Podcasts about Tokyo Olympics

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  • 2,472PODCASTS
  • 4,858EPISODES
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  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Tokyo Olympics

Show all podcasts related to tokyo olympics

Latest podcast episodes about Tokyo Olympics

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections
BONUS: Athletics LLC S2 E22 'Behind the Scenes' September 3, 2021

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:17


It's Athletics LLC day again! Hope everyone has had a great week! This week address a topic that we elected to push to this week, mental health and what it is looking like in regards to athletics/our athletes. Hear some different perspectives on the topic and some key points on peripheral issues related. Next, we take advantage of our connections by talking to Sir Lucious about the "behind the scenes" of coaching at the Tokyo Olympics. What was it like being the HC of the Olympic team? What does that even mean??? Lamar is in line for RAPID FIRE and our HeartBeatProps are nothing but heart felt. Lock in and see you in a few! Want to have an exploratory conversation about YOUR track equipment needs? Connect with us: Host Mike Cunningham on Twitter: @mikecunningham Email: sales@gillathletics.com Phone: 800-637-3090 Twitter: @GillAthletics Instagram: @GillAthletics1918 Facebook: facebook.com/gillathletics LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/gillathletics/

FTCUTD - The For The Culture Soccer Show
131: FTC/Shea Butter Supercut- The More Things Change w/ Staci Wilson

FTCUTD - The For The Culture Soccer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 153:09


The first ever SuperCut from FTCUTD and The Shea Butter FC Podcast, coming in with straight culture and moisturized soccer takes, and we are joined in the first hour of the pod by special guest, former USWNT member and US Olympic Gold Medalist Staci Wilson! We discuss her current journey as a youth soccer coach, also her experiences as a player and how the more things change, the more they stay the same in light of recent events within NWSL, also shedding light on the ways players can be manipulated in the process of pursuing their career, and discussing her role as a featured speaking at the United States Soccer Coaches' Convention and a quick Q&A at the end of the segment. After the interview we get an update from a returning Coach Tony, back on the pod after several weeks away, fresh from the winning gold at the Tokyo Olympics and coaching for the University of Washington football team, all the while still holding it down for Soccer in the Streets! Also in the episode we quickly recap the USMNT results so far in the October WCQs, an important update with Protagonist, and in 2UP/2Down we hit up Jon Gruden's sudden dismissal from the Raiders and the NFL, and Shea Butter Bombs AND MORE!! FTCUTD is a proud partner in The Alliance of Protagonist Podcasts!! To watch this episode and past FTC shows, check out our new YouTube channel, while you're there "Like & Subscribe" so you're notified anytime we add new content! http://bit.ly/FTCUTDTube Go to ftcutd.myshopify.com, and get your FTC drip! Get at the Sadio Mane and Briana Scurry Legends of the Culture Hoodies!! Series III OUT NOW!! Final week of its release!! Going away on 10/16 and once its done, they're gone!! https://ftcutd.myshopify.com/products/ftc-legends-of-the-culture-series-iii-hoodie Follow us on Social Media! Twitter - @FTCUTD Instagram - @FTCUTD Like us on Facebook - FTC 

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Dashed Dreams: The Tokyo Olympics, Sex Testing and Biology

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 65:53


Leading up to the recent Tokyo Olympics. athletes Annet Negesa of Uganda and Maximila Imali of Kenya both had their Olympic dreams crushed because of rules set by the track and field global governing body, World Athletics. They are just two—of many—elite women athletes who have been told their natural testosterone levels, if not lowered through medication or surgery, disqualify them from competition at the highest levels of sport. Join us for an in-depth conversation about intersex biology and the history of sex testing in women's athletics ahead of the Tokyo Olympics. About the Speaker In February 2021, Eliza Anyangwe became the editor of As Equals, CNN's ongoing gender inequality project. She began her career working for nongovernmental organizations Action Against Hunger and then the Pesticide Action Network, where she was Organic Cotton Officer, but has spent more than a decade in media, working for The Guardian, The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, and most recently The Correspondent, where she was managing editor. The Guardian Opinion series she commissioned and wrote for, a "Week in Africa," was longlisted for a One World Media award. In 2016, Eliza founded The Nzinga Effect, a media project focused on telling the stories of African and Afro-descendant women, and delivered that work through partnerships with organizations such as The Serpentine Galleries and The British Council. In 2018 she was awarded a development reporting grant by the European Journalism Centre to tell stories about the African women breaking taboos and carving out space to talk about sex and sexuality.  Eliza has written for The Independent, Financial Times, Al Jazeera and Open Democracy; has appeared on broadcast programs, including "Newsnight," "BBC World Service," PRI's "The World," and the podcast "Our Body Politic"; and has spoken at events, among them SXSW, D&AD Festival, The Google News Initiative Summit, the International Journalism Festival, Africa Utopia, The Web We Want Festival and the Next Einstein Forum. Eliza is a contributing author to Africa's Media Image in the 21st Century, published by Routledge. SPEAKERS Eliza Anyangwe Journalist; Editor, As Equals, CNN Gender Inequality Project; Twitter @elizatalks; Instagram @Elizatookthis Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Twitter @msmichellemeow—Co-Host John Zipperer Producer and Host, Week to Week Political Roundtable; Vice President of Media & Editorial, The Commonwealth Club—Co-Host In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 4th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Just Women's Sports
Alix Klineman

Just Women's Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 70:20


Olympic gold medalist Alix Klineman joins Kelley to talk about her journey from indoor volleyball star to beach volleyball champion. An athlete since childhood, Klineman was an All-American indoor player at Stanford and a member of Team USA before she decided to make the life-changing switch to beach. Klineman discusses the freedom that came with failing while transitioning sports and the importance of taking care of your body even when you're young. She then takes Kelley behind the scenes of her and April Ross' gold medal run at the Tokyo Olympics, where Klineman confirms that yes, she was nervous.

Inside Running Podcast
206: Sunshine Coast & Chicago Marathon

Inside Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 71:22


206: Sunshine Coast & Chicago Marathon   This episode is brought to you by our coffee partners at St. Ali.    Brad hangs with Jye Edwards & Rorey Hunter down at Mulligans Flat. Julian strings together some more continuous running and gets used to Dad life. Brady rediscovers the importance of team culture at the Bat's 10K Time Trial when the border restrictions lifts. Sunshine Coast Marathon returns to the streets of Queensland and was won by Isaias Beyn & Riine Ringi. Jack Bruce & Tennille Ellis won the Half Marathon, while Ryan Gregson & Ash Gentle took out the 10k. Sunshine Coast Marathon Results https://www.instagram.com/p/CU3S-_-BIWj/      Seifu Tura won the Chicago Marathon in 2:06:12, just over Galen Rupp who ran 2:06:35 backing up from the Tokyo Olympics. Ruth Chepngetich had a clear over Americans Emma Bates and Sara Hall, winning in a time of 2:22:31. Chicago Marathon Elite Results https://www.runnerstribe.com/latest-news/ruth-chepngetich-and-seifu-tura-crowned-champions-at-the-chicago-marathon/?fbclid=IwAR1QZCtW6AJ4hfJIULSvxOXaiZqul454Pczyq8y6aOZ2Vm-FnBxFZsxQQFg    Listener question of the week from James asks about surging on hilly tempo courses Moose on the Loose treads the tried and true topic of ineffective coverage of a major marathon. The boys then give a little preview on next week's Perth Marathon. Patreon Link: https://www.patreon.com/insiderunningpodcast Opening and Closing Music is Undercover of my Skin by Benny Walker. www.bennywalkermusic.com For shoes or running apparel contact Julian at: https://www.facebook.com/therunningcompanyballarat/ Join the conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/insiderunningpodcast/ To donate and show your support for the show: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=9K9WQCZNA2KAN

That Triathlon Show
How do track sprint cyclists train, Tokyo Olympics, and W' research findings with Mehdi Kordi, PhD | EP#307

That Triathlon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:23


Mehdi Kordi, PhD, is a track cycling coach (sprinting in particular) working with the Royal Dutch Cycling Federation. In Tokyo, the Dutch track sprinters brought home multiple golds and medals, and Mehdi joins us to discuss how these athletes train to be the fastest on the planet. Also we discuss the physiology of W' and how it relates to neuromuscular function, and other bits and pieces from Mehdi's research.        IN THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN ABOUT: -Mehdi's take on the Olympics in Tokyo and how his team performed -How do track sprint cyclists train? -The relationship between neuromuscular function and W' (anaerobic work capacity)  -The importance of muscle size (rather than neural functions, fiber type etc.) and maximum force capacity on W' -What sort of strength training might be used to improve W'? -Reliability and sensitivity of the Notio Konect aero sensor    SHOWNOTES: https://scientifictriathlon.com/tts307/   SCIENTIFIC TRIATHLON AND THAT TRIATHLON SHOW WEBPAGE: www.scientifictriathlon.com/podcast/   SPONSORS: ROKA - Exceptional quality triathlon wetsuits, trisuits, swimskins, goggles, performance sunglasses as well as prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses.  Online vision test for prescription updates and home try-on options available for eyeglasses. Ships from  the US, UK and EU. Trusted by world-leading athletes such as  Lucy Charles-Barclay, Javier Gómez Noya, Flora Duffy, Morgan Pearson, Summer Rappaport and others in triathlon, cycling, speed skating, and many more. Visit roka.com/tts for 20% off your order.   ZEN8 - The ZEN8 Indoor Swim Trainer is a tool for time-crunched triathletes looking to improve swim specific strength and technique. The swim trainer is a perfect complement to your training in the pool. On days when you don't have time to go to the pool, you can now do a short but effective home-based workout on the trainer. It is inflatable, so doesn't take up much space, and best of all, it is very affordable. Get 20% off your order at zen8swimtrainer.com/tts.   LINKS AND RESOURCES: Mehdi's Twitter and Research Gate profiles The Relationship Between Neuromuscular Function and the W′ in Elite Cyclists - Kordi et al. 2021 Reliability and Sensitivity of the Notio Konect to quantify Coefficient of Drag Area in Elite Track Cyclists - Kordi et al. 2021 Training talk and Tokyo 2020 with Nate Wilson | EP#303 Olympic gold medal training and preparation with Arild Tveiten | EP#304 Aerodynamic testing in the field with Michael Liberzon | EP#294   RATE AND REVIEW: If you enjoy the show, please help me out by subscribing, rating and reviewing: www.scientifictriathlon.com/rate/   CONTACT: Want to send feedback, questions or just chat? Email me at mikael@scientifictriathlon.com or connect on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter.

Bleav in Softball
Season 2 - Safe or Out?

Bleav in Softball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 66:28


The season 2 finale is here! Jenna looks back and highlights the greatest hits from the Safe or Out segment, where each guest gives their hot takes on all things softball - from bat flips to game day style, rules of the game, softball culture, and more. Plus, she breaks down the year in review and shares the last Foul Tip of the Week to help us get better. See you in season 3!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Inside with Brett Hawke
Dive Inside LIVE with MATT SATES!

Inside with Brett Hawke

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 47:43


South African teenager Matthew Sates joins us on the LIVE show to discuss his WJR breaking swims in Berlin! At the first stop of the FINA World Cup in Berlin, Matt Sates broke 2x SCM World Junior Records: the Men's 200 IM (23.90/28.45/32.21/26.89) and 200 Freestyle (23.58/25.93/25.63/25.51), breaking Daiya Seto and Kliment Kolesnikov's records. This summer, at the Tokyo Olympics, Sates placed 13th in the 200 IM and 32nd in the 100 Fly. He swims for Wayne Riddin at Seals Swimming Club in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He has committed to swim for the University of Georgia. Brett and Nate also discuss Clarie Curzan's decision to swim at Stanford, Femke Heemskerk retiring at the end of the ISL season, and our visit to UVA. Enjoy! Support Our Sponsors: THE MAGIC 5: Custom fitted goggles that are tailor-made for your exact face. You shouldn't feel you are wearing goggles. Use code BRETTHAWKE20 at checkout to receive 20% off. SWIM ANGELFISH: Receive the tools and skills needed to teach swimmers with autism, physical disabilities, anxiety, sensory and motor conditions with Swim Angelfish, the global leader in adaptive swim. Get certified online today! SUPERIOR SWIM TIMING: Run a swim meet with ease from your laptop. SST is fully compatible with Hy-Tek and Team Unify as well as Colorado, Daktronics, and Omega touchpads. Tell them Brett sent you! DESTRO SWIM TOWERS: Save $150 per double swim tower by using the code "brett" at checkout! SWIMNERD LIVE: Create an interactive heat sheet. Stream your swim meet scoreboard in real time over top your live stream. Turn any tv into a digital scoreboard. Subscribe & Listen: Apple Podcasts Google Spotify YouTube Produced by: SWIMNERD Supported by: Fitter & Faster #swimming #southafrica #fwc2021

Live from AC2nd
The 252 - Episode 38 – The Ministry of an NBA Chaplain

Live from AC2nd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 48:18


On this month's episode of The 252, Chris, Chris, and Sam look back at the Tokyo Olympics (and ahead to Beijing 2022 and Paris 2024), talk about the mental health of athletes, and interview Bethel alum Matt Moberg, a Minneapolis pastor who serves as a chaplain for the Minnesota Timberwolves.

Winning is Not Everything
#088: Pat Forde (Part 2) — Sports Illustrated Senior Writer — On The Highlights And Challenges Of Witnessing His Daughter Compete at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Winning a Medal

Winning is Not Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 12:00


In Part 2 of our conversation with Pat Forde, a senior writer for Sports Illustrated, we focus on his rare opportunity to cover an Olympics that included his daughter Brooke, a member of the U.S. Swim Team. Pat highlights the ups and downs of Brooke's journey, and his own highs and lows of witnessing it all. Winning Is Not Everything is a podcast aimed at bringing sanity back to youth sports with conversations with blue-chip athletes and coaches.

No Holds Barred with Eddie Goldman
Episode 1465: No Holds Barred: The Fight Against Fixed Fights In Olympic Boxing, Women's Boxing News, on the WAAR Room with Chris Baldwin and Malissa Smith

No Holds Barred with Eddie Goldman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 65:47


On this edition of No Holds Barred, host Eddie Goldman once again spoke with our colleagues Chris Baldwin of Angry Afro Radio and Malissa Smith of Girlboxing on the WAAR Room. A video of this discussion has also been posted on the Angry Afro Radio YouTube page.Our discussion took place Sunday, October 3.We finally have proof of what many already knew or suspected: Much of Olympic boxing has been fixed.On September 30, an independent report, mainly focusing on boxing at the 2016 Rio Olympics, was released by an investigative team led by Professor Richard McLaren. His team also had helped document the Russian state-sponsored doping program in the Olympics.This report documented how officials in AIBA, the Olympic boxing federation, fixed the selection of referees and judges at the fights in the 2016 Olympics, how they manipulated results, the culture of corruption and bribery in Olympic boxing, and how these corrupt practices were carried out and enabled by the top leadership in AIBA at the time.As the report stated, in AIBA,"The people are the problem." It should also be added that what corrupt governments have done in the Olympic movement has been a key reason why Olympic boxing has been so corrupt. The full report can be read here.While this investigation was undertaken at the behest of the current, new leadership of AIBA, many questions remain as to whether or not corruption has been sufficiently rooted out in this organization. The International Olympic Committee suspended AIBA as boxing's Olympic governing body in June 2019, and thus far has not indicated if or when it will be reinstated. The IOC organized the boxing competition at the recently completed Tokyo Olympics without AIBA.We discussed what we know about how the Olympic boxing bouts were manipulated, some of the fights that may have been fixed, the obvious and not-so-obvious motives for this rampant corruption, the implications of this crisis in amateur and Olympic boxing for professional boxing, how this type of corruption in the overall Olympic movement is far from unique, and much more.Malissa Smith also brought us the latest news from women's boxing, including multi-divisional champ Amanda Serrano signing with Jake Paul's newly-formed promotional company. We discussed what this might mean for a potential showdown between Serrano and undisputed lightweight champion Katie Taylor, what is next for unbeaten middleweight and super welterweight champion Claressa Shields who has been fighting in MMA as of late, and much more.Plus, we discussed the postponement of the 2022 Gay Games in Hong Kong to 2023, the latest Triller Trash news and why they are the frontrunner for the 2021 Roger Mayweather "You Don't Know Shit About Boxing" Award, and more.All this is part of our in-depth coverage of the corrupt world of boxing and sports governance in general.Please also subscribe to the No Holds Barred page on Patreon for much more exclusive premium No Holds Barred content.Now you can also support our independent, No Holds Barred journalism by purchasing items such as T-shirts, hoodies, tank tops, mugs, pillows, masks, and even mini-skirts at the new No Holds Barred with Eddie Goldman shop on Redbubble. (It has also been recommended to me that people choose sizes on the large side, as some items may run small.) You can browse all the items for sale and then place an order here.The No Holds Barred theme song is called "The Heist", which is also available on iTunes by composer Ian Snow.No Holds Barred is sponsored by:LenneHardt.com, the home of Lenne Hardt, the legendary MMA and sports announcer, voice actor, singer, actress, and comedienne. Lenne is also known for her jazz vocals with her Lenne Hardt Jazz Cabaret Band. For more information, to book her, or to order a custom message from her, go to LenneHardt.com.Skullz Fight Shop, home of the Skullz Double-End Bag, the perfect punching bag for your combat sports training. Skullz Double-End Bags provide a realistic striking target, and help improve speed, distance, and timing skills. Hang it and hit it right out of the box! No pump required. Skullz Fight Shop - Advancing combat sports equipment for the next generation of fighters. For more information, go to https://skullzfightshop.com.Adolphina Studios. Original art prints and handcrafted fine jewelry. For more information, go to https://www.etsy.com/shop/AdolphinaStudios.Thanks, Eddie GoldmanEddieGoldman.com

Hilltopper Nation
Beyond the Hill: Episode 67 - Larissa Franklin

Hilltopper Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 22:03


WKU Softball alum and new Olympic medalist Larissa Franklin discusses winning a bronze medal with Canada in the 2020 Tokyo Games, what the training process was like for the delayed Olympics, being one of five Hilltoppers competing in Tokyo, becoming the first medalist in WKU Softball history and the third medalist in WKU Athletics history, what life has been like since returning from Japan, playing against WKU in an exhibition with Team Canada this past spring, and her thoughts on the Hilltoppers' conference championship in May.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Story Behind
Olympic Runner Falls With Only 1 Lap Left | Deathbed Confession Reveals Dark Family Secret

Story Behind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 6:31


So many emotions swirl to the surface of the soul when a person begins looking for birth parents. But a deathbed confession reveals a dark family secret as Jane Blasio goes looking for her birth parents. AND An Olympic runner falls during the final lap at the Tokyo Olympics 2021 and that could have been it. But Sifan Hassan wowed the world with her astonishing comeback! To see videos and photos associated with this episode, visit GodUpdates! https://www.godupdates.com/olympic-runner-falls-sifan-hassan/ https://www.godupdates.com/looking-for-birthh-parents-jane-blasio/

Talk'n Throws- Texas Style
Talk'n Throws with Daisy Osakue Part 2

Talk'n Throws- Texas Style

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 69:44


Talk'n Throws with Daisy Osakue Part 2- 2021 placed 12th in the Tokyo Olympics represeting Italy, 2018 represented Italy in the European Championships where she placed 5th in the Discus, NCAA Div. II Record Holder in Discus 201'4, 7 time All American in Shot Put & Discus at Angelo State University, 2nd Team All American in High JumpTexas Track and Field Association Informative website for all things Texas Track and Field4Throws.com Family owned business offering all quality implements at reasonable prices. Code Talkinthrows10ReadyUp Athletic Development ReadyUP offers team consulting, semi-private & private strength and conditioning in the Austin area.Porta-Circle Making Throwing more accessible. Use the code“TEXAS4EVER” for 10% off.Big Frog of Colleyville Handles all printing and embroidery. FiberSport Discus We are taking the guess work out of discus selection. It is not just about rim weight.

The Mile You're In
Becoming An Olympic Medalist

The Mile You're In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 53:14


If there's one thing in life we must remember, failure and disappointment should not stop us from trying again. We can't allow it to let us give up on our dreams. Things don't always come easy and you should expect the unexpected along the way. Special guest and 2-time Olympic Medalist at the 2021 Tokyo Olympics, Kendall Ellis joins me to discuss the roller coaster of events and emotions that took place during her journey from the Olympic Trials to the Mixed Relay Olympic Finals. We also discussed the experiences with all of the current Covid related rules and restrictions at both events. Instagram https://www.instagram.com/kendi_kendall/Twitter https://twitter.com/kendi_kendall/Personal Website https://www.kendallellis.pro/Kendall's Incredible Comeback Win: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9XUf0FGCTsIntro & Outro produced by https://www.fiverr.com/awwyeahBackground music: Chill Noons by Kroniclehttps://soundcloud.com/the-chemist-10/chill-noons

Bleav in Softball
Stacey Nuveman - History (Part 2)

Bleav in Softball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 60:47


Jenna and San Diego State Head Coach Stacey Nuveman finish their conversation. In part 2, they talk about her coaching journey, transitioning from assistant to head coach, her vision for the program, her staff, pouring her heart and 30 year career into their team manual, leading through change, female head coaches, and the importance of women leading women. Plus, hot takes on the NCAA bracket, pitch calling and bat flips.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The DeJuan Marrero Podcast
Eps. 127 - Jazmon Gwathmey

The DeJuan Marrero Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 33:58


Professional Basketball Player Jazmon Gwathmey joins me on the podcast to share her experience representing Puerto Rico in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, Meeting Paul Gasol, Mental Health, and being able to play basketball again and much more! DeJuan Marrero Social Media YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UC5uNsn8rQXbVM2wOAoVC1hw?view_as=subscriber Spotify Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2lcn... Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dejuanmarrero/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedmpodcast_/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/dejuanmarrero?lan... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dejuan.marrero --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dejuan-marrero/support

The Fifth Floor
Meet Kenya's Guru of Love

The Fifth Floor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 40:44


The BBC's gender and identity correspondent, Megha Mohan, meets Robert Burale, an East African guru of love, whose seminars promise the hopeful they can “Get a boyfriend for Christmas". So what's the advice, and who's buying? Giant African snails in Kerala Giant African snails have become a pest in Kerala, so one area came up with a creative snail hunting idea: a chance to win over a million dollars for catching the most. Too good to be true? Over to the BBC's Jaltson Akkanath Chummar. China's Hainan island surf boom Covid restrictions on travel, plus surfing's debut at the Tokyo Olympics, have led to a boom in the China's home grown surf scene. Hainan island is proving a popular destination as Howard Zhang of BBC Chinese reports. Why car registration plates have blocked the Serbian Kosovo border A recent row over registration plates caused a blockade at the border and harsh words between Belgrade and Pristina. BBC Serbian's Marija Jankovic explains why registration plates are so contentious between Serbia and Kosovo. Vietnam's Spring Roll King BBC Vietnamese has been sharing the extraordinary story of Trinh Vinh Binh, nicknamed ‘the spring roll king', famous as the only businessman to have won a case against the Vietnamese government, as the BBC's Thu Phan explains. Image: Robert Burale Credit: BBC

RNZ: Checkpoint
David Nyika saddened to hear Rio bouts were manipulated

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 2:49


Tokyo Olympic bronze medallist David Nyika is saddened but not surprised a bout manipulation system existed in boxing at the 2016 Rio Games. An independent investigation, commissioned by amateur boxing's governing body AIBA, found judges used hand signals at the ringside to rig 14 bouts - including the super heavyweight final. Clay Wilson reports.

Ultimate Swimmer
Gunnar Bentz

Ultimate Swimmer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 60:14


Gunnar Bentz joins the podcast this week fresh off his second Olympic appearance! Gunnar has been prominent name in the swimming world over the last decade dating back to his early high school days when he was breaking National Age Group Records. After high school, Gunnar joined coach Jack Bauerle at the University of Georgia where he became a multi-time NCAA All-American and 2016 Olympian. After graduating in 2018 Gunnar transitioned to a pro career and ultimately moved to Austin, Texas to train with the GOAT, Eddie Reese to prepare for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Gunnar made his second Olympic team at trial in 2021 and represented Team USA proudly in Tokyo! We hope you enjoy this interview with a true Ultimate Swimmer!

Leading the Next Generation with Tim Elmore
Four Lessons on Leading Young People From the Tokyo Olympics

Leading the Next Generation with Tim Elmore

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 21:08


The postponed Olympics Games held in Tokyo are now history. As always, there were highs and lows for competing athletes, but we’d like to focus on some insights we gain as we watched this year's young athletes perform. In this episode, Tim Elmore and Andrew McPeak discuss four lessons on leading young people from the…

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
395: Energy, Perspective, Priorities, and Intention with Jen Dary of Plucky

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 48:55


Chad talks to Leadership Coach and Founder of Plucky, Jen Dary, about working with individuals and companies to create healthy dynamics at work. In fact, Plucky just released a new product that aids in doing just that! Manager Weeklies are notebooks designed to help leaders intentionally set up their weeks and track progress. It includes tips and tricks, including useful 1:1 tools. Each notebook is designed to last one quarter. Follow Jen Dary on Twitter (https://twitter.com/jenniferdary) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jen-dary-46b0367/) Plucky (https://www.beplucky.com/) Manager Weeklies info & order link (https://shop.beplucky.com/products/manager-weeklies-2-pack) Newsletter: beplucky.com/newsletter (https://beplucky.com/newsletter) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. And with me today is Jen Dary, founder of Plucky. Jen, welcome back to the podcast. JEN: Thank you. My third time. Three time's a charm. I feel very lucky. CHAD: There aren't many people who have been on the podcast as guests three or more times. So you're in an ever-increasing select group of returning guests. JEN: Thank you. I feel like it's maybe because the Tokyo Olympics have just started, but I feel competitive and ready to take on this third session. CHAD: [laughs] So the last time you were on was October 28th, 2019 is when the episode came out. JEN: Millennia ago. CHAD: Not quite two years ago, but yeah, also a millennia ago. And that was Episode 342 so if people want to go back and take a listen to that. And then before that, you were on Episode 270, which I actually don't even know the date of. It was even longer. So welcome back. You are celebrating the eighth anniversary of Plucky. JEN: I know. I don't really think of it in these ways because I don't have an MBA, or I didn't come from a business background or anything. But definitely when I hit five years, I feel like my husband said something about that. He was like, "Honey, you should be really proud. Not a lot of businesses make it five years." And that was not really on my mind. But now that Plucky is eight, I feel like oh man, I'm just so happy to talk about how businesses evolve and how what you thought it was going to be in year one was different than year three, was different than year five, and of course, it's different than year eight. So we're eight years in, but nothing's the same, and everything's the same. I'm sure you've experienced that too. CHAD: It was actually the eighth year going into the ninth year mark that we at thoughtbot started to make big changes. And it was that idea of coming up on a decade. It started to feel like, wow, there's real momentum here. And instead of thinking about what the next year looks like, what does the next decade look like? And are we the kind of company that is going to last 20 years? And that put us in a different mindset. And I started to think about the impact we were having and the legacy that we would have. And was it big enough for the size of the company that we had? JEN: How old is thoughtbot right now? CHAD: We just celebrated our 18th anniversary. JEN: Oh my gosh. All right. Well, maybe at the very end, you can give me your best wisdom for the ninth year. [laughter] CHAD: Oh jeez. Okay. [chuckles] JEN: No presh, but tuck that in the back of your brain. CHAD: Yeah, get some sleep. That's my best advice. JEN: [laughs] Great. CHAD: That would be great. We can come back to that. JEN: Cool. CHAD: So obviously, it's been a big two years since we last talked. I'm sure a lot has progressed in Plucky. How have things changed? JEN: Well, what's funny is that the two years spread that we're talking about or 18 months or whatever it is, for the most part, overlaps with COVID so far. So by the end of 2019, things were cooking, and everything is good. And even, personally speaking, my youngest son would be entering kindergarten in the fall of 2020. Again, as a business owner, a mom, all those things I was sort of at the end of 2019 hot, so good. And then I was anticipating 2020 to be continued pretty much the same as is. Like, we would keep training managers. I would keep traveling. All that would get easier because the kids are getting bigger, then my kid would go to kindergarten. And I was also finishing a book about...I can't remember if we talked about this before, but I was really sick in 2016. I had a brain tumor diagnosis, and I'm okay now. It was benign. I had this memoir that was eh, I don't know, maybe two-thirds done. All that was the plan for 2020, Chad. And I'm sure this is shocking news to you, but none of it happened, including freaking kindergarten, obviously in person. So on the business side of things, I kept everything stable as best as I could. So coaching kept going because coaching has always been remote. We have some products, and we kept shipping those out as best we could. At the very beginning of COVID, when everybody thought it was this three, four-week hiatus from real life, I recorded a story every day. Because I was like, what can I do for all the world that's working? So I recorded a storytime for Plucky with my kids. And I put it out on social media so that working parents could have another 15 minutes of distraction for their kids. That's how cute I was back then. [laughter] After one month of that, I was like, I need somebody to read stories to my kids. Yikes. CHAD: Yeah. [laughs] JEN: So the big thing that changed was that our manager trainings in person obviously I had to cancel those. So I transitioned from in-person to virtual events, and that has continued. And as of this recording, end of July, I was thinking that our November event this year…it's the 20th cohort of So Now You're a Manager. I was going to have it in person. And just last week, I pulled the plug on that. And I was like, no, we're going to stay virtual a little bit longer because I don't know how to predict what the hell is coming. So again, that sort of stabilizing, right? Like, okay, well, now I know how to do the virtual. That will be the stable choice this year, which is weird to say, but true. CHAD: Yeah. So you just gave a great organic listing of the things that Plucky does, and a big part of that was that in-person So Now You're a Manager training, which, if people remember from the previous episodes, new managers at thoughtbot have attended over the years. It's a really great training for people who become managers. So what was transitioning that to remote like? Because you'd only ever done it in person before, right? JEN: Yeah, totally. The first 11 cohorts were in person, and then we got to 12, and that was supposed to happen in March in Atlanta. We canceled that, and it wasn't until June that we had the 12th, and that was the first virtual one. And to say that I needed to go through stages of grief is probably pretty accurate. [chuckles] My energy in person is so a thing, like a tool of mine and just pulling people together, and making safe space for conversations and all that jazz. So I was like, what the hell is that going to be like on Zoom? And meanwhile, remember I'm watching my first grader go through the shenanigans of Zoom for the end of that year. And I'm like, oh my God, how am I possibly going to get grown-ups on this and paying attention and not being distracted? So a couple of things, I will say number one is I definitely interviewed four or five people in the industry who are good at virtual events, and I tried to get their deepest wisdom about it. The second thing is that I made the cohorts smaller. So in person, we have around 20 to 22 max, and in virtual, we do 10 to 12 max. And so that got a lot smaller. Also, instead of being two days back to back, I broke it into three half days which is just a different ask. And I wasn't sure if people would bite at that. I tried to mimic it after how some people do an MBA on the side. So then they go to work, and they practice the stuff they're learning at the MBA. And so that has been my thought like, okay, you'll be with me basically for a month. We'll have three half days together, usually on a Friday. And then you're practicing in the meantime. So between the times I see you, you're improving your listening skills. You're coming back with anecdotes about hires or tough conversations or whatever. So I won't say that's like a silver lining, but it's just a different beast. And the first day I did it, I mean, I'm telling you, I was on the bathroom floor on my knees like, don't let the internet go out. CHAD: [laughs] JEN: I was so scared. I don't know why looking back. I'm in tech, but I'm not technical. It's my husband who helps me set up a monitor and whatnot. Oh God, I was so nervous. And I just thought, shit, this is the thing I can't problem-solve. If the internet goes out, I don't know what to do, but if someone's upset, I can help them. So it just brought all of my skills in a different environment. And now I feel pretty good about it. I don't know if you found this with your distributed company overall, but I have worked very hard to make sure that it's a blend, of course, this digital experience, but also I use the mail. I use snail mail a lot. So attendees get a packet before we begin. They get a gift at the end, a graduation gift. And yeah, I feel like I've learned a lot about how to have a hand-in-hand experience of digital as well as a physical object that they can touch to make that experience more than just a screen. CHAD: Yeah, I think that's important. How did changing the format, reducing the class size, what business ramifications were there for that? JEN: Well, it's way less money. [chuckles] CHAD: Right. Okay, sorry. JEN: No. Oh my God. I want to be very real about these things, especially for people starting their businesses. It's way less money. And also if you think about it, everybody had already bought tickets to Atlanta, and then they had already started buying tickets to...I can't remember what the next one was going to be, New York, I think. So for a lot of the year, everything was, I'll say, comped, but that's not really what's going on. All of a sudden, the amount of seats that I thought I was selling for the year got reduced in about half, and much of that were already pre-bought tickets. So, as a line item, that was way lower. I also think I got...man, I haven't really said this transparently to anybody before, but I'll say it here. I got really scared about what to charge. Do you charge the same thing virtually than you do in person? And so I lowered it, I would say for a year. I lowered it by a couple of hundred dollars for each ticket because I didn't know what the market wanted. And also, I didn't know, oh God, were businesses closing? Were people getting prof dev budgets? Everybody was frozen for a good while. So I'm lucky that now today I'm back up to the same price that it had been before, but it's not as much income per event. And the other thing I'll say which affects money…but again, I want to be transparent for other folks who think about or currently run businesses. One great thing to come out of some of the social unrest of last year is that we now have an equity scholarship for So Now You're a Manager. So in every cohort, be that virtually or in person, I always reserve a seat for someone who's coming from an underrepresented group, so people apply. And that is something that I very happily said I will eat the cost of that ticket because it's important to me to have different voices in the room. And that has been a total awesome thing this year. That just started in January of 2021, but that's something really great that came out of last year. CHAD: Yeah. What did you find that customers wanted, and did it change over time? Was there an appetite for it to be remote, or was there resistance to it? JEN: I think at first people were overwhelmed and didn't want it. That's why I held it from March until June until I thought people were ready. I can tell you categorically that I've had the lowest percentage of parents attend of all time because, let's be real, who wants another kind of obligation? Or also, parents during this time, especially with young children, were not in that growth space necessarily for work because there was so much to keep afloat. So other than the three half days, I also have this optional hour that I throw in just if people can come; there's this extra exercise that didn't fit in from the original curriculum. And I don't think I've had one parent, maybe one, come across all those cohorts that have been virtual to that. So the optional stuff I see parents opting out of. That said, I saw more folks who maybe either live alone or maybe have a roommate but who are pre-family or some people won't have families but someone who was socially like, "It was so hard and tiring last year." And that sort of swung back around towards the summer and end of summer. I saw much more interest there because I think people were really lonely. CHAD: Yeah. And I also think, at least for me personally and for thoughtbot, that was when the thinking definitely shifted that this wasn't going to be going away anytime soon. And so we came to terms with that and started to then make much more long-term plans and permanent changes. JEN: I think it was also in the...I want to say like early fall when Twitter announced they'd be remote. Like, they have an office, but they wouldn't oblige anyone to ever come back again. And whenever that decision was made, there were a couple of other companies...At that point, I was still living in the Bay Area, and there were a couple of other companies that made similar suggestions. And so again, to your point, there was a revisioning of what the next phase was like or at least what to expect. And so, I think people weren't holding out to go back to normal. It was like, what's the new normal? CHAD: Yeah. So when we first shut down offices and went remote, we were giving updates every two weeks, and then it changed to every month. And then it would be like, "There's really no change. We're going to give another update in April." And then April was, "We'll give another update in May." And when it came to June, we just said, "We're planning on being in this mode for at least the end of the year. Let's start all acting and make this sustainable." So that is when our thinking changed too. JEN: Did you feel like with your CEOness and business responsibility over there...what kept you grounded for all that thing? Because obviously every time you make that announcement or regardless of whether that's in person or just...I don't even know– retention or whatever it is. It feels like you're just building strategy on freaking quicksand. CHAD: It wasn't easy. You feel responsible for everybody's well-being, both financially and everything else. And so the lack of stability…you want to provide it in an unstable world. You want to say, "Well, at least you shouldn't have to worry about this. Let's provide…" but it was impossible to do. And I'm much more comfortable with uncertainty. I think there's a spectrum of comfortableness with uncertainty, and I'm pretty far on one end of it, and even I was struggling. Same thing with like I'm very much on the spectrum of not having to worry about anxiety or anything like that, and even I was feeling it. And so I was just like...at one point I said to I think it was Diana or whatever "If I'm feeling this, if I'm getting chest palpitations, [laughs] something's really wrong, and we really need to pay attention to how everybody else is feeling." JEN: Oh, yeah. I even saw that anxiety obviously with coaching clients. There are some clients that when budgets dried up, there was like an initial drop-off, I would say March, April. But then I feel very lucky that the pipeline was still very strong, and I had clients stay with me or join or whatever. You remember as well as anybody not only did we have this health crisis going on, which again we still do but my last class...So third of three of the cohort in May last year was a couple of days after George Floyd's murder. And the responsibility I felt too...like, when all these things were going on last summer, it was like, who freaking cares about anything? It's like these huge things. And you start to say nothing matters. There are only three things that matter in life. And then you kept sort of recycling the drain on that. So here I am going into teaching the third of three classes. And during the third class, I always teach concepts on how to hire, concepts on how to lay someone off and fire someone, which everyone's always very barfy and nervous about. And I try to bring us together and graduate us in what feels like a victorious moment. But that's three days after George Floyd's murder, and everyone is reeling and needing to process. And I remember thinking that morning, I don't know how this is going to go because I was fully willing to rip up the plan and do something different. But at the same time, there's also sometimes they want some structure. Folks want to just show up and take this class and be distracted from what's going on in the world. So we sort of talked about this a few minutes before we started recording but really, what has been fascinating and challenging about continuing to train managers over the last two years is that these very large things are going on in the background: George Floyd's murder, a lot of social unrest in Minneapolis, the election, COVID, all these things. And you can't just put that away and show up to manager training. It is freaking relevant because it is relevant for them. Of course, it's very meta, but all of my students are then going to go back and be responsible for 3, 5, 7 other people in their day-to-day work. So it was really wild, but again, stretching and a challenge that I met with a lot of intention. I don't know if I was always super successful at it, but I thought a lot about it. CHAD: Yeah, I think that was the shift that we saw on our team. And what I've heard from people is that enough is enough in several different categories of things. And like, we just can't keep on doing what we were doing before. It's not working, and it is unacceptable. People are angry too. So it's not just processing. It's anger and wanting to see action, wanting to take action. And yet, doing it in a world where we can't actually be together, I think, made it particularly challenging for some people and for managers to know how to meet their team members where they were. And people process things in different ways too, and people need different things. And at that point, we had hired people who had only ever been remote. So I think the connections that you have with people that you might've worked with in person you can lean on a lot in the beginning. But then you're working with someone or managing someone who you've never met in person. JEN: Yeah. It's a whole new ball game. And I think that the notion of community has gone through the wringer, not only in the worst, it's a rebirth almost. I think the notion of locally what's going on for you and then who can you see? Who can you have a barbecue with? All of those questions of like, who can I be with? Of course, the internet's great, but the internet has some major, major boundaries to it. And people see that at work, and they see that in training. CHAD: One of the things we're struggling with in that category now is there are people who live next to each other because we were historically in offices. And as it becomes more possible to get together with each other, and this is something that, as managers, we're trying to navigate, it actually has a huge potential for exclusion now that we have hired a bunch of people who are anywhere. If the teams that were in-person together but are now working remotely start getting in person again, even if it's just an outing at a park, who's not able to attend that, and how will they feel? And what expectations have we set with them? And then you have just sort of equity and inclusion issues around people we've hired in Brazil since we've gone remote. There's no way for them to come. JEN: Sure. CHAD: It's not fair. And navigating that as a team, I think we've been able to do that, but it hasn't been easy. JEN: I think sometimes the only way to see it is none of it will work. So if none of it will work, then cool. The bar's low. [laughter] Yeah, it's not going to be perfect. And all in person had its issues too. So then, if you just sort of bottom it out and say, cool, cool, cool, there's no one silver bullet answer here. So what that means is yes, as human beings, folks who are possibly able to meet up for coffee will resonate and glow and be psyched to be around some other people. So, how do we say "No," less often to that? Because that's great. That's really something to celebrate. And I'm sure if everybody was in that situation, they would try to take advantage of that too. But then to say, if you're not in that situation, here's another option. And then, every once in a while, we'll mix those options together and have like a rolling menu with it so that nothing gets too static and paralyzed and presumed. And it's in that flow state, which of course, is more fatiguing because you have decision fatigue, and you got to keep making decisions about it. But if you can just say, "Oh, well, we're going to decide that on a week to week basis or on a quarter to quarter." I probably have said this to you before in one of these other podcast conversations, but I just really think that life is a giant science experiment. So if that's true, then you can just say, "Hey, y'all, for Q3, we're going to try this. And at the end of Q3, we'll ask you how that went, and we'll either keep doing it, or we'll totally change it, or we'll increment it." Software people are really good at this because they know that not everything has to go from 2.0 to 3.0. You could go 2.1, 2.2, 2.3. There are incremental builders. So if you can leverage that metaphor even culturally or socially with the makeup of the team and the way you run things, I don't know; I kind of think that's the best you got. CHAD: Yeah. And I think we generally have the idea that we trust people and that we can provide the information. And people will generally use that information to make good decisions that are oriented towards fulfillment. So a really good example when it comes to managers is in an environment where if you're meeting in person with someone, one team member and you're their manager, and you're not meeting in person with another, that could influence negatively the other person's path to promotion or the relationship they have with you and just subtly bias you towards the person that you might be able to meet in person with. And so as a manager, making sure people know that, that that is a thing that can happen is a good way to manage that bias because I think generally, people don't want to let that happen, but they might not even realize it, so they can actively manage it. JEN: Well, it sounds like even in that thought, you are gently nudging people back towards intention and back towards just not sleepwalking through their work, that this is important for us, not only in the distance conversation here but also obviously for race, and for gender and for all kinds of different ways that humans are. We will never get it 100% right and yet intention, and taking a beat, and taking a breath before you move into conversations about promotions or whatever will help remind you hang on a second, remember there's invisible stuff inevitably going on based on who I am and where I came from. How do I make sure things are fair today? Or whatever the reminder needs to be. It sounds like that's...I don't know. It's good that you have that front of mind. CHAD: So that's one example of remote management. How much of before the pandemic were people who were coming and attending the workshops? Were they managing people remotely? And how much of your curriculum was specific to that, if any? JEN: My gut says maybe about a third were remote managers. They are definitely with bigger companies that I was seeing that. The small agencies based in Pittsburgh, you know, Austin, those places were pretty localized. But so what you get with a bigger company is also a bit more infrastructure that supports some of these cultural conversations. And we had it as part of the curriculum, but it wasn't very big, and maybe I would sort of be intentional. There are breakout groups and stuff like that. And I might think I'm going to pair these two together for their practice one-on-one because I know they're both remote managers. I am very intentional about a lot of the pairings and all that stuff, and so I would be thoughtful in that way. But now, on some level, in all these virtual workshops, everybody has an equal footing now. So everybody's kind of screwed, and everybody's also making it work. So that has been a very interesting thing to see. And I always laugh at this example, a woman who came early on, maybe like the eighth or ninth cohort, and she's a remote manager. And she would say, "Well, I don't have a water cooler. I don't have, like, I'm walking down the hall sensing somebody's upset or anything." But she would say, "This is going to sound weird, but I keep an eye on how fast they emoji something." So if you have a person who...You know this person in Slack. They're always on Slack, always so supportive, funny, have something to say, a little thumbs-up emoji, or whatever. But if one day they're at work for sure and they haven't said anything about something, she would learn to read the tea leaves like that and check-in. And I just thought that was so clever and very creative. And what she's alluding to is this level three listening that I teach, which is gut or instinct or intuition. And what she was tracking was basically a change in behavior. And that's pretty much what we're tracking when we're in the office too. There could be many reasons why somebody doesn't emoji something right away. Maybe your daughter just ran into the room. Maybe there's a doorbell. There are a million things. But at the same time, not to be too precious about it but to casually track that at least instinctively. She was doing a good job of meeting the moment as best she could. CHAD: Are there other ways in which what you've been doing has changed over the last year? What are managers concerned about or challenged by? JEN: Yeah. First of all, I always had name tags that allowed for pronouns. But this is now certainly part of the curriculum. When we start, I give some social norms and then some tech norms. And so I make the suggestion that in Zoom, after your name, you put your pronouns. And it's not a huge chunk because I really don't feel like I am the best to teach this, but I've added in a DEI component, diversity, equity, inclusion component. And we have some folks in the alumni community who are DEI consultants, so that's great. I always give them shout-outs and refer over if people are looking for that. I've noticed that people are...I'll say careful, but what I mean by careful is that they are aware of all of the stuff we're talking about, like race and social stuff. Depending on where your office was in the country, the election was sometimes really hard. I think about companies in Ohio or Pennsylvania or swing states where it was not obvious that everybody in the office was on the same page about that. And the way that that stuff comes up and is like this piece of baggage in the room that prevents literally like a website being made. We want to think no, that shouldn't enter. That's not relevant here. And yet people are careful about both trying to say, "Listen, bring who you are. You're accepted here." And also like, well, sometimes what you're suggesting you believe about the world is harmful. The whole Basecamp thing is a good example of that. And so I found the managers who come to my training to just be open to not only sharing their experiences with that but looking very much for some guidance on that from their peers and then from me. CHAD: That's sort of what I was saying about people felt like you needed to be changing the way that you were approaching things. It wasn't okay anymore for most people to say, "We shouldn't be having this conversation. It's not a work-related conversation." It affects people's work and their ability to work. It is a work issue. And you can't simply put everything aside. That's one angle of it, but we're not all equipped. We're not all educated. We're not all ready to be able to do that as managers. JEN: Totally. But with the amount of shit that we have had to handle for the last two years, short of somebody who's a social worker/priest, I don't know who was ready. I feel like a lot of what we're talking about is so resonant for me because all of this is so hard. And if you are alone doing hard things, it's impossible. But the reason that I run the manager trainings the way I do and the reason that I hold onto them after and I put them in a Slack community, they're now alumni of the program. And it's active; it depends on the day. But people have hard questions that they're wrestling with. People have jobs that they're promoting, that they're trying to get people to apply to. It's this active community that goes on afterwards. Because, honestly, Chad, I feel like a big input into me creating So You're Now a Manager and the community around it was my experience becoming a parent. I was one of the first ones of all my friends. I was the first one of my siblings, and my son was the first grandchild on both sides. And I was like, this is so lonely. All my friends are going out in Brooklyn for dinner. And I was 31. It's not like I was very young or anything, but that's New York. And so I had a moms' group. And man, that moms' group got me through those early days because we could all laugh at how hard it was. We could cry together. And when I looked at the transition that people go through from IC, individual contributor, to manager or some level of leadership, you get responsibility. You have to play the messenger sometimes, something you're not totally down with. You have sometimes competition with peers. You have to manage up sometimes. And then you have these people who come to you with requests: I want a new career path. I want more money. I want a different title. And the slog of that is very reminiscent, on some level, of parenting to me. So I thought, well, this is not going to be like, here's your book. Good luck being a manager, although books could be helpful. For me, it seemed like there was at least a certain template of a person in the world who could use community too. So I always say you'll be with me for two days or a month if it's virtual. But I can't possibly teach you everything you'll encounter. That said, we can get some critical skills under your belt. And then you can just continue to riff with this peer network. And that has been a very, I would say, unique thing about the manager training I run and something that is so fulfilling to me. I have a very tiny business. Those are, in weird ways, kind of my colleagues, the funny jokes they tell or those personalities. That was another thing that we had to let go of. In 2020, I was going to have the first reunion. CHAD: Oh yeah. We actually talked about that in the previous episode as an idea. JEN: Heartbreaking. Yeah, it was called Encore. Basically, it was a follow-up and open to anybody that has already taken SNYAM, So Now You're a Manager. I had people who pitched talks, and we had selected them. And yeah, we had to pull the plug on that. So my hope is that next year we can do that. And now we've got almost...actually; I think we just hit 300 people, so maybe 50 will come, I don't know. We'll see. But I like the idea of providing a space for these folks who were new managers when I knew them and when they came through me but have gained some skills themselves and could become thought leaders in this management space. And whenever the world is ready for it, I'm excited to put that together. CHAD: Yeah, that's awesome. That sense of community is one thing I've struggled with, to be honest. Because having done this for 18 years, there aren't many people who worked at the company that work there now anymore. [chuckles] We've grown too. So I no longer have the close personal relationship that I had with most people at the company before or close work relationships. And combined with as we've grown, it's harder...you have to be more of a leader. You have to put yourself aside. It's harder to always be a servant to others. And then I found that especially difficult last year. And it's part of why I needed to not be CEO anymore and to transition to the COO role. Because I couldn't be in a position where everyone was always looking to me continually to make...and as distributed as we are, one of our values is self-management. But continually always looking to me to be the one who always has an answer, who is the stable one, I needed a break from that. So it's been nice, the transition. JEN: I was going to say is it better? CHAD: [chuckles] So it's a little bit different than I expected. So what happened was we made that change. We made other changes, and that was all going well. And then, in February, the largest vaccine scheduling provider in the United States came to us and needed help scaling the infrastructure and all that stuff. JEN: Oh my God. That's exciting. CHAD: And so I, along with a crack team of other experienced thoughtboters, went and spent all of our time focused on that. It has pros and cons, which is right as I was transitioning into a new role; I completely got pulled away and started working full-time with that client for a very important cause, which is the reason why we did it and decided it was worth it. The silver lining is it put everyone else in a position where we went very quickly from Chad's no longer the CEO to Chad's not here right now. [chuckles] And that was unexpected. But I think that it had downsides, but it had upsides too in terms of really being in a position where people could come into their own, into their new roles and sort of a forcing function for some of the changes that we needed to make. JEN: You know, I'll give you major props on that, Chad. Because 18 years and especially, I think this about a lot of things, but especially business here, people get stuck. They really do. They get stuck, especially founders, CEOs. They don't know how to get out of something if they're tired. And there are not a lot of models for what that could look like. The biggest disservice someone could make to leading a company would be to not really be feeling it because that shit trickles down. And if you're tired or if it's not your thing anymore, really, the biggest gift you can give is to go get aligned somewhere else and then hand over the reins to what I keep thinking of as the next generation. I coach a lot of people, or I work with a lot of people who are in the middle, let's say, so they're not C-suite, and they're not newest managers, but they're sort of senior there. They're totally ready to go. I can't overstate that. [chuckles] Will they mess stuff up? Sure. So did you. Will they have questions? Absolutely. But the next generation of every company it's the most strategic thing that a CEO could do is to think, what happens if I'm not here? That allows you to take a freaking vacation, like take a month off. Or that allows you to meet such a huge civic call, which you're describing here, and step away. Or again, God forbid something happened, and you get very sick; it allows the company to be bigger than yourself. So I just commend you on even having the courage to step towards COO and then obviously also kind of redirect as needed this year. But I hope that if there are other CEOs listening or folks in the C-suite who are wiped, this is my gentle nudge to them to hand over the reins at some point. Because you'll get a paycheck, I'm sure you can figure that. CHAD: [chuckles] Being wiped was one small part of it. And I had Diana on who's the new CEO, and we talked about this. We had grown to a certain point. Also, to toot my own horn, I had done a really good job of building a team of managing directors who were really good at what they were doing. And I was no longer the best manager for them. I was no longer what they needed in order to continue to grow. I could do it, but I wasn't the best person for it. So that was the overriding reason to make the change, and being tired and needing to not always be the one that everyone was looking to was certainly a part of it. But yeah, it's been good. JEN: Yeah. I figured we would get there at some point, but we talked a little bit earlier about how I have this new product coming out in September. So the product is called Manager Weeklies, and it's basically...I got to figure out the exact noun for this. I guess this is the marketing moment. [chuckles] But it's basically a small notebook. The way I think of it is it helps you take a deep breath before your week starts. And so I'm not messing with your to-do lists. Everybody has different versions of that, Trello or wherever the heck you keep it. But before you start the week, it is so important to wonder where's my energy at? What's my perspective? What are the couple of priorities? What am I blocking? Just a couple of invitation questions there. And then the idea is that you then can do this on whatever, a Sunday night or Monday morning. And then the rest of the week has, I feel like I've said intention 50 times in this conversation but has intention in it. You can decline those three meetings because they're not the highest priority. You can make some space to actually do the work that comes out of the meetings that you're in. And what I have watched over the last maybe three years are my coaching clients who get themselves together at the beginning of the week who have some sort of practice about setting things up in a good way are the most successful. They get the promotions because they look like they know what they're doing because they do. So anyway, it's called Manager Weeklies. So it's a small notebook. Each notebook is for a quarter. And then, because I'm a coach, I also filled it with other good stuff. Like at the end, there are all kinds of prompts for ways to give praise to people on your team, ways to give feedback, ways to handle conflict, ways to say, "Yes, no, maybe." And then there's a Work Wheel tool at the very end. And so my hope is that people who just feel like they show up on a Monday already behind that they would find some help with that intention. And I feel like what you're saying is that self-awareness component that came through for you, Chad, to say, I'm not the best at this, and also, I'm a little fatigued and so, therefore, deep breath. Here's the strategy going forward. It wasn't reactive, but there was some thought behind it. And so we'll see this fall people get a chance to try that out. CHAD: That's awesome. I feel like it's getting back to your roots but also building on it. So for people who don't know, the Plucky Cards were actually the first way that I was introduced to you was someone showing me a pack of those cards. So, where can people find out more about that? JEN: The best way for people to find any information is just to subscribe to the newsletter. I send it once a month. It's usually a reflection on work, life, something going on there. So if you go to beplucky.com/newsletter, then you'll be first in the know. What's very funny, Chad, is I have a former coaching client who holds the record now. He was the first one to buy the first pack of cards. He was the first one to buy the second pack of cards. [laughs] And he was also the first one to do this Small Group ticket that I recently did as a little offshoot of Plucky. So anyway, in my mind, I always laugh, and I wonder, I wonder if he's going to grab the first pack of Manager Weeklies this fall. But you're right. They certainly plug and play with the cards very well where there's even space in the weekly template to say, what's the one-on-one topic for the week? So it could be a card that you pull, and you use, or it could just be something else going on in the world that you want to bring to all the one-on-ones. But I feel like there are a lot of things I'm not great at in the world, but the things I am good at are people. And then I listen to people over and over again through all of these experiences. And I try to hear what else do they need? What weird little thing can I invent that could help them with some of these things that they struggle with? And I'm also just really mindful of the fact that not everybody has the budget for coaching or for manager training. And I would love for Plucky to be a brand that even if you work for a nonprofit or if you don't have the money to pay for some of those more expensive things that you would have 35 bucks for a pack of cards or 20 bucks or whatever the pricing will be for the notebooks and that you can engage with my brand, even if you're not very wealthy. And I feel like as a person who works and serves an industry like tech, that is always really a priority for me to not only coach or work with the people with the most money. CHAD: Yeah. If I remember right, you designed the cards, right? JEN: Oh my God, I wish. No. CHAD: Oh, okay. JEN: For the first pack of cards I worked with, I don't know if you know him, Greg Storey. CHAD: Yeah. JEN: He's great. Greg Storey did my first deck of cards, and then he moved on, and he's doing other interesting things with his career. So I have a designer who helped me with the second deck of cards called the Manager Pack. So that's questions for managers of managers to bring to one-on-ones, and then the Manager Weeklies are coming out. I've been collaborating with a woman who runs a design little shop called YupGup in Delaware. So her name is Joni. So it is so wild, Chad. I wish that I had any design sense. But it's like, I make these things which look like a terrible PowerPoint. I'm like, here, then there will be a bullet. And then I give it to a designer like Joni at YupGup, and all of a sudden, she has a logo. And then she has some emojis and colors. And I'm like, this is how I felt when I was pregnant, and someone showed me a sonogram, and I was like, (gasps) there's a baby in there. CHAD: [laughs] JEN: This is how I felt when she showed me them, and it was so exciting. And I will never be good enough to even be talented at all to make these things myself. But I hold the idea, and then I find someone who wants to help me make that in the world. It's just magical. That is so fun for me. And so I just ordered them. Actually, I ordered 1,000 of them about three hours ago. And so they'll come in August, and I just know it will be very surreal when I open the box and look at them and think about how many people in the world and pens in the world will be used to set intention, to set up people's weeks and hopefully, make a softer and more fair and thoughtful place to work. CHAD: And one of the things I love about your business and products is that you know you're having an impact beyond that 1,000 notebooks that you put out in the world because each of those people manages 3, 4, 6, 7 people. And if you can make work better for those people, then you have a 7,000-person impact. JEN: Yeah. And it's funny you say that because I think that recently...I keep saying I'm about to go away for a month or just be out of work for a month as a break after this whole COVID time. Since starting Plucky eight years ago, I didn't really have a model. I am not a traditional business. And even though many people kept saying, "When are you going to hire? When are you going to build the team? When are you going to do all of that?" That is not the shape of Plucky medium-term or long-term. I'm not going to be a coach factory. I certainly could, but then I'd end up super burned out and not liking my job. And then I'd have a sad company, and it would be bad. So I don't want to do that. CHAD: And that's literally the opposite of Plucky. JEN: Right. I mean, in the name, right? So, where I have landed as a model is to look at what artists do. And you would never take an artist...I really like Lisa Congdon in Portland. She's a cool, cool artist. And I've heard her speak, and I like her a lot. And what would Lisa Congdon's team look like? She sure isn't hiring other artists to do the work that she's over-signed up for. You get Lisa. And so she has a shop, and then she has partnerships where she teaches at different universities. And as I move into the ninth year here, I'm thinking a lot about what's standing between me and Plucky's shape and what an artist like Lisa Congdon has going on? And honestly, fully transparently, I think it's that I need to own that Plucky is me. And it's so messy in marketing. Do you use the royal 'we'? We at Plucky? Who is we? And I think that there's some good growth in front of me this fall and next year to say, yeah, I'm Jen, and I run a company called Plucky. And I'm putting this stuff out in the world, and I hope to have ripple effects. And it won't be by hiring 100 people. It'll be just like you described, selling things to X people, and then those people's reports, those ripples will follow down. And I'm really grateful to have found myself in this place because I love coming to work every day. CHAD: Awesome. Well, even though you love coming to work every day, also enjoy your vacation. JEN: Oh my God. Thank you. CHAD: And your time off and your time to reflect. JEN: Yes, thank you so much. CHAD: You already mentioned the website, but again, mention that, and then are there other places that people can follow along or get in touch with you? JEN: Yes, sure. So the newsletter, like I said, is beplucky.com/newsletter. On Twitter, you can look at @BePlucky. I'm on LinkedIn, too, obviously for Plucky. And then I have basically a behind-the-scenes account on Instagram because it was too annoying...Like, what do you take pictures of, Chad, when you're a coach? You can't take pictures of confidential conversations. CHAD: [laughs] JEN: So Instagram, I was like, I don't know what to do with this anymore. So anyway, I just have a behind-the-scenes one over there, which is called bepluckster because somebody else had it. So yeah, so all those ways. And also, I just generally say that if you're a person listening to this podcast and you just wanted to say something to me or ask a question, you should always just email me. It's just hello@beplucky.com. I love just hearing from people. And I might not be able to send you a three-page essay back, but I really love just interacting. And if something moved you or made you think about something, whether that was something I said or Chad, you can always just shoot me a note and tell me what you're thinking. I am not precious about that. CHAD: Awesome. Likewise. So you can subscribe to the show and find notes for this episode at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. You can find me on Twitter @cpytel. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening. Thanks for joining us, Jen. JEN: Thank you. Announcer: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Jen Dary.

The USA Weightlifting Podcast
Van Life with Olympian Harrison Maurus

The USA Weightlifting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 40:12


We're excited to host Harrison Maurus for his third appearance on the USA Weightlifting Podcast. In today's episode Harrison talks us through his 5 of 6, fourth place finish at the Tokyo Olympics where he broke his American record. We also dive into his preparation for the competition as well as what he plans to do now that he is out of training. Enjoy the show!Sponsors:www.RomWOD.com - Optimize Your Performance

Just Women's Sports
Jordan Larson

Just Women's Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 65:52


Olympic Volleyball Trifecta Medalist, Jordan Larson joins Kelley to talk about the Tokyo Olympics and winning her first Gold. Jordan talks about what it means to be coachable and how that's helped her transitions between college, the national team, and international clubs. Kelley even finds out how the nickname "the governor" really came to be...

WHOOP Podcast
Diver Tom Daley on winning Olympic gold, the importance of mindset, and the power of being the truest version of yourself

WHOOP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 53:03


World-class diver Tom Daley details his journey from child prodigy to Olympic champion, and explains what he's learned along the way about mindset, visualization, and being the true version of yourself. Tom discusses how he found diving (2:57), becoming world champion at 15 (6:16), coming out (10:01), being your true self (14:01), visualization (15:02), how he uses WHOOP (17:48), mindfulness and meditation (21:29), peaking for the Olympic final (25:18), managing fear (30:03), winning gold (39:53), accomplishing your dreams (42:39), and making sacrifices to succeed (44:42). Support the show (http://whoop.com)

Black and White Sports Podcast
NBA star Kevin Love Says "F##K HIM" to Team USA Director after CUT from Tokyo Olympic Roster!

Black and White Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 8:39


Website: www.blackandwhitenetwork.com Get your MERCH here: https://teespring.com/stores/blackandwhitesports Follow Black and White Network on Odysee: Black and White Sports: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitesports Black and White News: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhitenews Black and White Entertainment: https://odysee.com/@blackandwhiteentertainment Follow us on Rumble: Black and White Sports: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteSports Black and White News: https://rumble.com/user/BlackandWhiteNews Email: blackandwhitesports2019@gmail.com Check out the podcast site here for all of the live streams: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports Please support Black and White Sports for as low as .99 per month here: https://anchor.fm/blackandwhitesports/support Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/blackandwhitesports Join us and become a channel member today as we fight against Woke sports. Click the JOIN button or the link in the description and support us. Just starts at $4.99 per month and cancel anytime. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC73b_bf7j4fgTnBNRTqKKTA/join Check Out blackandwhitenetwork.com and help us SECEDE from Big Tech - Joint Videos, Exclusive Live Streams, and Silver Members can join in on Member Panel Streams! Uncensored! Or Help Sponsor the Channel & Website with the Basic $5 (and still get access to live streams on the website)

State Champs! Network
Jordan Larson - Olympic Gold Medalist | Above the Net

State Champs! Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 29:41


This week on Above the Net, Candace Lynn takes over in the studio and sits down with Vince Muscat to recap last week's top matches, review the MIVCA Miss Volleyball candidates, preview the top upcoming matches, and explore changes to the SC! Top Ten Rankings. Genna Rose also sits down with Olympic Gold Medalist Jordan Larson, an outside hitter for the USA Volleyball team. They talk about Jordan's entry into the sport, getting the Gold Medal kill in the Tokyo Olympics, becoming a leader on the biggest stage, and much more! Presented by Lawrence Technological University and sponsored by the MHSAA and the DMC Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan.

Hoopsology Podcast
Hoopsology Interview: The Washington Post's Ava Wallace on Ben Simmons, Beal, Westbrook, Tokyo, and D.C. Sports' Fans

Hoopsology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 31:35


Ava Wallace of the Washington Post joins the show to discuss Ben Simmons rumors and how he could fit on the Wizards as well as Bradley Beal's unique loyalty, interviewing Russell Westbrook, covering the Tokyo Olympics, and where DC sports fans' loyalties lie. Follow Ava Wallace here: https://twitter.com/avarwallace Like – Share – Subscribe Be sure to check out our podcast here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/hoopsology/id1509790773 or anywhere you listen to podcasts! Join the conversation! Twitter: https://twitter.com/hoopsologypod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Hoopsologypod/ IG: @hoopsologypod Thank you for your support! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hoopsology/support

The Betches Sup Podcast
#560 Should Women Athletes Have To Take A Stand? ft. Kelley O'Hara

The Betches Sup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 30:57


USWNT player Kelley O'Hara joins Amanda and Bryan to talk Tokyo Olympics, pay equity, and “Bachelor In Paradise.” O'Hara discusses her podcast for the Just Women's Sports network and an upcoming season of incredible interviews with women athletes. She describes the unusual vibe at the Tokyo Olympics and how she feels about the responsibility imposed on women athletes to take a stand. Finally, they play a Bachelor In Paradise-inspired game in which Kelley assigns reality tv personalities to positions on the soccer pitch.

Auxoro: The Voice of Music
#144 - Jonathan de Marte: Playing Baseball In The Tokyo Olympics, Pitching Drunk, UFC Vs. MLB, & Olympic Village Specimens

Auxoro: The Voice of Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 129:05


BONUS EPISODES & TOPIC SUGGESTIONS: https://auxoro.supercast.tech/ Jonathan de Marte is a professional baseball pitcher, an Olympian, and a member of Team Israel Baseball.  JONATHAN DE MARTE LINKS:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jjdemarte8/Twitter: https://twitter.com/jjdemarte8Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_de_Marte THE AUXORO PODCAST LINKS:Apple: https://apple.co/3B4fYju Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3zaS6sPOvercast: https://bit.ly/3rgw70DYoutube: https://bit.ly/3lTpJdjClips Playlist: https://bit.ly/3r9Qxsa Full Episodes Playlist: https://bit.ly/3r83in3 Website: https://www.auxoro.com/ AUXORO SOCIAL LINKS:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/auxoroTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@auxoroBitclout: https://bitclout.com/u/AuxoroTwitter: https://twitter.com/AuxoromagFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/auxoromagNewsletter: https://www.auxoro.com/thesource If you enjoy the show, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than 60 seconds, helps us appear higher in searches so more people discover the show, and it boosts my ego;) Past Guests On The Auxoro Podcast Include: Aubrey de Grey, Andy Weir, Eben Britton, Eric Jorgenson, Isabelle Boemeke, Houston Arriaga, Jerzy Gregorek, Chris Cooper, Gryffin, Elsa Diaz, Dave Robinson, Meghan Daum, FINNEAS, Chloé Valdary, Coleman Hughes, Maziar Ghaderi, YONAS, Ryan Michler, Ryan Meyer, Gavin Chops, Bren Orton, Zuby, Jason Khalipa, Ed Latimore, Jess Glynne, Noah Kahan, Kid Super, Deryck Whibley, and many more.  Audio editing by dbsound: https://www.fiverr.com/dbsound  

Bleav in Softball
Stacey Nuveman - History (Part 1)

Bleav in Softball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 65:57


Jenna is joined by San Diego State Head Coach, 3X Olympic medalist with Team USA, NCAA national champion, and 4X All-American at UCLA, Stacey Nuveman! In part 1, they talk about Athletes Unlimited, the evolution of the game from era to era, UCLA's history and secret sauce, her freshman year transformation, reaction to the Tokyo Olympics (and Beijing 2008), how to deal with losing, transitioning into life after playing, career aspirations, and more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Just Women's Sports
Alyssa Naeher

Just Women's Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 73:27


The woman who *truly* saved the day in the USWNT's 2019 World Cup run. World Cup Champion Alyssa Naeher joins Kelley O'Hara to deep dive about her journey from USWNT sub to superstar keeper. From scoring her first pair of goalie gloves, to dealing with pressure from the media, to all of the false starts and heartbreaks she experienced while waiting for her first national team game. Now having reached the top, Kelley and Alyssa discuss the keeper's secret to making big-time penalty saves before reflecting on the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and where the USWNT goes from here.

Babbittville Radio – Babbittville
Katie Zaferes: Breakfast with Bob at the Collins Cup

Babbittville Radio – Babbittville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 19:52


Katie Zaferes joined me for a chat a few days before the Collins Cup. Katie Zaferes represented Team USA at the Collins Cup as a Captain’s Pick. Katie won a bronze medal at the Tokyo Olympics in triathlon for Team USA and a silver medal for Triathlon Mixed Relay. Katie raced in Match 2 against… The post Katie Zaferes: Breakfast with Bob at the Collins Cup appeared first on Babbittville.

HMMR Podcast
257: Mailbag

HMMR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 38:48


It's time to open the listener mailbag again. As the track season comes to and end and the fall sports season starts up, we answer some questions on scoring trends in track and field, general preparation, plyometrics, med balls, and share some memories of Yuriy Sedykh. For more information on this topic, read the complete show notes at: https://www.hmmrmedia.com/2021/09/hmmr-podcast-episode-257-mailbag/ » Support the show: join HMMR PLUS to get full access to our coaching resources. More notes: This episode is brought to you by HMMR Plus. Become a member for full access to our videos, articles, and podcast archives. The August/September site theme is analyzing the Olympics. Check back throughout the rest of the month for more insights from Tokyo. We continue to break down the Tokyo Olympics on the site. As discussed at the start of the episode, our latest article outlines global trends in track and field: who's hot and who's not You can hear us answer more questions on Episode 247, Episode 246, Episode 241, Episode 213, Episode 199, Episode 176, Episode 174, Episode 143, Episode 126 and Episode 89. We looked at med ball training more on Episode 249 and in our May site theme. For some memories of Yuriy Sedykh, read our memorial post last week. In the past we've also looked at his world record and what it would take to break it.

That Triathlon Show
Olympic gold medal training and preparation with Arild Tveiten | EP#304

That Triathlon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 81:03


Arild Tveiten is the head coach and sports director of the Norwegian Triathlon Federation. At the Olympics in Tokyo 2021, Kristian Blummenfelt, who has been coached by Arild for 11 years, took the gold medal in the men's individual event, and fellow Norwegian athletes Gustav Iden, Casper Stornes, and Lotte Miller finished 8th, 11th and 24th, respectively. Here, Arild makes his third appearance on That Triathlon Shown to discuss the specifics around training and preparing for the Tokyo Olympics, including heat preparation, tapering, race schedules, and much more.       IN THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN ABOUT: -How Arild viewed the Norwegian results in the triathlon events at the Olympics -Training camps and racing blocks in preparation for Tokyo -Tapering strategies -Heat preparation protocols -Preparing for the bike course with near-constant cornering and accelerations -Kristian's swim strategy to lose minimal time to the front pack -Arild's verdict on what went well in the preparations and what could be improved for Paris 2024 -The next big goals for the Norwegian team and individual athletes -Shifting training focus to long-course (half and full distance) racing   SHOWNOTES: https://scientifictriathlon.com/tts304/   SCIENTIFIC TRIATHLON AND THAT TRIATHLON SHOW WEBPAGE: www.scientifictriathlon.com/podcast/   SPONSORS: ROKA - Exceptional quality triathlon wetsuits, trisuits, swimskins, goggles, performance sunglasses as well as prescription eyeglasses and sunglasses.  Online vision test for prescription updates and home try-on options available for eyeglasses. Ships from  the US, UK and EU. Trusted by world-leading athletes such as  Lucy Charles-Barclay, Javier Gómez Noya, Flora Duffy, Morgan Pearson, Summer Rappaport and others in triathlon, cycling, speed skating, and many more. Visit roka.com/tts for 20% off your order.   ZEN8 - The ZEN8 Indoor Swim Trainer is a tool for time-crunched triathletes looking to improve swim specific strength and technique. The swim trainer is a perfect complement to your training in the pool. On days when you don't have time to go to the pool, you can now do a short but effective home-based workout on the trainer. It is inflatable, so doesn't take up much space, and best of all, it is very affordable. Get 20% off your order at zen8swimtrainer.com/tts.   LINKS AND RESOURCES: Arild's Instagram and Twitter profiles Arild Tveiten – coach of Kristian Blummenfelt, Gustav Iden and Casper Stornes on triathlon training the Norwegian way | EP#223 How Norway became a triathlon powerhouse with head coach Arild Tveiten | EP#154   RATE AND REVIEW: If you enjoy the show, please help me out by subscribing, rating and reviewing: www.scientifictriathlon.com/rate/   CONTACT: Want to send feedback, questions or just chat? Email me at mikael@scientifictriathlon.com or connect on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter.

Talk'n Throws- Texas Style
Talk'n Throws with Ariana Ince- 2021 competed in Javelin at Tokyo Olympics, 2021 finished 7th at US Olympic Trials 57'19m, 2011 Graduate of Rice University where she was Conference USA Indoor & Outdoor Champion in the Pole Vault and placed 2nd

Talk'n Throws- Texas Style

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 93:21


Talk'n Throws with Ariana Ince- 2021 competed in Javelin at Tokyo Olympics, 2021 finished 7th at US Olympic Trials 57'19m, 2011 Graduate of Rice University where she was Conference USA Indoor & Outdoor Champion in the Pole Vault and placed 2nd in Javelin, 2007 Graduate of Gonzales High School where she was a 4X State Champion in Pole VaultTexas Track and Field Association Informative website for all things Texas Track and Field4Throws.com Family owned business offering all quality implements at reasonable prices. Code Talkinthrows10ReadyUp Athletic Development ReadyUP offers team consulting, semi-private & private strength and conditioning in the Austin area.Porta-Circle Making Throwing more accessible. Use the code“TEXAS4EVER” for 10% off.Big Frog of Colleyville Handles all printing and embroidery. FiberSport Discus We are taking the guess work out of discus selection. It is not just about rim weight.

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast
Marijuana Possibly To Be Removed From Banned Substances List

Hammer + Nigel Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 3:55


Following a national outcry over the ousting of Sha'Carri Richardson from the Tokyo Olympics, the World Anti-Doping Agency has decided to reconsider its stance on the substance that got Richardson banned. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bleav in Softball
Victoria Hayward - The Universe Knows

Bleav in Softball

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 71:19


Jenna is joined by Softball Canada captain, Olympic bronze medalist, 2020 Athletes Unlimited 3rd place champion, Chairperson of the PEC, Washington Husky, and new SDSU assistant coach, Victoria Hayward! They talk about Canada's team culture (featuring Canadian tuxedos and moose antlers), visualizing success, leading in everything she does, AU strategy, why AU vibes are so positive, UW queens, getting back into coaching, and life after the Olympics. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
September 15th, 2021 6am Alice News Network

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 18:12


 A mom is reunited with her daughter after the father kidnapped their child to Mexico years ago, the cardboard beds from the Tokyo Olympics are being reused for Covid patients, and over a third of Americans have been in a fight before!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WSJ Minute Briefing
U.S. Industrial Production Recovers to Pre-Pandemic Levels

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 1:57


Plus: Justice Department asks federal judge to temporarily block Texas abortion law. Data suggest Tokyo Olympics didn't worsen Covid-19 spread. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Real Science of Sport Podcast
S3 E20: THE COACHES: Neal Henderson - Secrets of Physiology and Psychology in Endurance Sport

The Real Science of Sport Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 79:28


American Neal Henderson is one of the most celebrated coaches in endurance sports - particularly triathlon and cycling. Have coached pros like Rohan Dennis and Evelyn Stevens to Hour records (and most recently bronze in the Olympic time trial for Dennis), Henderson has trained all levels from first-time finishers to national and World champions and several Olympians. He most recently travelled to the Tokyo Olympics for the Australian cycling team but has served on multiple coaching committees for both USA cycling and triathlon. He is currently the head of sport science at Wahoo with a strong interest in using science in his coaching methods. Ross caught up with him at his home in Boulder, Colorado. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inside Tri Show
Taylor Knibb - more than fast on a road bike

Inside Tri Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 63:21


Taylor Knibb was part of the silver medal winning Team USA in the Mixed Relay at Tokyo 2020.  She's no stranger to success, twice winning the Junior World Championships and being crowned U23 World Champion. She qualified for the Tokyo Olympics by winning WTCS Yokohama. And she really caught people's attention with some phenomenal performances on her road bike with aero bars. First on her Ironman 70.3 debut in Boulder to qualify for the Ironman 70.3 World Championships, and then again at the Collins Cup, where she beat Teresa Adam and the phenomenal Daniela Ryf. This athlete is going places! You'll hear:   06:45 What is Taylor doing in her bike sessions that nobody else is? 09:50 Why she is going to be changing her swim very soon 11:15 The influence of her mum, Leslie Knibb, who is a triathlon coach and successful age group triathlete. Taylor dropped her mum on the bike for the first time in 2012, as her mum was preparing for Kona! 15:40 Taylor talks about the first time Taylor broke away with Flora Duffy in a WTS race in 2017 'I was 19, it was very intimidating and she didn't say anything the whole ride' 19:35 About her training group in Boulder, under coach Ian O'Brien and why she spends a lot of time training with Jeanni Metzler. 21:00 About her Ironman 70.3 debut 'when I showed up to Boulder for Ironman 70.3 I had taped all of my gels to the top tube of my bike and apparently you don't do that in a 70.3 race. Apparently on the broadcast they were counting the gels I had taken because they could see the electric tape.' 27:20 I don't think I had expectations for this year. I was just focussing on one thing at a time, but the Olympics was the thing I wanted to do the best in, and I didn't so that has a bit of a dark cloud over it, but I was able to learn from it and I definitely don't want to make the same mistakes again. I am bummed about that. I don't want to make the same mistake twice. 30:20 Why she watches as much triathlon as she can 'I think I have watched every single World Championship Series race since 2009. I love watching the races I haven't been in and the ones I have been in and I think I learn more from watching them than racing them sometimes. I only learnt about triathlon in 2013 and I watched the races to learn about the sport as a whole. When I was a Junior I watched them to learn about the racing and now it's more about learning about my competitors and how the races pan out. 35:00 Her reaction when she found out she would be racing against Daniela Ryf and Teresa Adam at the Collins Cup. I had nothing to lose. But you can't say you're not scared lining up against Daniela Ryf, but it was also a huge honour lining up against her. "To be able to race her is so neat, I was just excited and grateful for the opportunity." 39:40 I felt bad for Daniela at the Collins Cup. I was just waiting for her to come past me. I went out way too hard on the bike and I wanted her to pass me because I wanted to see just how fast she goes, but hopefully some day that will happen. I still want to be better because I still made mistakes. 43:00 How she developed a competitive side with her brother when they were kids. 47:00 Why she is still trying to get better at switching off a bit and why it was easier to switch off from triathlon when she was University. Also this week... 57:00 GB Paratriathlete Fran Brown talks us through her 4th place finish at the Tokyo Paralympics. "It wasn't quite what I had planned." Find out more about this week's guests Taylor Knibb https://www.instagram.com/taylorknibb/?hl=en (Instagram) Fran Brown https://www.instagram.com/franrbrown/?hl=en (Instagram) Resilient Nutrition's Meet the nutter: https://www.robertherring.co.uk/about/ (Robert Herring) performance coach Like what you heard? Let me know! Connect with Inside Tri Show across Social Media, just search Inside Tri Show or click on the icons below... Support this podcast

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez
Courtney Frerichs On Her Bold Olympics Silver Medal Run in Tokyo, Breaking 9 Minutes At Pre Classic & Her Mindset Work To 'Belong' Among The Best

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 74:08


"That's honestly been the biggest change I made this year: Just mentally being so much more prepared, so much happier and just felt ready with myself. I wasn't really focused on what anyone else was doing. I knew I was ready. I think there were a few big things we worked on. I have such a perfectionist nature. It was super innate probably and then I grew up in a sport that just sort of cultivated that in gymnastics. The whole premise of the sport is perfection. We really tackled that. We realized it wasn't just in terms of running that trait was coming out. It's probably been my whole life. Whenever I get into a scenario, especially in training, where someone is pushing the pace or it's playing out differently than I think it should be, what tools do I have or what can I do to handle that vs. going into a panic mode – which is what was starting to happen pretty frequently." Olympic and world championship steeplechase silver medalist Courtney Frerichs re-joins the show. The last time she was on was in 2018 after she broke the American record in 9:00.85 at the Monaco Diamond League. This was recorded in August just after she became the first American woman to run under nine minutes in the steeplechase. In 2019, she had what she believes to be a disappointing season that ended with a sixth-place finish at the World Championships just two years after taking silver behind Emma Coburn. When the pandemic wiped away the 2020 outdoor season, she didn't do a steeplechase workout at all. She took a break from training for the event and then had an injury in December. You'll learn more about that and also how the two steeplechase races before the Olympic Trials set the blueprint for one of the best performances by an American at the Tokyo Olympics. In Japan, she took the lead after a kilometer into the race and tried holding on but was passed in the final lap by Uganda's Peruth Chemutai. Frerichs ended up with silver, which is the best performance by a female steeplechase at the Games since the event was added in 2008. You'll be put in her shoes for that race and hear about Shalane Flanagan's text message to her before the race + much more. At the Pre Classic just a few weeks later, she lowered her American record to 8:57.77 and then took third at the Diamond League final in Zurich after we recorded.

Pursuit of Gold with Laura Wilkinson
S1E53 - Coming Back Stronger with Diving Olympic Bronze Medalist Krysta Palmer

Pursuit of Gold with Laura Wilkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 81:38


Today's guest made history in Tokyo this summer, becoming the first woman to medal in springboard diving at the Olympics since Kelly McCormick won Bronze 33 years ago in Seoul, Korea in 1988. Krysta Palmer made her first Olympic team this summer at the age of 29. Watching her smile and giggle at the podium with her Bronze Medal proudly hanging around her neck warmed hearts all over the country. Krysta's positivity is infectious and her perseverance throughout her journey to get to the Olympic podium is absolutely inspiring. Today she opens up about the injuries that took her out of contention in the sport of trampoline, what it was like to start a brand new sport at the age of 20, and she walks us through her extraordinary adventure in Tokyo, from a close call in the preliminary round to the very moment she realized she had medaled. Krysta offers mindset tips all along the journey, and she shares with us her favorite way to process both the good and the bad so that she can keep coming back stronger.  Krysta begins with her unique journey in sports, and reflects on coming back stronger from her recurring injuries, as well as how she ultimately found diving at the age of 20. She talks about transitioning her skills from trampoline to diving, working with her coach, Jianli You, to change certain habits, and entering the 2016 Olympic Team Trials following her graduation from the University of Nevada. Krysta tells Laura about a training trip to China that served as a turning point in her path to becoming an Olympian, as well as how her own experience as a coach has helped her as an athlete, and what she learned from competing in the 2017 and 2019 World Championships (her first international meet). She explains how her mindset to learn and grow from setbacks has helped her through the pandemic, and shares the moving story of receiving her Olympic ring from Laura. You'll hear about Krysta's memorable experience at the Tokyo Olympics, how her faith keeps her grounded, and the surreal and exciting moment she realized she had medaled in Tokyo. Krysta's honesty and perseverance throughout today's conversation are sure to motivate and inspire as she shares her incredible journey, and everything she has overcome to be able to do what she loves to do. Episode Highlights: Krysta's journey in sports, beginning with gymnastics and trampoline at a young age Coming back stronger from her heartbreaking injuries and finding diving at the age of 20 Transitioning her skills from trampoline to diving, changing certain habits, learning new dives on the fast track Entering the 2016 Olympic Team Trials following her graduation from the University of Nevada Her training trip to China in 2016, and how it brought her closer to becoming an Olympian The difference between platform and springboard diving, and Krysta's transition from platform to springboard Supporting her athletic training after college through coaching, and how this has helped her become a better athlete Her experience at the World Championships in 2017 and 2019 Learning and growing the most from disappointments or poor competitions How this mentality helped her make the most of trials and tribulations brought on by the pandemic Training through injuries and her family's support throughout her career Krysta's very special memory of receiving her Olympic ring from Laura Her unique experience at the Tokyo Olympics The importance of Krysta's faith The surreal and exciting experience of realizing she had medaled in Tokyo How Krysta continues to process her accomplishment and what the next season of her life looks like Continuing her education and studying toward an MBA Quotes: “At the age of five, when I was young, I really really had this lifelong dream of being an Olympian one day.” “You're always having to use your visual awareness to spot where you are. And make changes based on where you are. So I learned that through trampoline, and that actually really progressed well into my diving career.” “I've had two big struggles in learning how to make a proper entry. And also learning how to get the rhythm and the timing with the springboard, because also trampoline is very quick - quick twitch muscle work.” “I competed platform in the 2016 Olympic Trials because we weren't quite there yet with springboard. And my coach had always said, Give it time. Because springboard diving...you need time to develop the skill of it.” “I came into the team mid-semester, so in January. And I had to learn all my springboard dives for 1-meter/3-meter before Conference in February.” “I think the biggest thing was just trusting my coach [Jianli You], because I knew that she has the knowledge and the skill to teach me, whatever it is. I'm learning and I have the talent to try it. And it only takes me trying it to learn something new.” “That was the trip that made me stronger as a diver and as a person.” “I really gained a whole other level of respect for my coach at that time, because I really saw how respected she is amongst all the Chinese coaches and athletes.” “For me, it really made me appreciate my sport and my country and our freedom to choose to be able to do sports.” “I think that was the biggest takeaway for me from the trials is just feeling like I fit in. But I know that there's still more in me and I still need to learn more in order to get to that point.” “We really did take a step back from platform at that time. Then springboard started to pick up, and I was competing in it at all the Nationals and getting better and better.” “The springboard is very similar to trampoline, and I can do a lot of the same skills that I would typically do on a trampoline as well.” “I was coaching our club team. And that's really the majority of where I got money in order to survive and make a living. And so I was starting to see things from a coaching perspective, which actually helped me as an athlete as well.” “That's been a big learning lesson as I transition from a college athlete to now a professional athlete, is just to really pay attention to everything that surrounds me as an athlete, and what's going to help me achieve my dream.” “My first ever international competition was the World Championships in 2017.” “Coming back from that competition, I really had done a lot of processing and journaling, writing things down of what went wrong. What I learned was my mentality going into this event - I really learned that I had put a lot of pressure on myself. And nobody else did that. I was the one that did it to myself.” “I really needed to learn from that. And not necessarily get dragged down by the failure of it. But stepping into, kind of, that failure and learning from it, and then growing from it, and taking the next step into the next chapter, and facing what happened… These competitions were actually the ones that I've learned and grown the most from.” “I think my mentality through all my injuries really helped me through the pandemic, because it was really, Be stronger than you were before the injury. And coming into the pandemic, I could see it two different ways - I could see it as a disappointment and as a setback. Or I could see it as an opportunity and an area to grow, and another year of training, which is really beneficial for me because I'm still a new diver.” “I really chose to look at it that way and took that mentality from the injury standpoint and said, Hey, I'm going to be stronger than I was before the pandemic.” “For me, it's a performance. I love getting out there and just showing off what I love to do.” “That was just a beautiful, beautiful moment for me to receive [my Olympic ring] from you. And you're telling the story - I'm still getting chills because it's special for me.” “For me, what keeps me grounded is reading the Bible and getting my time with God.” “At that point, [Coach Jianli You] knew that I had medaled. And so I gave her this big hug. And she just held me tight. And she just said, We did it. We did it. And so that's just - that was a beautiful moment.” “I don't think this is my peak performance as a diver... I know that there's so much more that I still have left in me.” Show Links The Pursuit of Gold Homepage Life at 10 Meters: Lessons from an Olympic Champion 5 Smart Strategies to Confidence Conquer Your Fear in 5 Days               Laura's Social Media: Laura's Instagram Laura's Facebook page Krysta's Social Media: Krysta Palmer's Instagram Cheer for Krysta Facebook Page Krysta Palmer's Twitter @PalmerKrysta

SBS Japanese - SBSの日本語放送
Brisbane team heading to the 'Robot Olympics' in the US - ブリスベン・チーム、アメリカでロボット・オリンピックに挑戦

SBS Japanese - SBSの日本語放送

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 5:34


With the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics over, it's now time for some of Australia's finest technological brains to test their skills on the international stage. A Brisbane-based team of robotics experts will represent the country - and the southern hemisphere - at this month's "Robot Olympics" in the United States. Tricky underground navigation challenges await the human and non-human competitors. - 東京オリンピックとパラリンピックが終わって、今度はオーストラリア最高のテクノロジーの頭脳が国際的なステージでそのスキルをテストする番です。ブリスベンに本拠を置くロボットの専門家らが今月アメリカで行われるロボットオリンピックにオーストラリアと南半球を代表して参加します。そこでは、難しい地下を通り抜ける課題が人間と人間以外の選手を待ち構えています。

Hammer Factor
Hammer Factor Episode 84 – ‘Olympics Report w Eric Giddens, Ottawa Off Limits and Yellowstone Kayaking'

Hammer Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 93:32


In the episode of the whitewater podcast, Eric Giddens joins us to discuss covering paddling in the Tokyo Olympics. From there...

Inside with Brett Hawke
#189 Tom Dean the 200 Free Olympic Champion

Inside with Brett Hawke

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 52:56


Tom Dean overcame two bouts of COVID to win the 200 Freestyle at the Tokyo Olympics beating out compatriot Duncan Scott and Brazil's Fernando Scheffer. He added a 2nd gold as a part of Great Britain's 4x200 Free Relay win. Tom trains with BFF Jimmy Guy (Episode 83) under Dave McNulty at British Swimming's National Centre Bath. His age group coach was Paul Lloyd. Enjoy! 00:00 Swimming Sponsors 03:30 Hello & Congrats 05:00 Facts about Red Heads 07:15 Tom's family 08:00 NCAA recruiting trips 09:20 University of Bath 11:00 Dave McNulty 15:20 Jimmy Guy 17:30 2x COVID 21:10 Natural talent? 23:15 Sister Connie 24:50 Shift from IM to Free 26:40 Ian Thorpe 28:55 Watching the greats 30:25 Being a contender 32:00 Duncan Scott 33:00 David Popovici 35:50 Paul Biedermann's 200 Free World Record 38:20 Holding 52's 40:25 Head games 42:15 4x200 Free Relay 46:40 ISL 49:52 The Cork 51:00 Paris Olympics 52:00 Peak Weekly Schedule Support Our Sponsors: THE MAGIC 5: Custom fitted goggles that are tailor-made for your exact face. You shouldn't feel you are wearing goggles. Use code BRETTHAWKE20 at checkout to receive 20% off. SWIM ANGELFISH: Receive the tools and skills needed to teach swimmers with autism, physical disabilities, anxiety, sensory and motor conditions with Swim Angelfish, the global leader in adaptive swim. Get certified online today! SUPERIOR SWIM TIMING: Run a swim meet with ease from your laptop. SST is fully compatible with Hy-Tek and Team Unify as well as Colorado, Daktronics, and Omega touchpads. Tell them Brett sent you! DESTRO SWIM TOWERS: Save $150 per double swim tower by using the code "brett" at checkout! SWIMNERD LIVE: Create an interactive heat sheet. Stream your swim meet scoreboard in real time over top your live stream. Turn any tv into a digital scoreboard. Subscribe & Listen: Apple Podcasts Google Spotify YouTube Produced by: SWIMNERD Supported by: Fitter & Faster #britishswimming #swimming #tokyo2020

Triathlon Taren Podcast
Everything You Wanted To Know About Taylor Knibb

Triathlon Taren Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 63:36


Taylor Knibb has been quietly tearing up short course triathlon racing for years, but she has had a big spotlight shining on her lately as she won silver in the Tokyo Olympic relay event, and then beat IRONMAN World Champion Daniela Ryf in their Collins Cup match-up last month.  On the podcast this week we find out all about this rising star in triathlon!

Awaken Your Alpha with Adam Lewis Walker - The #1 Mens Development podcast for inspirational stories & strategies to thrive!

This episode is about the psychology of excellence. Michael Gervais is a high performance psychologist working in the trenches of high-stakes environments with some of the best in the world, training the mindset skills and practices essential to pursuing and revealing one's potential. His clients include world record holders, Olympians, internationally acclaimed artists and musicians, MVPs from every major sport and Fortune 100 CEOs. He was part of the team for the Red Bull Stratos mission to transcend human limits. This is where Felix Baumgertner made a freefall jump from 128,100 feet being the first human to break the sound barrier without a capsule! He recently returned from the Tokyo Olympics where he was part of the USA Surfing team and Carissa Moore brought home the Gold medal! For Entrepreneurs on a Mission! FREE Training - How to get your own TEDx Talk http://talkXcelerator.com/Masterclass Watch Adam's "Awaken Your Alpha" TEDx Talk here: www.bit.ly/TEDxALW This quest takes me across the globe to interview the world's most successful minds and sharing my own insights along the way. As I continue to learn and implement the “Hacks” to life, I share the best through the podcast and in the Facebook group "Awaken Your Alpha" Search & Join us in the pursuit of high performance. The podcast is now also a bestselling book! TALES & TACTICS TO THRIVE www.AYAlpha.com/book Get all the resources from each shows spotlighted guest, get your support and your questions answered. Connect across social media @AwakenYourAlpha @AdamLewisWalker to join the conversation.

Harder to Kill Radio
Are You Eating Enough?

Harder to Kill Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 31:38


I am sure you have heard or seen the common rhetoric of ‘eat less, move more' online. While this perspective may be well-meaning, it is frequently misused and can have some dangerous consequences. When you are training hard, wanting to improve your performance, and ultimately feel better, it takes the right amount of fuel to achieve those results.   Key Takeaways If You Want To Make Sure You Are Eating Enough, You Should: Start unlearning the dialogue that eating less and moving more will give you results Eat enough relative to your activity level, even if you are not an ‘athlete' Use activities such as strength training to shift your mindset and improve your confidence   Proper Fuelling Is Not Just for the Olympics Recently the Tokyo Olympics have been in the spotlight as women athletes are reporting better performance due to increased food intake. This is not a coincidence, as these athletes need fuel to perform better. But, this is not just limited to the elite level of athletes that compete in the Olympics.  Anyone active needs to get enough energy through food to help them gain muscle, improve insulin resistance, create confidence, and ultimately feel and perform better.   Feel Like a Badass Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport, or RED-S, can have a huge impact on your endurance, strength, risk of injury, and much more. While the awareness around low energy availability is increasing, we need to keep having the conversation and shift our mindsets away from the ‘smaller is better' mentality.  By approaching your strength training, and nutrition intake as a way to make you thrive, instead of just a laundry list of things to avoid, you can gain confidence and feel like the badass you know you are. Properly fueling yourself is the only way to improve your performance and start seeing the results you are looking for. Are you ready to experience the magic that comes from feeding yourself enough? Share your thoughts with me in the comments section of the episode page.   In This Episode How the Tokyo Olympics brought light to the connection between nutrition and performance (4:14) Why you should care about how you fuel yourself even if you are not an elite athlete (9:21) Issues that can arise if people are not eating enough food or are in RED-S territory (11:53) The many benefits of getting stronger and fueling to support your body (21:10) How strength training can help you gain confidence and feel like a badass (26:18)   Quotes “For women, there is such a pressure and prize placed on leanness and smallness and getting rid of that extra couple percentage of body fat and optimizing those things to the detriment of performance and honestly health.” (6:45) “Here we are, it's 2021, and we have some women performing at the highest, highest levels. And even they are susceptible to a lot of the junk they have learned or the fact that they have not had a lot of guidance to what it really takes to fuel for something of that level.”  (9:19) “Hey, you know what's going to happen if you eat more food? You are going to feel better, you're going to have more energy, you'll be able to train harder, recover better, and perform better!” (14:35) “Looking back in hindsight, I have learned so much about what it takes to really fuel to perform well and to be healthy.” (19:36) “I want you to think about fueling to support your body as really allowing you to expand, to be able to do more, to be able to challenge yourself if that is what you love. And to do it in a way that is supporting your health at the same time.” (21:23)   Featured on the Show Join the Group Strength Nutrition Program Here Sports Science Is Changing How Female Athletes Train. It Could Help You, Too Article Join the Private Coaching Waitlist Here Steph Gaudreau Website Check out the full show notes here! Follow Steph on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | Pinterest I'd really love it if you would take 1 min and leave us a rating and review on iTunes! Podcast production & marketing support by the team at Counterweight Creative   Related Episodes LTYB 348: Improve Your Fitness Over 40 with Robin Legat LTYB 331: Strength Training & Your Relationship to Exercise