Podcasts about noting

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Best podcasts about noting

Latest podcast episodes about noting

Givers, Doers, & Thinkers—A Podcast on Philanthropy and Civil Society
Episode 39: Ian Rowe & leading a meaningful life

Givers, Doers, & Thinkers—A Podcast on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 65:53 Very Popular


This week on Givers, Doers, & Thinkers, Jeremy chats with the Ian Rowe about why we need to replace our obsession with equity with the empowering concept of agency. Ian V. Rowe is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, where he focuses on education and upward mobility, family formation, and adoption. He is co-founder & CEO of Vertex Partnership Academies, a new network of character-based, International Baccalaureate public charter high schools opening in the Bronx in 2022. He is widely published and quoted in the popular press, including The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, C-SPAN, the New York Post, and the Washington Examiner. With his recent book Agency, Ian Rowe seeks to inspire young people of all races to build strong families and become masters of their own destiny.To kick off the conversation, Ian shares about being a son of Jamaican immigrants in the 1960s and the wisdom and mindset his father passed down to him as a young man. Inspiring questions such as: How do we create better environments for young people to flourish? Why do young people feel like they have little control over their future? Ian identifies the trapping narratives that deprive people of a sense of agency and why it is such a hard concept to accept by those who follow the victimhood narrative. He then outlines how to address this issue in ways attainable for people from all backgrounds. Noting that, shockingly, the “gatekeepers” for the less advantaged don't always know what is best.Today's GDT Reader's Guide recommendation comes from American Philanthropic's Chief Solutions Officer, Kieran Raval. He shares Peter Thiel's book, Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future. Kieran identifies helpful takeaways like "taking risks is good," "having a bad plan is better than no plan," and "sales and product both matter," and how it applies to nonprofits.   You can find Givers, Doers, & Thinkers here at Philanthropy Daily, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Buzzsprout, and wherever you listen to podcasts.We'd love to hear your thoughts, ideas, questions, and recommendations for the podcast! You can shoot Katie Janus, GDT's producer, an email anytime!

Talking Talmud
Ketubot 76: The Case of the Extra Toe

Talking Talmud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 18:29 Very Popular


More on the blemishes. Noting that people with blemishes did indeed get married - even when there was knowledge of them in advance. Plus, some classic Gemara discussion and logic on a husband's claim regarding a preexisting blemish, and why preexisting alone doesn't decide the case. Also, the transactional basis of these marriages - and two parallel cases to them: 1. Transferring ownership of animals. 2. The status of an animal that is examined to be shechted. (With a hint to the much larger discussion of kinyan, a formal act of acquisition). Also, note the question of the burden of proof.

The Rebbe’s advice
2928 - Noting to worry about flying with a plane as long as it has four engines.

The Rebbe’s advice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 4:13


Noting to worry about flying with a plane as long as it has four engines. https://www.torahrecordings.com/rebbe/igroskodesh/009/013/2928

ParentEd
When I Lose My Cool with My Child: How do I Manage My Triggers?

ParentEd

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 25:52


Disobedience, illogical demands, ignoring our requests - these are just some of the things that our children do that cause us to lose our cool. Is there a way to avoid getting triggered if we're always ahead of our children's triggers? Joining our host, June Yong, is Skye Tan, a mother of two, who writes and speaks on parenting and marriage. Drawing from years of managing her triggers, Skye shares the realities of responding to our children's difficult behaviour. How we model dealing with our own difficult emotions has long lasting effects on our children, just like how our parents (in their best efforts) also shaped how we interact with the world. Noting the importance of parenting from wholeness and seeing our children as individuals navigating a new world, Skye hopes that parents will remember that: "...there are those (difficult) moments but at the end of the day, it's a joy we get to be a parent. We get to have this kids with us for however many years and then they're going to be their own person and grow up. This time will never come round again." --- How you respond to mental health issues has direct influence to how your children perceive and manage their mental health. Join us for our upcoming Raising Future-Ready Kids: Suicide Prevention & Mental Health webinar and learn how to recognise signs of anxiety, depression and mental health challenges, know what to do in the event your child experiences a mental health crisis, and have critical conversations about life and death. Saturday, 8 October 2022 | 10 AM -12 PM | Via Zoom Use early bird promo code EARLY15 to attend at $35  (Limited to the first 40 registrations, regular rate: $50)  Registration is open at https://www.family.org.sg/RFRKMentalHealth (www.family.org.sg/RFRKMentalHealth). --- If you have enjoyed this episode, please leave us a rating and review on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1498022898 (Apple Podcast) or https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/parented-1010477 (Podchaser). It'll be very helpful for others to find our podcast. You can also help us by copying this link https://www.family.org.sg/parentedpodcast (www.family.org.sg/parentedpodcast) to share with your friends. You can also support us by https://www.family.org.sg/givenow (giving monthly). We appreciate your generous giving as every dollar helps to sustain our efforts in strengthening families. Do note that if you are based in Singapore, one-time gifts above SGD$50 or monthly donations above SGD$10 are eligible for 250% tax-deductible benefits.

Lonestar Collective
VIDEO Week of 9/17/2022 CannaNews: job drug testing issues could have prevented rail strike, Poll shows Republicans favor cannabis reform, Dan Crenshaw letter says FDA answer completely insufficient

Lonestar Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 6:48


This week in our short recap of the week, a new poll has shown that Republican voters are overwhelmingly in favor for state legal/states rights cannabis markets with minimal federal regulation. Several congressional lawmakers have called the FDA as being a disappointment and their response being completely insufficient regarding CBD/hemp regulations. A prominent cannabis favoring congressman has called out drug testing as part of a modern day issue causing labor shortages and supply chain issues. Dan Patrick Says he is not there yet link https://youtube.com/shorts/grPibQ9nqEk?feature=share Dan Crenshaw Image by Gage Skidmore on Flickr Visit https://txcannaco.com to see more information and to read the entire article. Find us on social media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/txcancollective Twitter: https://twitter.com/txcannaco Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/txcannabiscollective/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TexasCannabisCollective Several members of congress sent a letter to the FDA to express disappointment in a response the FDA gave to them regarding questions that they had about hemp and cbd products. The letter opens stating that, This one-page technical assistance, which took your agency nearly four months to provide in response to our request, is simply a reformatting of a document provided to Congress over two years ago. Reps. Kathleen Rice (D-NY), Morgan Griffith (R-VA), Angie Craig (D-MN) and Dan Crenshaw (R-TX) were the congress members behind the writing of the letter. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) has proposed that the drug testing standards for the workforce undergo changes. Noting the recent rail strikes that have been averted, he notes that the job has a requirement of specialized skills, but a job pool shrunk by drug testing requirements. These are requirements that place qualified candidates out of the running for job positions over items they ingested up to six weeks prior to a test. This also gets qualified workers disqualified from continuing with a job by drug test, when they were not intoxicated or consuming on the job. “A lot of these shortcomings in terms of the supply chain are that people do not qualify for the jobs because they've used marijuana sometime in the last six weeks, which doesn't affect their ability to do their job, but it throws them out of the consideration,” Blumenauer said. News Theme by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Artist: http://incompetech.com/

Lonestar Collective
Week of 9/17/2022 CannaNews: job drug testing issues could have prevented rail strike, Poll shows Republicans favor cannabis reform, Dan Crenshaw letter says FDA answer completely insufficient

Lonestar Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 6:33


This week in our short recap of the week, a new poll has shown that Republican voters are overwhelmingly in favor for state legal/states rights cannabis markets with minimal federal regulation. Several congressional lawmakers have called the FDA as being a disappointment and their response being completely insufficient regarding CBD/hemp regulations. A prominent cannabis favoring congressman has called out drug testing as part of a modern day issue causing labor shortages and supply chain issues. Dan Patrick Says he is not there yet link https://youtube.com/shorts/grPibQ9nqEk?feature=share Find us on social media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/txcancollective Twitter: https://twitter.com/txcannaco Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/txcannabiscollective/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TexasCannabisCollective Dan Crenshaw Image by Gage Skidmore on Flickr Visit https://txcannaco.com to see more information and to read the entire article. Several members of congress sent a letter to the FDA to express disappointment in a response the FDA gave to them regarding questions that they had about hemp and cbd products. The letter opens stating that, This one-page technical assistance, which took your agency nearly four months to provide in response to our request, is simply a reformatting of a document provided to Congress over two years ago. Reps. Kathleen Rice (D-NY), Morgan Griffith (R-VA), Angie Craig (D-MN) and Dan Crenshaw (R-TX) were the congress members behind the writing of the letter. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) has proposed that the drug testing standards for the workforce undergo changes. Noting the recent rail strikes that have been averted, he notes that the job has a requirement of specialized skills, but a job pool shrunk by drug testing requirements. These are requirements that place qualified candidates out of the running for job positions over items they ingested up to six weeks prior to a test. This also gets qualified workers disqualified from continuing with a job by drug test, when they were not intoxicated or consuming on the job. “A lot of these shortcomings in terms of the supply chain are that people do not qualify for the jobs because they've used marijuana sometime in the last six weeks, which doesn't affect their ability to do their job, but it throws them out of the consideration,” Blumenauer said. News Theme by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Artist: http://incompetech.com/

MTR Podcasts
Artist Kesha Bruce

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 39:06


Brief summary of episode:Kesha Bruce, Born and raised in Iowa, she completed a BFA from the University of Iowa before earning an MFA in painting from Hunter College in New York City. Kesha Bruce has been awarded fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), The Vermont Studio Center, The CAMAC Foundation and the Puffin Foundation. Her work is included in the collections of The Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture (14 pieces), The Amistad Center for Art and Culture, The University of Iowa Women's Center, The En Foco Photography Collection and MOMA's Franklin Furnace Artist Book Collection. She has been represented by Morton Fine Art since 2011.Morton Fine Art is pleased to announce Take Me to the Water, a solo exhibition of mixed-media paintings by artist Kesha Bruce. An intuitive combination of painting, collage and textile art, Bruce's work represents the culmination of a holistic creative practice developed by the artist over several decades. Her eighth exhibition with the gallery, Take Me to the Water will be on view from September 17 to October 11, 2022 at Morton's Washington, D.C. space. The wall works of Kesha Bruce are less discrete executions of a concerted vision than the steady accumulation of a long creative process. Referred to by the artist simply as paintings, these mixed-media compositions are in fact patchworks of painted fabric, individually selected from Bruce's vast archive and pasted directly onto the canvas in a textile collage that can sometimes resemble a quilt. The result of a slow and perpetual artistic method, each work represents hours of treatment, selection and juxtaposition until the whole becomes manifestly greater than its parts. Bruce's process ends with her titling of each work: a poetic articulation of what the work is at this point capable of expressing for itself.Much like water, the routine behind Bruce's artmaking is cyclical and in service to a greater equilibrium – a pointed contrast to many of the epitomic works that make up much of the traditional art histories of the past several centuries, and which tend to aggressively emphasize rupture, madness and unsustainability as the most fruitful mothers of invention. Bruce's process is distinctly different, and points to more a promising alternative for artmaking, in which creativity and lived experience are inseparably intertwined. For Bruce, this means that art can be not only a form of self-care but an act of self-discovery. Noting that her color palette has become markedly warmer since she moved to Arizona (where she currently serves as the Director of Artist's Programs for the state's Commission on the Arts), the artist delineates her method as a form of strategic openness – making room and taking time to allow the materials to guide her toward their final form, rather than the other way around.The show's title, Take Me to the Water, alludes to a 1969 rendition of the traditional gospel song by Nina Simone at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Bruce locates something transcendent in the recording of Simone's performance that encapsulates what any form of artmaking, at its best, can be: a conversation between oneself and the divine. Deftly aware of the elemental power of water as a force that follows its own paths and forms its own shapes, Bruce identifies her artistic process closely with this element, and notes how the transcendental effects which result from it can be as overwhelming and rhythmic as the ocean waves of Big Sur. As an exhibiting artist for over 25 years, Bruce has steadily oriented her craft toward capturing and encouraging the process of artmaking as an end in its own right – a way both of making something new and taking stock of oneself. As an administrator who oversees the creative programming for the entire state of Arizona, Bruce is intuitively attuned to the reciprocal relationship between transcendent acts of self-expression and the quotidian struggle to survive. In this role, she is a mentor and advocate for hundreds of other artists; the example she sets in her own artistic practice, with its emphasis on personal growth over commercial capitulation, thus becomes a form of potent political praxis. The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture. Mentioned in this episode:Kesha BruceCome see Kesha Bruce's 8th exhibition with Morton Fine Art starting Sept. 17 To find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory. Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode ★ Support this podcast ★

F**k
Balance is a Verb, Not a Noun with Nicole Lapin

F**k "It All": Modern Women Redefining It All

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 55:42


To the people that say money can't buy happiness, Nicole Lapin's take is that they either don't have a good relationship with money OR they don't know how to manage it well... YET. *Thinking to yourself - Eeeee, some things need to change.*  Yeh, us too. Start with this episode!

Real Organic Podcast
Jesse Cool: The Customer Always Comes Last

Real Organic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 60:21 Very Popular


#081:  Celebrated Bay Area restaurateur and cookbook authorJesse Cool talks about her passion for ingredient-driven dishes and the path to opening some of California's first organic restaurants  - Late for the Train and Flea Street. Noting how things have changed in recent years, she also talks about the importance of growing deep respect for the farm-to-table workforce among eaters. Jesse Ziff Cool has been committed to serving local, fresh, and sustainable food for 46+ years in her Northern California restaurants. She has written seven cookbooks, including the recently re-released Simply Organic. As a dedicated fan of local farmers, ranchers, and fisherman, Jesse has been a longtime attendee of the EcoFarm Conference and has served on their board. To watch a video version of this podcast with access to the full transcript and links relevant to our conversation, please visit:https://www.realorganicproject.org/jesse-cool-customer-always-comes-last-episode-eighty-oneThe Real Organic Podcast is hosted by Dave Chapman and Linley Dixon, engineered by Brandon StCyr, and edited and produced by Jenny Prince.The Real Organic Project is a farmer-led movement working towards certifying 1,000 farms across the United States this year. Our add-on food label distinguishes soil-grown fruits and vegetables from hydroponically-raised produce, and pasture-raised meat, milk, and eggs from products harvested from animals in horrific confinement (CAFOs - confined animal feeding operations).To find a Real Organic farm near you, please visit:https://www.realorganicproject.org/farmsWe believe that the organic standards, with their focus on soil health, biodiversity, and animal welfare were written as they should be, but that the current lack of enforcement of those standards is jeopardizing the ability for small farms who adhere to the law to stay in business. The lack of enforcement is also jeopardizing the overall health of the customers who support the organic movement; customers who are not getting what they pay for at market but still paying a premium price. And the lack of enforcement is jeopardizing the very cycles (water, air, nutrients) that Earth relies upon to provide us all with a place to live, by pushing extractive, chemical agriculture to the forefront.If you like what you hear and are feeling inspired, we would love for you to join our movement by becoming one of our 1,000  Real Friends:https://www.realorganicproject.org/real-organic-friends/To read our weekly newsletter (which might just be the most forwarded newsletter on the internet!) and get firsthand news about what's happening with organic food, farming and policy, please subscribe here:https://www.realorganicproject.org/email/

Women in Ophthalmology - 10 Minutes of Science
S02E08 Superiority complex? It is complex

Women in Ophthalmology - 10 Minutes of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 13:29


Superiority complex? It is complexAssociate Professor Susan Carden examines the RAINBOW study, which compared treatment of ROP with ranibizumab versus laser therapy. Noting the extension trial may uncover more, there might be a superior treatment method. Listen in to find out more.View article here Susan Carden is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne.  She is a Consultant Ophthalmologist RCH and is head of the Education Vision Assessment Unit, RVEEH. She currently chairs the Victorian Branch, RANZCO.  Her areas of expertise includes retinopathy of prematurity, Low Vision, paediatric ophthalmology and general ophthalmology and international development.

CUNY TV's The Stoler Report
Industry Leaders Outlook on the Market: 2022-2023

CUNY TV's The Stoler Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 26:58


Noting the slow-down in the residential and for-sale markets: rates have almost doubled, buyers are holding off and sellers are tying to figure it out, guests comment that the market is changing. Demand is steady in the Hamptons; supply is limited. Westchester's residential markets are stable; office markets - fairly stable. Health care/hospitals/bio-technologies are booming industries in Westchester.

A New Morning
Noting the passing of Mikhail Gorbachev - Tom Rivers

A New Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 2:52


The Frequency Shifters Show
S2E8 -Magic, Spirit Guides, and Angels with Amy Sikarskie

The Frequency Shifters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 60:14


S2E8 -Magic, Spirit Guides, and Angels with Amy Sikarskie Join Corene Summers, founder of Artisan Farmacy and Reiki Master, and her cohost Alex Terranova, founder of DreamMason and Author of Fictional Authenticity, as they sit down with Amy Sikarskie. Amy Sikarskie is a Licensed Vocational Nurse, Master Energy Therapist, International Intuitive, Physical Channel, and Certified Past Life Hypnotherapist. She is a Reiki Master Teacher and certified in Pranic Healing, Earth-Based Transpersonal Healing, The Reconnection, Crystal Healing, Intuitive Communication, and more. Amy is the founder of Spirit School where she offers channeled messages, meditations, courses, and certifications in intuitive communication and energy therapy through online and in-person classes. She has also authored multiple best-selling books such as The Ultimate Guide to Channeling: Practical Techniques to Connect With Your Spirit Guides and Star-Seeded Ascensions: Activating the Starseed. On this episode we discuss: -Some challenges and a difficult morning Corene was experiencing, and we get the privilege of experiencing Amy work with Corene in the moment -Amy connected with and spoke with guides for Corene -Corene opens up and shares -How spirit guides help plan your life and support you and your soul -Ascended masters, arch angels, and messages from beyond -Ways to open up more -Learning to receive  -Noting and seeing messages -Amy's process and personal journey -Compartmentalization as a normal human behavior You can connect with Amy Sikarskie here: Website: www.amysikarskie.com Instagram: @AmySikarskie You can connect with Corene Summers here: Website: www.artisanfarmacy.com Instagram: @artisanfarmacy You can connect with Alex Terranova here: Website: www.TheDreamMason.com Instagram: @InspirationalAlex Corene Summers is a Reiki Master, Meditation, & Mindfulness Coach. Business Coach for Conscious Entrepreneurs. Chakra & Energy Healer. Holistic Wellness Coach. Certified Corporate Wellness Specialist© Champion of the Good in Humanity. Alex Terranova is a Personal and Professional Performance Alchemist & Coach, author of Fictional Authenticity, and podcast host named 40 over 40 in podcasting by podcast magazine who works with men whose achievements and financial successes have not created the rewarding, joyful, and fulfilling life and business they desire. He is also the Host of The DreamMason Podcast, Co-Host of The Coaching Show Podcast, and Co-Creator of Your Love Adventure. ***Intro & outro music provided by sound healer Jay Talor. Jay is the Founder of Current Vibrations (http://www.currentvibrations.com/) and Director of the Ahimsa School of Sound Healing (https://ahimsaschoolofsoundhealing.com/)

BIBLE IN TEN
Acts 10:1

BIBLE IN TEN

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 8:52


Sunday, 28 August 2022   There was a certain man in Caesarea called Cornelius, a centurion of what was called the Italian Regiment, Acts 10:1   The final verse of Chapter 9 told of Peter staying in Joppa at the house of Simon the tanner. Now, Chapter 10 begins with the words, “There was a certain man in Caesarea.” Caesarea has already been mentioned twice in Acts. It was first noted when Philip is said to have preached in cities until he came to Caesarea (8:40). It was also mentioned in verse 9:30 where it noted that the brethren brought Saul down to Caesarea and sent him off to Troas.   The direction of Acts is going to shift greatly in Acts 13, from the ministry of Peter to that of Paul. But before that happens, the introduction of Gentile converts is to now be noted. This will begin the shift from Jew to Gentile, from Jerusalem to the rest of the world, and from the focus of Peter's ministry to that of Paul's. Of this, Charles Ellicott rightly notes concerning this man –   “His admission into the Church, even if it were not the first instance of the reception of a Gentile convert as such, became, through its supernatural accompaniments and (in the strict sense of that word) its ‘prerogative' character, the ruling case on the subject. Whether it were earlier or later than the admission of the Gentiles recorded in Acts 11:20, we have no adequate data for determining.”   The man now to be referred to is “called Cornelius.” Some place the name Cornelius (Greek: Kornélios) as being Latin, coming from cornu, or horn. Abarim defines that as coming from the Greek keras, or horn. And that, in turn, comes from the Hebrew qeren also meaning horn. They say, “The name Cornelius probably stems from an adjective and a diminutive form combined, and means A Bit Like A Horn or, slightly more striking: Of The Little Horn.” For brevity, it means “Little Horn.”   Of this man, Luke next says he is “a centurion.” Ellicott says of this –   “Cæsarea was at this time the usual residence of the Roman Procurator of Judæa, and was consequently garrisoned by Roman troops. Greeks, Jews, and Romans, probably also Phœnicians and other traders, were mingled freely in its population.”   Concerning his rank, Cambridge gives a full description of his minimal scope of authority, saying, “This was not a distinguished office. He was commander of the sixth part of a cohort, i.e. of half a maniple. The name must have been given to such [an] officer when his command was over a hundred men. The Roman legion in these times was divided into ten cohorts, and each cohort into three maniples, so that the nominal strength of the legion would be 6000 men.”   Based on this, Cornelius is just a moderately positioned soldier. He has men over him and he is the leader of about one hundred under him. This is defined by the word “centurion.” In Greek, it is hekatontarchés, coming from hekaton, one hundred, and archó, to rule. Hence, he rules over a hundred. Of this ruling position, Luke says it was “of what was called the Italian Regiment.”   He is an Italian in a unit that is part of a greater unit forming the tenth part of a legion. The word translated as regiment was used in the gospels in regard to those stationed in Jerusalem at the time Jesus was crucified (see Matthew 27:27). Noting him as being of the Italian Regiment is probably expressly stated to identify the entire regiment as being from Italy and not hired or conscripted natives from other areas. This regiment may have been designated to provide protection for the Roman proconsul who ruled in the area.   Life application: Without even reading ahead in the story, it is obvious based on how the structure of the Bible, including Acts, is laid out that this person now being mentioned will become the focus of attention for a certain amount of time.   As he is a Gentile, he is outside of the covenant given at Sinai. He would be considered an unclean Gentile to the Jews. As a soldier, he is not in any special category within Roman society. He is just a person who follows orders and who would also give orders depending on his position. But his orders would only be to those who were also soldiers. As a centurion, he is in a very moderate position of authority. It would be easy to blame him for problems that occurred under his authority, and it would be rare for him to be given a great notice even if his soldiers were exemplary in their conduct.   In other words, Cornelius is just a run of the mill guy who is living a pretty average life but with nothing exceptional in it to make him stand out among a crowd. He would fit the description provided by Paul in 1 Corinthians 1 rather well –   “For you see your calling, brethren, that not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called. 27 But God has chosen the foolish things of the world to put to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to put to shame the things which are mighty; 28 and the base things of the world and the things which are despised God has chosen, and the things which are not, to bring to nothing the things that are, 29 that no flesh should glory in His presence.” 1 Corinthians 1:26-29   Those who are in high positions will feel secure in who they are, thinking they are great and in God's good favor. Their concern is not how to please God because they feel they must already be pleasing to Him. Those who live mediocre lives will normally understand that their position in society is not great. Therefore, they may more often be inclined to want to be pleasing to God. It is such people who will then be more willing to try to find out what it is that God finds pleasing.   When the gospel meets up with such a person, and when it is responded to, he has no place for boasting. Instead, he gives God the glory for what he has been freely offered. This is what God finds pleasing. When we trust in Him and not ourselves, He can, and He will be satisfied that we have placed our hopes in the right place. If you want to be pleasing to God, don't revel in your own goodness, but His. Be grateful for the gospel and glorify God through Jesus Christ whom He has sent to reconcile us back to Himself.   Lord God, how wonderful it is to have been called back to You through the gospel. You have done all that is necessary to reconcile us to You. Thank You for that! All glory belongs to You. We receive the gift! We believe the gospel! We accept Jesus! Amen.

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Aug. 26, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 18:00


  Landaas & Company newsletter  August edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Dave Sandstrom Steve Giles (with Max Hoelzl, Joel Dresang, engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Aug. 22-26, 2022) SIGNIFICANT ECONOMIC INDICATORS & REPORTS Monday No significant releases Tuesday The annual sales rate of new houses sank 12.6% in July and was 30% below the year-ago pace. The yearly rate of 511,000 houses sold was the lowest in six and a half years, according to the Commerce Department. The median sales price for a new house rose 8% from July 2021 to a record $439,400, Commerce reported. Meantime, the inventory of new houses for sale rose to 464,000, the most since March 2008. Wednesday In another sign of weakened housing, the National Association of Realtors reported a second consecutive drop in pending home sales in July. The trade group said its index declined 1% from June, the eighth fall in nine months. The index was down 20% from July 2021. The association said affordability is at its lowest point since 1989, with the typical mortgage payment up 54% from the year before. However, it suggested the housing market could revive in early 2023 if mortgage rates steady and the labor market stays strong. The Commerce Department said new orders for durable goods fell less than 0.1% in July, the first decline in four months. Commitments for commercial aircraft led a broad array of gains. Excluding the volatile transportation sector, orders rose 0.3% from June, better than analysts expected. Overall, demand for long-lasting manufactured items was up 11% from July 2021. Core capital goods orders, a proxy for business investments, rose 0.4% from June and were 10% ahead of the year before. Thursday The four-week moving average for initial unemployment insurance claims rose for the 18th time in the 20 weeks since hitting an all-time low in early April. At 247,000 claims, the average was the highest it has been since Thanksgiving, although it was still 33% below the 55-year average. The Labor Department reported that 1.4 million Americans claimed jobless benefits in the latest week, down 2% from the week before and down from 12 million the year before. The U.S. economy receded at a 0.6% annual rate in the second quarter, down from an initially estimated decline of 0.9%, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported. Consumer spending, which drives about 70% of  gross domestic product, rose at a pace of 1.5%, slightly better than the previous estimate of 1%. Upward revisions for inventories, exports and spending by state and local governments also moderated the second-quarter decline. Adjusted for inflation, the economy expanded by 1.7% from the second quarter of 2021; it grew 2.6% from the end of 2019, just before the pandemic. Friday The Bureau of Economic Analysis said consumer spending rose by 0.1% in July, suggesting continued economic growth though at a slower pace. That was down from a 1% gain in June. Personal income also weakened in July, a trend that has contributed to lower savings for consumers. In July, Americans saved 5% of disposable income, down from 8.3% in February 2020, at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The report also showed that the Federal Reserve's main gauge of inflation declined by 0.1% in July and was up 6.3% from the year before. In June, the one-year inflation rate was 6.8%, still far above the Fed's long-term target of 2%. Considered a precursor to spending, consumer sentiment rose in August as slower inflation boosted economic expectations. Noting that “overall sentiment remains extremely low by historical standards,” the University of Michigan said its index rose to 58.2 in August from 51.5 in July. It read 70.3 the year before. The survey's director said consumers' economic outlooks rose after two months at the lowest level since the Great Recession. Expectations for personal finances rose broadly with a slight easing in concerns about inf...

Purpose, Inc.
Purpose-Driven Investing with Stacey Kline of Otto Intelligence

Purpose, Inc.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 27:59


Stacey Kline, CEO of Otto Intelligence, joins the podcast to discuss the future of purpose-focused finance. Noting the accelerating shift in aligning values with investment priorities, she unpacks how wealth advisors can employ ESG metrics and clients' environmental and social impact preferences to inform investment strategies.

A Word on Teaching
The Assignments that Matter Most Are Invitations

A Word on Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 45:28


  In this episode, UIW professor of philosophy Paul Lewis discusses creating thought-provoking assignments.  Noting that university courses have many goals ranging from information transfer to encouraging the practice of thinking, Lewis focuses on that latter aspect of teaching.  He suggests that we carefully craft assignments that invite students to make personal yet thoughtful connections to course material. Lewis is a leader of UIW's “Core Activation Project,” and provides examples of assignments from that effort.“Does the Digital Classroom Enfeeble the Mind?” by Jaron Lanier  https://uiwtx.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A237391065/LitRC?u=txshracd2623&sid=bookmark-LitRC&xid=3d8b00cc     

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe
Friends Share Stories About the Greatest Living American, President Jimmy Carter

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 35:42


Devin: What superpower would you say you have learned from President Jimmy Carter?Jan: The greatest thing that I carry with me today and try to use in all my life and share with my children and other people is when he spoke one Sunday, he said if everybody would be kind and giving to the person in front of them—if we all did that, would we have a better world?Jan Williams and Zac Steele know President Jimmy Carter well. On a visit to Plains, Georgia, I visited with them at the Maranatha Baptist Church, where the 39th President taught Sunday school for four decades following his time in Washington.Plains is the tiny rural town in southwestern Georgia where Mr. Jimmy, as locals call him, was born, raised and has lived his entire life except for short stretches residing in government housing in Atlanta as Georgia’s Governor and Washington, DC as President. (Read about what to see and do in Plains in the newsletter I write with Gail.)During my visit, I chatted with other locals less formally about their experiences with the former President. They gushed with stories. One relatively new resident boasted that the Carters, then well into their 80s, came by to visit and welcome her to Plains when she moved to town. She’s had the Carters over for dinner often enough to count them as personal friends.It would take a book to properly make the case that Mr. Jimmy is the greatest living American. For now, I’ll ask only that you read this piece with the understanding that I believe it to be true. While under-appreciated as President, he is universally acclaimed for his work, quietly executed, since. Winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002 at age 78 would be a capstone for most people but was more of a mid-career milestone for Mr. Jimmy. He remained fully active, despite cancer and other challenges, into his mid-90s. He famously showed up at his annual Habitat for Humanity build with fresh stitches from a fall.The Carter Center he founded works to make lasting peace amidst conflict, assure democratic elections around the world and fight disease, focusing on Guinea worms. In 1986, before the Center tackled the problem, there were millions of cases each year. So far in 2022, there have been two cases. Yes, you read that right. Two cases.Well aware of his work and reputation as a humanitarian, those who know him best see a deeply faithful Sunday School teacher. His final lesson in the fall of 2019 was about “being ready to go to heaven,” Jan Williams, a member of the Maranatha Baptist Church and a retired school teacher, says. Though that final lesson coincided with the outbreak of COVID-19, Mr. Jimmy decided to retire at the age of 95 due to his health.People came from around the world to attend Sunday School lessons taught by Mr. Jimmy. He taught whenever he was in town. The line formed the night before. Those wishing to attend slept in their cars in the church parking lot or on the street. As they arrived, Jan and her team gave each car a number that determined their spot in the queue the following morning.Before entering, the secret service wanded the guests to check for weapons. They strongly discouraged bags and thoroughly inspected the ones people brought. Following the Sunday School lesson, the Church hosted a worship service that the Carters always attended. Following the worship service, those who wanted could queue up for a photo with them. Everyone did.Jan, who taught the Carters’ youngest child, Amy, in the fourth grade, accompanied the family to help care for Amy at the inauguration.“He is a very humble person,” Jan says of Mr. Jimmy. “He doesn’t like for you to give him any praise. He’s expressed that to me many times because I get to see the effect he has on other people when he was teaching, and I would want to tell him a little story, and he’d say, ‘Gee, you know, I don’t want to hear any praise.’”He makes Plains a unique place. Jan says he is the only President to have lived his entire life in one town. He was born in Plains but lived a few miles outside town growing up. Today, he lives in the 3,200-square-foot home the Carters built on their property in 1961. Zillow estimates the value at $240,000.Jan takes some credit for the former President’s choice. To me, she said, “To tell you the honest truth,” and as an aside to him, she says, “Mr. Jimmy, you know this.” Then, back to me, she says, “I was surprised when he won. I really was.”“When he did win, I did ask him, ‘What are your plans after you’re no longer the President?’ And he said, ‘I’ll come back to Plains, that’s home,’” she says. “And I said, ‘I’ll hold you to that.’”Many in Plains were heartbroken by the defeat in 1980. Jan recounted that experience:Mrs. Carter was the most devastated. She took it personally that people voted against her husband. Of course, the incident with the hostages kind of took us all down. He started immediately wanting to work on the Carter Center. So, he got busy out trying to meet important people and raise money. She just kind of stayed at home.We knew how we felt. We were sad, too. And I think an ironic thing from above was that when he came home after [President Reagan’s] inauguration in Washington and he was no longer the president, and when he landed here in Plains on Marine One, the clouds opened up and it flooded rain. I took that as a sign from above that maybe even heaven was crying, that he wasn't going to be our president again. I really did. I took that as a great symbol.Jan learned the superpower of kindness from Mr. Jimmy. How to Develop Kindness As a SuperpowerJan describes how the lesson pervades Plains culture. My Sunday school teacher now is Kim Fuller, who is his niece. She said the other day, she was in a store, and a lady in front of her didn't have enough money to pay for her groceries. Kim said, “I'll pay.” My Sunday schoolteacher lives life like her uncle does. And the lady said, ‘Ma'am, it's 40 something dollars.’ She said, “I don't care how much it is. You have children. I will pay for your food.”Mr. Jimmy manifested kindness routinely. Jan shared a favorite example of that.I had a group of people here one Sunday, and this lady, they came on a bus, a tour bus. She said, “My little sweet man who has a cane, has cancer, and he doesn't have long to live. But this was a lifelong dream. He was in the Navy. He got out the year before Mr. Jimmy did, but their paths didn't cross.”And she said, “Is there any way, any way that President Carter could just speak to him?”Well, there's one request out of 600 more, you know. I said, “Let me think about it and I'll see if I feel it.” I don't ask him. Never did. Never will ask him to do favors. Yeah, but I went to him and I said, “President Carter, there's a man out here who is in the Navy and he's dying of cancer. And this is probably his last trip and this is what he wanted to do.”I said, “If you feel led from above, would you just step over and speak to him before you start your class?”And he kind of looked at me. “He said, this really means something to you, doesn't it?”I said, “I'm asking from the bottom of my heart.”I said, “I'll tell you what I'll do. I'll stand by the little man.”“Where?” He's saying because he's on the front row. “If you feel led, you come over to that little man.”He said, “Okay.” Well, every time he came in, he told everybody good morning. And he'd say, “Do we have any visitors?” A church full! And he did some other things. I'm just standing there, kind of looking at him thinking, have you forgotten what I asked you to do?All of a sudden, somebody coughed over where I was standing, and he looked over, and he remembered. He said, “If everybody will wait just a minute, I have something special I want to do this morning.”So he walked over to the little man and knelt down in front of him and held his hands and said, “I understand you're kind of sick.”The little man was crying. He said, “I just want you to know I thank you for your service to my country and that when you go back home today, you'll know that Rosalynn and I are praying for you.”Then he got up and went back and started the lesson. The lady that brought him to Plains told me that within two weeks he passed away. But he told everybody about what President Carter did special for him.The former President converted his garage into a woodworking shop after his time in Washington. Jan says, “When President Carter joined our church in 1981, he asked me what I would like for him to make.” “I said, ‘Oh, I’d love for you to make some beautiful collection plates,’” Jan says, holding up a collection plate. “So this is Philippine Mahogany. He did all the woodworking on it. Mrs. Carter put in the felt.”“I said, ‘Now you’ve got to sign it somewhere.’ So on the bottom of the plate, he put a JC.” She affirmed that even when JC, meaning Jimmy Carter, isn’t in the building, JC, meaning Jesus Christ, is.Mr. Jimmy also made the cross that hangs in the sanctuary.Devin: What is a superpower you have learned from Jimmy Carter?Zac: Probably the way he treats human beings.Zac Steele, at age 36, is the youngest Deacon in the church. He summarizes his responsibilities as a Deacon as “any duties as assigned.”One duty is to visit the Carters on Sunday mornings to help them set up the television to watch the live stream of the services. I visited with him just a few hours after his latest visit to their home.He described receiving the “Same old toothy grin that Mr. Carter’s been giving for years.”“Usually, it takes me a few minutes to get it set up,” Zac says. “So, we’re talking church, and that conversation usually slides onto some Braves baseball while we’re trying to get to church.”Not having heard the conversation I had with Jan, he describes a similar kindness in how Mr. Jimmy treats human beings.“I’ve got a cell phone right here with a message on it,” Zac says. “I’ve got my birthday voicemail from both of them during the pandemic where they couldn’t get out and visit. But, you know, I’ve got a ‘happy birthday, Zac’ call ‘thinking about you.’”Noting that public figures often fail to live up to their public image upon closer inspection, the Carters are the opposite. “You see the work they do as humanitarians,” Zac says. “But, there’s a lot more to them than what people give credit for.”Zac’s day job was teaching at the Georgia State Fire Academy. A few years ago, he mentioned to Mr. Jimmy that he’d be doing a class in Plains. Not thinking much of it, the former President said, “I’d love to see that.”On the day of the training, the secret service agent in charge called Zac to ask him to hold the training for an hour or so to allow President Carter to see it. He watched the class from his car.Zac, on rare occasions, teaches the Sunday School class. Once, with his parents, sister and nieces in attendance to support him, the Carters attended church in person. They sat with his family. Zac described the “class and character” he demonstrated to his family as “incredible.”I asked Zac how to emulate President Carter. Zac made the case that it couldn’t be done. After describing the almost frantic pace of the work President Carter has kept working for peace and global health in his advancing years, he said, “I mean, who does that stuff anymore? It’s just absolutely unheard of.”It sounds to me the way you’d describe the greatest living American. Get full access to Superpowers for Good at devinthorpe.substack.com/subscribe

Church of the Advent - Denver, CO
The Outcome of Faith

Church of the Advent - Denver, CO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 17:44


In the second of two sermons answering the question “What is faith?”, Pastor Jordan Kologe examines the outcomes of those whose faith is recorded in Hebrews 11-12. Noting the trials faced by the original audience of the letter to the Hebrews and the persecution many global Christians face today, we can expect that life will not be free from hardship, even for those who have faith. Despite various earthly outcomes, Christians must fix their eyes on Jesus through a faith that sees the ultimate outcome of God's commendation and reward.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann discusses the C.D.C. easing Covid guidelines, noting virus is ‘Here to Stay'

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 17:42


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention loosened Covid-19 guidelines on Thursday, freeing schools and businesses from the onus of requiring unvaccinated people exposed to the virus to quarantine at home. The changes are a sharp move away from measures such as social distancing requirements and quarantining, which had polarized much of the country, and effectively acknowledge the way many Americans have been navigating the pandemic for some time. The agency's action comes as children across the country return to school and many offices have reopened. “We know that Covid-19 is here to stay,” Greta Massetti, a C.D.C. epidemiologist, said at a news briefing on Thursday. “High levels of population immunity due to vaccination and previous infection, and the many tools that we have available to protect people from severe illness and death, have put us in a different place.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann discusses the C.D.C. easing Covid guidelines, noting virus is ‘Here to Stay'

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 17:42


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention loosened Covid-19 guidelines on Thursday, freeing schools and businesses from the onus of requiring unvaccinated people exposed to the virus to quarantine at home. The changes are a sharp move away from measures such as social distancing requirements and quarantining, which had polarized much of the country, and effectively acknowledge the way many Americans have been navigating the pandemic for some time. The agency's action comes as children across the country return to school and many offices have reopened. “We know that Covid-19 is here to stay,” Greta Massetti, a C.D.C. epidemiologist, said at a news briefing on Thursday. “High levels of population immunity due to vaccination and previous infection, and the many tools that we have available to protect people from severe illness and death, have put us in a different place.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.10.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 55:46 Very Popular


VIDEOS: 1. The Anti-Smartphone Revolution – (13:23) ColdFusion 2. Gravitas Plus: Explained: The China-Taiwan conflict (9:11)   HEALTH NEWS Astonishing effects of grapes, remarkable potential for health benefits Frequent nut consumption associated with less inflammation Body posture affects how oral drugs absorbed by stomach [why not supplements too?]  Lifting Weights Beats Out Cycling, Swimming For Vegans Wanting Stronger Bones Perfectionism Linked To Burnout At Work, School And Sports, Research Finds  Mindfulness Therapy Better Than Antidepressants Astonishing effects of grapes, remarkable potential for health benefits Western New England University, August 8, 2022 Recent studies released by Dr. John Pezzuto and his team from Western New England University show “astonishing” effects of grape consumption and “remarkable” impacts on health and on lifespans. Published in the journal Foods, one study showed that adding grapes in an amount equal to just under two cups of grapes per day to a high-fat diet, typically consumed in western countries, yielded reductions in fatty liver and extended lifespans.  Noting that these studies add an entirely new dimension to the old saying ‘you are what you eat,' Pezzuto, who has authored over 600 scientific studies, said that the work with grapes showed actual changes in genetic expression. “That is truly remarkable.” Adding grapes to a high-fat diet also increased levels of antioxidant genes and delayed natural death.  Acknowledging that it is not an exact science to translate years of lifespan from a mouse to a human, Pezzuto said that his best estimate is the change observed in the study would correspond to an additional 4-5 years in the life of a human. Another study by Dr. Pezzuto and his team published in the journal Antioxidants, reported that grape consumption altered gene expression in the brain and had positive effects on behavior and cognition that were impaired by a high-fat diet.  Frequent nut consumption associated with less inflammation Brigham and Women's Hospital, August 1, 2022 In a study of more than 5,000 people, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that greater intake of nuts was associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, a finding that may help explain the health benefits of nuts. The results of the study appear in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. “Population studies have consistently supported a protective role of nuts against cardiometabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and we know that inflammation is a key process in the development of these diseases,” said corresponding author Ying Bao, MD, ScD, an epidemiologist in BWH's Channing Division of Network Medicine. “Our new work suggests that nuts may exert their beneficial effects in part by reducing systemic inflammation.” In the current study, the research team performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Nurses' Health Study, which includes more than 120,000 female registered nurses, and from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, which includes more than 50,000 male health professionals. The team assessed diet using questionnaires and looked at the levels of certain telltale proteins known as biomarkers in blood samples collected from the study participants. They measured three well-established biomarkers of inflammation: C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2). After adjusting for age, medical history, lifestyle and other variables, they found that participants who had consumed five or more servings of nuts per week had lower levels of CRP and IL6 than those who never or almost never ate nuts. In addition, people who substituted three servings per week of nuts in place of red meat, processed meat, eggs or refined grains had significantly lower levels of CRP and IL6. Peanuts and tree nuts contain a number of healthful components including magnesium, fiber, L-arginine, antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids such as α-linolenic acid.  Body posture affects how oral drugs absorbed by stomach [why not supplements too?]  Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, August 8, 2022 A common, economic, and easy method of administering drugs is orally, by swallowing a pill or capsule. But oral administration is the most complex way for the human body to absorb an active pharmaceutical ingredient, because the bioavailability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract depends on the medication's ingredients and the stomach's dynamic physiological environment. In Physics of Fluids, researchers from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine employ a biomimetic in-silico simulator based on the realistic anatomy and morphology of the stomach—a “StomachSim”—to investigate and quantify the effect of body posture and stomach motility on drug bioavailability. “”When the pill reaches the stomach, the motion of the stomach walls and the flow of contents inside determine the rate at which it dissolves. The properties of the pill and the stomach contents also play a major role. Stomach contents, motility, and gastric fluid dynamics all play a role in a drug's bioavailability, and stomach contractions can induce pressure and generate complex pill trajectories. This results in varying rates of pill dissolution and nonuniform emptying of the drug into the duodenum and, sometimes, gastric dumping in the case of modified-release dosage. The modeling appears to be the first of its kind to couple gastric biomechanics of posture with pill movement and drug dissolution to quantify an active pharmaceutical ingredientpassing through the pylorus into the duodenum. The model enabled the researchers to calculate and compare the emptying rate and the release of a dissolved active pharmaceutical ingredient into the duodenum for a variety of physiological situations. Lifting Weights Beats Out Cycling, Swimming For Vegans Wanting Stronger Bones Medical University of Vienna (Austria), August 2, 2022 When it comes to bone health, a new study finds people on a plant-based diet should grab the dumbbells. Researchers in Austria have found that lifting weights is the best form of exercise for vegans – trumping cycling and swimming. The team found that vegans who do resistance training once a week – such as machine-work, free weights, or bodyweight resistance – have stronger bones than plant-based eaters who do other forms of exercise. The new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, found vegans who did resistance training had similar bone structure to omnivores — people who eat both meat and vegetables. For at least five years, authors followed 43 men and women on a plant-based diet and 45 men and women who eat meat as well. “Our study showed resistance training offsets diminished bone structure in vegan people when compared to omnivores.” Perfectionism linked to burnout at work, school and sports, research finds  York St. John University (UK), July 31, 2022 Concerns about perfectionism can sabotage success at work, school or on the playing field, leading to stress, burnout and potential health problems, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.  In the first meta-analysis of the relationship between perfectionism and burnout, researchers analyzed the findings from 43 previous studies conducted over the past 20 years. It turns out perfectionism isn't all bad. One aspect of perfectionism called “perfectionistic strivings” involves the setting of high personal standards and working toward those goals in a pro-active manner. These efforts may help maintain a sense of accomplishment and delay the debilitating effects of burnout, the study found.  The dark side of perfectionism, called “perfectionistic concerns,” can be more detrimental when people constantly worry about making mistakes, letting others down, or not measuring up to their own impossibly high standards, said lead researcher Andrew Hill, an associate professor of sport psychology at York St. John University in England. Previous research has shown that perfectionistic concerns and the stress they generate can contribute to serious healthproblems, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, fatigue and even early mortality. The study was published online in the Personality and Social Psychology Review. The study found that perfectionistic concerns had the strongest negative effects in contributing to burnout in the workplace, possibly because people have more social support and clearly defined objectives in education and sports. A student can be rewarded for hard work with a high grade, or a tennis player can win the big match, but a stellar performance in the workplace may not be recognized or rewarded, which may contribute to cynicism and burnout.  “People need to learn to challenge the irrational beliefs that underlie perfectionistic concerns by setting realistic goals, accepting failure as a learning opportunity, and forgiving themselves when they fail,” Hill said. “Creating environments where creativity, effort and perseverance are valued also would help.”  Mindfulness Therapy Better Than Antidepressants University of Exeter (UK), July 31, 2022  Antidepressants are big business.  But for the same money, and without the side effects, a little mindfulness can do the same job.  A new study from the University of Exeter in the UK suggests that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is just as good as drugs – and maybe even better   MBCT is a structured training program for the mind and body.  It was developed to help people deal with repeated bouts of depression.  It teaches them skills to recognize and respond constructively to the thoughts and feelings associated with relapse.  In other words, it helps patients re-focus their thoughts as a way to avoid falling back into depression. Prior studies have shown that MBCT reduces the risk of relapse or recurrence of depression by about 34% compared to usual care or placebo.  B The research published in The Lancet  followed a group of 424 depressed patients for two years. The patients had all suffered three or more previous major depressive episodes.  And they were all taking a maintenance course of antidepressants. The MBCT group attended eight group therapy sessions in which they learned mindfulness practices and cognitive-behavioral skills, and participated in group discussions.   After two years, relapse rates were worse in the drug group.  The drug group relapsed at the rate of 47% compared to only 44% for the mindfulness group.  The researchers concluded that MBCT may be an effective alternative to antidepressants for prevention of depressive relapse with no significant difference in cost. And it may be a good alternative for people who choose not to use drugs.  But they also suggested MBCT was more beneficial than drugs in preventing relapses in patients who were at highest risk of relapse especially those who reported severe childhood abuse.

Hacks & Wonks
RE-AIR: Evaluating the Role of Incarceration in Public Safety with Criminologist Damon Petrich

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 56:34


On this Hacks & Wonks midweek show, Crystal has a robust conversation with Damon Petrich about his research at the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. As lead author of the seminal work “Custodial Sanctions and Reoffending: A Meta-Analytic Review,” Damon performed an extensive analysis of 116 research studies looking at the effect of incarceration on reoffending. The review's finding that the oft-used policy of imprisonment does not reduce the likelihood of recidivism sparks a discussion about how the United States ended up as the world leader in mass incarceration and the disconnect between conventional assumptions about what prisons provide versus reality. Noting that the carceral system does a poor job of rehabilitation - while eating up budgets across the country and exacting significant societal costs - Damon and Crystal talk about how to design and evaluate programs that do work to deliver greater public safety for everyone. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii and reach Damon for more information about his research at petricdm@ucmail.uc.edu   Resources  “Custodial Sanctions and Reoffending: A Meta-Analytic Review” by Damon M. Petrich, Travis C. Pratt, Cheryl Lero Johnson, and Francis T. Cullen for Crime and Justice: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/10.1086/715100   Scott Hechinger Twitter thread: https://twitter.com/ScottHech/status/1447596444886523911   “Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2022” by Wendy Sawyer and Peter Wagner from the Prison Policy Initiative: https://www.prisonpolicy.org/reports/pie2022.html   “Risk-need-responsivity model for offender assessment and rehabilitation” by James Bonta and D. A. Andrews for Public Safety Canada: https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/rsk-nd-rspnsvty/index-en.aspx   “Let's Take a Hard Look at Who Is in Jail and Why We Put Them There” by Alea Carr for the ACLU-WA blog: https://www.aclu-wa.org/blog/let-s-take-hard-look-who-jail-and-why-we-put-them-there   Book - “Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect” by Robert J. Sampson: https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/G/bo5514383.html   Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program - “Police Legitimacy and Legal Cynicism: Why They Matter and How to Measure in Your Community”: https://www.lisc.org/media/filer_public/05/0b/050ba3aa-044f-4676-bc1e-6e2b6c48412c/091317_bcji_resources_police_legitimacy_fundamentals.pdf   “Polls Show People Favor Rehabilitation over Incarceration” by Matt Clarke for Prison Legal News: https://www.prisonlegalnews.org/news/2018/nov/6/polls-show-people-favor-rehabilitation-over-incarceration/   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Well, I am excited to welcome Damon Petrich, who's a doctoral associate in the School of Criminal Justice at University of Cincinnati and incoming assistant professor at Loyola University Chicago. He was the lead author of a recent article, "Custodial Sanctions and Reoffending: A Meta-Analytic Review," along with Travis Pratt, Cheryl Lero Johnson, Francis T. Cullen. Damon's research focuses on the effectiveness of corrections and rehabilitation programs, desistance from crime, and the impact of community violence on youth development. Thank you so much for joining us, Damon. [00:01:13] Damon Petrich: Thank you very much for having me on, Crystal. I'm excited to talk a little bit about my work and the implications of that and all that, so thanks again. [00:01:20] Crystal Fincher: I'm very excited to talk about this and it's extremely timely - has been for a while. We have conversations almost every day in the public sphere having to do with public safety - this is such a major component of it. And so I'm hoping as we have this conversation, it'll help us to better assess what the costs and benefits are of custodial sanctions and incarceration, and alternatives to that - to have a conversation that kind of orients us more towards public safety. Sometimes we're so concerned with metrics around police and how many they are, and what the length of a sentence should be. And sometimes we focus on things that take us off of the overall goal of keeping us all safer and reducing the likelihood that each of us are victimized and to hopefully prevent people from becoming victims of crime. And just to have accurate conversations about how we invest our public resources - what we're actually getting from them, and then how to evaluate as we go along - what we should be tracking and measuring and incentivizing. As so many people talk about taking data-driven approaches and create all these dashboards - that we're really doing it from an informed perspective. So just to start out - what actually were you studying and what were you seeking to find out? [00:02:47] Damon Petrich: Yeah, so the main purpose of our meta-analysis, which I can explain exactly what that is later on if you have questions, but the main purpose was to understand what happens when you take one group of offenders and you sentence them to something custodial like prison or jail, and then you sentence another group of similar offenders to something non-custodial like probation. How do those two groups differ in terms of whether they reoffend? So does prison actually deter recidivism, or does it make people more likely to commit crime afterwards? So that's sort of what we were looking at and so we considered all of the available research on that, in this review. [00:03:29] Crystal Fincher: Got it. So right now we have gone down the path of mass incarceration - that is the default punishment that we, as society, have looked to for crime. Hey - sentence them and many times it's, Hey, they're going to jail. Sometimes they get out of jail and they have supervision that continues, but jail is really focused, where we focus a lot of our effort and where we put people and hope that that'll straighten them out and they come out and everything is fine. How did we get here and where are we in terms of how we're approaching incarceration in our society, in our country? [00:04:11] Damon Petrich: Yeah, so there is a lot of public uproar around a lot of issues, like race issues, and there was crime spikes and concerns over social welfare - and there's all this confluence of issues in the '60s and early '70s. And we decided to - as a country, not everyone, but politicians decided that we should tackle the crime problem by A) incarcerating more people, and then B) once they get there, keep them there for longer. So we enacted things like mandatory minimum sentences, where the judge really has no discretion over what happens - the person gets automatically a sentence of incarceration if they've committed a certain type of crime. You had habitual offender laws where if you're - like California's three strikes policy - where if you have two prior felonies and you get a third, no matter what it is, you're going to jail for life. Michigan had the "650 Lifer Law," where if you get caught with 650 grams of heroin or cocaine, you're automatically going to prison for life. And then we got rid of parole and stuff like that in a lot of states. So all these things lead to more people going to jail and then for longer, and those laws came to be in the '70s and '80s. And over that time, our incarceration rate ballooned up by about 700%, so by the early 2000s, we were at over 2 million people incarcerated and another 7-8 million people on probation or parole. So it's a pretty big expansion - the United States has 5% of the world's population and a quarter, or 25%, of the prisoners, so it's a little ridiculous. The crime rate here isn't nearly as high, or nearly high enough to justify that huge disparity. So yeah, it's a whole confluence of factors led us to be the world leader in incarceration. [00:06:14] Crystal Fincher: And what attitudes or what justifications are the people who have the power to enact these policies and continue these policies - how are they justifying them? [00:06:25] Damon Petrich: So there's a few reasons why you might want to incarcerate somebody. One is just because you want to punish them or get revenge on them, so that's more of a moral reason. But the main focus of politicians were twofold - one was incapacitation, so that one means that because you're keeping somebody locked up in a cage, obviously they can't be out in the community committing crimes. So the thought is that you're going to reduce crime that way. The research on that is a little squishy even now, and I can talk a little bit more about that later if you want. But the other reason, and the one that we focused on in our review, was that prison deters people from going back to crime after they get out. So the idea there is that prison sucks - you go in there, you're cut off from your job, from your family, from your friends, or from just having hobbies or things to do. And you're not going to want to go back, so when you get out of prison - you think real hard, and you think how much prison sucks, and you decide not to go back to crime. That's the thinking behind that deterrence hypothesis anyway. So those two - incapacitation and deterrence - were the main drivers of those increase in laws and stuff during the '70s, '80s, and '90s, but there really wasn't any evidence for either of them - in the '70s and '80s in particular. So most of the research evaluating whether prison actually does deter recidivism has popped up over the last 25 years or so. [00:08:05] Crystal Fincher: And as you took a look at it - all of the studies that have popped up over the past 25 years had varying degrees of rigor and scientific validity. But as that body of research grew, people began to get a better idea of whether incarceration actually does reduce someone's likelihood of reoffending. How big was that body of work, in terms of studies, and what were you able to look at? [00:08:40] Damon Petrich: So in our particular review, we looked at 116 studies, which is a pretty sizable number. Most people - when you read through an article and a literature review might have 10 studies or something that they just narratively go through, but we looked at 116. And then within those 116 studies, there were 981 statistical models. So 901 different comparisons - or 981 different comparisons - of what happens to custodial versus non-custodial groups. So we looked at a pretty big chunk of literature. [00:09:20] Crystal Fincher: And in that, in the reliance of - that's a really big number - and I think, people now are maybe more familiar, just from a layperson's perspective, of just how big that number is. As we've seen throughout this pandemic that we're in the middle of, studies come out - people are looking at one study, and wow - study number two comes out and we're feeling really good about it. And man, we get to five studies and people are like, okay, we know what's going on. To get beyond a hundred is just a real comprehensive body of study and analysis. What were you able to determine from that? [00:10:05] Damon Petrich: So I should probably explain upfront what a meta-analysis is and why it's useful. So like you were just saying - like in the COVID pandemic, for example - one study will come out and it'll say, oh, Ivermectin reduces symptomatic COVID cases by X percent. And then the next study will come out and say, Ivermectin makes people way worse. So any individual study can be kind of misleading. A good analogy for what a meta-analysis does would be to look at baseball, for example. So let's say you're interested in some rookie player that's just come out, he's just joined Major League Baseball and you go to his - you want to know how good this player actually is? You've never seen him play, you've only heard rumors. So you go out to his first game, he gets up to bat four times and he gets no hits. So you walk away from that game thinking, wow, this player is terrible, the team wasted all their money recruiting and paying this guy's salary. But that could have just been an off game for many reasons - it's his debut game so maybe there's just first-game nerves, maybe the weather was bad, maybe he was having personal problems in his life, or he had a little bit of an injury. So there's a number of reasons why looking at his performance from that one game is not going to be representative of who he is as a player. Ideally, you'd want to look at all the games over a season where he might go up to bat 250 times. And over those 250 times, he gets 80 hits, which is a pretty good batting average - it's over .300. So with that amount of data, you could come to a more solid conclusion of whether he's actually a good player or not. And with that amount of data, you could also look at what we call moderating characteristics. So you could look at, for example, whether he plays better when it's an away game or in a home game, whether it's early or late season - you could look at all these sorts of things. So this is essentially what we're doing with research as well, in a meta-analysis. So if you look at studies on incarceration - one might show increases in recidivism after people go to prison, the next might show decreases, and the next might show that probationers and prisoners reoffend at about the same rates. So just like in the baseball analogy, in a meta-analysis, we're looking at all of the available research. We're combining it together and determining A) what the sort of overall or average effect of incarceration is, and then B) whether these moderating characteristics actually matter. So in other words, is the effect of incarceration pretty much the same for males as it is for females, or for juveniles as adults, or when the research design is really good versus when it's not so great. So that's basically what we did in this meta-analysis is again - looked at 116 studies and from those 981 statistical estimates. [00:13:13] Crystal Fincher: Very helpful. Totally makes sense with the baseball analogy, and I especially appreciate breaking down with all the statistical models and not just kind of thumbs up, thumbs down - the binary - it either increases or reduces the likelihood of recidivism. But under what conditions are - might it be more likely, less likely that someone does? What are some of those influencing effects on what happens? And so you were just talking about the justification that people used going into this, and now that we have data coming out - does it turn out that people go into prison or are incarcerated in jail, they think - wow, this is horrible. Some in society are like the more uncomfortable we make it in jail, the better we want to make sure it's a place that they never would want to come back to - that it's so scary and such a bad experience that they are just scared straight for the rest of their lives. Does it actually turn out to be that way? Do they take a rational look at - this was my experience, I don't want to go back again, therefore I will not do any of the things that I did going in. [00:14:28] Damon Petrich: I would not say that's the conclusion - no. So again, based on the 116 studies that we looked at, which is again a lot, people who are sentenced to incarceration - so jail, prison - they commit crime, they reoffend at about the same rates as if you'd sentence those same people to probation. So in other words, they're not being deterred by being sent to prison. These effects are the same for both males and females. So in other words, prison doesn't reduce reoffending for one group versus the other. It's the same whether we look at adults versus juveniles, it's the same regardless of what type of recidivism we're interested in - rearrests or convictions. It's pretty much the same across the board. There's some slight variations in research designs, but even within those, prison either has no effect or it slightly increases recidivism. We don't find any conditions under which prison is reducing reoffending or deterring these people from going back to those lives. [00:15:35] Crystal Fincher: So from a societal perspective, a lot of people kind of make the assumption that, Hey, we arrest and we incarcerate someone - whew, our streets are safer. They get out, and now they can choose to reintegrate themselves into society hopefully - they do and we're all safer because of it. But it looks like impressions that some people may have that, Hey, we're letting someone off easy. And suggestions - there's so much media coverage around this - and suggestions that because we're letting people off easy, that we're making it easier for them to reoffend, or they don't feel sufficiently punished enough and so that becomes an incentive to reoffend. Does that seem like it tracks with what the studies have shown? [00:16:33] Damon Petrich: Not really - so there's some studies that actually ask prisoners and offenders whether they'd prefer going to prison or probation. And a lot of them will say, oh, I'd rather do a year in prison than spend two or three years on probation. So it's not like they view probation as just being super easy. And they're not saying this because they received time off their sentence for being in the study or anything like that. Probation's not easy either - and you have to also think that while these people are on probation, they're able to stay in close touch with their family, they're able to maintain connections with work or find work, they're able to participate in the community, they can pay taxes - that I know a lot of people who are pro-prison love. So there's all sorts of reasons why - beyond just them reoffending at the same rates as if they'd gone to prison - there's a lot of reasons why we might want to keep these people in the community. And it's not like we're saying, let everybody out of prison - so the nature of this research - you want to compare apples to apples. So in this research, comparing prisoners to probationers - these have to be people who are getting - they could either legitimately get a sentence of jail or probation, or prison or probation. So these are going to be first-time offenders, people who are relatively low-level - they've committed low-level crimes and all that. So we're not saying - there's not going to be a situation where a murderer just gets probation - that sort of thing. So I know that might be a concern of some people - they think that's a natural argument of this analysis, but it's really not. [00:18:24] Crystal Fincher: Well, and to your point, we're really talking - if we're looking at all of the crime that gets people sentenced to prison time, a very small percentage of that is murder. A very small percentage of it is on that kind of scale - you can wind up in jail or prison for a wide variety of offenses - many of them, people perceive as relatively minor or that people might be surprised can land you in prison. Or if someone has committed a number of minor offenses, that can stack up - to your point in other situations - and increase the length of detention or the severity of the consequences. As we're looking through this and the conversation of, okay, so, we sentence them, we let them out - it's not looking like there's a difference between jail or community supervisions, things like probation - what is it about jail that is harmful or that is not helpful? What is it about the structure of our current system that doesn't improve recidivism outcomes for people? [00:19:42] Damon Petrich: Probably the main one is the rehabilitation is not the greatest. So just as an example, substance abuse is a very strong predictor whether people are going to reoffend, unsurprisingly. About 50% of prisoners at the state and federal level in The States meet the DSM [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders] criteria for having a substance use abuse disorder - so they meet the clinical criteria for substance abuse disorder. So half of them, and then more than that just use substances, but they don't meet the criteria for a disorder. But of that 50% who has a substance abuse disorder, only about 20% of those actually receives treatment for it while they're incarcerated. So, you're not dealing with a root cause of reoffending while they're in prison - so you're not deterring them, but you're also not rehabilitating them - so you're really not doing anything. And then in the rare cases where these people are provided with rehabilitation or reentry programming, it's often not based on any sort of evidence-based model of how you actually change people. So there's a lot of psychological and criminology theory and research on how you actually elicit behavioral change, and these programs really aren't in line with any of that. And I could give examples if you wanted, but - [00:21:17] Crystal Fincher: Sure. I think that's helpful, 'cause I think a lot of people do assume, and sometimes it's been controversial - wow, look at how much they're coddling these prisoners - they have these educational programs, and they get all this drug treatment for free, and if they don't come out fixed then it's their own fault because they have access to all of these treatment resources in prison. Is that the case? [00:21:43] Damon Petrich: No, I wouldn't say so - first of all, they don't have access, a lot of them, to any programs. And then, like I said, the programs that they do get really aren't that effective. So the big one that everybody loves to argue for is providing former inmates with jobs. If you look at any federal funding for program development, like the Second Chance Act or the First Step Act - I think that was one under Trump - and then under Bush, there was a Serious [and] Violent Offenders Reentry Initiative - pretty much all of these federal bills will be heavily focused on just providing offenders with jobs. And almost all of the evaluations of these programs show that they don't reduce reoffending. And it's not really that hard - again, if you go back to the literature on behavioral change and, criminology literature - it's not really that hard to understand why just providing a job isn't going to reduce or lead somebody away from a life of crime. A lot of these people have spotty work histories where they've never had a job at all, they believe and know that it's easier to gain money by doing illicit work than it is legal work, they have things like low self-control so they're very impulsive, they don't know how to take criticism or being told what to do by a boss. They live in neighborhoods with very poor opportunities for good jobs and education, and maybe there's a mindset around there that illegal work or whatever is just a better way to go - that's sort of ingrained. So there's a lot of different reasons why just handing somebody a job isn't going to lead them away from crime, 'cause they have all these other things that need to be dealt with first. So ideally, a rehabilitation program that's comprehensive would deal with all of those other background factors and then provide them with a job. Because if you make them less impulsive, better able to resist the influence of their antisocial friends, and get this thought out of their head that other people are being hostile towards them when they're really not - all these sorts of cognitive and behavioral biases that they have - if you deal with all of those things and then you give them a job, they're more likely to actually latch onto that job as something worthwhile doing. And then they're going to go on to get out of a life of crime. But if you just give them a job and you haven't dealt with any of those issues, you can't really expect that to work. And that is the model that we currently do - is something that we don't really expect to work that well. [00:24:28] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, that's - it's really interesting and I don't know that a lot of people actually know that, Hey, giving someone a job isn't sufficient - which is why I think it's so important to talk about studies like this, because some of what has become conventional wisdom, really is not accurate or reflects what has been studied and discovered. And I guess in that vein, what are the factors - you just talked about a few - but what does increase someone's likelihood of reoffending or recidivism, and what reduces it? [00:25:08] Damon Petrich: So those are probably two ends of the same, or two sides of the same coin, but this is pretty well known in criminology - a model called the risk-need-responsivity [RNR] model was developed by a couple of fellow Canadians, named James Bonta and Don Andrews, along with some of their colleagues in the '80s and '90s. And they, through again, other meta-analyses just like we did, found certain categories of characteristics of people who are more likely to reoffend. So you have things like having antisocial peers - so that one's pretty obvious - if you have a bunch of friends that are involved in crime, it's going to be pretty hard for you to get out of that life because you're surrounded by those people. Same with family members. If you have what are called criminal thinking patterns - so again, you might have what's called a hostile attribution bias, things like that, where somebody says something a little bit negative to you and you take that as a huge insult and you retaliate with anger and aggression - things like that. Or being impulsive - so you're again quick to anger, you're swayed by small little enticements in the environment and that sort of thing - so you're easily swayed one way or the other. Things like that are strong predictors of reoffending. Substance abuse - it's what I mentioned earlier. If you don't really have any sort of proactive leisure activities, like hobbies and stuff like that. So there's a bunch of well-known things that we know are strongly associated with recidivism, and a rehabilitation program should ideally deal with them. Now this model that Andrews and Bonta and all these other people came up with - this RNR risk-need-responsivity model - the risk part says that we should give people a risk assessment when they're entering prison or leaving prison and determine what level of risk are they from reoffending. And we assess these different criteria, like criminal thinking patterns and antisocial friends and substance abuse. So we determine what those factors are and then we design them a treatment program that actually deals with those factors at the individual level. So we're not just giving a blanket rehabilitation program to everybody, and you're providing the most amount of care to the people who most need it or who are the most likely to re-offend. And then once we've done all that, we need to make sure that we're addressing these problems in some sort of a format that we know actually works. The most well-known one, but not as often used, the most well-known within the sort of psychologist and criminological literature is cognitive behavioral therapy [CBT]. So this is pretty popular for dealing with depression and all sorts of eating disorders and substance abuse problems in non-offender populations. Well, those programs also work in offender populations and they work pretty well. So the research shows - again meta-analyses - that when you deal with all these three factors - risk, need, and responsivity - you can reduce reoffending rates by about 26%. So it's a pretty sizeable amount - it's much greater than you're getting by just sentencing people to prison without doing anything. [00:28:42] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely, and I think you cover in your paper - those things are absolutely true. And you just talked about several administrations' attempts to implement programming and resources to try and help people get jobs, potentially - hey, there's even a CBT treatment, but if that treatment has twice as many people as are recommended being in a session and occurs over half the time that it's supposed to, you really are sabotaging the entire process or really setting it up for failure. And it just seems to be an expensive exercise that we aren't really getting anything out of. Does that seem to be consistent with how you've seen the attempts at introducing this programming within prisons and jails? [00:29:40] Damon Petrich: Yeah, for sure - this is a pretty common finding too - so it's not just about preaching that you're going to do these things. You actually have to implement them well. So just like you said, there's a number of studies that show this - so you've designed some really great program that deals with all of these risk factors that lead people back into reoffending, you give it to them in a cognitive behavioral setting. So all seems good on paper, but in practice, like you said - one of the famous studies there - can't remember the names of the authors offhand right now - but one of the famous studies there showed that they're providing it to people in groups of 30, as opposed to 15, and they're delivering it in a really short amount of time. And they're not maybe giving it to the highest-risk people - so they're just mixing random people in there at varying levels of risk. So when you do all these sorts of things - you implement the program poorly - you can't really expect it to work. And this is often the case - is the government pays people to come up with these great programs, and then not enough funding is provided to actually make sure that they're implemented and evaluated well. So the amount of funding that actually goes into that - developing the programs to begin with - is small, but when you do do that, you're not making sure that you're actually implementing things well. So it's just sort of shooting yourself in the foot, and probably making people come to the conclusion that these things don't work - when they do work, if you just implement them well. [00:31:17] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and there's also a lot of rhetoric - and you discuss this - there's a lot of rhetoric coming from the government, even coming from leadership within the Bureau of Prisons or leadership in our carceral system, saying we do want to rehabilitate people. We are trying to implement programming that does this. You see - we have these educational opportunities and we are doing evaluations of people. And it may be happening while they're understaffed or other challenges, but one of the biggest, I guess, red flags is that none of the evaluation of their programs and none of the incentives that arise are in any way tied to what is the actual result of what happens. Are you actually succeeding on reducing someone's likelihood for reoffense? It does not seem like any compensation is tied to that, any kind of evaluation of positions or regular reporting - to say, is this program having its intended effect? And if not, what do we need to do to correct for that? Is that what you found? [00:32:33] Damon Petrich: I would say that's probably a pretty fair assessment. A lot of the programs that are implemented are never evaluated at all. And then the ones that are - it's usually once - there's one evaluation of those programs. And then, like you said, there doesn't really seem to be a lot of self-reflection - I don't know what other word you would use - but these programs don't really change on the basis of these evaluations. So, it's kind of disheartening to hear about, I guess. [00:33:14] Crystal Fincher: It feels very disheartening to live in the middle of - and one of the big things about this is that this - we have these conversations and we talk about these studies and we're saying, yeah, it actually - we're not doing anyone any favors right now when it comes to reducing recidivism. And having these conversations oftentimes detached from the cost associated with what we're paying for these. And my goodness are we paying to incarcerate people? It's not just, well, we do lock them up and we keep them away. Or we do a good job of keeping them in - they reoffend, they go back to jail. And lots of people are like, we did our job, they went back to jail - boom, everything is fine. But we are paying through the nose and out the ear for this - just here, we're in the state of Washington, and right now the state spends about $112 per day, or over $40,000 annually, to incarcerate one individual - that's the cost per inmate. In King County - the county that we're in - they spend $192 a day, or $70,000 annually, to incarcerate an individual. That is a huge amount of the tax dollars that we spend - these come out of our general fund, meaning that these are dollars that every service, everything that is not a dedicated source of revenue, is competing for. So when we talk about things and have conversations like, well, we don't have the budget for that and we don't have the money - that is related to how much of that money we're spending on other things. And my goodness, I would think that we want to get our money's worth for that level of expenditure. And it really appears that if we're saying the goal of jail is to get people on the straight and narrow path and becoming contributing members of society and all of the implications of that, it doesn't seem like we're getting our money's worth. And so, if those aren't the goals and if we just want to punish people, it's not like we're punishing people for free. We're punishing people at the cost of $70,000 per day [year], and at the cost of all the other services and infrastructure needs that we have. So it really seems like we're punishing ourselves as much, or more, as others - particularly if we're bringing people back into society that are likely to reoffend in one way or another. And so if our goal is to keep our community safe and that is the North Star, it looks like we need to realign our processes and our expenditure of resources. I guess my question to you, after all that, is - how should we be moving forward? What should we be looking to do? What is shown to work? [00:36:24] Damon Petrich: Well, I would say - yeah, $70,000 a year as just a revenge cost per person seems like a lot. $80 billion in the country as a whole, for a revenge cost, seems like a pretty high price to pay, given we're not reducing reoffending. You could make the argument that these people aren't offending while they're in prison, but that's - there's other reasons why that might not be completely accurate, which I could talk about too, but - [00:36:59] Crystal Fincher: Well, I'm interested in that. Why might that not be accurate? [00:37:03] Damon Petrich: So, obviously the person - if you incarcerate a particular individual, obviously they can't be out in the community committing crimes. So that's obvious, but there's a number of reasons why that might not, en masse, actually reduce crime a whole lot. The research on it - this is a little bit squishy - in terms of whether incarcerating more people leads to lower crime rates, because one influences the other. But for example, if you look at illegal drug markets - a lot of the homicides in the United States and other violent crime that people are really concerned about, and it's plastered all over the media is - homicides, gang-related stuff. So if you take key gang members out and you put them in prison, what ends up happening is that there's competition in that market to take over that person's place, either within the gang or other gangs coming in. So what ends up happening oftentimes is a spike in violence. So that's one reason why just incapacitating, particularly high-crime individuals, might not actually lead to lower crime rates overall. Again, you're lowering crime for that one person, but you might be increasing crime on a more systemic level. Beyond that, these things have broader societal and community level impacts - incarcerating a lot of people. Again, research shows that when you're incarcerating a lot of people in a particular community - so there's a bunch of really good work by Robert Sampson - he has a book that came out a few years ago called Great American City. And he looked at these individual neighborhoods in Chicago over time, and what he finds is that in communities where there's a higher number of people incarcerated in a particular community, this ends up increasing what's called "legal cynicism." And this is done in some other work as well with David Kirk and Andrew Papachristos - but they show that this increases legal cynicism, which means people are skeptical of police helping them out, the police doing a good job. And what ends up happening after that - when people are more cynical of the legal system, they're less likely to report crimes to the police, they're less likely to cooperate with the police. So what ends up happening? You incarcerate more people and people in that community end up being less willing to cooperate with law enforcement. And this leads to sort of an endless cycle where things sort of get out of hand. So there's all these unintended and nonfinancial consequences of incarcerating a lot of people that could potentially end up leading to more crime. [00:40:03] Crystal Fincher: Well, and - speaking as a Black woman - obviously, looking at the impacts of mass incarceration in the Black community and in neighborhoods around the country - where it is almost like the community is responding to the actual outcome and that, Hey, this actually isn't making my community any better. I'm experiencing traumatic impacts from this - whether it's my relative went to prison or a sole breadwinner in the family and now we're thrown into poverty, or I'm in a situation where I don't have a parent who used to be there - who now is no longer there. Or causing instability and impacting the education that people get and the kind of job opportunity, watching someone who's come out have to struggle and be ostracized. And it looks like, Hey, this is just the first step on a long cycle of traumatic and undesirable events - and I don't want to participate in a system that is doing that. With that, as we look forward, and I think this is also related to conversations about just fundamental trust in our criminal legal system and relations with police and throughout the system. It's - if we think about how to turn that around - to me, seems related to thinking about the question of how do we get better outcomes for everyone? 'Cause it seems like right now where we're investing a lot in poor outcomes for people who were already, usually, in pretty poor spots leading to themselves being incarcerated, coming out and not necessarily improving, definitely not improving. And if anything, a chance that it gets a little bit worse. How do we change that entire outcome? And I know you're looking specifically in the incarceration space, but what should be, what could be done differently? Or do we just need a fundamental restructuring of the way we do this? [00:42:17] Damon Petrich: I don't know about a fundamental restructuring - I don't, I'm not great at that high-level thinking stuff, but what I do know is that - we're probably going to continue to incarcerate people. That's something that's done in every country and people seem to love here. So if we actually want to use prison for public safety - because 95% of inmates eventually get out - if we actually want to use it for public safety, then let's actually try wholeheartedly to rehabilitate them while they're in there. And again, there's a lot of theory and evidence-based principles on how we can do this, like the risk-need-responsivity model that I talked about earlier, cognitive behavioral therapy more broadly. If you use these types of things and continue to work on them and develop them over time, then yeah - prison might actually be helpful if people are going there and getting the help that they need. But that's not what's happening currently. So that's one level in incarceration terms - that's the area that I know best. So that's one way you could potentially alleviate some of this stuff is - if people are actually getting resources and stuff when they're in prison, and then when once they're reintegrating, they're not only going to reoffend less, but maybe they're going to contribute to their community more. They're going to be better able to connect with their family and stuff like that. So rather than being a hindrance, it could potentially be a help. Obviously, again, it's not ideal to remove people from their communities and their family and friends. And like I said earlier, if you have the option to sentence them to something community-based instead, I think that's the better route to go. But if you are going to send people to prison, which I think we're going to continue to do a lot of the time, then let's rehabilitate them while they're in there is the main point. And do so based on what actually works to do that. [00:44:23] Crystal Fincher: It's really the investment in the people who are there, and we're - I think up against a lot of societal attitudes and resistance where it just feels wrong to a number of people to be providing services and shifting that investment to things that are seemingly helpful for the inmate, because everything about how we've been conditioned to understand our prison system has been - the punishment is kind of the key, and they'll make rational decisions afterwards to avoid prison based on how bad the punishment is. When it comes to community supervision, things like probation, what are the differences there? If there are better outcomes from that, what accounts for the better outcomes when it comes to probation versus incarceration? [00:45:23] Damon Petrich: I wouldn't say the outcomes are better - they're just pretty much the same as they would be if they're sentenced to prison. So, probation costs less and then it also enables the people to be out in the community doing community things, like being with their friends and families and all that. I mean, you can't quantify, based on a recidivism percentage, what their family members and friends and employers are getting out of it. So that's something we can't really look at - or I guess you could, but something we don't often do - but so there's intangible things that you would get by keeping people in the community. Plus it doesn't lead to all that other stuff I talked about where people become cynical of the legal system and it leads to this cycle of whatever. [00:46:11] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and so if we're were doing this programming in prison and helping people, I think your research shows it's extremely important to do both the structural, Hey, you need a place to live, you need to be able to pay your rent and your bills - so having a job, having housing, having healthcare, getting those very basic needs met is critical. But also addressing a number of the mental or behavioral health issues that are common among the incarcerated population - and dealing with that is as important. And basically those two things both need to happen hand-in-hand. How do we do a better job of that in our current system? [00:46:57] Damon Petrich: Well, first of all, I'd like to say that you're right there - I think maybe when I was talking earlier about employment, it might sound like giving people jobs is just a waste of time, but that's not the case. It needs - the two things need to be paired - you need to deal with the cognitive and behavioral problems in addition to giving them jobs and housing support and all that. In terms of how you actually go about doing that, there are examples in the literature of programs that do this, so there's examples out there. I think if you're a state or local or even federal correctional department and you're interested in doing this - implementing something that's evidence-based - or if you're just a concerned citizen that wants to rally your local officials to do that - go and talk to researchers like me, or people at universities that have criminology departments or criminal justice departments, because this knowledge is out there. It's widely available. You just have to go and seek it out. So at my university, for example, we have the University of Cincinnati Corrections Institute and under the guidance of Ed Latessa, he was - now passed - but he was, over the last 30 years, responsible for disseminating a lot of this evidence-based practices to some of the state and local criminal justice agencies. And they helped with implementation and evaluation in a lot of these places, so the help is out there. You just have to look for it a little bit. [00:48:38] Crystal Fincher: And another question I had - your analysis seemed to suggest that when we're talking about low-risk, medium, and high-risk offenders - or people who have done relatively minor crimes versus those who have done more serious crimes - that these interventions are particularly effective the more serious the offense or crime has been. And that perhaps even sometimes treating someone who is a really low-risk as if they're a high-risk, can worsen the outcomes for that person. Is that the case? [00:49:21] Damon Petrich: Yeah, that tends to be a finding in research - we're not exactly sure why, but providing a lot of really intensive services to people deemed to be low-risk can actually be harmful rather than helpful. We don't know based on research why, but there's a lot of pretty good hypotheses about why. So a low-risk offender is going to be somebody who's a first-timer who's committed some not-that-serious crime. So they probably have a job, they probably have pretty strong connections with their family and all that. So if you're taking them and you're putting them in a program where you have to be there 40 hours a week, they're probably going to get fired from their job, it's going to be harder to stay in contact with friends and families that are sort of tying you into a non-criminal life. And then you're probably going to be associating with all kinds of people who are high-risk, and maybe they're going to draw you towards, oh yeah, I could earn four grand going out tonight and stealing some laptops. There's a lot of reasons why just taking low-risk people and putting them in these programs is going to be harmful rather than helpful. [00:50:31] Crystal Fincher: And so with that in mind, and you talk about, Hey, if we're trying to influence local electeds - one of the interesting things about having a podcast and radio show that caters to extremely politically and civically inclined people is that we actually do have a number of policymakers and politicians who listen, and people who are enacting and in control of this policy. If you were to talk to them and give them advice about how to move forward, especially in the current environment that we find ourselves in, where over the past few years has been increasing awareness of some of the defecits of our system and pushes to change those. And also, as we have seen more recently, a real strong pushback from a lot of people who are invested in our current system saying, Hey, let's not change things too much. Maybe we need to jail more and for longer. And maybe we're just not doing enough incarceration, and that's the answer. In that kind of political environment, what would you tell people who are in charge of this policy, who may be facing pressure to keep going forward with the status quo, about how they should evaluate how they should move forward and the kinds of things that they should do? [00:52:07] Damon Petrich: I know a lot of these politicians get lobbied by correctional officer groups or whatever, and that's whatever, but ultimately you get voted in by voters. So, I'm not an expert on public opinion - I have other friends who are more into that kind of stuff, but I do know from talking with them and from reading that literature, that the public actually does support rehabilitation. So they have for a long time and it's shifted more towards being in support of rehabilitation over time. So right now, most Americans support providing rehabilitation programs to prisoners and offenders. So this is something that's going to please your constituency, people want this kind of thing. And it's not like you're going to be losing all kinds of jobs by getting rid of prison - there's going to be a need for skilled people who can provide these programs and probation officers and all these sorts of things. So it's not a net loss when you're getting rid of prisons. There's a lot of reasons to sentence people to community supervision and things like that - provide rehabilitation. There's public support for it, there's jobs involved, there's cost savings - big time, obviously - it's way cheaper to keep somebody out of prison than it is to keep them in prison. So there's a lot of different reasons why you would want to do that as a politician. [00:53:43] Crystal Fincher: I think that makes sense. Certainly it's a lot cheaper to keep someone out of prison versus in prison. I mean, we talked about the annual costs - in the state of Washington over $40,000, King County over $70,000 - comparing that to how much we invest in a student of $11,500 a year. If we focus more on investing in people, both inside and outside the system, it seems like we set ourselves up for a safer community, fewer people being victimized, and more people leading thriving, productive, tax-paying lives. And we're all happier than we are right now, I would think, I would hope - it seems like the research points in that direction. So I certainly appreciate you taking the time to speak with us about this. Is there anything else that you want to leave with us, in thinking about this study and your research? [00:54:55] Damon Petrich: I think we covered it pretty well. Just to circle back to something you just said - I know this might put me out of a job since I focus on what happens when people's lives go awry, but you really are better off to invest in early prevention programs and giving people a good start on life than trying to correct the program or the problem afterwards. So yeah - politicians spend some money on prevention programs. I know the good effects of that are a long way out, but they're actually good on a societal level. So I guess I would add that, even though it's not good for criminologists, maybe, to put themselves out of a job like that. [00:55:40] Crystal Fincher: Well, much appreciated, and thank you so much for having this conversation with us today. [00:55:45] Damon Petrich: Yeah, thank you very much for having me on. I'm glad that there are people out there interested in this stuff, so thanks again. [00:55:51] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you next time.

Savage Minds Podcast
Topher Field

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 97:01


Topher Field, political commentator and Australian documentary filmmaker, discusses the politics and public health decisions that led him to make his latest documentary, Battleground Melbourne (2020). Historicising what happened during Melbourne’s lockdown and the ensuing mask mandates, vaccines and vaccine mandates, Field criticises the propaganda and theatre that has been elaborately disseminated by mainstream media and curated by Big Tech such that no discussion or democratic protest can take place. Noting how in many western nations and Australia alike people have expressed quite reasonable concerns about the effectiveness and the safety of the vaccines being rolled out, Field details that the cost-benefit analysis we were promised is not supported by the data. Explaining how he and others took to the streets of Melbourne to stand up to Daniel Andrews (Premier of Victoria) demanding the human rights that many western democracies have denied their citizens, Field notes the irony of how lockdown became Andrews’ Machiavellian tool for pitting the police and the “laptop class” against the working class where all groups are simply trying to survive and do their jobs. Criticising how evil is represented in popular entertainment, Field vituperates the propaganda created by governments and media the world over that pushed immoral laws and mandates that conditioned people towards fear and away from critical thinking, observing, “People who do evil things are people who do what they are told for the most part and the worst evils in history…have been done by people who were acting in accordance with the law and doing what they were told.” Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Myth Matters
Ecological Consciousness and "The Queen Bee" fairy tale

Myth Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 32:25 Transcription Available


"Noting these tokens and examples some have saidthat a share of divine intelligence is in bees,and a draught of (a)ether: since there is a god in everything..."--Virgil, The "Georgics," 29 BCEStories from contemporary indigenous cultures convey an ecological consciousness of balance and symbiosis that is foreign to the way many people live today.Are there stories in the European tradition that can help those of us in that cultural mindset reconnect with our nature and the earth, and refashion this relationship? How does a myth or story become a source of guidance and wisdom? Support the show

Lancaster Farming Industrial Hemp Podcast
Congress Examines USDA Hemp Program

Lancaster Farming Industrial Hemp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 51:01


Last week, the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research held a hearing to examine the USDA Hemp Production Program. The subcommittee heard from a panel of producers, researchers, tribal members, and state ag commissioners that gave an overview of the hemp industry and offered insight toward the 2023 Farm Bill. Noting the absence of representatives from USDA and FDA, ranking member Jim Baird from Indiana said, “I do believe it is a missed opportunity that we don't hear from the federal agencies tasked with implementing provisions on hemp today.” On this week's podcast, we will listen to highlights from the hearing, including testimony from Colorado Ag Commissioner Kate Greenberg, who offers five recommendations for how Congress can provide support to federal agencies to allow for greater flexibility and improve state-run hemp programs. First on her list is removal of DEA requirements for testing labs. “Our state-of-the-art laboratory began the process of obtaining DEA certification in 2019. However, as of this hearing we still await their approval,” Greenberg said. All panel experts expressed the need for clarification from the FDA concerning the regulation and use of CBD. Also on this week's show, we check in with Lancaster County hemp farmer and cover crop coach Steve Groff, who this week used a sickle bar mower to cut 5 acres of hemp on his farm in Holtwood, Pennsylvania. Groff's hemp was direct-seeded in 15-inch rows, roughly 50 pounds per acre, into a cover crop of black oats and hairy vetch on May 18. The crop reached a height of 12 feet in 75 days and had not started to flower before being cut. He will rake the cut hemp into narrow swaths and turn it a few times, allowing the stalks to ret before baling with a New Holland wet baler. Lancaster Farming also talks to Morris Beegle, organizer of the fourth annual Southern Hemp Expo, taking place in Nashville Aug. 18-20. Learn More: Watch the Congressional Hearing https://www.lancasterfarming.com/farming/industrial_hemp/an-examination-of-the-usda-hemp-production-program/video_24fe545c-14d8-11ed-8f65-b7c948bba48f.html Watch Steve Groff Cutting Fiber at Cedar Meadow Farm https://www.lancasterfarming.com/community/videos/cutting-hemp-fiber-at-cedar-meadow-farm/video_b16f1980-14ce-11ed-acf3-fbdebeb1cdb1.html Southern Hemp Expo, Nashville, Tennessee, August 18-20, 2022 https://www.southernhempexpo.com/ Kings Agriseed's Field Day, August 16-17, 2022 https://kingsagriseeds.com/ Penn State's Twilight Hemp Walk August 16, 2022 https://extension.psu.edu/hemp-research-field-walk Thanks to our Sponsors All Walks Hemp Bedding https://allwalkspet.com/ IND HEMP https://www.indhemp.com/

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips
Lessons Learned Doing Audits on Our Youtube Channels #2177

Marketing School - Digital Marketing and Online Marketing Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 4:16 Very Popular


In episode #2177, we share some of the lessons we have learned auditing our YouTube channels! From the research necessary to boost your views and subscribers, to which metrics you should prioritize, we cover it all! Tune in today, and get started on building your best channel yet! TIME-STAMPED SHOW NOTES: [00:20] Today's topic: Lessons Learned Doing Audits on Our Youtube Channels. [00:25] Differences between SEO on YouTube and Google! [00:53] Why auditing your channel is so important to your improvement. [01:21] The metrics to focus on and try to boost. [02:06] Noting the topics that are most successful. [02:41] The power of research; why diving deep into content performance can make all the difference. [03:36] That's it! [03:40] Go to https://www.marketingschool.io/live to apply for our live event!   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:   Subscribe to our premium podcast (with tons of goodies!): https://www.marketingschool.io/pro MrBeast   Leave Some Feedback:     What should we talk about next? Please let us know in the comments below Did you enjoy this episode? If so, please leave a short review.     Connect with Us:      Neilpatel.com Quick Sprout  Growth Everywhere Single Grain Twitter @neilpatel  Twitter @ericosiu    

Iodine Intelligence - Empowering Intelligent Care
The Impact of Mid-Revenue Cycle Leakage on the Healthcare System

Iodine Intelligence - Empowering Intelligent Care

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 29:03


In this episode of Iodine Intelligence, Fran Jurcak, Chief Clinical Strategist at Iodine Software and Kati Beisel, Director of Health Information for Integris Health, which is Oklahoma's largest state-owned not-for-profit health care system and ranked one of the top 25 health care systems in the US, discuss the difficulties associated with solving the challenges presented by mid-revenue cycle leakage. There are many costs associated with mid-revenue cycle leakage both immediate and long-term. Not only that, but the negative impact can also be felt throughout an organization. Everything from day-to-day operations, budget planning, resource allocation, patient outcomes, and staffing initiatives suffer from ineffective processes and systems. Fran Jurcak took a moment to speak to the significant issue of quantifying costs, noting that it is not a perfect process. “There continues to be anywhere from 4 ½ to half a million dollars lost in revenue in the average 250 bed hospital. So, fairly significant loss based upon workflows even after investments in areas to try and diminish that leakage,” stated Jurak. Beisel concurred, adding that Integris Health has “been scrutinized in the mid-revenue cycle quite a bit in recent years and I think that's for good reason because there is so many places for revenue to leak in the process.” She goes on to mention common areas of loss including physician documentation, staffing shortages, coding requirements, and reporting methods. Despite the significant challenges associated with implementing processes and software to improve CDI and reduce mid-revenue cycle leakage, both women agreed that the work is important. Noting that every dollar and dime counts, Beisel spoke of the need to reinvest in talent to better serve patients and communities while improving quality of patient care. Additional points of conversation included potential solutions, Iodine's various software solutions, and Integris Health systems journey to date.

Savage Minds Podcast
George Christensen

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 96:18


George Christensen, a former Australian politician, discusses the disastrous political decisions made during the pandemic including the lockdowns, mask mandates, vaccines, vaccine passports and discrimination within Australia since early 2020. Focussing on the loss of liberty, Christensen notes that at the height of the pandemic the case fatality ratio was far too low to justify the lockdowns. Noting the hokum lent to the mask and vaccine mandates, Christensen queries why lockdown became a go-to model from one country to the next despite the science not justifying such draconian tactics. Criticising the power of the World Economic Forum (WEF), Christensen vituperates how the WEF instigated the Great Reset, influencing world leaders who parroted the WEF mantra on lockdown while this organisation, a vast collection of the wealthiest companies (eg. Big Tech, the weapons industry, major media, Big Pharma, the insurance industry, etc) on the planet, aggressively pushed lockdown. Christensen analyses the vast power of the WEF, observing how the editorial narrative in mass media is being driven by the corporate sector which has its hands in every level of government, healthcare, public policy, corporate media, and Big Tech. Major media and Big Tech, Christensen notes, have been instrumental in controlling the social and political narrative by curating what is published within major media and what permitted to be uttered and shared on social media. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Epiclesis
Abraham in the Mirror

Epiclesis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 41:49


On this Sunday, we explore Genesis 18. Noting the rhythm of revelation and response in the story, we consider the Lord's ultimate goal for His visit with Abraham and the actual core of our faith and relationship with the Lord.

The Holistic Counseling Podcast
Episode 72 How To Teach Meditation in Sessions: Solo Episode by Chris McDonald

The Holistic Counseling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 33:35 Transcription Available


Are you ready to integrate meditation into your practice? Are you unsure about how to start teaching clients how to meditate?  IN THIS PODCAST:What is meditation? 1:16 Figuring out the best way to teach meditation 5:25 What is Concentrative Meditation 11:38 What is Mindfulness Meditation? 19:35 What Is Meditation?What meditation is NOT! Overcoming obstacles by being consistent in your meditation practice Engaging in the present moment without trying to change anything What is the importance of meditation and the benefits from it  Figuring Out The Best Way To Teach MeditationThe importance of setting up an invitation to your clients Setting up the appropriate space for you and your client to begin the meditation process Finding and practicing the appropriate voice for each client during guided meditation Why it is important to let go of any projected outcome in guided meditation What Is Concentrative Meditation?Integrating sound into concentrative meditation Teaching clients to use their breath as an anchor in concentrative meditation Techniques for using Mantra in meditation How to use an image in concentrative meditation What Is Mindfulness Meditation?What is “Noting?” Noticing our thoughts without judgment Using imagery in mindfulness meditation Mindfulness meditation walkthrough   Connect With MeInstagramhttps://my.captivate.fm/@holisticcounselingpodcast ( @holisticcounselingpodcast) https://www.facebook.com/holisticcounselingpodcast/ (Facebook) Join the privatehttps://www.facebook.com/groups/227234677747980 ( Facebook group) Sign up for my free email course:https://my.captivate.fm/www.holisticcounselingpodcast.com ( www.holisticcounselingpodcast.com) Rate, review, and subscribe to this podcast onhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-holistic-counseling-podcast/id1560859961 ( Apple Podcasts),https://www.stitcher.com/show/the-holistic-counseling-podcast ( Stitcher),https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health--Wellness-Podcasts/The-Holistic-Counseling-Podcast-p1420697/ ( TuneIn),https://open.spotify.com/show/3hEmF2DyEKm49I2tqXDX0k?si=Xlq6uvasQb2MWVfvUbfBvQ&nd=1 ( Spotify), andhttps://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5jYXB0aXZhdGUuZm0vaG9saXN0aWMtY291bnNlbGluZy8 ( Google Podcasts).

The Nonprofit Lab
E5: Organic Nonprofit Leadership

The Nonprofit Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 67:17


Organic leadership is all about leading naturally right where you are. On this episode I talk to Alex Mays about her family history and how she's grown up with nonprofits, and ended up helping to launch her own nonprofit, Lesson-Check-in. The conversation is also a unique perspective of the nonprofit space from a nonprofit leader who's also an angel investor in the startup world. We talk about what it's like starting a nonprofit after the pandemic started, and the biggest changes that are here to stay, and explore the question of how everyone can take action to make a difference in their communities. Alex Mays is an angel investor and nonprofit leader from Atlanta, Georgia. Watching her father closely as he built one of the largest non-profits in Atlanta and fundraising over $1,000,000 annually, motivated her to team with a small group of peers to lead Lesson Check-In. Noting the impact made by the deployment of capital inspired her to begin angel investing as a means for empowering diverse teams and businesses that are ethically contributing to the advancement and enhancement of humanity. Alex will graduate this year with her international Juris Doctor from Australia and plans to use her passion for driving positive change, paired with her financial and legal skills to continue making an impact across the world. Here's my conversation with Alex

Revtribes Podcast
Lead at Every level – You

Revtribes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 23:03


In this episode, we explore the upcoming "Lead at Every Level" workshop with Jodi Evans, Founder, and CEO of Revolutionary Tribes. Through the workshop, we try to assist participants in comprehending the various facets of leadership and provide them with the means to realize their vision.  In today's podcast, Jodi outlines the four self-leadership principles applicable at all levels, one of the workshop's primary teaching points. Nevertheless, the workshop will cover significantly more than these four foundations. We are conducting a comprehensive study of your intentions, communication, and action plan during the workshop! [00:37] Motivation - To acquire a wealth of information about leadership or to go further into it, we must look beyond the dental profession at present. Noting that Jodi explains the purpose of the workshop. [02:42] Who You Are, Not What You Do -  By drawing on her own experiences and discussing the lessons she has learned from them, Jodi demonstrates that leadership is not about completing a series of tasks on a list and that it is about who we are rather than what we do. [09:20] Personal Life and Professional Life - Jodi strongly stresses that, in the end, our personal lives are the best sign of the type of leaders we are most likely to develop into in the long run. [10:54] Your Why Needs to be About You – Jodi broadly discusses why our "Why" should be about us and not someone else. She argues that the "why" must be about us for it to be closer to the truth, providing examples from her own life. [15:05] Polarizing Beliefs are the Key to Your Freedom – Jodi explains that polarizing beliefs are the key to our freedom, emphasizing how the stuff we believe to be highly negative or positive traps us. She further describes how placing so much emphasis on things stops us from achieving our intended destination. [20:23] Focus on Strength and Acknowledge Weakness – Jodi elaborates on why and how we should focus on our strengths and admit our weaknesses, noting that we are trained to challenge ourselves in a highly counterproductive way. Resources: Connect with Melissa and Jodi: LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/melissa-hall-b0909865/ LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/jodi-evans-089297100/ Mentioned in the episode: Two-Day Executive Dental Leadership Intensive to Accelerate NEXT LEVEL growth for YOU and YOUR TRIBE: leaders.dental

The Yoga Pro Podcast
The Importance of the Spine in Yoga with Kaya Mindlin

The Yoga Pro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 61:39


Our spine is the center line of our body but many of us take for granted this amazing structure by holding on to tension in the body, missing out on the spiritual and yogic relationship of the spine, and clinging to outdated cues and teachings around core strength.   In this episode, Yoga Therapist and Educator Kaya Mindlin joins us to challenge old ideas around the spine and show us how the softer side of yoga can truly make us strong.   Kaya has been sharing yogic teaching and practice for 21 years. With thousands of hours of tutelage with masters in the full spectrum of the yoga tradition she seamlessly threads the mystical with the practical in her yoga teachings and practice programs. Her Supreme Release Yoga approach works directly & gently with the spine as the central axis of health and as the subtle conduit of spiritual awakening; and is rooted in the tantric viewpoint that the body and life itself is the vehicle for spiritual revelation.   Topics: -Kaya's spine story -How to know if spinal tension is holding you together and what to do about it -Hypermobility and instability -Core strength vs core tension -Understanding muscular elasticity and it's relationship to strength -Looking at the center line of the body holistically -Moving away from the desire to “fix” pain -Noting how the body feels without pain -Why we hold on to pain patterns -How the yoga world can do better  -Why we should question cues and teachings that we may be falling back on -Differences in anatomy and why the skeleton model might not be the best for teaching anatomy -What yoga reveals about the spine (Kaya shares a quote from yoga texts) -Why the work is ongoing and why you have to keep at it -How stopping resistance gives space for release -Why the spine is meant to hold us up -Patanjali's relevance to the spine -Kundalini rising signs and symptoms and why the spine needs to be unobstructed -Some practices that Kaya likes for softening the spine   Please fill out our survey and receive a FREE I'm a Yoga Pro sticker! https://lynxshort.com/podcastsurvey   Would you or someone you know make a great guest?   Apply with this podcast guest form and waiver https://forms.gle/wGDiv3i1ZSDAzu8o6     Connect with Kaya:   https://yogawithkaya.com/ https://www.instagram.com/kayamindlin/   YogaPro Listeners can try Kaya's Supreme Release Yoga practice for the spine for 15% - find the SRY Studio on Kaya's website and use the coupon code: yogapro15   Catch her other episode: What is Advanced Yoga with Kaya Mindlin https://www.theyogapropodcast.com/what-is-advanced-yoga-with-kaya-mindlin/   Connect with Pamela: www.theyogapropodcast.com www.instagram.com/interoceptiveperformance https://interoceptiveperformance.vipmembervault.com Email: info@interoceptiveperformance.com   Music:  The State of Things (The Bouncy Song) by Rena Wren is used with permission.   www.renawren.com

Project Chatter Podcast
S5E125: Social Value and Key Project ROI Criteria with Dr Alexia Nalewaik

Project Chatter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 62:28


In this episode Dale and Val talk with Dr Alexia Nalewaik about expanding our social and climate responsibility beyond financial incentives. Noting the influence of projects on local infrastructure, business and environments, in some cases creating thriving communities. Have we moved into social measures for projects? What's holding us back? Are we ready to introduce other ROI measures? Dr Alexia talks with us to discuss some of the exciting work she is involved in and how this may shape projects in the future.  Dr. Alexia Nalewaik FRICS CCP CCA has over 25 years of internationally recognised experience in audit, systemic risk, project analytics, governance, and cost estimating. She holds degrees in physics, civil engineering, and project management. Her focus on risk, stakeholders, transparency, and assurance continue to prove valuable to major clients in utilities, transportation, infrastructure, scientific facilities, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, and manufacturing. She is a professorial lecturer at American University, and the host of #PMChat weekly. Dr. Alexia has written two books on project-related topics (“Project Cost Recording and Reporting” and “Project Performance Review”), and published over 100 research papers and technical guidance. She is a Fellow of RICS Americas, AACE International, the Guild of Project Controls, and ICEC; she is a Past President of AACE International, and a Past Chair of ICEC. For more information, see ResearchGate and www.pellucidprojects.com. We also say thank you, as we complete our fifth season of the Project Chatter Podcast. Thank you to all our guests for their value and insight into several topics of interest. You've helped us pay it forward.  Proudly sponsored by:  JustDo - https://www.justdo.com/   PlanAcademy - https://www.planacademy.com/chatter/ ($75 off any course)   InEight - https://ineight.com/   Prosci - https://empower.prosci.com/project-chatter (FREE resource kit)Stay safe, be disruptive and have fun doing it! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/project-chatter-podcast/message

Hungarian Living
Getting Started with Genealogy Part 2

Hungarian Living

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 3:47


Hi! This is part 2 of the icipici edition of the Hungarian Living podcast on Getting Started with Genealogy. Today's assignment is for you to track down the birthdates and death dates for the various people you listed in Part 1. If you missed that assignment, here is a link to that episode Getting Started with Genealogy Part 1. I am terrible with birthdays. If you are the person who absolutely expects me to remember your birthday every year, I am 100% sure I will disappoint you somewhere along the way. But, knowing birth and death dates is important for genealogy work. And sometimes it just offers you interesting information. For example, my husband, his sister, and his brother each have their birthdays within a 21 day period but, of course, their birth years are different. Their births were really clustered together on the calendar. On my side of the family, I have 3 siblings. My two older brothers have birthdays within two weeks of one another and my younger brother and I were born within two weeks of one another.  Does it mean a whole lot? Probably not, but it is interesting to notice potential patterns. When it comes to dates of death, pay attention. As you were growing up you may have noticed there was a somber time of year in your home but you had no idea it coincided with the anniversary of a death of a loved one. It isn't unusual that there is a pattern of solemness or sadness that casts a shadow on the family during what might ordinarily be a joyful time. Noting the death dates might help you recognize a pattern you didn't even realize was there. And while we are on the topic of death, obituaries often contain very interesting information about the life of the deceased. Anytime you have access to an obituary or even a simple prayer card, you may find important clues to life events that will help you in your research. Be sure to check out Hungarian Living for more resources as you explore your Hungarian heritage!

BJSM
Applying Sport Psychology to Improve Clinical Performance with Dr Helen Church. EP #510

BJSM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 30:56


This BJSM podcast discusses how health care professionals can learn from the sports psychology world. Noting the similarities between athletes and health care professionals Dr Helen Church has put together a new PERFORM (Performance Enhancing Routine for Optimisation of Readiness using Metacognition) framework, using Performance Enhancing Routines to improve clinical performance. She provides practical advice on how you and your practise can benefit from simple sport psychology measures giving some fantastic examples for inspiration. Dr Helen Church is a GP trainee and academic clinical lecturer at the University of Nottingham, working as a clinical assistant professor in medical education. This podcast is hosted by Dr Shona Kohlhardt. Links to useful papers further discussing sports psychology in clinical performance: 1. Using Insights From Sports Psychology to Improve Recently Qualified Doctors' Self-Efficacy While Managing Acutely Unwell Patients (Church et al., 2021) https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Fulltext/2021/05000/Using_Insights_From_Sports_Psychology_to_Improve.41.aspx 2. Applying sport psychology in health professions education: A systematic review of performance mental skills training (Sandars et al., 2021) https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0142159X.2021.196643 3. Applying sport psychology to improve clinical performance (Church et al., 2017) https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0142159X.2017.135953 4. What can medical educators learn from the Rio 2016 Olympic Games? (Church et al., 2017) https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0142159X.2016.127040

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 06.29.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 62:48


Broccoli Reduces Your Risk of Four Major Diseases University of Illinois, June 23, 2022   It's one of the most advantageous veggies you can eat, and love it or hate it, broccoli offers an array of health benefits. University of Illinois researchers have identified candidate genes controlling the accumulation of phenolic compounds in broccoli. Consumption of phenolic compounds, including certain flavonoids, is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease, type II diabetes, asthma, and cancer.   Sulforaphane in broccoli can also help to prevent or slow the progress of one of the most common forms of arthritis. Scientists have also discovered that broccoli protects the skin against the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays.  Many studies have shown that a diet rich in vegetables -- particularly brassica vegetables such as broccoli -- is linked to decreased risk of heart disease and stroke. The researchers crossed two broccoli lines and tested their progeny in terms of total phenolic content and their ability to neutralize oxygen radicals in cellular assays. They then used a genetic technique called quantitative trait locus analysis to search for the genes involved in generating phenolics in the most promising progeny.   By identifying the genes involved in accumulating these compounds, the researchers are one step closer to breeding broccoli and related Brassica vegetables like kale and cabbage with mega-doses of phenolic compounds.   The good news is that phenolic compounds are flavorless and stable, meaning the vegetables can be cooked without losing health-promoting qualities.   Once these vegetables are consumed, the phenolic compounds are absorbed and targeted to certain areas of the body or concentrated in the liver. Flavonoids spread through the bloodstream, reducing inflammation through their antioxidant activity.   "These are things we can't make ourselves, so we have to get them from our diets," Juvik says. "The compounds don't stick around forever, so we need to eat broccoli or some other Brassica vegetable every three or four days to lower the risk of cancers and other degenerative diseases."       Can Chronic Cellphone Use Hinder your Infant's Development? Environmental Health Trust, June 23, 2022   The two most important communicative mechanisms a newborn innately has to navigate his world are eye gaze and crying. From birth, newborns are constantly developing speech, language and communication skills with every response they command from their caregiver. As early as 5 days old, an infant can tailor his cries to reflect hunger, wetness, or discomfort as well as differentiate between mother and caregiver. Additionally, very early on newborns and infants develop prelinguistic skills: eye gaze (signaling a cue for communication) and joint attention – the ability of an infant to rest his or her gaze on a object at the same time the caregiver is looking at the same object. It is speculated that eye gaze between baby and mother is one of the most important prelinguistic skills to occur before verbal communication develops.   However, excessive cell phone usage can work to hinder the communicative rhythm and bonding experience that new mothers and infants work to establish, especially within the first six months. Communicative cues can be easily missed and trying to decode differences in newborn cries (hunger vs wet diaper) can become very difficult. As it is so important for new mothers to pay attention to different cries, constant distraction from a cell phone can alter the way the other perceives the cry, thus making it more difficult to decode.    Infants are so intuitive early on, that even the slightest delay in response to a coo or a cry can alter the way they perceive their world. Additionally, if a mother is perusing high-emotion content that is so pertinent in Facebook and social media, the overflow of emotion may inadequately color her response to the infant.   Breastfeeding can also be affected by a constant need to search the web or pursue Facebook, taking away from a significant bonding period for mother and baby, according to Erin Odom.    Physically, the mother may be present but mentally they are “somewhere else”. Many mothers use the cellphone to pass the time during the long nursing/feeding sessions of early infancy. However, infants are highly communicative during feeding, and texting and social media, when so engrossing, can distract a mother from the needs of the infant.   Chronic cell phone usage such as texting and social media usage could absolutely hinder infant development as a result of missed cues on the part of the mother.    The early months of a newborn who continuously has to wait for mother while looking at the cellphone before responding, to cry initiation for communication or other cues, the brain's connections will actually reorganize around this delay, later dampening the development of instinctual communication between mother and infant.         Yoga And Meditation Could Potentially Reverse The Genetic Effects Of Stress Coventry University (UK), Antwerp University (Belgium), Radboud University (Netherlands), June 21, 2022 A review of multiple studies focusing on the effects of mindfulness practices like yoga and meditation has found that these efforts may have the potential to reverse genetic expressions of stress. As the analysis, published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology, explains: While some MBIs, such as yoga, Tai Chi, and Qigong, have a strong physical component, others like meditation and mindfulness, breath regulation techniques, and the relaxation response (RR) are mainly sedentary. Despite the variability in these techniques, they all seem to produce various psychological benefits on healthy and clinical populations, such as the reduction of perceived stress , the alleviation of depression, decreases in anxiety, or to help in coping with a chronic medical disease. However, it is less clear what are the mechanisms underpinning the self-reported benefits of MBIs. Noting that there is some speculation that “MBIs increase gray matter in the brain regions related to emotion regulation, learning, memory, self-referential processes, and perspective taking,” they acknowledged the evidence is not conclusive and set out to delve deeper into the genetic expressions of stress and how MBIs may affect them. The review analyzed 18 studies “that used gene expression analysis in research on meditation and related MBIs [mind-body interventions].” Ultimately, they found that “meditation and related MBIs [were associated with] downregulation of NF-κB-targeted genes, which can be understood as the reversal of the molecular signature of the effects of chronic stress.”h useful information unless the relationship between gene expression and psychological variables is directly explored.”   Curcumin-piperine combo may support heart health for diabetics: Study  Baqiyatallah University of Medical Science (Iran), June 25, 2022 A combination supplement containing curcuminoids plus piperine from black pepper may support heart health for diabetics by improving the levels and functionality of cholesterol, says a new study. The combination reduced total cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol levels, and improved levels of Lp(a) [Lipoprotein(a)], a structural component of LDL. “Although elevated Lp(a) has been considered as an important risk factor for premature atherosclerotic CVD for quite a long time independently of LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels, until very recently, the possibilities of influencing Lp(a) were extremely limited,” wrote scientists from Iran, Croatia and the USA in Complementary Therapies in Medicine . “Hence, this finding that curcuminoids as naturally occurring dietary supplements can decrease elevated Lp(a) in patients with [type 2 diabetes] is very important since such supplements are becoming more and more popular and attractive to the patients.” On the other hand, the curcumin-piperine combination significantly increased HDL levels by 1.56 mg/dL, compared to only 0.2 mg/dL in the placebo group.   Parkinson's is partly an autoimmune disease, study finds Columbia University, June 21, 2022 Researchers have found direct evidence that autoimmunity—in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues—plays a role in Parkinson's disease, the neurodegenerative movement disorder. The findings raise the possibility that the death of neurons in Parkinson's could be prevented by therapies that dampen the immune response. The study, led by scientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, was published in Nature. "The idea that a malfunctioning immune system contributes to Parkinson's dates back almost 100 years," said study co-leader David Sulzer, PhD, professor of neurobiology (in psychiatry, neurology and pharmacology) at CUMC. "But until now, no one has been able to connect the dots. Our findings show that two fragments of alpha-synuclein, a protein that accumulates in the brain cells of people with Parkinson's, can activate the T cells involved in autoimmune attacks. "These findings, however, could provide a much-needed diagnostic test for Parkinson's disease, and could help us to identify individuals at risk or in the early stages of the disease." Scientists once thought that neurons were protected from autoimmune attacks. However, in a 2014 study, Dr. Sulzer's lab demonstrated that dopamine neurons (those affected by Parkinson's disease) are vulnerable because they have proteins on the cell surface that help the immune system recognize foreign substances. As a result, they concluded, T cells had the potential to mistake neurons damaged by Parkinson's disease for foreign invaders. The new study found that T cells can be tricked into thinking dopamine neurons are foreign by the buildup of damaged alpha-synuclein proteins, a key feature of Parkinson's disease. "In most cases of Parkinson's, dopamine neurons become filled with structures called Lewy bodies, which are primarily composed of a misfolded form of alpha-synuclein," said Dr. Sulzer.   Vegetarian diets produce fewer greenhouse gases and increase longevity, say new studies  Loma Linda Health University, June 25, 2022 Consuming a plant-based diet results in a more sustainable environment and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, while improving longevity, according to new research from Loma Linda University Health. Based on findings that identified food systems as a significant contributor to global warming, the study focuses on the dietary patterns of vegetarians, semi-vegetarians and non-vegetarians to quantify and compare greenhouse gas emissions, as well as assess total mortality. The mortality rate for non-vegetarians was almost 20 percent higher than that for vegetarians and semi-vegetarians. On top of lower mortality rates, switching from non-vegetarian diets to vegetarian diets or even semi-vegetarian diets also helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The vegetarian diets resulted in almost a third less emissions compared to the non-vegetarian diets. Modifying the consumption of animal-based foods can therefore be a feasible and effective tool for climate change mitigation and public health improvements, the study concluded. "The takeaway message is that relatively small reductions in the consumption of animal products result in non-trivial environmental benefits and health benefits," said Sam Soret, Ph.D., MPH, associate dean at Loma Linda University School of Public Health and co-author of the studies. "The study analyzed more than 73,000 participants. The level of detail we have on food consumption and health outcomes at the individual level makes these findings unprecedented,” Soret said. 

You Start Today with Dr. Lee Warren | Weekly Prescriptions to Become Healthier, Feel Better, and Be Happier.

The 5 R's of Mind Management Will Set You Up For Success! Renew. "Do not allow this world to mold you in its own image. Instead, be transformed from the inside out by renewing your mind. As a result, you will be able to discern what God wills and whatever God finds good, pleasing, and complete." (Romans 12:2) Reset. "Finally, brothers and sisters, fill your minds with beauty and truth. Meditate on whatever is honorable, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is good, whatever is virtuous and praiseworthy." (Philippians 4:8) Retake. "We are taking prisoners of every thought, every emotion, and subduing them into obedience to the Anointed One." (II Corinthians 10:5) Be Realistic. "If we go around bragging, "We have no sin," then we are fooling ourselves and are strangers to the truth. But if we own up to our sins, God shows that He is faithful and just by forgiving us of our sins and purifying us from the pollution of all the bad things we have done. If we say, "We have not sinned," then we depict God as a liar and show that we have not let His word find its way into our hearts." (Noting the truth of our own issues allows us to set our minds/hearts towards defeating them) (I John 1:8-10) Ready to Roll. "Stay focused (set your mind) on what's above, not on earthly things, because your old life is dead and gone. Your new life is now hidden, enmeshed with the Anointed who is in God." (Colossians 3: 2-3) Music by Shane and Shane

Ninja Coaching Coast To Coast
Let's Talk Pricing Sensitivity!

Ninja Coaching Coast To Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 24:13 Very Popular


Today, Matt and Garrett chat about price sensitivity and how to position yourself properly when the marketplace seems unbalanced. They also explore the importance of pricing your listings properly and how to adjust as soon as the marketplace shifts. To kick off the conversation, Matt and Garrett talk about the necessity of pricing properties, and Matt goes on to explain his 'using the freeway' analogy of pricing. Noting that the market is currently a seller's market, our hosts outline the tools you need to position yourself properly in the market and why you need to gather knowledge about price sensitivity and the role it plays. Join the Ninja Selling Podcast group on Facebook at Ninja Selling Podcast Facebook where you share ideas, ask questions, and connect with other Ninjas. You can also leave a voicemail with your direct feedback at 208 MY-NINJA. And visit Ninja Selling Events for more information about upcoming open installations. Or if you're interested in taking your goals a step further, visit Ninja Coaching to check out all of our amazing coaches. Episode Highlights: The skill of pricing properties properly The freeway analogy What happens when you price wrongly? Important tools to position yourself in the market Understanding price sensitivity Quotes: “The necessity of pricing properties properly has never gone away.” “We're seeing a lot of issues around price sensitivity because people aren't paying attention to their position on the market.” “Be aware of the sensitivity, gather information, use the tools.” “Positioning matters, because the prices are sensitive.” “This is good knowledge for you to have. It puts you in the top echelon of your realtor colleagues, for sure.” Links: www.TheNinjaSellingPodcast.com Email us at TSW@TheNinjaSellingPodcast.com Leave a voicemail at (208) MY-NINJA Ninja Selling www.NinjaSelling.com @ninjasellingofficial Ninja Coaching: www.NinjaCoaching.com @ninja.coaching Ninja Events www.NinjaSelling.com/Events Garrett garrett@ninjacoaching.com @ninjaredding Matt matt@ninjacoaching.com @matthewjbonelli The Ninja Selling Podcast Facebook Group Ninja Coaching Book Study

KZYX News
Ukiah police chief being investigated for assault claim unrelated to Carley suits

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 6:29


June 15, 2022 — Ukiah Police Chief Noble Waidelich is on paid administrative leave, pending the results of a criminal investigation into an alleged assault on a woman. Waidelich is facing a jury trial in September over accusations of domestic violence and financial abuse by his ex-girlfriend, Amanda Carley. Carley's adult daughter Madisyn is also suing Waidelich for damages over what she says is harm she suffered by witnessing her mother's abuse when she was a teenager. The Carleys are not involved in the most recent allegation, which is being investigated by the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office. Both of the Carleys' suits are civil matters, which means they are not being prosecuted by the District Attorney. Sheriff Matt Kendall said he received a call Monday afternoon regarding a report of an assault on a woman by Noble Waidelich. Kendall called the reporting party, who gave him enough information to make him believe that her claim needed to be investigated. The alleged assault was not in his jurisdiction, so he called the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office, which took over. He added that outside agencies are often called in to avoid the appearance of impropriety. Kendall said he would have been notified immediately if Waidelich had been taken to the county jail. Sergeant Juan Valencia, of the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office, confirmed that Kendall asked his department to take on the investigation, and that Waidelich spoke with investigators, but was not taken into custody. In a statement, he wrote that “Upon completion of the investigation, the case will be submitted to the Mendocino County District Attorney's Office for review.” District Attorney David Eyster did not return a call requesting comment on the case. The City of Ukiah issued a brief press release a little before 11:00 on Tuesday night, saying that Waidelich had been placed on administrative leave as of June 14, pending the ongoing criminal investigation; that no further information may be disclosed by the City at this time; and that the City is working to provide continuity of services. But the Police Department is now without a chief. Ukiah Mayor Jim Brown said that typically, the next in command at the police department would take over as acting chief. City Manager Sage Sangiacomo confirmed that Crook, who is not in the office this week, has been appointed acting chief of the Ukiah Police Department. It's not clear which of the lieutenants is in charge while he is gone, but Brown said the department is “not left to run amok,” and that he “feels confident the police department will run as efficiently as it ever has.” Waidelich's attorney, James King, did not return a request for comment, but Richard Freeman, who is representing Amanda and Madisyn Carley, agreed to a brief interview. He confirmed that the latest allegation does not involve either of the Carleys' cases. “Those incidents took place a number of years ago, so there is nothing about the current investigation that relates to them,” he said. Amanda Carley's case, which she filed in 2017, is against Noble Waidelich, the County of Mendocino, the probation department, where she worked as a probation officer, and her boss at the time, Albert Ganter. Madisyn Carley filed her case in December of last year, against Waidelich alone. Freeman said the question of whether the cases will be combined is “in a state of flux,” and that the question of whether or not Amanda Carley's case will proceed to its trial date of September 26 “remains to be seen.” While Amanda Carley's case has been winding its way through the system for years, “Madisyn Carley's case, which does not involve the county, is in its very early stages.” As for the current allegation, he said that “ultimately, the court may need to make a determination as to whether any of it or parts of it would be admissible as relevant and material to the allegations of Amanda Carley, which date back several years…without the specifics, it is very hard to predict how that would be resolved.” Noting that the latest investigation is still considered an allegation, Freeman concluded that Waidelich “has an opportunity, as anybody suspected of criminal wrongdoing does, an opportunity to understand those charges, and to defend himself.” In March, the City of Ukiah reached a settlement for over $300,000 including attorneys' fees with Gerardo Magdaleno, a naked, mentally ill man who was beaten by police on April first of last year. And last month, the city paid a quarter of a million dollars to a woman who accused former officer Kevin Murray of sexual assault. The City also paid over a million dollars to settle with a man who claimed Murray beat him in 2018.

Alpha Exchange
Vishnu Kurella, Macro Portfolio Manager

Alpha Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 53:43


Trading convertible bonds on emerging market underlyings in the pre-GFC period, Vishnu Kurella quickly learned that even indices can experience enormous daily moves. A macro portfolio manager who evaluates opportunities through the lens of optionality, he shares the lessons learned from trading through the frequent episodes of crisis that characterize modern markets. In this context, Vishnu emphasizes liquidity and the implications for being able to unwind trades without excessive friction. In his rendering, open-mindedness is also a critical part of the risk management process.Here, it becomes important to continuously look for shifts in the macro risk regime and to be prepared to re-underwrite existing exposures as appropriate. From here, we jump to considerations in trade implementation and seeking to overlay an expected distribution of outcomes relative to that which is implied by option prices. Lastly, we talk as well about the current risk climate, one in which equity markets have been punished by inflation and Fed policy uncertainty. Vishnu shares his views on the pressure points. Noting the incredibly favorable environment for corporates in 2021 in which both base rates and credit spreads were extremely low, he sees something considerably more fragile now. I hope you enjoy this episode of the Alpha Exchange, my conversation with Vishnu Kurella.

Two Guys Garage Podcast
The Art and Science of Paint

Two Guys Garage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 43:36


On this episode, Chris Small of AkzoNobel leads the guys on a deep dive exploration of different types of automotive paint and how to successfully apply them. Noting that “cleanliness is pretty much everything,” Small makes the case for waterborne over solvent based paints. “Less experienced painters can have better results blending and things like that right out of the gate.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Ellen Griffith Spears, "Rethinking the American Environmental Movement Post-1945" (Routledge, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 69:10


Rethinking the American Environmental Movement Post-1945 (Routledge, 2019) turns a fresh interpretive lens on the past, drawing on a wide range of new histories of environmental activism to analyze the actions of those who created the movement and those who tried to thwart them. Concentrating on the decades since World War II, environmental historian Ellen Griffith Spears explores environmentalism as a "field of movements" rooted in broader social justice activism. Noting major legislative accomplishments, strengths, and contributions, as well as the divisions within the ranks, the book reveals how new scientific developments, the nuclear threat, and pollution, as well as changes in urban living spurred activism among diverse populations. The book outlines the key precursors, events, participants, and strategies of the environmental movement, and contextualizes the story in the dramatic trajectory of U.S. history after World War II. The result is a synthesis of American environmental politics that one reader called both "ambitious in its scope and concise in its presentation." This book provides a succinct overview of the American environmental movement and is the perfect introduction for students or scholars seeking to understand one of the largest social movements of the twentieth century up through the robust climate movement of today. Ellen Griffith Spears is a professor in the interdisciplinary New College and the Department of American Studies at the University of Alabama. She is the author of Rethinking the American Environmental Movement post-1945 (2019/20) and the award-winning Baptized in PCBs: Race, Pollution, and Justice in an All-American Town (2014). Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental studies scholar at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Aging GreatFULLy with Holley Kelley
Life and Death Matters with Holley Kelley

Aging GreatFULLy with Holley Kelley

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 62:44


In this week's Aging GreatFULLy power-hour we explore simple yet bountiful ways to receive the most out of life in the present while preparing thoughtfully for what is to come – our inevitable future passing. Host Holley Kelley, a gerontologist, Fellow in Thanatology, and Founder of the Latter-Life Planning Institute, puts the spotlight on some of her professional work and discusses facets of her book, Sunrises and Sunsets: Final Affairs Forged with Flair, Finesse and FUNctionality, and shares the many ways planning can bring peace of mind and newfound passion-borne freedom to living extraordinary in the present. While Aging GreatFULLy often emphasizes innumerable ways Aging Rebels can center themselves in Best Life Now Practices, Kelley reminds listeners to make a habit of setting daily intentions alongside their smiles and gratitude practices. She focuses on things that one can do to live with peace and concord not only in the present, but so one can die with a clear conscious, regret free, as well as ensure those they leave behind can receive closure and live with resolution too, referencing her novel “Kick-the-Bucket-List”. She also discusses ways to ensure you're living everyday life, not just going through the motions, such as working that Bucket List emphasizing that each day is a gift and to be cherished and honored through our grand living!Kelley acknowledges that many people are challenged to know where to begin when it comes to basic planning and that it's easy to just "not think about it" or leave it to another day. Noting there's not day of the week called “someday” she gives a prod, elbow and on-air nudge for everyone who hasn't yet done so, to complete their advance directives and even reviews one on air, sharing what it entails to try to answer some of the questions many may have about doing so.From discussing changes as we age, to thoughts about personal items, funeral planning, memorials and your many wishes in general, including thoughts you'd like to leave behind with those you love, it's an important conversation for anyone who believes they may someday die. Life and Death Matters—Matter. And Kelley covers them A-Z in her book, Sunrises and Sunsets…well, actually, her acronym for covering them is CREATED PEACE, her innovative 12-Step process allowing everyone to plan through a soulful and enriching journey. Her process goes beyond the physical and technical and connects one spiritually, mentally and emotionally to truly discover and explore Life and Death Matters in a way that is gentle, compassionate and transformational. For those interested, Sunrises and Sunsets: Final Affairs Forged with Flair, Finesse and FUNctionality book is available on Amazon Prime, Barnes & Noble or you can ask for it at your local booksellers. For exclusive autographed copies available in the continental U.S., visit her store at: https://www.latterlifeplanninginstitute.com/store/c11/Books_-_Sunrises_and_Sunsets_Single_%26_Bulk.html. Kelley has been changing the way people around the world plan for the end while inspiring grand new beginnings. For speaking engagements, workshops, keynotes, individual or group consulting, or to learn more about the many custom services that support others to Live Vibrantly, Plan Thoughtfully, Age Dynamically, visit https://www.latterlifeplanninginstitute.com/.Thank you, amazing Aging Rebels, for listening to the Aging GreatFULLy show! We are proud to be the Listener's Show and create this show for YOU! If you enjoy this episode, please share it with your friends and family and leave us a positive show review on your favorite platform! We are grateful and love spotlighting listener reviews on air who do! To listen, stream, connect, share, download, subscribe, visit our host page at or https://www.spreaker.com/show/aging-greatfully-with-gerontologist-holl OR find more ways to listen, audio content & access our line of exclusive #AgingRebels™ Merch at: https://www.latterlifeplanninginstitute.com/aging-greatfully-radio-show.html or you can always connect with host Holley Kelley at: www.HolleyKelley.com. Always remember, you rock and you ROLE model and we appreciate YOU!

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 6/8/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 114:30 Very Popular


On Wednesday's Mark Levin Show, Nicholas J. Roske, armed with a handgun, a knife, and a bag filled with tools and zip ties was arrested outside the home of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after admitting he was there to murder Kavanaugh. Kavanaugh's home address was published online after being doxed by pro-abortion groups in May. Two years ago Sen Chuck Schumer threatened two Supreme Court Justices, is this not seditious? Yet, no one called for his resignation or for a televised congressional hearing during prime time. Then, Speaker Nancy Pelosi failed to secure the Capitol building and has sat on legislation to protect the Justices. No action was taken. Merrick Garland hasn't prosecuted a single public official for their actions, yet Pelosi will hold a hearing to smear President Trump. Later, The House passed a bill that will ambiguously ban high capacity 'assault weapons.' This bill faces a difficult fate in the U.S Senate. The term 'assault rifle' is misleading and has not been defined. Whereas machine guns or automatic weapons are already banned and have been banned under the assault weapons ban. AR-15's are semi-automatic just like a revolver or pistol that only shoots one bullet at a time and then reloads. Afterward, Bill O'Reilly calls in to discuss his new book "Killing the Killers: The Secret War Against Terrorists." https://www.amazon.com/Killing-Killers-Against-Terrorists-OReillys/dp/1250279259/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1651691996&refinements=p_27%3ABill+O%27Reilly&s=books&sr=1-1 O'Reilly added that what we're witnessing is leftists out of control and engaging in an ideological civil war. Noting that even liberals are tired of the progressive wokeness. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pondering AI
Risk vs. Rights in AI with Dorothea Baur

Pondering AI

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 36:34


Dr. Dorothea Baur is an ethicist and independent consultant on the topics of ethics, responsibility and sustainability in tech and finance.Dorothea debunks common ethical misconceptions and explores the novel issues that arise when applying ethics to technology. Kimberly and Dorothea discuss the risks posed by risk management-based approaches to tech ethics. As well as the “unholy collision” between the pursuit of scale and universal generalization. Dorothea reluctantly gives a nod to Milton Friedman when linking ethics to material business outcomes. Along the way, Dorothea illustrates how stakeholder engagement is evolving and the power of the employee. Noting that algorithms do not have agency and will never be ethical, Dorothea persuasively articulates our moral responsibility to retain responsibility for our AI creations.A transcript of this episode can be found here. 

Alpha Exchange
Jon Kalikow, President, Gamma Real Estate and AFC Gamma

Alpha Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 55:50


For Jon Kalikow, more than two decades of experience in the derivatives and converts market provided important lessons on risk management and the reality that even well designed trades rarely go strictly according to plan. Our conversation explores lessons imparted by Mr. Market, both during the Dotcom bubble and the Global Financial Crisis. In the former, efforts to strip out the optionality embedded in convert positions were stymied by basis risk across markets. And in the period leading into the GFC, Jon grappled with the burden of option carrying costs, even as his firm was well positioned with long convexity on subprime and US financials.Today, Jon is President of Gamma Real Estate and AFC Gamma, a public REIT in the cannabis space. Through our discussion, we learn more about the risks and opportunities in real estate lending through Jon's lens as a creditor. Noting that lending has a similar economic profile to equity put selling, he contrasts the two by drawing attention to the complex decision-tree required to “take delivery” in a real estate transaction, something Gamma ultimately did in 2017 after a borrower defaulted.Next, our conversation explores credit extension in the cannabis industry. We learn more about the unique regulatory issues in the space and how Jon and his team evaluate borrowers in seeking to construct a diversified portfolio of loans. We learn more about the differences in state regulations and how that impacts AFCG's appetite for lending. I hope you enjoy this episode of the Alpha Exchange, my conversation with Jon Kalikow.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Monday, May 23rd, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 18:30


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Monday, May 23rd. 2022. We’re finally back after a week in the Valley of the Sun, also known as Phoenix Arizona… We were down filming a TV show with our corporate sponsors Aromored Republic, as well as wrapping up our CrossPolitic Liberty Tour, where we discussed the five stones of true liberty… because we have giants to slay in our land. You can find the show on our app, as it was our Sunday Special… and with guys like Jeff Durbin, Delano Squires, and Dr. James White on the stage, you’ll want to check it out. So here’s what you guys missed over the weekend… First, have you guys heard there’s this scary new virus on the loose? The WHO, or World Health Organization seems to think we should be terrified of it. Well according to CNBC, the Monkey Pox is spreading primarily through sex… but not just any sex…. It’s primarily spreading through homosexuals… That’s right folks, monkey pox is here, and we’ve rolled out the rainbow carpet for it… Biden says everyone needs to be concerned… https://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/23/monkeypox-outbreak-is-primarily-spreading-through-sex-who-officials-say.html Monkeypox: 'Everybody should be concerned,' says Joe Biden Play whole clip. Well yo