Podcasts about Mozambique

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Country on the east coast of Southern Africa

  • 1,321PODCASTS
  • 2,448EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Mozambique

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Latest podcast episodes about Mozambique

Naturally Adventurous
S2E16: Further Mozambique & eSwatini (Swaziland) adventures with Ken Behrens

Naturally Adventurous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:59


Charley introduces another compilation of Ken's messages from his recent trip overland through Mozambique & eSwatini If you wish to support this podcast, please visit our patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/naturallyadventurous?fan_landing=true Blue Korhaan recording courtesy of Alan Collett, XC310997. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/310997. License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Feel free to contact us at: ken.behrens@gmail.com or cfchesse@gmail.com Naturally Adventurous Podcast Travel Nature Adventure Birding --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ken-behrens/message

The Fisheries Podcast
151 - Tracking Fish, Marine Food Web Dynamics, and more with Danielle Orrell

The Fisheries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 38:41


This week, Zach chats with Danielle Orrell (she/her), who is a PhD candidate at the University of Windsor studying marine food web dynamics and the movement of fish in the nearshore environment surrounding Ascension Island. Also discussed is her experience studying fish movement and ecology in some incredibly different parts of the world such as the Arctic, The Bahamas, and Mozambique, as well as her experience as a queer woman in the field of fisheries science. Check it out! Danielle's social media: Instagram- @bigfishmoves   Twitter- @DaniOrrell _____________________________________________________________________ Get in touch with us! The Podcast is on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook: @FisheriesPod  Become a Patron of the Fisheries Podcast here: https://www.patreon.com/FisheriesPodcast Buy podcast merch: https://teespring.com/stores/the-fisheries-podcast-fan-shop Thanks as always to Andrew Gialanella for the fantastic music. The Fisheries Podcast is a completely independent podcast, not affiliated with a larger organization or entity. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by the podcast. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by the hosts are those of that individual and do not necessarily reflect the view of any entity with with those individuals are affiliated in other capacities (such as employers).

Naturally Adventurous
S2E15: Mozambique & Malawi adventures with Ken Behrens

Naturally Adventurous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 42:23


Charley introduces a compilation of Ken's messages from his recent trip overland through Mozambique & Malawi. Check out a Google map of sites mentioned: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=12mxvO9mTy-uksjhOO7FxmQvZMQhzIhOW&usp=sharing Check out some photos related to the episode: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?vanity=naturallyadventurouspodcast&set=a.317541726863172 If you wish to support this podcast, please visit our patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/naturallyadventurous?fan_landing=true Yellow-throated Apalis recording courtesy of Willem-Jan Emsens, XC166717. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/166717. License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Feel free to contact us at: ken.behrens@gmail.com or cfchesse@gmail.com Naturally Adventurous Podcast Travel Nature Adventure Birding --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ken-behrens/message

Leave our world a better place
Marine predator tagging at Benguerra with JD Filmalter & Ryan Daly

Leave our world a better place

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 42:31


Marine scientist Ryan Daly and fisheries biologist JD Filmalter speak about the marine predator tagging project running in the Bazaruto Archipelago, explaining what species are targeted, how they are tagged and monitored, and what information is gathered. Discover how tracking the movements of the marine world's top predators can lead to an enhanced understanding of their lifecycle and contribute towards the management of marine reserves along the entire coastline of Africa. Learn how you too can contribute towards the preservation of the world's oceans by taking part in the Oceans Without Borders Marine Predator Tagging Expedition.

Fearless with Jason Whitlock
Ep 94 | Soviet Singer Rejected Communism to Follow God to America

Fearless with Jason Whitlock

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 84:19


On a very special Tennessee Harmony segment, Jason interviews Christian Ray Flores, an evangelist from Austin's TRIBE church. Flores tells his epic personal history, starting with his childhood under Marxism in Russia, Chile, and Mozambique. How did he go from a master's degree in economics to becoming a major pop star in the Soviet Union? What sparked his conversion to Christianity and his ultimately founding a church in Texas? How does his outlook on America's future differ from Whitlock's? What personal chapter in his life does Flores reflect upon as he talks about abortion?   ​​Today's Sponsor: Get with Good Ranchers today and support American farmers! Visit https://GoodRanchers.com/FEARLESS to get $20 dollars OFF and FREE express shipping.   Save 20% on “Fearless” swag! Use Promo Code Fearless20 at: www.shop.blazemedia.com/fearless to make yourself an official member of the “Fearless Army.”  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Fasting Method Podcast
Expert Guest: Nadia Pateguana

The Fasting Method Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 39:32


Episode #2 In this first Expert Guest episode, Megan puts Nadia in the hot seat and asks her to share her journey to fasting. Nadia shares what she has learned over the last 18 years working in Mozambique, Canada, and Portugal. Intermittent Fasting has completely changed the trajectory of her career from traditional, naturopathic medicine to consulting for The Fasting Method as their Women's health expert. Learn More About Our Community: https://www.thefastingmethod.com Join our FREE Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/TFMNetwork Watch Us On YouTube: https://bit.ly/TFMYouTube Follow Us on Instagram: @fastingmethod 

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-16-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 5:25


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 16th, 2021.A couple of openings to tell you travelers about. India started letting fully vaccinated foreign tourists enter the country on regular commercial flights. Infections are falling and vaccinations rising there. Visitors haven't been allowed in since March 2020. Or maybe Cambodia's more to your liking. It reopened its borders to fully vaccinated travelers two weeks earlier than planned and has one of the world's highest rates of immunization. But here's where not to go, especially if you're using the CDC as your travel agent. The agency has advised against travel to the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Iceland because of rising cases there. However, they moved some countries to the level one low risk category, including Japan, India, Pakistan, Liberia, Gambia, and Mozambique. Without waiting for authorization from the FDA or a recommendation from the CDC, all adults in New York City are now allowed to get booster shots. Three states, California, Colorado and New Mexico, are also shoving the federal government aside and taking matters into their own hands. COVID sure hurt the melting pot on U.S. college campuses. International student enrollment fell by 15% or 1.1 million students during the 2020-2021 academic year. That's the biggest drop since the late 1940s. Travel restrictions and delayed visa processing were largely to blame. Amazon agreed to pay $500,000 and be monitored by California officials to make sure that from now on, it notifies workers within a day about new coronavirus cases. It will also notify local health agencies within 48 hours. The half-million will go to enforce the state's consumer protection laws. All of this is because of California's “right-to-know” law that took effect last year. In the United States cases were up 14%, deaths are down 14%, and hospitalizations are down 7% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 3. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Wyoming, Montana, Kentucky, Alaska, and Ohio. There are 9,237,610 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Rhode Island 34%, Michigan 22%, Minnesota 20%, and New Mexico and South Dakota 15%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Scotts Bluff, NE. San Juan, NM. Grant, NM. Scurry, TX. Big Horn, MT. Wadena, MN. Bethel Census Area, AK. Otsego, MI. And Washburn, WI. There have been at least 764,363 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 72%, Rhode Island at 71.7%, and Connecticut and Maine at 71.4%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia at 41.2%, Wyoming unchanged at 44.8%, and Alabama at 45.5%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 58.8%. Globally, cases were up 12% and deaths were down 3% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 19,303,850 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 70,823. The U.K. 39,705. Russia 38,420. Germany 30,483. And Turkey 23,852. There have been at least 5,106,593 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Indicast Podcast Network - Mother Feed
Indicast # 233: India at COP26

Indicast Podcast Network - Mother Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 28:25


IA very Happy belated Diwali to one and all. As COP26 draws to a close, countries make their promises and hope to keep them to make a difference to the worsening climate crisis. Where does India stand? In sports, Rahul Dravid has been appointed as the head coach of the Indian men's cricket team. And in a quirk of evolution, elephants in Mozambique are being born without tusks to make themselves less attractive to poachers.

Indicast - Indians on India
Indicast # 233: India at COP26

Indicast - Indians on India

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 28:25


IA very Happy belated Diwali to one and all. As COP26 draws to a close, countries make their promises and hope to keep them to make a difference to the worsening climate crisis. Where does India stand? In sports, Rahul Dravid has been appointed as the head coach of the Indian men's cricket team. And in a quirk of evolution, elephants in Mozambique are being born without tusks to make themselves less attractive to poachers.

Table Rock Fellowship Messages
Bold Declarations

Table Rock Fellowship Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 38:16


Missionary Pastor Denford Chizanga from the Africa Development Mission Trust shares with us the way that God is moving in Zimbabwe, Zambia and Mozambique.

Le Nouvel Esprit Public
Thématique : La guerre de vingt ans, avec Elie Tenenbaum / n°219 / 14 novembre 2021

Le Nouvel Esprit Public

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 58:46


Connaissez-vous notre site ? www.lenouvelespritpublic.frUne émission de Philippe Meyer, enregistrée au studio l'Arrière-boutique le 29 octobre 2021.Avec cette semaine :Elie Tenenbaum, directeur du Centre des Études de Sécurité de l'Institut Français des Relations Internationales.Nicole Gnesotto, titulaire de la chaire « Union Européenne » au CNAM.Lucile Schmid, membre du comité de rédaction de la revue Esprit.Richard Werly, correspondant à Paris du quotidien helvétique Le Temps. Dans « La Guerre de vingt ans », un livre récompensé cette année par le prix du livre Géopolitique, Marc Hecker et Elie Tenenbaum chercheurs à l'Institut français des relations internationales, spécialistes des questions de défense et de terrorisme font la rétrospective de deux décennies de lutte contre le terrorisme, en particulier sur les théâtres étrangers : du début de la « guerre contre le terrorisme » américaine, après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001, à New York, à la fin du contre-terrorisme comme priorité stratégique revendiquée par les États-Unis. En 2021, les États-Unis se sont retirés d'Afghanistan, vingt ans après avoir occupé le pays pour traquer al-Qaïda tandis que la France est engagée dans un conflit comparable au Sahel, où elle tente de résorber la menace djihadiste qui ne cesse pourtant de croître aux quatre coins du désert.L'ouvrage distingue cinq actes. De 2001 à 2006 : après l'onde de choc des attentats du 11-Septembre, les États-Unis réagissent en renversant les Talibans en Afghanistan puis le régime de Saddam Hussein en Irak. De 2006 à 2011, de nouvelles méthodes de contre-insurrection sont mises en œuvre pour tenter de stabiliser ces deux pays. De 2011 à 2014, les djihadistes profitent du printemps arabe pour se relancer. De 2014 à 2017, c'est l'apogée de Daech en zone syro-irakienne. Enfin, le cinquième acte est encore en cours : la menace s'adapte à la perte du sanctuaire levantin. Parmi les enseignements tirés de ces différentes étapes, il ressort que les djihadistes ont une véritable pensée stratégique, savent innover et font preuve d'une remarquable capacité d'adaptation. Toutefois, estiment les auteurs, s'ils demeurent une menace durable et peuvent nous porter des coups et nous faire mal, ils ne constituent pas une menace existentielle. En surréagissant, nous risquons d'entrer dans un processus d'escalade dangereux, nous mettent en garde Hecker et Tenenbaum, rappelant que l'Occident représente à peine 1% des victimes du terrorisme dans le monde, avec en 2020 plus de morts du fait du terrorisme d'ultra-droite que du terrorisme djihadiste. En revanche, en Irak ou en Afghanistan, au Nigéria ou au Mozambique de véritables guerres se déroulent avec des bilans beaucoup plus lourds. Au total, ce sont les musulmans qui, à travers le monde, payent le prix le plus élevé du terrorisme djihadiste.Si Daech a fini par perdre son sanctuaire au Levant, ce groupe n'a pas disparu : il pratique encore la guérilla et son idéologie continue d'attirer des sympathisants. Fin 2018, le Center for Strategic and International Studies comptabilisait entre 100.000 et 230.000 djihadistes actifs dans le monde, soit deux à trois fois plus qu'en 2001. Aujourd'hui, il semble que le centre de gravité du djihadisme soit en train de se déplacer vers le sud. En Afrique, les trois fronts les plus visibles sont la Somalie, la bande sahélo-saharienne et le bassin du Lac Tchad, où sont présents des partisans d'al-Qaïda et de Daech, tandis que d'autres foyers voient le jour comme au nord du Mozambique.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Corruption Crime & Compliance
Episode 214 -- Review of the Credit Suisse Global Fraud and Bribery Enforcement Action

Corruption Crime & Compliance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 23:53


Credit Suisse Group AG (“Credit Suisse”), a global financial institution, and its London-based European subsidiary, Credit Suisse Securities (Europe) Limited (“CSSEL”) resolved a wide-ranging bribery and fraud scheme involving investments and financing arrangements for an $850 million loan for a tuna fishing project in Mozambique. To resolve the violations, Credit Suisse agreed to pay a total of $547 million in penalties, fines and disgorgement as part of comprehensive criminal and civil resolutions in the United States and the United Kingdom.In this Episode, Michael Volkov reviews the Credit Suisse global fraud and bribery enforcement action.

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast
BPS 147: Neill Blomkamp - Big Budget Indies and Creative Freedom

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 70:30


Ever since I saw District 9 and learned of all the mythical stories behind the short film becoming a feature, I have been a massive fan of today's guest, Neill Blomkamp. Though Neill is here today to talk about his new sci-fi horror fiction film, Demonic, we also chatted up about his other films that have been successful over the years.Released in August 2021, Demonic follows a young woman who unleashes terrifying demons when supernatural forces at the root of a decades-old rift between mother and daughter are ruthlessly revealed.Neill is a South African Canadian film director, producer, screenwriter, and animator, best known for writing and directing multiple-award-winning films such as Chappie, Elysium, and the iconic District 9, along with a plethora of short films, commercials, and special effect credits.If you have seen a few of Neill's works already, you would already know and admire his dystopian, action, and sci-fi style of writing and filmmaking. He depicts the short film in documentary style, with xenophobic social segregation themes.In 2009 Neill and his wife, Canadian screenwriter Terri Tatchell, co-wrote a short film titled, Alive in Joburg, which later became his feature film debut, District 9. Neill received an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Picture for this $210.8 million-grossing film from a $30 millionbudget.District 9 was a critically acclaimed splash, earning multiple awards, including the Bafta, the Academy, Golden Globes, etc., for its visual effects, editing, screenplay, and picture. And a 90% on rotten tomato. But the success of this film is truly in the story it tells and the inspiration that drove it.In 1982, a massive star ship bearing a bedraggled alien population, nicknamed "The Prawns," appeared over Johannesburg, South Africa. Twenty-eight years later, the initial welcome by the human population has faded. The refugee camp where the aliens were located has deteriorated into a militarized ghetto called District 9, where they are confined and exploited in squalor.In 2010, the munitions corporation, Multi-National United, was contracted to forcibly evict the population with operative Wikus van der Merwe in charge. In this operation, Wikus is exposed to a strange alien chemical and must rely on the help of his only two new 'Prawn' friends.As you will hear in our conversation, this project was inspired by parts of Johannesburg in South Africa's history Neill was learning. His journey involved gaining awareness of xenophobia from relatively poor South Africans against immigrants from Mozambique, Nigeria, and Malawi --- a sentiment is still prevalent with some South Africans to this day.The initial short film, Alive In Joburg that preceded District 9, had a socio-political theme shot in realism-based style paired with sci-fi but of performers sharing real-life experiences of illegal aliens/immigrants in South Africa.By the time he had to adapt the script for the feature, District 9, Neill had moved into an interest of South Africa's history, including apartheid, and precisely its border war period in the 1980s.As mentioned earlier, Neill started his career in this industry through visual effects and animation in commercials. When he moved to Canada at 18 years old, the pathway opened up for him to finally pursue his childhood dream of working in the film industry.He did Ads animation for some years while closely following the works of film directors who had gone the commercials to film directing route. One of his most prominent commercials to date, which was shelved by the clients based on creative differences, was a short film Superbowl ad for Nike.Even though he spent a short time doing commercials, Neill has held on to all the transferable lessons and tips to his filmmaking and screenwriting.IN 2015, Neill released his third feature film, dystopian sci-fi action fiction, Chappie, co-written with his wife, Tatchell --- starring Sharlto Copley, Dev Patel, and Hugh Jackman. Chappie became a massive success at the box office with a gross of from a $49 million budget.Chappie, an artificial general intelligence law enforcement robot, is captured during a patrol and reprogrammed by gangsters after being stolen. He becomes the first robot with the ability to think and feel for himself.Wanting to experiment and have more creative freedom Neill created Oats Studios. Oats Studios makes experimental short films, a testing ground for ideas and creativity leading to full scale feature films based on ideas created here. One of the studios most popular shorts is Rakka.Not to give too much away, let's dig into my interview with our incredible and inspiring guest, Neill Blomkamp.

Radio foot internationale
Radio Foot Internationale - Dernières journées d'éliminatoires Qatar 2022 en Afrique

Radio foot internationale

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 48:30


Au sommaire de Radio foot, ce mercredi 10 novembre 2021 (16H10 TU), les Éliminatoires Coupe du monde - Zone Afrique : présentation des enjeux de la 5e journée (11 au 13 novembre 2021) ! Six pays peuvent déjà s'assurer la première place de leur groupe et rejoindre le Maroc et le Sénégal en barrages d'accès (mars 2022). Et puis un invité Hassane Kamara, international ivoirien du GYM sera en direct pour évoquer son match de demain (11 novembre 2021) face au Mozambique et le périlleux déplacement des Éléphants au Cameroun, le 16 novembre 2021. - Équipe de France : Pogba blessé et absent pour deux mois, qui pour le remplacer aux côtés de Ngolo Kanté chez les Bleus ? Cette blessure peut-elle être un tournant préjudiciable dans la carrière de la « pioche » en équipe de France comme en club ? Angleterre : feu vert pour le grand retour des supporters debout dans les stades ! Ces tribunes populaires avaient disparu depuis la tragédie d'Hillsborough en 1989 où 97 supporters de Liverpool avaient perdu la vie. Cinq clubs (Manchester City, Manchester United, Chelsea, Tottenham et Cardiff City) les réinstalleront à nouveau à partir de janvier 2022 ! Le foot anglais où le business est roi, va t-il un peu retrouver de son âme populaire ? Autour d'Annie Gasnier pour en parler : Naïm Moniolle, Patrick Juillard et Bruno Constant - David Fintzel / Pierre Guérin - Technique/Réalisation : Laurent Salerno.

Events from the Brookings Institution
Mozambique's al-Shabab insurgency, and local and international responses

Events from the Brookings Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 92:10


On November 9, the Brookings Institution's Africa Security Initiative and Initiative on Nonstate Armed Actors explored the international and internal drivers of the conflict, the threat it poses regionally, and the policies adopted and available to address it. The panel conversation explored the role of external actors, such as the military forces of Rwanda and of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), which the Mozambican government invited to assist in responding to the insurgency.   Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

El Faro
Gatopard@ | Mariza: "Cantar en el Teatro Real es un sueño"

El Faro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 23:05


Esta madrugada nos ha acompañado Mariza, la cantante más internacional que tiene Portugal. Comenzó su carrera hace 20 años y ya entonces decían de ella que sería la sucesora de Amalia Rodrigues, a la que ha hecho un homenaje en su último disco: 'Mariza canta Amalia'. La conversación con Mara Torres ha empezado bajo el seudónimo de Marta, que es el nombre de su abuela materna. Ella, al igual que Mariza, tiene sus raíces en Mozambique y su familia forma parte de la tribu africana de los 'Mashops': "Mi abuela es la hija del rey de la tribu y es un pilar para todos nosotros". Con tres años dejó Maputo, la capital, para irse al barrio lisboeta de Mouraria, conocido por ser la cuna del fado, y lo hizo junto a su madre mozambiqueña y su padre portugués: "Éramos refugiados y llegamos sin nada. Mis padres abrieron una taberna y vivíamos encima, en un pequeño apartamento donde dormíamos entre patatas, cebollas y cajas de cerveza". Este restaurante fue su primer escenario, donde aprendió sus primeros fados y donde empezó a cantar cuando tenía cinco años. Ahora, cuatro décadas más tarde, es una de las voces más reconocidas entre las artistas lusas, tiene nueve discos en el mercado y atesora, entre otros, el Premio Luso-Español de Arte y Cultura. El año pasado, con motivo del centenario del nacimiento de Amalia Rodrigues, publicó el disco 'Mariza canta Amalia' y ahora está de gira por España con conciertos en A Coruña, San Sebastián, Bilbao y Madrid. 

Earth Wise
Weather Disasters On The Rise | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 2:00


It seems like the news is always filled with stories about storms, heatwaves, drought, and forest fires.  This is because these things are happening with unprecedented frequency. According to a new report from the World Meteorological Organization, weather disasters have become five times more common since 1970, in large part a result of climate change.  […]

West-Ark Church of Christ
Conversations - Part 8 - Mozambique and Bulgaria

West-Ark Church of Christ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 37:24


Littérature sans frontières
Littérature sans frontières - Isabela Figueiredo, souvenirs sans filtre de son enfance au Mozambique

Littérature sans frontières

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 29:00


Isabela Figueiredo est née à Maputo en 1963, (anciennement Lourenço Marques), de parents portugais. Elle quitte le Mozambique au moment de l'indépendance du pays en 1975. Ses parents restent, et elle vit seule avec sa grand-mère pendant une dizaine d'années au Portugal. Professeure, journaliste, elle publie en 2009 son premier livre «Carnet de mémoires coloniales» qui a grand retentissement au Portugal, puis Isabela Figueiredo publie «La grosse» (A Gorda), à venir aux éditions Chandeigne en 2022. "Carnet de mémoires coloniales est le premier livre d'Isabela Figueiredo. Dans ce récit biographique, elle revient sur son enfance à Lourenço Marques, devenu Maputo depuis l'indépendance du Mozambique en 1975. Elle y dépeint sa relation aux adultes, à ses parents, à son père. Entre grande tendresse, amour filial et une certaine admiration de cet homme fort et protecteur, s'ajoute très jeune chez la jeune Isabela le rejet de ce qu'il est aussi, un colon, raciste, sexiste et violent. La grande force de ce texte réside dans cette ambiguïté dévoilée. Elle aime sans pouvoir s'empêcher de condamner et condamne sans pouvoir s'empêcher d'aimer." (Présentation des éditions Chandeigne) Un livre traduit du portugais par Myriam Benarroch et Nathalie Meyroune et préfacé par Léonora Miano.

La Brújula
Ciencia en La Brújula: La población de elefantes que aprendió a nacer sin colmillos por la caza furtiva

La Brújula

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 10:24


Alberto Aparici nos cuenta un extraño caso de una población de elefantes en Mozambique

MLex Market Insight
Apple, Google fight to keep control of their app stores; and Credit Suisse's Mozambique mess

MLex Market Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 22:16


Both Apple and Google are grappling with mounting antitrust concerns over the way they manage their app stores. In a stunning development, Google has agreed to slash its Play Store commission fee from 30 percent to 15 percent — ending the set-in-stone cut that has become synonymous with doing business with app stores. Meanwhile, Apple is hoping to reach a settlement with small developers, in what is shaping up as a do-or-die struggle for the Big Tech company as it attempts to retain unfettered control of its App Store. Also on today's podcast: the monster penalty imposed on Credit Suisse over financial-crime failings. The “tuna bonds” affair isn't so much about the eye-watering $475 million fine as it is about how far the long arm of US justice can reach.

Compliance Kitchen Podcast
Podcast: DOJ – Credit Suisse Mozambique loan case reaches a $547M resolution

Compliance Kitchen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 8:43


Credit Suisse resolves a Mozambique loan case for $547M.  Listen in for more on this international investigation and enforcement effort.

Economist Radio
Competitive spirit: tech after the pandemic

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 21:53


After a year of breakneck growth, the big five tech companies—Alphabet, Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft—are coming back down to earth. We look at how the pandemic has changed the industry and spurred on smaller firms. Serbia's military build-up is making its neighbours nervous. The country's president tells us why he's been amassing arms. And evolution usually unfolds over millions of years. But new research into Mozambique's tuskless elephants suggests that it can be turbocharged by humans. Additional audio used with permission from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Competitive spirit: tech after the pandemic

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 21:53


After a year of breakneck growth, the big five tech companies—Alphabet, Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft—are coming back down to earth. We look at how the pandemic has changed the industry and spurred on smaller firms. Serbia's military build-up is making its neighbours nervous. The country's president tells us why he's been amassing arms. And evolution usually unfolds over millions of years. But new research into Mozambique's tuskless elephants suggests that it can be turbocharged by humans. Additional audio used with permission from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Kubhula
Episode 70 - Marta Uetela

Kubhula

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 88:33


Marta Uetela is an industrial designer who is a very energetic and positive individual that from a selfless act, started an organisation that is changing the lives of many, one step at a time. She won the second-best green startup in Africa, the number one prize in the 6th edition of the competition SeedStars in Maputo, and the 193rd Commonwealth Point of Light, but those are not even her most significant achievements. Guiding us by connecting the dots, she explains how design, welding, being encouraged by her father and brothers at a young age to get involved in mechanics, and another myriad of unusual events got her in the position she is today.LinksBioMec WebsiteMarta Uetela on InstagramStartup Moçambicana Distinguida Como a Segunda Mais Inovadora em ÁfricaBioMec Vence a Sexta Edição do Seedstars MaputoRainha Elizabeth II concede prémio a jovem empresária moçambicana Marta UetelaGIST Catalyst Semifinals AnnouncementJoin Kubhula Members Area for FreeFollow Kubhula on InstagramPlease consider supporting this podcast

Hecho en Alemania: El magacín económico
Tres víctimas del cambio climático

Hecho en Alemania: El magacín económico

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 4:18


Pescadores en Mozambique que ya no pueden pescar, agricultores en India sin cosechas y mujeres en Guatemala que terminan en la pobreza. La historia de tres personas nos muestra qué supone el cambio climático para las regiones afectadas.

In Pursuit of Development
Living in a Materials World: Extractives on the road to Net Zero — Tony Addison

In Pursuit of Development

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 53:57


Tony Addison is a Professor of Economics, University of Copenhagen in the Development Economics Research Group. He was a Chief Economist and Deputy Director of UNU-WIDER in Helsinki, Finland. He was previously Professor of Development Studies, University of Manchester; Executive Director of the Brooks World Poverty Institute (BWPI), University of Manchester (from 2006-2009); and Associate Director of the Chronic Poverty Research Centre (CPRC).His books include: From Conflict to Recovery in Africa (Oxford University Press), Making Peace Work: The Challenges of Economic and Social Reconstruction (Palgrave Macmillan), and Poverty Dynamics: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective (Oxford University Press). He was a lead author for The Chronic Poverty Report 2008-09: Escaping Poverty Traps.Extractive Industries: The Management of Resources as a Driver of Sustainable Development (Oxford University Press, 2018, open access book)Twitter: Tony AddisonTwitter: Dan Banik & In Pursuit of Developmenthttps://in-pursuit-of-development.simplecast.com/

Heart Pocket Podcast
HPP0159 Struggles, Barriers and Success, part 2

Heart Pocket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 22:36


Can an oral communicator in remote areas of Mozambique enjoy the same training and understanding of Scripture as literate learners in the USA? What if these oral learners have no access to commentaries? Drew continues sharing about the barriers and struggles he encountered in missions, along with the successes and discoveries using STS with oral learners. Today's show: Barriers People May Have Value of Stories and Transferable Process Oral Learning vs Commentaries Links … Simply the Story … Upcoming workshops … God's Story: From Creation to Eternity …  Simply The Story Facebook …  Moment for Eternity - Training for Evangelism Follow us on Twitter ~ Feedback ~ Facebook ~ iTunes Podcast ~ Vimeo 

CalCast - Create International Podcast Network
Episode 183: GNNEpi#183 - "Imams and Whole Villages are coming to Christ”

CalCast - Create International Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 7:24


In this episode, “Imams and Whole Villages are coming to Christ”, brother Pedro tells us the story of how once he gave cheap phones and Bluetooth speakers to his disciplers, they were able to go out to remote locations and lead people to Christ, give them the units and teach them how to use them to run discovery Bible studies in other remote villages. The result was three new villages corporately deciding to become followers of Jesus. Pedro tells us stories of former Muslim imams making decisions to follow Christ. God is using simple and affordable communication technology to spread his salvation message to the Yao people of Mozambique.VisIt our website at: www.GodNetworkNews.com If you are a regular listener please consider donating to help us continue providing these incredible true stories fresh from the field. Donate by PayPal at: https://www.paypal.me/CreateGCRC Or consider becoming a Patreon Partner by joining at: http://www.patreon.com/calcast Join to gain access to more valuable resources for mobilization and mission to Unreached Peoples.

WanderLearn: Travel to Transform Your Mind & Life
African Real Estate With Empowa & the Cardano Blockchain and NFTs

WanderLearn: Travel to Transform Your Mind & Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 49:34


Africa's population will grow from 1.3 billion to over 4 billion by 2100. It already has a housing shortage. Glen Jordan hopes to solve that with blockchain technology. Glen is the CEO of Empowa, the first DeFi property platform on the Cardano blockchain. Empowa combines emerging technology, sustainable building, and decentralized financial inclusion. You can watch this interview on YouTube. Glen Jordan and Francis Tapon discuss the following: 00:00 Intro 00:40 Structural issues 03:00 What is the scope of Empowa? 04:15 Mozambique example 06:00 Lease to buy vs. Mortgage 07:30 NOT for sale sign 11:40 Currency risk - EMP Token 14:00 How to pay rents 15:00 NFTs 21:00 Pensions for informal sector 23:00 Circular building 25:00 Housing shortage in Africa 27:45 Cinder block savings 30:30 Cardano 36:00 Impact investing 37:00 NFT Revenue Stream 39:20 Is Empowa too ambitious? 42:30 ISPO Oct 2021 44:00 Benefits of staking ADA 45:00 Future of Empowa Cardano ISPO Stakepools EMP1 (Smiles on Africa) ID: d27af8f35c3d336500ff190011cd01edd1f84254002fad053 d326356 EMP2 (Proof of Africa) ID: 4c419cdf15bae400b98aa9ec9a7d3de6dafc9eb258b31f 172c891dd5   Record Feedback for this episode https://speakpipe.com/ftapon   More info If you like this, subscribe and share! If you like this podcast, subscribe and share!  Gossamer Gear sponsored this show! On social media, my username is always ftapon. Follow me on: http://facebook.com/ftapon http://twitter.com/ftapon http://youtube.com/user/ftapon http://pinterest.com/ftapon http://tumblr.com/ftapon My Patrons sponsored this show! Claim your monthly reward by becoming a patron at http://Patreon.com/FTapon Rewards start at just $2/month! Affiliate links Start your own podcast with the same company I use, Podbean, and get one month free! https://www.podbean.com/ftapon  In the USA, trade crypto with Kraken   https://r.kraken.com/c/2226643/687189/10583  Outside the USA, trade crypto with Binance and get 5% off your trading fees!   ISPO Stakepools: EMP1 (Smiles on Africa) ID: d27af8f35c3d336500ff190011cd01edd1f84254002fad053 d326356 EMP2 (Proof of Africa) ID: 4c419cdf15bae400b98aa9ec9a7d3de6dafc9eb258b31f 172c891dd5  

Kottke Ride Home
Mon. 10/25 - Music That Gives You Chills, and Why It Does

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 16:46


The countercultural witchcraft music of the 1960s, and a study exploring what it is about certain songs that give us a spine-tingling chill. Plus, elephants in Mozambique have evolved to be born without tusks. And the guy who discovered a budget hack for spending just $150 on meals all year: eat every meal at Six Flags.Sponsor:NetSuite, netsuite.com/kottkeLinks:13 Vintage Halloween Songs from the 1910's, 20's, & 30's (History Tea Time with Lindsay Holiday, YouTube)A Look Back at America's Psychedelic Countercultural Witch Music (Atlas Obscura)The Munsters - At Home With The Munsters - Vinyl LP (Rough Trade)Researchers analyzed 700-plus songs known to give people chills. Here's the playlist (Quartz)Songs To Give You Chills playlist (Quartz, Spotify)Tuskless Elephants Escape Poachers, but May Evolve New Problems (NY Times)Poaching drove the evolution of tusk-free elephants (Ars Technica)Meet the Guy Who Spends Just $150 a Year to Eat All His Meals at Six Flags (Mel Magazine)Iron-stomached man discovers savings benefits of eating meals at a Six Flags par (A/V Club)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

IOE insights, debates, lectures, interviews
Transforming universities for a changing climate | Research for the Real World

IOE insights, debates, lectures, interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 31:34


Climate change affects all of us, but some more than others. What can universities do, particularly in countries seen as highly vulnerable to extreme weather events and threats? As the principal investigator for the Transforming Universities for a Changing Climate research project (Climate-U for short), Professor Tristan McCowan is working with teams in Brazil, Fiji, Kenya and Mozambique to strengthen higher education's contribution to addressing the causes and impacts of climate change in lower-income contexts. Dr Keri Wong finds out more from Professor McCowan about Climate-U's objectives and how teaching, community engagement and public awareness can be made possible, what it's like working with researchers from different disciplines and countries, his thoughts on climate change denial, and imagining what an alternative and innovative university might look like. Full show notes and links: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ioe/news/2021/oct/transforming-universities-changing-climate-rftrw-s11e01

The History Hour
The Greenham Common women's peace camp

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 50:12


The anti-nuclear weapons protest began in 1981 and lasted nineteen years. Also the first transgender priest in the Church of England, WW2 Polish refugees in Africa, plus why lesbian mothers caused such a stir in the 1970s and was the untimely death of Mozambique's President Samora Machel an assassination? Photo: Women from the Greenham Common peace camp blocking Yellow Gate into RAF Greenham Common , 1st April 1983 . (Photo by Staff/Reading Post/MirrorpixGetty Images)

Slate Money
Will You Accept These Cookies?

Slate Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 60:34


This week, Felix Salmon, Emily Peck and Stacy-Marie Ishmael talk about ad tracking and big changes at Apple, what's going on with tuna bonds, and big businesses buying up real estate. In the Plus segment: Legacy admissions.  Mentioned In the show: “Snap's Stock Plummets as It Blames Apple's Privacy Changes for Hurting Its Ad Business” by Sarah E. Needleman “Zillow pauses homebuying as tech-powered flipping hits snag” by Patrick Clark “Credit Suisse agrees to pay $475 million in fines over the ‘tuna bond' affair in Mozambique” by Matthew Goldstein “Amherst College drops admissions edge for children of alumni” by The Associated Press Email: slatemoney@slate.com Podcast production by Cheyna Roth Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Business Daily
Business Weekly

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 50:00


As the Swiss bank Credit Suisse is fined $475m for participating in Mozambique's tuna bonds fraud, on Business Weekly we find out how the southern African country was devastated by the scandal. Also, we hear how a decaying oil tanker marooned off the coast of Yemen could trigger a major environmental and humanitarian disaster. The SFO Safer is loaded with hundreds of tons of crude oil - so why is it just being left to rot? Plus, we report from a climate conference in Edinburgh where delegates are being encouraged to come up with new ways to cut carbon emissions, including a innovative and surprising diet for cattle. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and edited by Matthew Davies.

Global News Podcast
Alec Baldwin fatally shoots woman on movie set

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 30:54


Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins was killed when film star fired prop gun. A man was also injured, and police say they're investigating but no charges have been filed. Also, our correspondent follows a group of migrants from Iraq to eastern Europe, and how ivory-poaching in Mozambique has led to more tuskless elephants being born.

Innovation Forum Podcast
Weekly podcast: Building climate smart communities in the global south

Innovation Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 31:33


This week: Peter Williams, president of the International Institute of Rural Reconstruction talks about the work of the institute in the rural communities of southeast Asia and Africa, some of the factors that are necessary points of focus for effective development projects, and the IIRR's climate smart village model. Plus: Una Kent, vice-president CSR international, at WallgreenBootsAlliance on her thoughts about the key points from a half-day conference on climate change and human health co-hosted by WBA and Innovation Forum.   And, COP26 momentum builds despite Russia and China apparent no-shows; UN biodiversity COP pledges net-positive impacts; Credit Suisse fined for Mozambique tuna sector corruption; and La Isla Network's work on potential climate change impacts on agriculture commodity supply chains worker health gaining traction, in the news roundup. Host: Ian Welsh

Marketplace All-in-One
Credit Suisse reaches multi-million dollar settlement in “Tuna Bonds” scandal

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 7:19


From the BBC World Service: The bank has agreed to a $475 million settlement with U.K., Swiss and U.S. regulators over a corruption scandal involving Mozambique’s tuna fishing industry.

Marketplace Morning Report
Credit Suisse reaches multi-million dollar settlement in “Tuna Bonds” scandal

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 7:19


From the BBC World Service: The bank has agreed to a $475 million settlement with U.K., Swiss and U.S. regulators over a corruption scandal involving Mozambique’s tuna fishing industry.

World Business Report
UPDATE: Credit Suisse pays $475m in fines to settle Mozambique ‘tuna bonds' case

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 11:05


Credit Suisse Group is to pay $475 million to American and British authorities to resolve bribery and fraud charges related to a $2 billion scandal over Mozambican government-guaranteed loans which came to be known as tuna bonds - they were originally intended to help build up a domestic tuna fishing fleet in the country. A Credit Suisse subsidiary also pleaded guilty to a conspiracy charge in New York. Nine companies including Amazon, IKEA, Unilever and Michelin have pledged to use only zero carbon emitting container shipping by 2040. 90% of world trade is transported by sea, and global shipping accounts for nearly 3% of the world's CO2 emissions. But environmental campaigners want the shipping industry to move faster. The pressure group Ship It Zero says the switch to zero-emissions should be done by 2030

Witness History
The Mysterious Death of Samora Machel

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 9:07


When the socialist leader of Mozambique and some of his senior advisers were killed in a plane crash on the border with South Africa, many were suspicious. It was October 19th 1986 and the two countries were divided over Apartheid. The plane made a sudden direct turn straight into a range of mountains, and one of the air crash investigators at the scene, Dr Alan Diehl, told Rebecca Kesby there are reasons to suspect the plane was deliberately diverted off course. (PHOTO: The socialist leader of Mozambique Samora Machel delivers a speech. Credit: Getty Images.)

jivetalking
Achim Hager on forests, sustainability and community

jivetalking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 57:36


Episode 155: Achim Häger is a forest ecologist. He received his doctorate in forestry from the University of Goettingen. Achim is from Germany but lived 15 years in Costa Rica, where he taught undergraduate and graduate programs at the Organization for Tropical Studies, School for Field Studies, and the University of Costa Rica. Achim worked briefly as a consultant for the FAO in Mozambique before joining LUC in 2020. Achim's research is about the relationships between biological diversity and ecosystem services in forests and agroforestry systems. He is now researching similar relationships in dune ecosystems. Achim's homepage: https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/staffmembers/achim-hager#tab-1 "Outside the environment" (a classic spoof) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3m5qxZm_JqM Seeing like a state: https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/98/04/19/reviews/980419.19graylt.html

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere
Des Empires français et britannique à Black Lives Matter : une décolonisation inachevée (4/5)

Histoire Vivante - La 1ere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 29:47


Quels sont les échos de l'Empire dans nos sociétés contemporaines ? Comment le raconter, comment les descendants des colonisés vivent-ils cette histoire ? Comment décoloniser l'histoire, et que faire des statues ? Etienne Duval sʹentretient avec Meera Sabaratnam, maître de conférences en relations internationales à l'Université SOAS de Londres, spécialiste des aspects coloniaux et post-coloniaux de la politique internationale et membre du groupe de travail "Décoloniser l'Université". Elle est lʹauteur de " Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in Mozambique " (London: Rowman & Littlefield International). Nicolas Bancel, professeur à lʹUniversité de Lausanne, spécialiste de lʹhistoire coloniale et post-coloniale mais également de lʹhistoire du sport. Il a notamment publié " Le postcolonialisme ", (PUF) et " Enseignement, formation et biopolitique, du colonial au postcolonial " (dans Enjeux postcoloniaux de lʹenfance et de la jeunesse. Espace francophone (1945-1980) (Peter Lang, 2019).

Kinda Christian
Miracles in Mozambique: A Conversation With Will Hart

Kinda Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 56:09


Warning: some of this content is a bit tough to hear, so listener discretion is advised. Sometimes you have a guest on that simply blows your mind. Will Hart has been on the front line serving people in some of the most difficult and war torn areas in the world. As the president of Iris Global, Will is on a mission to serve, bring God's love to the people of Mozambique and usher in change. Will also has seen a thing or two. A miraculous thing or two. He is the first guest I have had on the program that will look you in the virtual eye and share that he has seen multiplication of food, healing of the blind and deaf and cars that run on empty for an entire day. Things that defy explanation. Take a listen and you decide what is actually going on.

Tomorrow's Leader
#201 - Get There Now with Susanne Conrad

Tomorrow's Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 21:48


In this episode, John Laurito chats with Susanne Conrad, the Founder of Lightyear Leadership and the author of GET THERE NOW. She shares with us what leadership is to her and the importance of letting your team understand what it feels like to achieve the goal. She also talks about the importance of intentionally creating a community that will lift you and are also on the same trajectory as you in terms of generating positivity. There's just so much golden nugget of wisdom in today's episode, so make sure you tune in. Susanne Conrad is one of the few global women leaders and entrepreneurs in the personal development and leadership space. She was the co-developer of lululemon's renowned leadership culture and served as Director of Possibility at lululemon from 2007-2017. Susanne has over 30 years of experience transforming tens of thousands of lives across the globe and revolutionizing culture at hundreds of organizations, including Toms, Kit and Ace, Earls Kitchen + Bar, and imagine1day.Susanne trains, develops, and certifies leaders around the world. The Lightyear Leadership programs she leads alongside educational leadership programs in Mozambique and Ethiopia create a unified force for positive transformation among students, teachers, government ministers, and community leaders.Susanne is a storyteller who will restore your peculiarity and empower you to be who you came to be. She demonstrates powerful inner listening and has a deep connection to a higher power. Susanne sees the best in all people and their full potential, no matter their background or walk of life. She can challenge and gently coach people through hard things and is an agenda-free champion for people's goals, vision, and success.Susanne hails from Vashon island in the Pacific Northwest. When not leading progressive programs at Lightyear, she is leading dance and movement, adventuring in her Sprinter Van named Gloria, and laughing with her friends and family.Find Susanne:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/susanne-conrad-lightyear/IG: https://www.instagram.com/susanne_conradLightyear Leadership: https://www.lightyear.co/Grab a copy of her book: Get There Now https://www.susanneconrad.com/Show notes:[2:05] What is great leadership for Susanne[3:09] The key ingredients to get people behind you[5:28] Be in choice[8:19] Stepping outside of your comfort zone[11:14] The importance of choosing your circle[12:28] What is Lightyear Leadership, and what does that community look like?[14:49] On developing leaders as a leaders[17:41] GET THERE NOW[21:21] OutroGet a copy of Tomorrow's Leader on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/huseae9hText LEADER to 617-393-5383 to receive The Top 10 Things That The Best Leaders Are Doing Right NowFor questions, suggestions, or speaker inquiries, contact me at john@lauritogroup.com

Africa Today
Kenyatta family's secret assets exposed by leak

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 28:02


The Pandora Papers reveal that the family of Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta secretly owned a network of offshore companies for decades. The president says he will "respond comprehensively" to the leak once returning from a state visit abroad. Plus, A special report looking at how daily life for women has been affected by the insurgency in Mozambique's Cabo Delgado province. And South African amapiano DJ DBN Gogo talks about her journey in music.

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Silence Falls in Libya

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 28:47


It's not easy to talk in Tripoli; Palestinian anger over Nizar Banat's death; the MH17 trial in the Netherlands; Rwandan forces in Mozambique; a number plate dispute in the Balkans In Libya, the promise of a new dawn after the overthrow of the Gaddafi regime a decade ago now seems to ring hollow. After its revolution came civil war – as militias proliferated and fought for control. For more than six years the country was split between rival administrations in the east and west. There's been a ceasefire since last year, and an internationally-brokered unity government is now installed. Elections are planned for December. Daily life for Libyans hasn't got much easier though. There are still frequent electricity blackouts, high unemployment – and regular street protests. But Tim Whewell was more struck by a sense of creeping silence. In Ramallah, a military trial has begun this for 14 members of the Palestinian security forces, charged in connection with the death of a prominent critic of the president. Nizar Banat – who was known for his outspoken Facebook posts alleging corruption among the Palestinian political elite – was badly beaten and died shortly after he was taken into custody in June. The official line was that he'd died of natural causes. But his death sparked some of the biggest protests against the Palestinian Authority in years.. Yolande Knell reports on the case - and the public anger it's triggered. Since 2017, Mozambique has been trying to stop a shadowy insurgency in its northern province, Cabo Delgado. The rebels there claim to be affiliated to the Islamic State – but little is known about the group. It started with small-scale, isolated attacks, but the conflict escalated last year, driving hundreds of thousands of people from their homes. It is estimated that 2,500 people have died in the fighting so far. This March the militants gained the world's attention when they launched attacks in the gas-rich area of Palma, forcing French petroleum giant Total to shut down its operations there. To fight back, Mozambique has called on help from military forces from Rwanda – who now say they've retaken 90% of the province in a month-long operation. The rebels have now been pushed deep into the area's forests - but Mozambique says it is not claiming victory yet. Anne Soy has been to the region with the Rwandan forces. A court in the Netherlands has been hearing emotional testimony from those whose relatives died aboard flight MH17, which was brought down over rebel-held eastern Ukraine in 2014. Dutch prosecutors have brought charges against three Russians and a Ukrainian citizen: they are all suspected of having key roles in transporting the missile system used to launch the rocket which hit the plane. None of the men have appeared in court; only one has appointed a team of lawyers. Two-thirds of MH17's passengers were Dutch citizens, and the Netherlands blames Moscow for the attack. Anna Holligan has seen and heard some of the evidence submitted by the bereaved. Armed conflict can break out for all kinds of reasons. But a row over car number plates seems one of the more unlikely flashpoints. Yet in the Balkans this summer, that's exactly what prompted Serbia to put its troops on high alert, Kosovo to deploy its special police – and NATO to step up its peacekeeping activities in the area. As Guy De Launey knows from long experience – it's always important to consider what's on your number plate before you set off on any journey in the region. Producer: Polly Hope

Speak Up For The Ocean Blue
SUFB 1217: Tracking the critically endangered wedgefishes in Mozambique

Speak Up For The Ocean Blue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 17:40


A study is underway in Mozambique to study the distribution ranges of two species of wedgefishes family (bottlenose wedgefish and bowmouth guitarfish) to help better manage their population.  The species are considered critically endangered due to the fin-trade industry. The fish are either sought for their fins through catching them individually or as bycatch. The fin-trade can yield more money for the rays' fins that will bring in more revenue for the fishers than the meat from the rest of their body.  The study employs a new tactic in Mozambique, where it uses acoustic and satellite tags to track the wedgefishes in close and long ranges.  The results from the study will inform policy to help better protect these fishes in marine protected areas or through quotas (or both!). Link to article: https://news.mongabay.com/2021/09/new-research-hopes-to-shine-a-light-on-wedgefish-the-pangolin-of-the-ocean/ Link to Beyond Jaws Podcast: https://www.speakupforblue.com/show/beyond-jaws/ Connect with Speak Up For Blue: Website: https://www.speakupforblue.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakupforblue/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/speakupforblue

Africa Daily
Is it safe to go home to Cabo Delgado?

Africa Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 13:44


After four years of brutal attacks by Islamist militants, Mozambique's Cabo Delgado province has been left decimated. Hundreds of thousands of people have fled their homes. In July, Rwandan forces stepped in. Neighbouring countries have since joined them. Things seem to have stabilised. Now, some Mozambican authorities have urged displaced people to return to the region. But is that true? Is it really safe to go home? #AfricaDaily Host: Alan Kasujja (@Kasujja) Guest: Borges Nhamirre (@BorgesNhamirre)

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Mozambicans fleeing Islamic insurgents feel failed by government, forced into drug trade

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 9:34


The Southeast African nation of Mozambique is being terrorized by "Al Shabaab," an ISIS-affiliated insurgency that has killed 3,000 people and displaced many more. With the support of the Pulitzer Center, special correspondent Neha Wadekar and filmmaker Ed Ram report from Mozambique on the drivers of this conflict. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders