the challenges that we have, especially in the Jewish community for our next generation of children, who really do see ourselves not as the minority and don't see ourselves anymore mirrored in the African American community. Dumisani Washington  28:25 But one of my favorite things about the Jewish tradition of the Seder, is that you all lean and recline in the Seder today, and you tell your children, when we had the first one, we sat with our sandals on, our staff, in our hand, our belts ....because we were slaves leaving slavery, but now we are no longer. And that whole ethos of telling children, right? There's a strong parallel in the black American community, right? The whole point of going from struggle to a place where you can live in peace or at the very least, you recognize and realize the sacrifice of the people who came before you right? And I won't step into the controversial for lots of different reasons, we'll be able to unpack it, but let me just say this, for the black American experience when you're talking I often teach this in our sermons and other things that arc .... and let me say again, no, people are monolith. Obviously we just kind of put that on the table, all the Jews arent' alike all black Americans aren't alike..... Having said that, there is an overarching story when you talk about black Americans, who, from slavery to Jim Crow, segregation, black codes, all of those types of things to the modern era. And that story cannot accurately be told without talking about God and His people. In other words, when you're talking about the spirituals "Go Down Moses". "Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho" and I talked about that in the book, these songs that are rooted in the scriptures, most of the time in, in the Tanakh, our Jewish brothers and sisters' side of the Bible. I mean, sometimes in the New Testament, most of the time, these songs are being sung in hope. And that hope was realized, right? It's not an Negro spiritual song technically, but I put it in that category, part of the greatest one ever. I mean, how it culminates would be "Lift Every Voice and Sing" us a song that today has all these political things connected to it for lots of different unfortunate reasons. But when James Weldon Johnson wrote that song, wrote it as a poem? Those stanzas and anybody listening to this, I want to tell Google that Google Lift Every Voice and Sing"; just read the words. And this was a very powerful, very, very much God and God's love, and our hope and our faith and our trust, and our honoring the people who came before us; all of those things. And he talked about being free. Now, it's written in 1899. Right? You still have questions. I mean, there are no laws against lynching there going on, it's still crushing racism. However, he as a father in the black community is not only acknowledging what God has done, there's amazing things that are happening. One of the economist's that I quote, in my book, Thomas Sol said that the black community after slavery, and less than 50 years after slavery went from 0% literacy to almost 50% literacy, in that half a century, something economic historians say has never happened before. And now you're later on, you're talking about the black Wall Street, you're talking about black oil barons and landowners and factory owners, right? You're talking about this black middle class emerging. There's been no civil rights bill, right? There's been no Pell grants for school. These things don't even exist yet. We're talking about the 19 teens and the 1920s. You're talking about black people who had previously been slaves for hundreds of years. Why am I saying all that we as a people know full well; if we know our history, know full well what it is to come from all of those dire situations into a place of blessing, even though there may be struggles just like our Jewish brothers and sisters. We are convinced an organization that as we know, as a black community, particularly younger people that we are talking with, and teaching, as we know and appreciate our history, not the history that's regurgitated in terms of media and, and for political purposes. But truly our history, there is a great deal to be proud of about that. And to see, as I said in the sermon a couple of months ago, not only does it not a victim narrative, I descended from superheroes, my people went through slavery, Jim Crow, and still build on Wall Street still built the Tuskegee Institute. Still, we're soldiers who fighting for their own freedom in the Civil War. I mean, you're talking on and on and on things that they should have never been able to accomplish. When I consider what they accomplished with not very much help often. I recognize the greatness of the heritage that I come from, then that allows me to see an Israel rise like a phoenix from the ashes and not spurn that but recognize that our Jewish brothers and sisters have gone through millennia of this and Israel then to be celebrated, not denigrated. Adam Mintz  33:12 Thank you. We want to thank you. Your passion, and your insight is really brought a kind of a new insight to our discussion here. We really want to thank you, you know, we at Madlik we start on time and we end on time, Shabbat is about to begin in just a little while. Hopefully we'll be able to invite you back in the future as we continue this conversation. But I know I join Geoffrey and everybody on the call and everybody who's gonna listen to the podcast. Thank you for joining us and for really your insight and your passion. You really leave us with so much to think about as we begin the Shabbat. Dumisani Washington  33:51 Thank you. Thank you for having me. Adam Mintz  33:53 Thank you Geoffrey, Shabbat Shalom, everybody, Geoffrey Stern  33:55 Shabbat Shalom. And Reb Dumisani, you mentioned the songs. There's a whole chapter in your book about Negro spirituals. And as the rabbi said, w are approaching the Shabbat. And as you observe the Sunday we observed Saturday, but you know that the secret of living without a land or being on a difficult mission is that Sabbath, the strength of the Sabbath, and the connection between Noah and the word Menucha which is "rest" is obvious. And there was a great poet named Yehuda halevi. And he wrote a poem about the Yona; the dove that Noah sent out of the ark to see if there was dry land. And he he said that on Shabbat. Yom Shabbaton Eyn L'shkoach, "the day of Shabbat you cannot forget"  Zechru l'reach Hanichoach"  He also uses Reach Nichoach which is a pleasing scent,Yonah Matzah Bominoach, the yonah, the dove found on it rest v'shom ynuchu yegiah koach  and there in the Shabbat , in that ark of rest on that ark of Sunday or Saturday is where we all gain strength. So I wish you continued success in all that you do. And that this Shabbat and this Sunday we all gather the strength to continue our mission. But I really do hope that we get another chance to study Torah together. And I really hope that all of the listeners go out and buy your book, Zionism in the Black Church because it is an absolute thrill. And I understand you're coming out with a new book that's going to talk more about the Jewish people and the various colors and flavors that we come in. Dumisani Washington  35:55 Hopefully to put that out next year sometime. Absolutely. Geoffrey Stern  35:59 Fantastic. Well thank you so much so Shabbat Shalom and we are we are in your debt. Dumisani Washington  36:05 Thank you. Shabbat Shalom and looking forward to bye bye   Music: Lift Every Voice and Sing - Melinda Dulittle https://youtu.be/6Dtk9h1gZOI 

Millionaire Secrets
How To Motivate People, Transform, And Be A True Leader | KIRK S. LIPPOLD | Unlock Your Potential #178

Millionaire Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:58


Welcome to another episode of Unlock Your Potential! I meet all kinds of fascinating people on this show. All of them are elite performers in different fields, who all made their achievements in unique ways. But this interview in particular is unique. Commander Kirk Lippold (Retired) served in the US Navy since 1981 and was the commanding officer on board the USS Cole. If you've never heard of the USS Cole, it was involved in a terrorist attack in Yemen in the year 2000. This attack was the precursor to 9/11. After years of service defending our freedom, he retired. But instead of going into military contracting, he chose a very different path. Speaking to Kirk, he's a natural leader. He has the confidence and resolve of someone who really understands pressure. Not only this, but he has some incredible insights into people, America, and the relationships that exist within our society. It's easy to see why he did what he did next! He founded his company Lippold Strategies LLP in 2007 that provides leadership consultation for some of the biggest companies in the world. His top-down approach to business and thoughtful management techniques are highly sought after by executives around the globe. But how did he learn all this in the US Navy? Kirk draws the interesting comparison between running a USN battleship and running a business. When you boil it down, there are a LOT of similarities. Resourcing, HR, assets, chain of command, budgets… The list goes on. When you look at it like this, it's easy to see why he's in such high demand! This was a fascinating interview, and I want to thank Commander Kirk Lippold and all the listeners for joining us. I'll see you in the next one! Create the life you've always wanted!

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann
#247 Dead ships, film strikes and pandemic travel

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 41:49


Why is the UN worried about a supertanker in Yemen? Will strikes cause a streaming video shortage? And what next for the ‘zero-Covid' success stories? Olly Mann and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With Joe Evans, Jess Hullinger and Holden Frith

UN News
News in Brief 6 October 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 3:14


Afghanistan: ‘Depth of destitution' must be met with urgent aid scale-up   COVID-19 cases and deaths continue to decline  UN envoy urges commitment to peace in Yemen on first visit 

Squabbit
61. Blanket Mountaineer (protecting the Alps, Alabama's Constitution, and the 'Well of Hell')

Squabbit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 31:34


Grab your favorite, fall blanket Squabbits and let's get cozy! This week, we've got amazing positive news for you today from around the world. All the way from here in America, to the Swiss Alps, and then we finish out the episode with a story based in Yemen. First up, we talk about a project in place where mountaineers are wrapping the Swiss Alps in giant sun-reflecting blankets. We're talking 14 footfield-sized blankets! (04:30) Then we cover the new committee in Alabama that is working to revise the state's constitution. Specifically targeting racial systemic prejudice while doing so. Amazing work being done here! (09:45) We start off SPOOKY SEASON by learning about the "Well of Hell" or officially called, the Well of Barhout. We talk about the spooky folklore behind this spot and the current events surrounding it! (17:51) Sources: Alps wrapped in a Blanket Alabama Constitution  Alabama con't "Well of Hell" folklore Well of Barhout exploration 

UN News
News in Brief 4 October 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 3:35


Climate change message of solidarity, as UN chief addresses UNCTAD15 Libya: War crimes likely committed since 2016, UN probe finds Yemen: Children killed in Marib city flare-up

Shaping Opinion
What’s Next in Afghanistan

Shaping Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:05


Journalist Hollie McKay joins Tim from Afghanistan where she lives and from where she files her reports as the Taliban strengthens its control over the country in the wake of the U.S. pullout. Hollie is a war crimes investigator, an author and a reporter who gives a view on what life is like for the people of Afghanistan now that the Taliban is in control. https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/shapingopinion/Afghanistan_auphonic.mp3 Photo Source: Hollie McKay America just marked the 20th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and four hijacked aircraft. The attacks were waged by Islamic terrorists with the backing of Osama Bin Laden and the terrorist group Al Qaeda.  At the time, Al Qaeda and the Taliban operated terrorist training camps in Afghanistan, where the 9/11 hijackers trained. On October 7, 2001, the United States and Great Britain responded to the 9/11 attacks by targeting terrorist training camps in Afghanistan with bombs and cruise missiles. That led to a war against the terrorists in that country and a 20-year war-time occupation. By August of this year, that conflict started to come to its end as the United States pulled out of the country. Over the 20 years of the Afghan war, more than 3,500 allied troops died in combat. That includes 2,448 American service members. More than 20,000 Americans suffered combat-related wounds. Many more came home with scars you can't see. According to Brown University, roughly 69,000 Afghan security forces were killed during that period, as well as 51,000 Afghan civilians and 51,000 terrorists and militants. The United States had spent $2 trillion on the conflict.  In the end, the U.S. left billions of dollars in military equipment and arms, including armored vehicles, drones and military helicopters. In 10 days in August, from August 6th through the 15th, the Taliban took control of Kandahar, Mazar-e-Sharif and then the capital city, Kabul. The incumbent Afghan government quickly fell apart with the country's president fleeing to the UAE. The U.S. evacuated its embassy, and thousands of American citizens went to the Kabul airport to flee the country. During the evacuation, two suicide bombers attacked the Kabul airport, killing more than 103 people, including 12 American Marines and one U.S. Navy medic. By the time the Taliban took control, there were still an undetermined number of Americans and Afghan allies still in the country. Hollie McKay is a war crimes investigator and has worked on the frontlines of several war zones that have included Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, and many other places, including Afghanistan. Links Afghans Dying at Border as Tensions Intensify Between Taliban, Pakistan, New York Post Driving Across What Was Once Afghanistan's Terror-Filled Highway, Knewz The Transformation of Kabul, One Month After the Taliban Takeover, New York Post Taliban Official: Strict Punishment, Executions Will Return, Associated Press Hollie McKay (website) About this Episode's Guest Hollie McKay Hollie McKay Hollie S. McKay is a foreign policy expert and war crimes investigator. She was an investigative and international affairs/war journalist for Fox News Digital for over fourteen years where she focused on warfare, terrorism, and crimes against humanity. Hollie has worked on the frontlines of several major war zones and covered humanitarian and diplomatic crises in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Syria, Iran, Turkey, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Burma, Russia, Africa, Latin America, and other areas. Her globally-spanned coverage, in the form of thousands of print articles and essays, has included exclusive and detailed interviews with numerous captured terrorists, as well as high-ranking government, military, and intelligence officials and leaders from all sides. She has spent considerable time embedded with US and foreign troops,

Newshour
Pandora Papers expose world leaders' secret wealth

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 49:12


The secret wealth and dealings of some world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest leaks of financial documents. Some 35 current and former leaders, including King of Jordan and the Azeri president Ilham Aliyev, are featured in the files from offshore companies, dubbed the Pandora Papers. Also in the programme, we hear from Afghanistan, after a bombing at a funeral in a Kabul mosque targets the Taliban And an eyewitness account from the current frontline in Yemen's long civil war. (Picture shows a composite image of property in London. Credit: BBC)

Newshour
Yemen: heavy fighting in Marib

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 47:22


Government forces and Houthi rebels clash in Western Yemen. We also hear about the women detained by the rebels. Also on the programme: the father of a three-year-old girl killed in the port explosion in Beirut last year tells us that he's disgusted with the latest halt to the investigation; and the head of a French commission investigating the Roman Catholic church says it's found evidence of about 3000 abusers since 1950. (Picture: A checkpoint in Aden, Yemen. Credit Reuters / Salman)

UN News
‘People feel trapped': UN aid chief in Yemen

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 12:23


When David Gressly, the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen, called for $3.85 billion from international donors to avoid a point of no return in March, he said that “Yemen can't wait”. Five months on, some $2 billion has been received, averting the immediate risk of famine, but leaving significant gaps in desperately needed areas, such as healthcare. During a recent visit to UN Headquarters, Mr. Gressly spoke to UN News's Conor Lennon about the current humanitarian situation in Yemen, and the impact the COVID-19 pandemic continues to have across the war-torn nation.  

AlternativeRadio
[Eqbal Ahmad] Terrorism: Theirs and Ours

AlternativeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 57:01


Terrorism is the scourge of the era. It is a fearsome symbol conjuring up images of ferocious-looking, bearded men brandishing AK-47s. The media focus on the terrorism of official enemies like Saddam Hussein, bin Laden, and Zarqawi. After they were done away with, new demons appear to justify war and bloat the Pentagon budget. Be afraid of ISIS and Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Be afraid of Yemen and Somalia, Pakistan and Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria. Be afraid of all the jihadi groups that have mushroomed all over the Middle East. The notion that the U.S. and its allies engage in terrorism is simply not a topic for discussion. To scrutinize U.S. policy is verboten. The War on Terror goes on and on. Recorded at the University of Colorado.

The Geology Flannelcast
#110 - Well of Hell (and Other Sinkholes)

The Geology Flannelcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 57:20


The Flannelcasters talk about the Well of Hell in Yemen, and some other notable sinkholes around the world.

Habari za UN
Mkimbizi wa ndani nchini Yemen aliyepata ajali akiwa kazini asema hajakata tamaa

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 2:07


Nchini Yemen maisha ya ufukara ni dhahiri miongoni mwa wakimbizi wa ndani ambapo hata kwa wale ambao walibahatika kupata vibarua, ajali kazini imeleta madhila na machungu zaidi na kuzidi kutia mashaka mustakabli wa watoto nchini humo kama anavyosimulia Anold Kayanda (Taarifa ya Anold Kayanda) Upepo unavuma katika kambi ya wakimbizi ya Al Shaheed jimboni Al Mukha nchini Yemen. Abdullah Jaber anarejea kwenye kibanda chake cha mabati kisicho hata na paa, akiwa na kile kitakachokuwa mlo wa siku kwa familia yake ya mke na watoto wawili. Analakiwa na mkewe Wardah ambaye anapokea kifurushi na kupeleka jikoni tayari kwa mapishi. Mazingira ya nyumba yao ni taswira halisi ya ufukara, malazi yamechakaa, halikadhalika vifaa vya jikoni. Abdullah akiwa anacheza na watoto wake Jaber mwenye umri wa miaka 3 na Ghosson binti huyu mwenye umri wa mwaka mmoja na miezi 10, mkewe Wardah anaandaa mlo ambao ni viazi mbatata, karoti na biringanya. Kuni ni makaratasi na takataka. Baada ya muda mlo umeiva na kipaumbele ni binti yao Ghosson huku Jabber akiambulia kiduchu. Bwana Abdulla anasema, “awali hali yangu ilikuwa nzuri na niliweza kukimu familia yangu lakini nilipata ajali kazini na nimefanyiwa upasuaji mkononi, kwa hiyo nimeacha kufanya kazi hivyo sina kipato. Kuna nyakati mjomba wangu ananitumia fedha.” Familia hii ilihamia hapa kambini baada ya mapigano kuwafurusha kutoka jimboni Hudaydah. Baba huyu mwenye familia akaendelea na simulizi akisema, “nasikitika sana ninapokuwa sina fedha ya kuhudumia binti yangu, na wakati huo huwa natamani dunia ipasuke inimeze. Hata hivyo najitahidi na vile vile nahaha kusaka kibarua.” Ingawa yuko kwenye machungu, Bwana Abdulla anatumaini akisema “natamani binti yangu Ghosson awe na afya njema kama watoto wengine na pia natumai atapata elimu nzuri siku za usoni.” TAGS: UNICEF, Yemen

Habari za UN
Taasisi ya kusaidia wakimbizi wandani nchini Yemen yashinda Tuzo

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 2:50


Shirika la Umoja wa mataifa lakuhudumia wakimbizi UNHCR limeitangaza taasisi ya Jeel Albena ya nchini Yemen kuwa mshindi wa mwaka 2021 wa tuzo ya wakimbizi ya Nansen kutokana na kazi  nzuri ya kuwasaidia wakimbizi wa ndani nchini humo.    (Taarifa zaidi na Leah Mushi)   Ushindi wa taasisi hiyo ya Jeel Albena ya Yemen umetangaza leo huko Geneva Uswisi, na Kamisha Mkuu wa shirika la Umoja wa Mataifa la kuhudumia wakimbizi duniani Filippo Grandi akisema imejitolea kwa muda mrefu kuwasaidia maelfu ya wananchi wa Yemen walioathirika na mapigano na hivyo kuwa na mchango mkubwa. “Kila mwaka tunatoa tuzo kwa mtu au kikundi kilichoenda mbali zaidi ya majukumu yao kuwasaidia wakimbizi wa ndani na watu wasio na uraia. Taasisi ya Jeel Albena imefanya vizuri sana kusaidia watu wa pande zote za kwenye mzozo nchini Yemen. Wafanyakazi wake na watu wanaojitolea walikuwa kamili, walifanya kazi kwa umakini na kwa ukimya wakati mapigano yakiendelea, katika hali ya hatari ambapo wadau wengi walikimbia.” Amesema Kamishna Grandi.   Taasisi hiyo imetoa malazi ya dharura kwa wakimbizi wa ndani 18,000 pamoja na wenyeji wao. Halikadhalika imesaidia maelfu ya wakimbizi kupata ujira, kujikimu na kurejesha heshima na utu wao.    “Kauli mbiu yao ni “Na wayemeni kwa Wayemeni” ni mfano wa roho yao iliyojikita katika kutafuta suluhisho kwa pamoja na jamii ambazo wanafanya nazo kazi” amefafanua Kamishna Mkuu Grandi.   Tuzo hiyo itakabidhiwa tarehe 4 mwezi ujao kwa muasisi wa taasisi hiyo Ameen Jubran ambaye naye alikuwa mkimbizi wa ndani na alinusurika kuuawa katika machafuko.  Muasisi huyo amesema kitendo cha yeye kulazimika kuyakimbia makazi yake ya asili kimemzidishia morali wa kutaka kuwasaidia zaidi wakimbizi wa ndani.   Kitendo cha tuzo na Nansen kupatiwa taasisi hiyo, kutawezesha dunia kuitazama Yemen zaidi na kuona madhila wanayokumbana nayo watu zaidi ya milioni 4 waliolazimika kuhama makazi yao na ambao kwa zaidi ya mwaka mmoja wamekuwa wakimbizi wa ndani na zaidi ya asilimia 80 wamekuwa wakimbizi kwa zaidi ya mwaka mmoja.   Tuzo hiyo pia itasaidia kuonesha dunia kazi zinazofanywa na asasi nyingine za kiraia nchini humo.   Kamishna Grandi amehitimisha taarifa yake kwa kusema “Jeel Albena ni mshindi anayestahili tuzo ya Wakimbizi ya Nansen, ambayo haitolewi tu na UNHCR, bali na kamati inayoongozwa na serikali za Norway pamoja na Uswisi.   “Ni matumaini yangu makubwa tuzo hii itafanya jumuiya za kimataifa kutupia macho nchi ya Yemen na naamini wakiona kazi isiyo ya kawaida ya Jeel Albena watahamasisha hatua zaidi za kusaidia watu ambao wameteseka. Hongera kwa Jeel Albena “  

CODEPINK Radio
Episode 111: Climate Strike, Military Budget & Afghanistan Relief.

CODEPINK Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 55:01


In this episode, we hear the voices of youth at the Global Climate Strike and activist and author Winona LaDuke on stopping the Line 3 pipeline threatening to contaminate indigenous lands. We also go to the House floor for debate between AOC and Republicans on the military budget and Congressman Ro Khanna on his amendment to cut off funds for Saudi Arabia's war on Yemen. During the second half of our show, we turn to Afghanistan with Phyllis Bennis of the Institute for Policy Studies on reparations and relief, also Medea Benjamin, co-founder of CODEPINK, on our new campaign: Pay the Afghan teachers.

Habari za UN
Jarida 29 Septemba 2021

Habari za UN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 14:02


Karibu usikilize jarida ikiwa leo ni siku ya kimataifa ya kuhamasisha kuhusu upotevu na utupaji wa chakula na mwenyeji wako ni mimi ASSUMPTA MASSOI.  Miongoni mwa utakayo sikia ni pamoja na programu ya UNICEF nchini Kenya yawasaidia watoto wa kike kurejea shuleni.  Taasisi ya kusaidia wakimbizi wandani nchini Yemen yashinda Tuzo ya UNHCR ijulikanayo kama tuzo ya wakimbizi ya Nansen.  Lokua Kanza, mwanamuziki nguli ndani  na nje ya Jamhuri ya Kidemokrasia ya Congo, DRC ambaye pia ni balozi wa kitaifa wa elimu wa shirika la Umoja wa Mataifa la kuhudumia watoto, UNICEF nchini humo, ametumia ziara yake katika shule ya msingi aliyosoma utotoni ili kuchagiza wanafunzi wa kike na wa kiume kupatia kipaumbele suala la elimu.  karibu usikilize habari hizi na mengine mengi ikiwemo makala kutoka nchini Uganda.   

UN News
News in Brief 29 September 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 3:32


Famine likely happening in Tigray, warns UN's emergency relief chief   COVID-19, annexation, compounded crisis of Palestine occupation  Yemeni humanitarian organization wins Nansen Refugee Award  

Pod Save the World
Jared Kushner is “Rasputin in a slim-fitting suit”

Pod Save the World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 94:28


Tommy and Ben talk about the results of the German elections, Senate hearings on Afghanistan, a report about a Trump administration plan to arrest Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, votes on Israel and Yemen on Capitol Hill, an update on Burma, and funny Trump foreign policy stories. Then Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian joins to talk about his new podcast 544 Days, which details his time being held hostage in Iran's notorious Evin prison. For a closed-captioned version of this episode, please visit crooked.com/podsavetheworld.  For a transcript of this episode, please email transcripts@crooked.com and include the name of the podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Genstart - DR's nyhedspodcast
Genstart: Til våbenmesse med en arabisk prins

Genstart - DR's nyhedspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 23:31


Den danske virksomhedsejer Michael Holm vil ændre verden til det bedre. Men hans virksomhed, IT-giganten Systematic, er til våbenmesse med en arabisk prins - og inden længe sender danskerne krigs-software til de Forenede Arabiske Emirater. Et land, der bekriger det udsultede land Yemen. Systematic fortsætter handlen med landet - også efter daværende udenrigsminister i 2018 nedlægger eksportforbud af militært udstyr til netop Emiraterne. Er dansk krigs-software med til at forværre situationen i Yemen? Og hvordan smyger Systematic sig udenom et dansk eksportforbud? Undersøgende journalist hos Danwatch, Emilie Ekeberg, der sammen med TV2 optrevler eksport-eventyret, udlægger sagen. Vært: Simon Stefanski.

PRI's The World
US-Saudi meeting hints at new diplomatic approach

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 47:22


US National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan heads to the Middle East to meet with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, as well as officials in the United Arab Emirates, to talk about Yemen and Iran. What is the significance of this trip? And top US Army officials faced sharp questioning on Tuesday on Capitol Hill about the US' chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan. We hear from retired United States Army Gen. David Petraeus about his reaction. Plus, Swedish musician José González was first inspired by the Brazilian bossa nova and Latin folk his parents played at home in Argentina. On his latest album, “Local Valley,” he turned to the sounds of Ghanaian highlife.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
9/23/21 End of the Empire – Episode 2

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 88:56


Pete Quinones and Scott Horton are back for the second episode of their new podcast End of the Empire. The two begin by discussing a new documentary about Waco that reanalyzes the FLIR footage, showing that federal agents were in fact firing on Branch Davidians on the final day of the siege. Next, they talk about the recent House votes on Yemen which leads to a discussion of libertarian strategy. After that Scott and Pete talk about the AUKUS pact between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States. Lastly, they touch on some updates on Afghanistan and the BLM protests against vaccine passports in NYC.  Discussed on the show: “When the Government Lied: Waco's Infrared Deception” (Vimeo) Waco: A New Revelation (IMDb) Waco: Rules of Engagement (IMDb) “The Oklahoma City Bombing Archives: An Introduction & Recommended Reading List” (Libertarian Institute) The Secret Life of Bill Clinton Unrivaled by Michael Beckley  Mike Prysner confronts George W. Bush  Scott Horton Show — Muntadhar al-Zaidi on the Infamous George Bush Shoe-Throwing Incident “Evacuation Eyewitness: What I Saw in Kabul” (Libertarian Institute)  Podcast Feeds: iTunes Spotify Amazon Stitcher iHeartRadio playerfm podcastaddict

UN News
News in Brief 27 September 2021

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 3:22


Global tourism slump is an emergency for many nations: Guterres  Yemen: Endless suffering of children after years of conflict and aid crisis  Iran not allowing full monitoring access, says UN nuclear watchdog  

Immigration Review
Ep. 74 - Precedential Decisions from 9/20/2021 - 9/26/2021 (nexus; Yemen; motion to reopen - changed country conditions, sua sponte, exceptional circumstances; NTA deficiencies; parole; accomplice & categorical approach; credibility)

Immigration Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 47:57


[2:49] Ghanem v. Att'y Gen. U.S., No. 19-1475 (3d Cir. Sept. 22, 2021)asylum; political opinion; nexus; mixed-motive; tribal; ignoring evidence; corroboration; reasonable explanation; CAT; Matter of J-F-F-; hypotheticals; Houthi; Yemen [9:09] Abushagif v. Garland, No. 19-60807 (5th Cir. Sept. 24, 2021)motion to reopen; changed country conditions; affidavits; inherently believable; burdens; asylum; CAT; Libya [14:01] Matter of Arambula-Bravo, 28 I&N Dec. 388 (BIA 2021)NTA; jurisdiction; Niz-Chavez; Pereira; parole termination; charging document; 8 C.F.R. § 212.5(e)(2)(i); 8 C.F.R. § 1003.13; INA § 274(A)(1)(a)(ii); aggravated felony; INA § 101(a)(43)(N); alien smuggling [20:10] Tino v. Garland, No. 20-3508 (8th Cir. Sept. 20, 2021)Pereira; Niz-Chavez; jurisdiction; NTA; asylum; Guatemala; gangs [22:29] Berdiev v. Garland, No. 20-9542 (10th Cir. Sept. 21, 2021)sua sponte motion to reopen; equitable tolling; ineffective assistance of counsel; due diligence; Matter of  Zmijewska; ten-year bar for failure to voluntarily depart; Chenery [29:55] Alfred v. Garland, No. 19-72903 (9th Cir. Sept. 22, 2021)Valdivia-Flores; Washington robbery; categorical approach; accomplice; aiding and abetting [36:27] Li v. Garland, No. 18-70943 (9th Cir. Sept. 21, 2021)adverse credibility; omissions; inconsistencies; Iman v. Barr; totality; respondent confusion and sloppy testimony; misuse of pronouns; China; house church; misrepresentation in application  [41:02] Cui v. Garland, No. 18-72030 (9th Cir. Sept. 23, 2021)motion to reopen; in absentia; exceptional circumstances; appeal of in absentia removal order; immigration court mistakes; Matter of Guzman-Arguera*Sponsors and friends of the podcast!Kurzban Kurzban Tetzeli and Pratt P.A.www.kktplaw.com/Immigration, serious injury, and business lawyers serving clients in Florida, California, and all over the world for over 40 years.Docketwisewww.docketwise.com/immigration-review"Modern immigration software & case management"*Want to become a patron of Immigration Review? Check out our Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview *CONTACT INFORMATIONEmail: kgregg@kktplaw.comFacebook: "Immigration Review Podcast" or @immigrationreviewInstagram: @immigrationreviewTwitter: @immreviewDISCLAIMER: Immigration Review® is a podcast made available for educational purposes only. It does not provide specific legal advice. Rather, the Immigration Review® podcast offers general information and insights regarding recent immigration cases from publicly available sources. By accessing and listening to the podcast, you understand that there is no attorney-client relationship between you and the podcast host. The Immigration Review® podcast should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state. MUSIC CREDITS: "Loopster," "Bass Vibes," "Chill Wave," and "Funk Game Loop" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/immigrationreview)

Plug-In
Plugin Podcast #8: What is Yemen Really Like? w/Mxshrxh

Plug-In

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 95:23


Four everyday guys vent about things on their minds in a secluded basement and share it with the internet. Our first guest on the Plugin Podcast... A Yemeni from America, who has not traveled to the country in over 9 years, shares his experience traveling to Yemen from America this past month. Follow Fahd on his TikTok: Mxshrxh Also available on Youtube: Plugin - YouTube --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mauricio-vivero/support

DeenStrong
Friday Sermon: Pure Hands For Yemen Relief

DeenStrong

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 21:01


Friday Sermon: Pure Hands For Yemen Relief by Imam Bilal Elsakka

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays
Governor Gavin Newsom announces $15 billion climate package, signs two bills protecting abortion access; House limits support for Saudi war in Yemen; San Diego is the first city in California to ban ghost guns

KPFA - The Pacifica Evening News, Weekdays

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 59:58


The Not So Fit Couple Podcast
Nick Butter - The Man Who Ran Around The World

The Not So Fit Couple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 109:09


Nick Butter is one of the most celebrated ultra runners on the planet. He is the first human being to ever run a marathon in every country on earth (196 to be exact) and has recently completed a 128 day run around Britain where he ran 200 marathons back to back, a large portion of which was done with a broken leg. Nick's stories don't end there, from being held at gunpoint in the largest market on earth to being smuggled across the Yemen border by drug smugglers this is seriously one of the most incredible podcasts we've had the pleasure to hold.

Newsdive
Biden's Feminist Airstrikes (feat. Danaka Katovich)

Newsdive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 41:31


This week Sam is joined by Danaka Katovich, the Yemen and Peace Collective coordinator at the anti-war group CODEPINK. They talk about how Biden is still enabling Saudi human rights violations from the war on Yemen to the severe repression of political dissidents. They also cover the violence of drone warfare and why the military can't really be feminist.

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews
9/22/21 Hassan El-Tayyab on How We Can Help End the War in Yemen by Tomorrow

Scott Horton Show - Just the Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 23:03


Scott talks with Hassan El-Tayyab about tomorrow's vote to end all support for the Saudi campaign in Yemen. The legislation, introduced by Rep. Ro Khanna (D-CA) is going to be debated on the floor this afternoon (September 22nd). Scott and El-Tayyab urge everyone to call their representatives and tell them to vote to end support. El-Tayyab's organization has set up a phone number to make the process easy: 1-833-STOPWAR. Call this number now and help bring one of the worst atrocities going on in the world today to an end. Discussed on the show: https://www.fcnl.org/  Hassan El-Tayyab is a musician and peace activist, who works as the lead lobbyist on Middle East policy for the Friends Committee on National Legislation. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
9/22/21 Hassan El-Tayyab on How We Can Help End the War in Yemen by Tomorrow

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 23:03


Scott talks with Hassan El-Tayyab about tomorrow's vote to end all support for the Saudi campaign in Yemen. The legislation, introduced by Rep. Ro Khanna (D-CA) is going to be debated on the floor this afternoon (September 22nd). Scott and El-Tayyab urge everyone to call their representatives and tell them to vote to end support. El-Tayyab's organization has set up a phone number to make the process easy: 1-833-STOPWAR. Call this number now and help bring one of the worst atrocities going on in the world today to an end. Discussed on the show: https://www.fcnl.org/  Hassan El-Tayyab is a musician and peace activist, who works as the lead lobbyist on Middle East policy for the Friends Committee on National Legislation. This episode of the Scott Horton Show is sponsored by: The War State and Why The Vietnam War?, by Mike Swanson; Tom Woods' Liberty Classroom; ExpandDesigns.com/Scott; EasyShip; Thc Hemp Spot; Green Mill Supercritical; Bug-A-Salt; Lorenzotti Coffee and Listen and Think Audio. Shop Libertarian Institute merch or donate to the show through Patreon, PayPal or Bitcoin: 1DZBZNJrxUhQhEzgDh7k8JXHXRjYu5tZiG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lspUIfwyQVM

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1443 Legacies of 9/11: War on Terror, Islamophobia and Conspiracy Theories

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 71:22


Air Date 9/21/2021 Today we take a look at the parallel legacies of 9/11 including the war on terror and military spending, the casual acceptance of Islamophobia, the adoption of ever-wilder conspiracy theories, and the acceleration of the political divide in America culminating, so far, in the January 6th Insurrection. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript   BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: 9/11: A Story in Three Parts. - Unf*cking The Republic - Air Date 9-10-21 We were tempted to let the 20th anniversary of 9/11 pass given it will be oversaturated with remembrances and armchair punditry as well as the usual tragedy porn imagery. Ch. 2: Endless militarization has bled US society dry - The Real News Podcast - Air Date 9-14-21 It's been 20 years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Since then, the US has channeled an unfathomable amount of its resources into the military-industrial complex. Ch. 3: “Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire”: Deepa Kumar on How Racism Fueled U.S. Wars Post-9/11 - Democracy Now! - Air Date 9-14-21 According to the Costs of War Project, the wars launched by the United States following 9/11 have killed an estimated 929,000 people in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, Yemen and elsewhere. Ch. 4: 20 Years Later: How 9/11 Changed Being Muslim in America - The Brian Lehrer Show - Air Date 9-10-21 Rowaida Abdelaziz, national reporter for HuffPost where she focuses on immigration, Islamophobia, and social justice issues, joins to discuss how being Muslim in the United States changed after the September 11th attacks. Ch. 5: 20 Years Since 9/11, 20 Years of Conspiracy Theories - Doomed - Air Date 9-10-21 Matt looks at the conspiracies, hoaxes, and urban legends that surround the day and the Bush administration. Ch. 6: The road from 9/11 to Donald Trump - Vox Conversations - Air Date 9-12-21 Sean Illing talks with national security reporter Spencer Ackerman, author of the new book Reign of Terror. They discuss the staggering changes to our country in the 20 years since 9/11 Ch. 7: America, 20 years after 9/11 - World Review from the New Statesman - Air Date 9-10-21 Jeremy Cliffeand Sarah Manavis are joined by New Yorker columnist and author Evan Osnos to discuss his new book, Wildland: The Making of America's Fury and how America has changed since the attacks on New York and Washington. Ch. 8: The Direct Line From 9/11 to January 6th - WhoWhatWhy - Air Date 9-10-21 Award-winning journalist Spencer Ackerman examines how 9/11 opened the door to America's worst historical impulses and led directly to Donald Trump and January 6th. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 9: Rescue 9/11 w/ Jim Lobe and Laila Ujayli - American Prestige - Air Date 9-11-21 The boys interview Laila Ujayli, associate editor at Inkstick Media, about growing up as a young Muslim in post-9/11 America. Ch. 10: Congressmember Barbara Lee, the Lone Vote for Peace After the September 11th Attacks - Breaking the Sound Barrier by Amy Goodman - Air Date 9-9-21 Congressmember Lee courageously voted no against the AUMF twenty years ago. FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 11: Final comments on Brian Williams and the campaigns we can win vs the campaigns worth winning MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent SHOW IMAGE: Description: The camera looks up at a young Muslim woman, wearing a black hoodie with the hood up over her black head covering, as she stands outside a glass entryway looking out into the distance. An American flag is wrapped around her shoulders. Credit: "Protest against Donald Trump's Muslim ban" by Fibonacci Blue | License | Changes: Cropped and very slight increase in contrast, brightness and saturation   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com  

Skullduggery
Botched Drone Strike (with Joe Cirincione)

Skullduggery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 42:57


US Central Command's top general Kenneth McKenzie last week had to make one of the most painful mea culpas in the history of the US Government's war on terror. A drone strike intended to save the lives of US soldiers had ended up taking the lives ten innocent Afghan civilians. Seven of them were children. A rare acknowledgment that a tool the Pentagon and CIA have relied on for years to target terrorists was in this instance tragically botched thanks to sketchy intelligence that confused a civilian aide worker with an ISIS suicide bomber. McKenzie came clean, only after reporters on the ground exposed the Pentagon's mistake raising new questions about how many other civilians in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen have also been killed in US drone strikes. And how does this affect the Biden administrations planned use of “over the horizon” drone strikes to prevent Al-Qaeda resurgence in the country we just abandoned? Joe Cirincione joins to discuss the botched strike and where we go from here. GUEST:Joe Cirincione (@Cirincione), Analyst, Author, Distinguished Fellow @QuincyInst, Fmr. President @plough_shares, VP @amprog, Hill rat.HOSTS:Michael Isikoff (@Isikoff), Chief Investigative Correspondent, Yahoo NewsDaniel Klaidman (@dklaidman), Editor in Chief, Yahoo NewsVictoria Bassetti (@VBass), fellow, Brennan Center for Justice (contributing co-host) RESOURCES:The Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft - Here.Yahoo News' Dylan Stableford and Chris Wilson's original piece on the bothced drone strike - Here.Dan Klaidman's book Kill or Capture on focusing on drone strikes - Here.Follow us on Twitter: @SkullduggeryPodListen and subscribe to "Skullduggery" on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.Email us with feedback, questions or tips: SkullduggeryPod@yahoo.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Tom Barnard Show
Moon Pjugg and Hobbs Ep 24-My favorite new comic Ali Sultan

The Tom Barnard Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 31:07


Ali Sultan is from Yemen. He has learned alot about America since he moved here. Including how to speak English. Check him out on Stephen Colbert! www.youtube.com/watch?v=y45yvjDKwKg www.moonpjuggandhobbs.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Reveal
Forever Wars

Reveal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 51:41


Since 9/11, the power of the U.S. military has been felt around the world in the name of rooting out terrorism. But at what cost? From Fallujah in Iraq to tiny villages in Afghanistan and Yemen, Reveal reporter Anjali Kamat talks to three journalists about how America's so-called war on terror has shaped an entire generation.  Anand Gopal is a foreign journalist who traveled across the Afghan countryside, meeting with Taliban commanders and trying to understand how people understood the war. He says when U.S. President George W. Bush divided the world into those who are “with us” and those who are “with the terrorists,” it was an oversimplification and had tragic consequences for Afghanistan. Within months of the invasion, the Taliban wanted to surrender, but 9/11 was fresh and the U.S. said no. Instead, the military allied with anti-Taliban warlords and incentivized them to hunt down “terrorists.” Gopal says thousands of innocent people were arrested, tortured and killed – which only galvanized the Taliban and drew more recruits to their ranks.  To many Americans, Fallujah is remembered as the site of two brutal battles where many Americans died during the invasion of Iraq. But to journalist Feurat Alani, it's also his parents' hometown. While American TVs filled with images of the city as a jihadist stronghold, Alani knew it was a bustling city full of regular people whose lives would be forever changed by the invasion. Alani recounts precious memories of Fallujah, like swimming in the Euphrates River with his cousins and seeing football matches with his uncles. But after the invasion, his family fell apart and the city was reduced to rubble. The football stadium turned into a cemetery, and joyful moments there became somber walks through gravestones.    Finally, journalist and filmmaker Safa Al Ahmad talks about what America's post-9/11 wars have done to Yemen, where drone strikes became part of everyday life for civilians. Al Ahmad recounts what it felt like to ride in a pickup truck, wondering if she would be targeted as the sound of a drone buzzed overhead. She saw on the ground how the tactics of the war on terror in Yemen led to resentment and hostility among people whose lives were upended. While the 9/11 attacks happened 20 years ago, Al Ahmad says that for people in other places, bombings, airstrikes and drone attacks have never stopped. “They're still living the nightmare that people in New York lived for the day,” she says.