Podcasts about South China Sea

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A marginal sea of the Pacific Ocean from the Karimata and Malacca straits to the Strait of Taiwan

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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
South China Sea

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Best podcasts about South China Sea

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Latest podcast episodes about South China Sea

CNA Talks
The Scale of China's Illegal Fishing

CNA Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:19


China is one of the most powerful countries on the planet and its influence on the global economy is well known. However, many people may not realize that China has the largest distance water fishing fleet on the planet and is considered by non-governmental organizations to be the largest contributor to illegal fishing. In this episode, CNA analyst Ryan Loomis and Heidi Holz join John Stimpson to discuss the scale and impact of illegal fishing, the other illicit activities that accompany it, and the impact on the nations whose sovereignty is violated by these practices. Heidi Holz is a research scientist in CNA's China Studies Division, specializing in PRC maritime policies and activities, particularly those related to the South China Sea. Ryan Loomis is a Research Analyst at CNA's China Studies Division, specializing in PRC actors' behavior in the maritime domain, and PRC media responses to US operations and activities worldwide. CNA Report: Exposing the Gap Between PRC Rhetoric and Illicit Maritime Activity: https://www.cna.org/centers/cna/cip/china/prc-maritime

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #218: Biden Team Blames Trump for Iran Nuclear Deal Failure

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:02


On COI #218, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman update the Iran talks, the new Cold War with China, and the genocidal war in Yemen. Connor discusses the ongoing indirect negotiations in Vienna to restore the JCPOA. There are troubling signs that the Biden administration may be preparing for the talks to fail. House Republicans are demanding President Biden's team immediately end the talks. Whatever happens, a decision is coming soon, and Biden's team plans to continue scapegoating Trump. Although there are still positive statements coming from the EU foreign policy chief, the Chinese, and the Iranians themselves. Connor covers China's growing Middle East influence. Beijing and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) are working toward building a free trade area and a strategic partnership. China is the GCC's top trading partner and the region forms a centerpiece in the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). China recently invited Syria to join the BRI as well. Additionally, last year's Tehran-Beijing comprehensive cooperation agreement is now entering its implementation stage. Kyle and Connor talk about the U.S. military carrying out massive military exercises with Japan. Tokyo also sailed warships near Chinese-controlled islands twice in the last ten months. The U.S. just wrapped up war drills in the South China Sea including with an aircraft carrier strike group. Washington sent an Ohio class nuclear submarine to Guam, it carries dozens of nuclear warheads and 20 Trident ballistic missiles. Kyle reports on the war in Yemen where the Saudis announced they will be increasing the bombings of the long battered country. Massive strikes, killing civilians, are being carried out including in the capital city. The Houthis have retaliated, they conducted a high-profile drone attack on Abu Dhabi that destroyed three oil tankers and killed three people. The UAE wants the U.S. to redeclare the Houthis a terrorist group. Such a move would make it even more difficult for aid to enter the blockaded and starving country. Most of Yemen's civilians live in the northern territory held by the Houthis, the threat of U.S. sanctions would designedly deter most any humanitarian assistance. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
Biden Team Blames Trump for Iran Nuclear Deal Failures

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:03


On COI #218, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman update the Iran talks, the new Cold War with China, and the genocidal war in Yemen. Connor discusses the ongoing indirect negotiations in Vienna to restore the JCPOA. There are troubling signs that the Biden administration may be preparing for the talks to fail. House Republicans are demanding President Biden's team immediately end the talks. Whatever happens, a decision is coming soon, and Biden's team plans to continue scapegoating Trump. Although there are still positive statements coming from the EU foreign policy chief, the Chinese, and the Iranians themselves. Connor covers China's growing Middle East influence. Beijing and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) are working toward building a free trade area and a strategic partnership. China is the GCC's top trading partner and the region forms a centerpiece in the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). China recently invited Syria to join the BRI as well. Additionally, last year's Tehran-Beijing comprehensive cooperation agreement is now entering its implementation stage. Kyle and Connor talk about the U.S. military carrying out massive military exercises with Japan. Tokyo also sailed warships near Chinese controlled islands twice in the last ten months. The U.S. just wrapped up war drills in the South China Sea including with an air craft carrier strike group. Washington sent an Ohio class nuclear submarine to Guam, it carries dozens of nuclear warheads and 20 Trident ballistic missiles. Kyle reports on the war in Yemen where the Saudis announced they will be increasing the bombings of the long battered country. Massive strikes, killing civilians, are being carried out including in the capital city. The Houthis have retaliated, they conducted a high profile drone attack on Abu Dhabi that destroyed three oil tankers and killed three people. The UAE wants the U.S. to redeclare the Houthis a terrorist group. Such a move would make it even more difficult for aid to enter the blockaded and starving country. Most of Yemen's civilians live in the northern territory held by the Houthis, the threat of U.S. sanctions would designedly deter most any humanitarian assistance.

ChinaPower
The View of China from the US Congress: A Conversation with Rep. Ami Bera

ChinaPower

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:27


In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, US Representative Ami Bera joins us to discuss Congress' view of China's growing power. Rep. Bera explains that China has been an issue of bipartisan agreement in the US House of Representatives, Senate, and the Biden administration. Specifically, he says there is bipartisan support for Taiwan, the One China Policy, and the Taiwan Relations Act, and notes that there are more varying opinions on issues such as cooperating with China on climate change. Rep. Bera also examines how Congress views Afghanistan, the South China Sea, and Taiwan, and justifies the need to increase Taiwan's participation in the international community. He argues that the best way for the US to compete with China is to invest domestically, specifically on issues related to infrastructure and immigration. Lastly, Rep. Bera describes a potential rocky future in US-China relations and explains that healthy competition between the two nations could improve both countries.  

The Lawfare Podcast
The Annual “Ask Us Anything” Episode

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 35:32


As is our annual tradition, we're bringing you the Lawfare “Ask Us Anything” episode. You, the listeners, sent over your questions, and we, the Lawfare staff and Lawfare contributors, have got answers. Julian Ku, Alan Rozenshtein, Benjamin Wittes, Natalie Orpett, Scott R. Anderson and David Priess tackle questions about the South China Sea, Jan. 6, and an interesting collection of questions about elected officials, the executive branch and constitutional issues.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8 The Strategy of Denial: American Defense in an Age of Great Power Conflict, by Elbridge A. Colby. Hardcover – September 14, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:56


Photo:  Millions of barrels of crude oil are traded through the South China Sea each day 4/8 The Strategy of Denial: American Defense in an Age of Great Power Conflict, by  Elbridge A. Colby.   Hardcover – September 14, 2021  Elbridge A. Colby was the lead architect of the 2018 National Defense Strategy, the most significant revision of U.S. defense strategy in a generation. Here he lays out how America's defense must change to address China's growing power and ambition. Based firmly in the realist tradition but deeply engaged in current policy, this book offers a clear framework for what America's goals in confronting China must be, how its military strategy must change, and how it must prioritize these goals over its lesser interests. The most informed and in-depth reappraisal of America's defense strategy in decades, this book outlines a rigorous but practical approach, showing how the United States can prepare to win a war with China that we cannot afford to lose—precisely in order to deter that war from happening. 

The John Batchelor Show
USN Allies testing the PRC in South China Sea waters. @JoshRogin @WashingtonPost #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 11:22


Photo:  Decree no.174-NV from the presidency of Ngô Đình Diệm, Republic of Vietnam (VNCH), redistricting the Paracel Islands as part of Quảng Nam Province effective 07-13-1961. Paracels were previously part of Thừa Thiên (Huế) Province since 03-30-1938, when redistricted by the government of French Indochina. Decree dated 07-13-61. @Batchelorshow USN Allies testing the PRC in South China Sea waters. @JoshROgin @WashingtonPost #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/12/23/china-is-testing-west-we-shouldnt-back-down/

Sea Control
Sea Control 304 - France in the Pacific (Part 2 - French)

Sea Control

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 29:22


CIMSEC, NOW AVAILABLE IN FRENCH! Commander of French forces in the Pacific, Rear Admiral Jean-Mathieu Rey, joins the program to discuss France's role and presence in the Pacific. This episode was edited and produced and hosted by Alexia Bouallagui.

Casting Lots: A Survival Cannibalism Podcast
S3 E9. SEA PART I – The Bolinao 52

Casting Lots: A Survival Cannibalism Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021


This week, we look at Vietnamese ‘boat people' and the Boliano 52 – a group of refugees left without aid in the South China Sea. Disclaimer: This episode was recorded prior to the announcement in December 2021 of an amendment to the Nationality and Borders Bill to provide the RNLI with legal protection in the case of rescuing refugees at sea. However, we feel the sentiments expressed in this episode surrounding the bill still merit inclusion. TRANSCRIPT https://castinglotspod.home.blog/2021/12/23/s3-e9-sea-part-i---the-bolinao-52/ CREDITS Written, hosted and produced by Alix Penn and Carmella Lowkis. Theme music by Daniel Wackett. Find him on Twitter @ds_wack and Soundcloud as Daniel Wackett. Logo by Riley. Find her on Twitter and Instagram @tallestfriend. Casting Lots is part of the Morbid Audio Podcast Network. Network sting by Mikaela Moody. Find her on Bandcamp as mikaelamoody1. BIBLIOGRAPHY Associated Press. (2008). ‘Dominican migrant: We ate flesh to survive', NBC News, 4 November. Available at: https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna27531105 Associated Press. (2008). Migrants Turn to Cannibalism to Survive. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xh8cwHd-WtM&ab_channel=AssociatedPress BBC Newsnight. (2015). Left at sea, reduced to cannibalism - Newsnight. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQ2jMXvr96c&ab_channel=BBCNewsnight Constantine, N. (2018). A History of Cannibalism. London: Arcturus Publishing. Available at: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ZFFyDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT90 Editors of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. (2015). ‘Boat people refugees', in Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Available at: https://www.britannica.com/topic/boat-people-refugees Fritsch, J. (1989). ‘Balian Guilty in Viet Boat Case, to Get Reprimand', Los Angeles Times, 24 February. Available at: https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1989-02-24-mn-266-story.html Fritsch, J. (1989). ‘‘I Killed to Help the Living' : Cannibal or Savior: Viet Refugee Says He Was Both', Los Angeles Times, 24 February. Available at: https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1989-02-24-mn-267-story.html Gourevitch, P. (2015). ‘Search and Rescue', New Yorker, 26 April. Available at: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/05/04/search-and-rescue ‘Government minister ‘hopes' cannibalism at sea no longer needed thanks to new technology'. (2021). Sky News, 22 June. Available at: https://news.sky.com/story/government-minister-hopes-cannibalism-at-sea-no-longer-needed-thanks-to-new-technology-12339438 Kamm, H. (1981). ‘A Vietnamese Orphan Tells of Killings and Cannibalism in 52-Day Sea Escare', New York Times, 13 August. Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/1981/08/13/world/a-vietnamese-orphan-tells-of-killings-and-cannibalism-in-52-day-sea-escare.html KQED. (2008). Vietnamese American Journey: Bolinao 52. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqqIIOSTj2U&ab_channel=KQED Liu, S. (2015). ‘Duc Nguyen, Boat Person Refugee and Documentary Filmmaker of Bolinao 52 (2007) and Stateless (2015)', Break the Silence. Available at: https://soundcloud.com/breakthesilence_uci/ducs-interview-copy Los Angeles Times. (1988). ‘Cannibalism on the High Seas Vietnamese Watched the Killing Begin With His Friend, Cousin', Orlando Sentinel, 13 November. Available at: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/os-xpm-1988-11-13-0080230074-story.html Lung, H. (2006). Lost Fighting Arts of Vietnam. New York, NY: Citadel Press. Available at: https://archive.org/stream/lost_fighting_arts_of_vietnam/lost_fighting_arts_of_vietnam_djvu.txt McKenzie, S. (2000). ‘Vietnam's boat people: 25 years of fears, hopes and dreams', CNN. Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20030405185711/http://edition.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2000/vietnam/story/boat.people/ Nguyen Mang, T. (2021). Vietnamese Boat People. Available at: https://www.vietnameseboatpeople.org/ ‘Officer's action probed.' (1988). New Castle News, 11 August, p. 1. Available at: https://newspaperarchive.com/new-castle-news-aug-11-1988-p-1/ Quang, T. et al. (2009). ‘Boat People ‘Ate Their Relatives'', Radio Free Asia, 11 May. Available at: https://www.rfa.org/english/women/food-05112009123100.html Richburg, K.B. (1988). ‘Vietnamese Refugees Report Cannibalism on Voyage', Washington Post, 10 August. Available at: https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1988/08/10/vietnamese-refugees-report-cannibalism-on-voyage/a914a8c6-b50a-434c-adda-ac93dff1eef2/ Right Here in My Pocket. (n.d.). Bolinao 52 Story. Available at: https://www.rhimp.com/bolinao52/story.html Right Here in My Pocket. (2007). Bolinao 52 Trailer. Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcUFFaWoydQ&ab_channel=RightHereinMyPocket Suarez, M. (1989). ‘U.S. Captain Convicted In Cannibalism Case, Given Reprimand', AP News, 24 February. Available at: https://apnews.com/article/3f237384445ccad8fd5da3d045e637cc Swain, J. (1988). ‘Cannibalism: the chilling secret of lost boat people', Sunday Times, 20 November. Available at: http://www.jonswain.org/articles/articles/articles/article1.html ‘Vietnamese boat people'. (2021). Wikipedia. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_boat_people ‘Vietnamese boat people under investigation for cannibalism'. (1988). UPI, 9 August. Available at: https://www.upi.com/Archives/1988/08/09/Vietnamese-boat-people-under-investigation-for-cannibalism/5712587102400/ ‘Vietnamese refugees forced to cannibalism for survival'. (1987). UPI, 12 August. Available at: https://www.upi.com/Archives/1987/08/12/Vietnamese-refugees-forced-to-cannibalism-for-survival/8126555739200/

China Unscripted
#145 Is China's Rise to Global Hegemon Inevitable?

China Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 64:55


China has been trying to build a parallel world order alongside that of the US-led western system, and it would like nothing more than to be the world's only superpower. It has long been laying plans to do just that. Is China's rise to becoming a global hegemon more powerful than the US inevitable? We discuss that and more in this episode of China Unscripted. Joining us in this episode is Anders Corr, the publisher of the journal of Political Risk and principal at Corr Analytics. He's also the author of the new book The Concentration of Power: Institutionalization, Hierarchy, and Hegemony.

The CyberWire
Cyberespionage in Southeast Asia. Two young extortion gangs make their bones. Bot-herders like MikroTik devices. Log4Shell zero-day exploited in the wild. Update on the Assange case.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 24:30


Cyberespionage in support of Belt and Road, and of Beijing's claims in the South China Sea. Karakurt ransomware skips the encryption and goes right to the doxing. Black Cat ransomware is rising. Vulnerable MikroTik devices are bot-herders' favorites. The Log4Shell zero-day is being exploited in the wild, and will be a tough one to remediate. Julian Assange moves closer to extradition. Johannes Ullrich on changing user behavior. Our guest is Oliver Rochford of Securonix on the affordability of good security. And shoulder-surfing as a threat to Snapchat users. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/10/236

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
Conflicts of Interest #198: Biden & Putin Talk as NATO Looks East

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 98:14


On COI #198, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman update the Iran talks, tensions in eastern Europe, and America's Cold War with China. Kyle reports on today's talks between President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Tensions continue to rise over the Ukrainian-Russian border and war in the Donbas is threatened. Moscow wants legally binding guarantees that the U.S. will not deploy more troops and military equipment to its borders, as well as an immediate halt to NATO's eastward expansion. Connor covers the latest on the JCPOA talks. The U.S. claims Tehran is intransigent and not taking the negotiations seriously. Connor examines both sides' demands and argues that it is the Americans who refuse to engage in good faith. Tel Aviv is dispatching the head of the Mossad and the Israeli Defense Minister to Washington. Reportedly, they will push the U.S. to attack Iran, increase sanctions, and spread lies regarding Iran's supposed race to build a bomb. But the CIA Director has now announced Tehran is not seeking a nuclear weapon. Kyle also breaks down the latest developments in Washington's multi-layered anti-China campaign. U.S. diplomats will boycott the next year's Beijing Winter Olympics over discredited and debunked claims that China is committing a “genocide” against their Uighur population. Biden has set new records for how many spy planes the U.S. is flying in the South China Sea. Last month, 94 such sorties were recorded. Defense Chief Lloyd Austin has proclaimed the U.S. is a “pacific power” and there is even talk of expanding the AUKUS military pact. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Communism Exposed:East and West
Will China's ‘String of Pearls' Stretch From the South China Sea to the Atlantic?

Communism Exposed:East and West

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 6:49


Will China's ‘String of Pearls' Stretch From the South China Sea to the Atlantic?

Communism Exposed:East and West
[Audio]Will China's ‘String of Pearls' Stretch From the South China Sea to the Atlantic?

Communism Exposed:East and West

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 6:49


[Audio]Will China's ‘String of Pearls' Stretch From the South China Sea to the Atlantic?

Conflicts of Interest
Biden & Putin Talk as NATO Looks East

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 98:14


On COI #198, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman update the Iran talks, tensions in eastern Europe, and America's Cold War with China. Kyle reports on today's talks between President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Tensions continue to rise over the Ukrainian-Russian border and war in the Donbas is threatened. Moscow wants legally binding guarantees that the U.S. will not deploy more troops and military equipment to its borders, as well as an immediate halt to NATO's eastward expansion. Connor covers the latest on the JCPOA talks. The U.S. claims Tehran is intransigent and not taking the  negotiations seriously. Connor examines both sides' demands and argues that it is the Americans who refuse to engage in good faith. Tel Aviv is dispatching the head of the Mossad and the Israeli Defense Minister to Washington. Reportedly, they will push the U.S. to attack Iran, increase sanctions, and spread lies regarding Iran's supposed race to build a bomb. But the CIA Director has now announced Tehran is not seeking a nuclear weapon. Kyle also breaks down the latest developments in Washington's multi-layered anti-China campaign. U.S. diplomats will boycott the next year's Beijing Winter Olympics over discredited and debunked claims that China is committing a “genocide” against their Uighur population. Biden has set new records for how many spy planes the U.S. is flying in the South China Sea. Last month, 94 such sorties were recorded. Defense Chief Lloyd Austin has proclaimed the U.S. is a “pacific power” and there is even talk of expanding the AUKUS military pact.  

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: The Role of Joint Venture Universities in China

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021


Denis F. Simon, senior adviser to the president for China affairs and professor of the practice at Duke University, leads a conversation on the role of joint venture universities in China.   FASKIANOS: Thank you and welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic, if you would like to share it with your colleagues. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Denis Simon with us to talk about the role of joint venture universities in China. Dr. Simon is senior advisor to the president for China affairs and professor of the practice at Duke University. From 2015 to 2020, he served as executive vice chancellor at Duke Kunshan University in China. He has more than four decades of experience studying business, competition, innovation, and technology strategy in China, and is fluent in Mandarin Chinese. He served as senior advisor on China and global affairs at Arizona State University, vice provost for international affairs at the University of Oregon, and professor of international affairs at Penn State University. He has extensive leadership experience in management consulting and is the author of several books. Dr. Simon, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought we could begin by having you give us an overview of joint venture universities in China. What has the last two years in U.S.-Sino relations and COVID-19 meant for joint venture universities and their long-term goals? SIMON: Great. Well, thank you, Irina. I really am happy your team was able to arrange this. And I can't think of a more important subject right now. The president of Duke University, Vincent Price, has called our joint venture a beacon of light in the midst of the turbulence in U.S.-China relations. And so, this is a rather appropriate time for us to take stock at where this venture is and where it may be going. So let me just give an overview, talk a little bit about what joint ventures are, how they operate, and some of the challenges of operating them, and some of the effects of the last, as you said, two years, with the tensions growing in U.S.-China relations. Well, I think the first thing to recognize is that while there are over two thousand joint venture projects and initiatives involving foreign schools and universities, there are really only ten joint venture universities. These are campuses authorized to give two degrees—a Chinese degree and a foreign degree. The last one that was approved is Julliard, from the United States. So there are four U.S. joint ventures, two from the U.K., one from Russia, one from Israel involving the Technion, and the rest from Hong Kong. And so they're not growing by leaps and bounds. Everyone is taking stock of how they are working. The one from Duke is a liberal arts or a research-oriented university, and I think the same can be said for NYU Shanghai also in the same category. Joint venture universities are legal Chinese entities. This is very important. So, for example, our campus at Duke is not a branch campus. It is a legal Chinese entity. The chancellor must be a Chinese citizen, because they represent the legal authority of the university within the Chinese law, and also the Chinese education system. We are liberal arts oriented. The one involving Russia and Israel are polytechnic. They're more for engineering. Kean University, which is the State University of New York, has a very big business-oriented program. The U.K. programs also have very big programs. So some are liberal arts, like Duke, but others are also polytechnic. So they span the gamut. And finally, these are in many cases engines for economic development. In the cities in which they occur, these universities are sort of like Stanford in Silicon Valley. They're designed to act as a magnet to attract talent, and also to train young people, some of whom hopefully will stay in the region and act as a kind of entrepreneurial vanguard in the future as they go forward.   Now, the reality is that they've been driven by a number of factors common to both the Chinese side and the foreign side. One is just the whole process of campus internationalization. U.S. universities, for example, over the last five to ten years have wanted to expand their global footprint. And setting up a campus in X country, whether it's been in the Middle East or been in China in this case, has been an important part of the statement about how they build out a global university. A second driver has been government regulation. So in China in 2003, the government set in place a series of regulations that allowed joint venture universities to be established. And I think we need to give kudos to the Ministry of Education in China because they had the vision to allow these kinds of universities to be set up. And I think the impact so far has been very positive. And then finally, they're a vehicle for building out what I would call transnational collaborative research. And that is that they're a vehicle for helping to promote collaboration between, let's say, the United States and China in areas involving science and technology, and their very, very important role in that. That's why I said we're not just a liberal arts university, but we are a research-oriented liberal arts university. And I think that NYU Shanghai, Nigbo and Nottingham, et cetera, they all would claim the same space in that regard. Now, why would a city like Kunshan want to have a joint venture university? After all, Kunshan is rather unique. It's one of the wealthiest cities in China, the largest site of Taiwan foreign investment, but it never has had its own university. So somebody in the leadership did, in fact, read the book about Silicon Valley and Stanford. And they decided, I think it was a McKinsey study that helped them make that decision, that they needed to have a university. And the opportunity to work with Duke was there. And it's a little bit a long, complicated story, but we've ended up where we are today with a university which now will embark on the second phase of having a new campus. But this clearly, for Kunshan, has been a magnet for talent, and an effort to help Kunshan transition from a factory to the world economy to a new knowledge economy, consistent where—with where Xi Jinping and the Chinese leadership wants to take China during the current period, and into the future. It also provides a great bridge for connectivity between the high-tech knowledge communities in North Carolina, and particularly around Research Triangle, and the companies in the Kunshan area. And that bridge at some times or others can be very vibrant, and there are people and activity moving across it. And it's also a place where internationalization of Kunshan gets promoted through the visibility of Duke. Every year during my five years, we had 2,000-plus visitors come to our university, both from abroad and from within China, to understand: What do these universities mean and what's going to happen to them? Now, for Duke, a lot of people think it's about the money. They think that these joint venture campuses make a lot of money. And I can tell you, nothing could be further from the truth. This is not about money. This is about, as I mentioned before, internationalization. But it's also about the opportunity for pedagogical innovation. You can imagine that in existing universities there's a lot of baggage, lots of legacy systems. You don't get virgin territory to do curricular reform and to introduce a lot of edgy ideas. Too many vested interests. But within an opportunity like DKU or NYU Shanghai, you get a white piece of paper and you can develop a very innovative, cutting-edge kind of curriculum. And that's exactly what has been done. And so you get a kind of two-way technology transfer, obviously from Duke to DKU, but also interestingly from DKU back to Duke. And the same thing again happens with these other universities as well. And I think that's important. So there's a great deal of benefit that can accrue to Duke simply by having this campus and watching it go through this kind of evolving development of a new curriculum. Now, we must not forget, these ten joint ventures, and particularly in the context of Sino-U.S. relations, are not all that's there. Starting with Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and its relationship with Nanjing University, the United States has had projects like this going on in China. There are joint colleges. So, for example, the University of Pittsburgh and Sichuan University have one in engineering. And similarly, Michigan and Jiao Tong University also have similar kinds of ventures. And these all seem to be working very nicely. And then there's a whole array of two-plus-two programs, three-plus-two programs. All of these are part of a broad landscape of educational engagement that exists between the two countries. It is much more extensive than anyone could have imagined in the late 1970s, when the two countries signed the bilateral agreement. Now, what are some of the things that happen when you manage these joint venture universities? First, let me mention the operational issues that come across. So you probably, you know, ask: How do you find your partner? Well, in a joint venture university, you must have an educational partner. So for Duke, it's Wuhan University. For NYU Shanghai, it's East China Normal University. And for Kean University it's Wenzhou University. And you go through these—finding these partners, and the partners hopefully form a collaborative relationship. But I can tell you one of the problems, just like in all joint ventures in China, is the sleeping in the same bed but with two different dreams phenomenon. Duke came to China to bring a liberal arts education and to serve as a platform for knowledge transfer across the Chinese higher education landscape. Kunshan wanted a Stanford that can provide commercializable knowledge that can turn into new products, new services, and hopefully new businesses. And so they kind of exist in parallel with one another, with the hope that somewhere along the future they will—they will come together. Another issue area is the issue of student recruitment. Student recruitment is very complex in China because of the reliance on the gaokao system. And the gaokao system introduces an element of rigidity. And the idea of crafting a class, which is very common in liberal arts colleges, is almost impossible to do because of the rather rigid and almost inflexible approach one must take to evaluating students, scoring them, and dealing with a whole array of provincial quotas that make X numbers of students available to attend your university versus other universities. And don't forget, these joint venture universities exist in the context of over 2,000 Chinese universities, all of whom are trying to recruit the students. So you get intense involvement not only from the officials in the province level, but also Chinese parents. And the idea of Chinese parents make helicopter parents in the U.S. look like amateur hour. They are very, very involved and very, very active. A third area are home campus issues that we have to think about. And that is that a lot of people have always said to me: Wow, you know, the Chinese side must give you a big headache. And with all due respect to all my dear colleagues and friends, I can say also sometimes I got a headache from the Duke side as well. And I think anyone who sits in these kind of leadership positions must figure out how to balance the interests and the perspectives of the home country campus and the host country campus, and their ability to work together. And there are a lot of issues that come up along the way that make it very, very complex. And in particular, the idea of attracting faculty. Seventy-five percent of our faculty are hired locally. That is, they are in tenure or tenure-track jobs by Duke-Kunshan University. Twenty-five percent must be supplied by Duke. The reason is very simple: The Chinese authorities want to make sure that the quality of the education is no different than what's offered at Duke. And because we have to give two degrees, a Chinese degree and a Duke degree, that Duke degree is not a Duke-B degree, or a Duke-lite degree. It is the same degree that you get at Duke University, signed by the head of the board of trustees, the president, the provost, et cetera, et cetera. So this is a real Duke degree. It's not Duke-lite. The fourth thing I want to mention, which I mentioned before slightly, which is money. These are not inexpensive ventures. And they also are a kind of elite education. And the degree to which they can be replicated over and over again in China is something that remains to be—remains to be seen. We've had a lot of people coming from Congress who have looked at these joint venture universities and said, ah, you're selling out American values and academic freedom or religious freedom, in return for a big payday. And as I said, that's simply just not the case. These joint venture universities are very difficult to run. You must pay faculty according to the global faculty prices. And plus, there are lots of expat benefits that you have to pay to them. The tuition rates that you can charge to Chinese students are set by the provincial authorities. And therefore, in our case, they're about 50 percent less than what international students have to pay. And so already you're in a deficit, technically speaking, because Chinese students are getting a, you know, preferential price. Also, the idea of building up a research capability is not inexpensive, particularly if you're looking at developing a capability in science and engineering. These are, again, very expensive propositions. Now, I don't want to make it seem like it's all hardship. There are lots of rewarding moments. I think, as I said, the pedagogical side is one of those. And also the opportunity to really build true cross-cultural understanding among young people has been very important. Now, let me just make a couple of comments about where we are in terms of the last two years in particular. No one—you know, when our joint venture was formed, and similarly for the other ones which were formed before ours—could have envisioned what was going to happen, particularly in terms of the U.S.-China trade war, the onset of the protests in Hong Kong, and the issues—human rights issues that have to do with Xinjiang, Tibet, et cetera. And also, as everyone knows, COVID also presented some amazing challenges to the campus. We had to, by late January/early February 2020, we evacuated the whole campus when COVID came. And for the last two years, all of the international students have been studying either in their home country or if they've been able to come to the United States, they've been able to study at Duke during this period. And the big question is, when are these international students going to be able to go back? Which of course, that raises the big question about what is the campus like without international students? Our campus has somewhere between 35 to 40 percent international students. NYU Shanghai has 50 percent international students. Those make for very interesting pedagogical challenges, particularly given the fact that the high school experiences of these young people from China versus all countries—you know, we have forty-one different countries represented at DKU—make for a very challenging learning environment and teaching environment. Now, a couple of the issues that really have been exacerbated over the last two years, first of all are visa issues. Delays in being able to get visas or sometimes denial of visas. Another one are the uncertainties about the campus. Many people think that as Sino-U.S. tensions have risen, OK, the Chinese side is going to shut the campus. No, no, no, the U.S. side is going to shut the campus. And there's been the lack of clarity. And this also not only hurts student recruitment sometimes, but it also can hurt faculty recruitment as well—who are also wondering, you know, what's going to happen in the future and what kind of security of their jobs. Most recently we've also had—particularly because some of the policies adopted during the Trump administration—national security issues. So we want to build a research capability. Let's say the city of Kunshan says: We'll support the building of a semiconductor research capability. Duke University has to say no. That technology now is a more tightly controlled technology and it's not clear what we can and can't do. And so some of these kind of initiatives get interrupted, can't go forward. And everyone is very vigilant to make sure that nobody crosses the line in terms of U.S. law. And, of course, watching out for Chinese law as well. So where is this all going? I think these difficulties are going to continue. The most obvious one that everyone talks about is academic freedom, the ability to deal with these complex, controversial issues. I can say very proudly that up until this point, and at least until when I left in June of 2020, we had not had any kind of explicit intervention that stopped us from doing something, per se. We've had the national committee for U.S.-China relations, China town halls for several years. They didn't have one this past year, but we've had it for several years. We have courses on China politics. We have courses on U.S.-China relations, et cetera. So we haven't had that. But we've had to be flexible. Instead of having an open forum about Hong Kong, we created a minicourse to talk about Hong Kong. So those issues are out there. Academic freedom is a real issue that is one of those redline issues. And everyone is a little bit nervous all the time about getting into that. The other thing, of course, is the fluidity in the Chinese environment itself. We know that China continues to witness political changes, further economic reforms. And a lot of the commitments that were made, you know, five years ago, ten years ago, the ability to see them through. DKU is covered by a CEA, a cooperative educational accord, that promises academic freedom in the engagement of the university's work on campus. Now, if you go out and throw a brick through the mayor's window, well, all bets are off. But while you're on campus, you should be able to have, you know, academic freedom. And this is not a political issue. This is an accreditation issue. If the pedagogy and the learning environment were to become distinctly different, the Southern States Accreditation, which accredits the Duke degrees, could not accredit the degree that's coming out of DKU. And so there must not be any kind of significant gap or significant differentiation in order to preserve that issue of academic integrity. Now, finally, I would say—you know, looking now retrospectively, looking back at all of this, I think there's no more important kind of initiative than these universities. Getting young people from all around the world to sit in the same classroom, engage with one another, even become uncomfortable. It's great if they can do that when they're eighteen to twenty-four so hopefully when they're forty-five to fifty, they sit down and deal with these real issues, they can have some degree of understanding and some perspective of why the other side is thinking the way it does. This doesn't happen automatically on these campuses. There's a lot of orchestration and a lot of fostering of activity. But I would just say that he ability and the opportunity to do this makes this, and makes all of these joint ventures, really exciting opportunities that have larger impact than just the campus on which they sit. And let me stop here. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. That was really a terrific overview. And you really brought your experience to the table. Thank you. So let's go to all of you now for your questions, comments. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the “raise hand” icon, or you can type your question in the Q&A box. Please include your affiliation so I can read it. And when I call on you, please unmute yourself and also say who you are and your academic affiliation, so to put it in context. I'm going to go first, raised hand, to James Cousins. There we go. Q: Hi. Yeah, this is Morton Holbrook at Kentucky Wesleyan College, along with James Cousins. FASKIANOS: Great. (Laughs.) Q: And thanks very much, Dr. Simon. A great explanation. Happy to hear about academic freedom. Could I hear a little bit more about, for example, textbook choice? Do you have to submit—do professors have to submit textbook choices to the party secretary, for example? I assume there's a party secretary there. Is there self-censorship by professors who would want to skip over Tiananmen massacre or the Taiwan issue or the South China Sea issue? Thank you. SIMON: OK. Great question. So I'm happy to say that each professor creates their own syllabus, as they would in the United States. We have three big required courses, one of which is China in the world. And it is to look at the impact of the West on China, and China's impact on the West. And in that course, which every student has to take, we discuss very, very sensitive issues, including the Taiwan issue, including Chinese security policy, including South China Sea, et cetera, et cetera. There are some limitations on books that can be imported through the Chinese customs, because those will be controlled at the customs port. But because we have unlimited access through the internet right directly into the Duke library, any book that any instructor would like to have on their syllabus, that book is available to the students. So we do not have to report any of these teaching intentions to the party secretary. In the case of DKU, the party secretary is the chancellor. That just happened when we got a new chancellor a couple years ago. And we also have a deputy party secretary. But for the most part, they do not intervene at all in the academic affairs of the university. And the main reason for this is that the university must remain accredited for giving out both the Duke degree and the Chinese degree. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to go next to a written question from Michael Raisinghani, who is an associate professor at Texas Women's University. And two parts. What are some things you would have done differently going forward based on your experience over the last five years? And this is also—camps onto what the prior question was—does China censor the minicourse on Hong Kong? SIMON: So let me take the second one first. The minicourse on Hong Kong was a sort of an in-place innovation. We got a directive from the government indicating that we were to have no public forum to discuss the events in Hong Kong. And we had had two students who were in Hong Kong during the summer, witness to the events that were going on. And they came back to the campus after the summer wanting to basically expose everything that went on in Hong Kong. Now, obviously we wanted this to be a learning opportunity. And so we didn't mind, you know, talking about the media, the press, you know, who's vantage point, et cetera. So we felt that that could be best done within a minicourse. And so we literally, in real time, created an eight-hour minicourse. We had four of our faculty put together teaching about the society and the issues in contemporary Hong Kong. And each of those classes, you know, they discussed, you know, ongoing issues. I can tell you that there were lots of PRC students attending at the beginning of the session. There were fewer by the end. And we can, you know, extrapolate why they may have pulled out. But nobody pulled out because somehow someone was holding a gun to their head and said: You ought not to be here. So, you know, there's a lot of peer pressure about academic freedom issues. And there also is some issues about self-censorship that exist. And we try to deal with them. We try to make the academic environment extremely comfortable for everybody. But I can tell you, look, there's parental pressure. We don't know who the parents are of some of these kids. They may be even party officials. And so we basically, you know, let the kids determine. But we let the kids say: Look, in the classroom, all—everything goes. And I instituted a policy which I would not have changed, and that is that no cellphones in the classroom. No cellphones at major events, without explicit permission of the participants. And that means that in the class you cannot record by video or by audio what's going on in the classroom without special permission of the—of the instructor when that's happening. During my five years, you know, that worked very well. It raised the level of engagement by all students. And I would say people felt much more comfortable. A hundred percent comfortable? No. That wasn't the case. There is still some uneasiness. What would I have done differently? That's kind of a very interesting question. It kind of comes up because I'm writing a book about my experiences. I think maybe, you know, I would have tried to build more bridges with Duke earlier on. I think that Duke's involvement in this was really what the Chinese side bought. And I think that we needed to get more Duke involvement in terms of trying to sell the DKU opportunity to the faculty. I would have become a little bit more proactive in getting them to understand the benefits of spending a semester or two semesters at DKU. I think we—that would have helped to build more political support for the DKU project back on the DKU—back on the Duke campus in the United States. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to raised hand, to Maryalice Mazzara. Q: Hi. Hello to both of you. And, Dr. Simon, great to see you. I'm here at SUNY Office of Global Affairs at SUNY Global Center. And I must say, disclaimer, I had Dr. Simon as a boss, my first boss at SUNY. And he was wonderful. So and I've worked a lot with China, as you know, Denis, from when we started, and continuing on. What would you say you would recommend going forward? So you just had a question about, you know, what would you have done differently in the last five years. For those of us, and all of us on the call, who are interested—very interested in U.S.-China positive relations, what would you recommend that we can do at the academic level? SIMON: So one of the things I think we need to realize is that China's Ministry of Education is extremely committed to not only these joint venture projects, but to international engagement as a whole. During my five years, I had an extensive opportunity to interact with a number of officials from the ministry, not only at the central government level but also at the provincial government level. And despite some of the noise that we hear about China regarding self-reliance and closing the door, I think that understanding that China is open for business. It wants to see more international students come into the country. There are now about close to 500,000 international students. China wants to grow that number. You know, there are about 700,000-plus Chinese students studying abroad, 370,000 of them, or so, in the United States. The ministry is very interested. And I think that we need to basically build bridges that continue to be sustainable over time, so that we continue to engage in the educational sphere with China. And that means that perhaps it's time for the two countries to sit down and revise, update, and reconfigure the education cooperation agreement that was signed back when Deng Xiaoping visited the United States in '78, and then formalized in '79. I think that we need to think about altering the rules of the road going forward so it takes into account that China is no longer a backward, or a higher-education laggard. China how has world-class universities, offering world-class curriculum. Collaboration and research between faculty in the U.S. and faculty in China is extensive. We need to make sure that initiatives, like the China initiative through the Justice Department, doesn't take hold and basically lead to the demise or the decoupling of the two countries. Basically, the bottom line is: Keep going forward. Keep being honest with your Chinese partners and your Chinese colleagues. Let them know some of the challenges that you face. And make them feel committed to playing by the rules of the game. And we have to do the same on our side. And if we can do that, I think that the basis for collaboration is not only there, but the basis for expanded collaboration is very real and can help, hopefully, over the long term overcome some of the difficulties and the tensions that we face because of lack of understanding and lack of trust that currently plagues the relationship. FASKIANOS: Great. The next question is from Emily Weinstein, who is a research fellow at Georgetown University. Curious about issues associated with intellectual property. Since JV universities are Chinese legal entities, in the case of DKU does Duke maintain the IP or is it the independent DKU entity? SIMON: Well, right now let's assume that the faculty member is a permanent member of the DKU faculty. Then that faculty member, in conjunction with the Chinese regulatory environment, would own a piece of that IP. The university doesn't have a technology transfer office, like you would see at Duke in the United States, or Stanford, or NYU, et cetera. And I think that probably no one really can see that there would be, you know, just a lot of new IP coming out of this. But I think that now, given the momentum that's been built up in some of these areas, I think that that is an issue. And I think that that's something that will get decided. But right now, it's a local issue. The only way that would be different is if a faculty member from Duke came over, participated in a research project, and then laid claim. China has a—(inaudible)—kind of law in place. And of course, we know the United States does. That would tend to be the basis for a sharing of the IP. And I think that was the basic notion going forward, that as a joint venture whatever came out of these collaborative research engagements, they would be on a shared IP basis. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Wenchi Yu, who has raised a raised hand. Q: Hi. Thank you. Hi, Denis, good to see you again. A question about—first of all, just a small comment about China still welcoming collaboration internationally at higher ed. I think that's been the case for a couple years. The question now is not so much about their will, but more how, right? So in order to collaborate in a way that neither side compromises our own values and principles, I think that's more of the key question. So I think moving forward if you can just maybe go deeper on this point. How can we really collaborate without, you know, feeling that we're making too much of a compromise? And the second related is, I think what we're seeing in terms of the change of attitude is not just at higher ed level. You and I have talked about K-12 as well. It's also been extremely difficult for international schools as well as online education to even, you know, try to connect students with anything international, whether it's curriculum or, you know, international foreign tutors, educators. So, I mean, do you think, you know, this will impact higher ed? You know, and what is your interpretation of Ministry of Education's attitude? And, you know, how much is what local officials can actually be flexible when it comes to implementation of those bigger policies? SIMON: So I think one of the—one of the challenges I didn't get to mention, but I'll talk about it now, is this issue of homogenization. I think that the Ministry of Education, because of its general approach to curriculum and things of that sort, would like all universities basically to operate very similarly and that there's not a whole bunch of outliers in the system. The special provisions for these joint venture universities are indeed just that, they're very special, they're very unique. And in fact, just like lots of regulation in China, they couldn't cover the entire waterfront of all the operating, all the administrative, and even all the political issues that might come across. And so many of these, the CEA agreement, or the equivalent of that, was signed, you know, are very unique to those nine or ten joint venture universities. And they—as you know, in China just because you sided with Duke doesn't mean that if you're up next you're going to get the same terms and conditions. And I think that right now because of the tensions in the relationship, it would be difficult to actually replicate exactly what Duke, and NYU, and some of the other universities had, particularly because of the very pronounced way academic freedom issues had been—had been dealt with. But I think that each of our universities is very clear about the red lines that exist regarding issues as sensitive, like academic freedom. In other words, there are very few issues that would invite the kind of deliberation about potential withdrawal, but academic freedom is one of those. Religious freedom, in terms of what goes on on the campus is another issue. Again, the campus is sort of like a protected territory in the way an embassy would be, in many ways. And it's not exactly the same. It doesn't have that legal status. But what I'm suggesting here in terms of the operating environment is sort of like that. So up till now, we've been very fortunate that we haven't felt the full brunt, you know, of some of the political tightening that some Chinese universities have experienced. And so we've been pretty—the situation has been pretty good for all of us. But I think that part of the problem is that we were dealing with China in a very asymmetrical, hierarchical kind of manner in the past. And that is that the gap between the two countries was very large in capability, particularly in education and higher education. And therefore, it was from the haves—Europe, the United States, et cetera—to the have-no country. That's no longer the case. And so therefore, that's why I think that in order to get more accommodation from the Chinese side, we have to bring China much more to the table as a co-equal. And as China sits at that table, then we have to secure commitments to say: Look, we commit to doing this when we're in China. You have to commit to doing this, whether it's regarding IP theft, whether it's regarding the censorship of Chinese students in the United States, whether it's all other kinds of things that we know are problems. And at the same time, as many U.S. university leaders have done, we promised to protect our Chinese students, that they don't become the object of attack because we have a kind of anti-China, you know, fervor going through the country, and somehow these students are going to be, you know, experiencing some problems. This is a very difficult period. But I don't see how we can continue to go forward based on a document, or set of documents, that were signed forty-plus years ago. I think we need to begin to consider, both in education and in science and technology, to sign a new agreement that looks at new rules of the game, reflecting the different status of the countries now versus what it was forty years ago. FASKIANOS: I'm going to ask the next question from Qiang Zha from York University in Toronto, Canada. Two questions: A rise in nationalism and patriotism can be observed among Chinese young generations. How is it going to impact the JVs in China? And whether and now the JVs in China impact the country's innovation capacity and performance. SIMON: So it seems that there's two questions there. Let me respond. Professor Cheng Li, who's at Brookings Institution, has just written a very interesting article about this growing patriotism and even anti-Americanism among young Chinese, that I would recommend. And it's a very important article, because I think we had assumed in the past that young Chinese are very global, they're cosmopolitan, they dress the dress, they walk the talk, they listen to the same music. But I think that what's going on in the country especially over the last ten years is an effort to say, look, you know, stop worshiping Western things and start attaching greater value to things Chinese. And I think that that's sort of had an impact. And I think when you go and look at a classroom discussion at a place like DKU, where you have students from forty different countries talking about a common issue, Chinese students tend to band together and be very protective of China. I think that's just a common reaction that they have. Now, in a—as a semester goes on, a few of them will break away a bit from those kind of—you know, that rigidity, and open their minds to alternative ways to thinking about problems and issues, and particularly in terms of Chinese behavior. And I know that I've advised a number of students on projects, papers, et cetera. And I'm almost in awe of the fact of the degree to which they in fact have broken away from the old molds and old stereotypes that they had when they entered the program back in 2018. So this is part of a process that occurs over time. And I think it's something that we have to have some patience about. But I am worried. And I'll just give you an example. You know, a young Chinese student comes to the United States, has their visa. They get to immigration in the United States, and they're turned back all of a sudden and they're forced to go home. No apparent reason, but somebody thinks they're up to no good, or they don't—they weren't from the right, you know, high school, or whatever is the case. We've got to really be careful that we don't start to alienate not only young Chinese—which I think that's a big problem—but also Chinese American faculty and staff who are at our universities, who now feel that they're not trusted or they're under suspicion for doing something wrong. And I know in conversations that I have had with numerous of these people who have talked about should I go back, should I go to a third country? If I'm not in the U.S., should I be in—you know, in Europe? What's a good place for me to go, because I don't feel good—nor does my family feel good—now in the United States. We have created a big problem that's going to have a very negative effect on our talent needs in the 21st century. And that includes young Chinese who would come to the United States for advanced education and hopefully stay here when they get their doctorates, or whatever degree they came for, and Chinese Americans who are here who have been loyal, who have been hardworking, who now feel that somehow they are not trusted any longer. And we're in a big dilemma right now at this point in time. And I think that my experience at this JV university says, look, as I said, it doesn't happen naturally that there's a kumbaya moment that everyone gets together and hugs and is on the same wavelength. There's a lot of intense discussion among these young people that we must recognize. But hopefully, through the process of being put together and making friends and building trust, they can begin to open their minds for different perspectives and different ideas. And I think that if DKU, or NYU Shanghai, or these other campuses are going to be successful, they must continue to push in that direction. Not to close the door, pull the shades down, and simply hide. But they must be open. And one of the things at DKU, all of our events, open—are open. Our China town halls, we invited officials from Suzhou and Kunshan to come and listen to whether it was Henry Kissinger or somebody else who was—Ray Dalio, who was on, or Fareed Zakaria. They're all the same thing, we invited people to come to listen and to have an open mind to these kind of events. So I think that we are a beacon of light in the midst of a turbulence. I think President Price's comment is very apropos to what this represents. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take two written questions. The first is from Peggy Blumenthal, who is senior counselor to the president at the Institute of International Education. Do you see a difference in the kinds of Chinese students who enroll in Duke-Kushan versus those who applied to study in Duke in North Carolina? Are they less from elite political families and less wealthy families? And do you have any students from Taiwan or Hong Kong? And then a second question from GianMario Besana, who's at DePaul University, the associate provost for global engagement. How is faculty governance handled? Are faculty teaching at the JV tenured as Duke faculty? SIMON: OK. So, yes, we have students from Taiwan. And we don't always get students from Hong Kong, but we're open to having students from Hong Kong. So there is no limit. The only thing is, and I'll mention this, that all Chinese students, PRC students, must have a quote/unquote “political” course. And that course has been revised sharply by our partner at Wuhan University to make it much more of a Chinese history and culture course. The students from Taiwan must take that course. Now, they don't want to take it and they reject the idea of taking it, but that's a requirement. And so they do take it. But I can assure you, the one that we have is much softer than some of the things that go on at other Chinese Universities. In terms of the caliber of the students, one thing is very clear. As the reputation of places like DKU and NYU Shanghai, et cetera, have grown, the differentiation between who applies to the U.S. campus and who applies to the DKU campus, that differentiation is getting smaller and smaller. And the reason is very simple: we cannot have a two-track system if we're giving a Duke degree to the students graduating at DKU, and the same thing for NYU Shanghai. We must have near equivalency. And we have a very strong requirement in terms of English language capability. We don't trust, frankly, TOEFL. And we don't trust, you know, some of the other mechanism. We now deploy specialized versions of language testing so we can ensure that the quality of the language is strong enough so at the beginning of the engagement on campus, when they matriculate, they are able to hit the ground running. And that helps a great deal. In terms of faculty governance, the faculty in place, you know, at DKU, as far as I know, are able to—in effect, they meet as a faculty. There's an academic affairs committee. We have a vice chancellor for academic affairs who oversees the faculty engagement, in effect. And the faculty do have a fairly loud voice when there are certain things that they don't like. There's a Chinese tax policy is changing. That's going to have a big impact on their compensation. They've made their concerns well known to the leadership. If they don't like a curriculum that is being, you know, put in place and they want to change it, they will advocate, you know, to redo some of the curriculum that has been done, and also alter the requirements. So their voice is heard loudly and strongly. But it's through the vice chancellor for academic affairs to the executive vice chancellor of the campus. It doesn't necessarily go through the chancellor. And I don't mean to suggest that there's full compartmentation of the Chinese side. But there are certain things in which we closely operate together and joint decision making. And then there are things in which basically, at least up to my time, the engagement was a little lighter on the academic side and more intense on the operational side. And I think that that was the model that we had hoped to sustain from the beginning. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take the next question from David Moore from Broward College in Florida. Do you know of any issues the Chinese have with required courses at Duke in U.S. history or U.S. government/political science? And just to give context, he writes, Florida has recently imposed a new required test in civic literacy, which has questions related to the U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights, and major Supreme Court cases. Next year students in China will need to take this test in order to graduate. Are you aware of any such requirements imposed by other states? SIMON: So I'm not aware right now that North Carolina, for example, has this kind of requirement. But I can tell you that we do teach courses about American government, American society, American culture. In other words, American studies gets a full, you know, treatment, if that's what your major is or that's something that you choose to study. Now, like many places, even on a U.S. campus, except from what you've just told me, I mean, you could go through an entire university education without doing American studies whatsoever. But I think from what I'm hearing from you, that's not going to be the case in Florida now. (Laughs.) We don't—we haven't had that problem. The only requirement, as I said, is on the Chinese side, that Chinese students must have this one course on Chinese history and culture, and they also must have military service. They do this short-term summer military training that they must go through. And I've gone to the graduation. It's a—it's kind of fascinating to watch it. But, you know, it's something that's for bonding purposes. And, you know, that makes China different. Remember, this is not an island existing, you know, in the middle of in the entire China. In some ways, the campus and the fact that we're in China become part of the same reality. It is not the case—you know, we can't be an island unto ourselves. That's when I think real problems would occur. I think the more that we can integrate and understand what's going on in the larger societal context, it's important for our students, particularly the international students who come. And the international students are such a critical element because they represent an alternative perspective on the world that they bring into the classroom, as does our international faculty bring new ideas into the classroom. And those are what basically can open up the minds of our Chinese students. We're not here to make Chinese students think like Americans. We're here to raise global awareness. That's all we want to do. We want to give them alternatives and options and different perspectives on the world, and then let them make up their mind. Let them decide what's the right, or wrong, or comfortable way to think about an issue, and then feel that on this campus and then, you know, further on in their lives, they have the power and they have the capacity to think for themselves. And that's why—just one point I want to make—critical thinking is such an important part of our pedagogy. How to think critically and independently about issues and express yourself in a lucid fashion are part of what we call seven animating features that we want with each of our graduates. And another one is something called rooted globalism. And that is the ability to understand your own roots, but also the ability to understand the roots of others, and bring that to bear as you begin to look at a problem like: Why do these two countries have different views on climate change? Or why do they think different—so differently about handling pandemics, or handling even things like facial recognition and video surveillance? We have one professor who studies this, and he and I have had many numerous conversations about how to involve Chinese students in these discussions, so they don't feel intimidated, but get exposed to these kinds of debates that are going on. Now issues like what's the future of AI, in which we're looking at moral, ethical issues that face societies—all societies, not just American or Chinese society—and how do these get worked out? These are what the opportunities are that we can accomplish in these kind of joint venture environments. FASKIANOS: A next question from Lauren Sinclair. I'm administrator and faculty at NYU Shanghai. I'm very interested in the notion of pedagogical reciprocity and cross-cultural exchange. Do you see any evidence that this is occurring? Do you have qualitative or quantitative measures through institutional or student-level surveys? SIMON: So this occurs—this kind of what I call knowledge transfer occurs because we do have, as I mentioned, 25 percent of the faculty on the campus at any time are Duke or Duke-affiliated faculty. So when we are doing things on the campus at DKU, there are Duke faculty who are exposed to these experiences, they get to hear the students' presentations, et cetera, et cetera. They're part of the discussions about the curriculum. And I can tell you that the Duke curriculum and the DKU curriculum are different in many respects, ours being much more highly interdisciplinary, for example. And we have a project called Signature Work. When our students do this, they get a chance to spend—under normal situation, not COVID—but a semester at Duke. And during that semester at Duke, that also serves as a vehicle for the students to bring with them the things that they've learned, and the way that they've learned them. And we also have vehicles for our faculty in certain cases to spend time at Duke as well. And one best example I have to give you is the COVID experience. DKU was online by March of 2020. With the help of Duke's educational technology people we started delivering curriculum to our students in March, April, May, so that they could finish their semester. Quickly, by time June rolled around, Duke, as well as all sorts of U.S. universities, were faced with the dilemma of how to go online. The experience of DKU in handling the online delivery to students who were located all over the world, and the Duke need to be prepared to do that, had great benefit to Duke when it tried to implement its own online programs. That experience was very positive. The synergies captured from that were very positive. And I think that this serves as a reminder that knowledge and information can go in both directions. You mentioned cross-cultural. And again, I think the more faculty we can get to come and have an experience in China, and that they bring back with them the learning that's occurred, we've seen that now get transported back to Duke, and delivered in Duke classrooms based on the experience that they've had in China. FASKIANOS: Well, this has been a fantastic hour. Thank you very much. We are at the end of our time. It came, alas, too quickly, and I could not get to all the questions. So my apologies. But we will send around the link to this webinar, the transcript, and other resources that Dr. Simon has mentioned. So, Denis, thank you very much for doing this. We really appreciate it. SIMON: My pleasure. And thank you for having me. FASKIANOS: And we will be having our next Higher Education webinar in January 2022. So this is the last one for this year. And we will send an invitation under separate cover. As always, I encourage you to follow @CFR_Academic on Twitter and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for more resources. I'm wishing you all luck with your finals, grading, all of that, wonderful things that you have to do as faulty and as academics. And hope you enjoy the holidays. And of course, stay well and stay safe. And we look forward to reconvening in the new year. (END)

Dig: A History Podcast
Dragon Lady of the South China Sea: Cheng I Sao, Woman Commander of China's Pirate Confederacy

Dig: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 63:33


Bad Women Series in collaboration with Hallie Rubenhold's new podcast Bad Women: The Ripper Retold . Episode #1 of 4. The life story of Shih Yang, known to history by her married name Cheng I Sao (the wife of Cheng I) would inspire countless novels and semi-fictionalized accounts of a Chinese pirate queen or “Dragon Lady” of the South China Sea. Indeed, her life was so sensational, and pirates so marginalized, that authors, even historians, have found it difficult to parse fact from fiction. But have no fear, we're not in the business of peddling fiction and we're not starting now. We've done the work. So, sit back, relax, and hear about the life of Cheng I Sao, the woman commander of the Pirate Confederacy in the South China Sea.  Find transcripts and show notes here: www.digpodcast.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Modern Wisdom
#407 - Jamie Metzl - China's Plan For Global Domination

Modern Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 82:52


Jamie Metzl is a futurist, geopolitical expert and Founder and Chair of the global social movement OneSharedWorld. The war between East and West is unfolding in front of our eyes. From Chinese land grabs in the South China Sea to bugged electronics and squeezed trade sanctions, tensions seem to be rising below the surface. Expect to learn what China's anti-US propaganda looks like, why tennis star Peng Shuai's disappearance is so disturbing, why the CCP has stopped children from playing computer games for more than 3 hours per week, how much the civil discontent in the West is Chinese-created, Jamie's predictions for the next few decades of relations and much more... Sponsors: Join the Modern Wisdom Community to connect with me & other listeners - https://modernwisdom.locals.com/ Get 5 Free Travel Packs, Free Liquid Vitamin D and Free Shipping from Athletic Greens at https://athleticgreens.com/modernwisdom (discount automatically applied) Reclaim your fitness and book a Free Consultation Call with ActiveLifeRX at http://bit.ly/rxwisdom Get 5 days unlimited access to Shortform for free at https://www.shortform.com/modernwisdom (discount automatically applied) Extra Stuff: Check out Jamie's website - https://jamiemetzl.com/  Get my free Reading List of 100 books to read before you die → https://chriswillx.com/books/ To support me on Patreon (thank you): https://www.patreon.com/modernwisdom - Get in touch. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chriswillx Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/chriswillx YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/modernwisdompodcast Email: https://chriswillx.com/contact/ 

China Unscripted
#143 Chinese Tennis Star Peng Shuai Is Not OK

China Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 71:08


Tennis star Peng Shuai hasn't been in the public eye much since she accused former top communist party official Zhang Gaoli of sexually assaulting her. The only glimpses the public has had into her life have been tightly choreographed videos and photos put out by state-run media and the International Olympic Committee, which has been working closely with China to host the 2022 winter Olympics in Beijing. In this Just Us episode of China Unscripted, we discuss Peng Shuai, China's bullying in the South China Sea, the CCP's attempt to erase the memory of the Tiananmen Square Massacre, the US standing up for Taiwan, and China's horrific family planning policies.

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 265】#669 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【斯里蘭卡2019年連環爆炸案;習近平 feat. 東協;美聯準主席鮑爾再四年;國際刑警組織 (Interpol)】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 28:50


Short History Of...
The Pirate Queen

Short History Of...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 47:17


It's November 28th, 1809. The Imperial fleet in Tung Chung Bay is aflame. But the crew of Zheng I Sao's ship watch on and cheer. This is the greatest victory of the Pirate Queen, scourge of the South China Sea. At its peak, her fleet was more than twice the size of the Spanish Armada. But who was Zheng I Sao? How did she become one of the most successful pirates of all time? And why did she go under the radar for so long? This is a Short History of The Pirate Queen. Written by Joel Duddell Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Out The Gate Sailing
Sid Shaw // Shipwrecked in the South China Sea - Ep. 84

Out The Gate Sailing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 47:24


In 1967, my father Sidney Shaw was shipwrecked on a small reef just south of Vietnam while sailing aboard an 87-foot steel schooner named Dante Deo. The crew of seven, including a young child, were attempting to navigate the reef strewn South China Sea when they struck the Bombay Reef. Over 50 years later, my dad's memories of the disaster and survival are still vivid as he recounts the story.

RNZ: Sunday Morning
Ken Follett: 'I think about my characters when I go to sleep'

RNZ: Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 29:26


Master storyteller Ken Follett is one of the best-selling authors of the past 50 years, with over 178 million sales of his 32 books in print. The Welsh writer's latest book, Never, marks a return to the genre that marked the beginning of his career, the espionage novel. Set in modern day America, Never - Follett's first contemporary thriller in more than a decade - follows the story of a female President of the United States as she fights a global crisis that threatens to lead to a Third World War that few will survive. Follett, who spends a year researching and planning his books, joins the show to discuss Never and how he goes about his craft.

Geopolitics & Empire
Harley Schlanger: Elites Suffered Loss at COP26, They Want War in Ukraine or South China Sea

Geopolitics & Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 55:22


Harley Schlanger discusses the importance of JFK on the 58th anniversary of his assassination, how he had been moving against 'empire policy', and how far downhill the U.S. has gone since. The U.S. is committed to a global “rules-based order” with rules made by bankers and some of the same cartels, networks, and trusts who […]

FT News Briefing
China's game-changing hypersonic technology

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 11:34


Read a transcript of this episode on FT.comhttps://www.ft.com/content/e83a0e51-9195-4c95-8f0b-263f97794302Joe Biden has nominated Jay Powell to serve a second term as chair of the Federal Reserve, opting for continuity as the US economy grapples with persistently high inflation and a patchy labour market recovery; China's hypersonic weapons test in July included a technological advance that enabled it to fire a missile as it approached its target travelling at least five times the speed of sound, a capability no country has previously demonstrated and one that caught Pentagon scientists off guard. Joe Biden nominates Jay Powell for second term as Fed chairhttps://www.ft.com/content/9e9540a2-2ba8-4e0e-84d8-a1945c20453aChinese hypersonic weapon fired a missile over South China Sea, Pentagon struggles to understand how Beijing mastered technologyhttps://www.ft.com/content/a127f6de-f7b1-459e-b7ae-c14ed6a9198cUber to sell cannabis to customers in Canadahttps://www.ft.com/content/22855150-d04c-4f43-adb1-f066c170555aThe FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Gavin Kallmann and Michael Bruning. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
Madmen Everywhere: NATO Preps for War With Russia as Australia Imprisons Citizens in COVID Camps

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 78:23


On today's TruNews, London's Financial Times reported that Communist China tested a hypersonic missile in July that defied the laws of physics. The vehicle was able to fire off its own missile over the South China Sea while traveling at five times the speed of sound. No country has publicly demonstrated similar technology. The Financial Times said Pentagon war planners were caught off guard by the Chinese glide vehicle's ability to fire off its own missile in mid-flight. Russia continues to warn NATO over border buildups, and in preparing for a possible response with a winter war. Later in the Godcast, Rick and Doc talk about an official in Australia, who is already using the army to take people to COVID camps. Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart. Airdate 11/22/21.

The Cipher Brief Open Source Report
The Cipher Brief Open Source Report for Fri, Nov 19, 2021

The Cipher Brief Open Source Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 10:09


In this episode: US charges two Iranians with waging a sophisticated campaign to disrupt the 2020 US presidential election; Biden says he may boycott Beijing Olympics just days after summit with Xi; US Army says get vaccinated or get out; Britain will designate entire Hamas organization as terrorist entity; China using maritime militia of 300 vessels to dominate South China Sea. 

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
Conflicts of Interest #190: Congress Is Set to Give Highly Corrupt Pentagon Hundreds of Billions

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:43


On COI #190, Kyle Anzalone discusses Congress closing in on passing a near $800 billion funding bill for the Pentagon as it fails in every category. A report from the Pentagon inspector general found the agency has failed to make much progress tackling its sexual abuse/harassment issues. As many as half of all women who serve report being targets. Despite sexual abuse being an issue that multiple Pentagon heads promised to tackle, almost no progress has been made.  Kyle updates the 2022 NDAA's progress in the Senate. The vote on the massive funding bill is expected to take place this week. A provision that requires women to register for the draft will likely make it into the bill.  Kyle breaks down the recent Biden-Xi talks. The talks netted some very minor successes. However, the Biden administration followed up the talks by announcing deeper ties with Taiwan and war games in the South China Sea. This will likely prevent any building of diplomacy.  Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
Congress Is Set to Give Highly Corrupt Pentagon Hundreds of Billions

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:44


On COI #190, Kyle Anzalone discusses Congress closing in on passing a near $800 billion funding bill for the Pentagon as it fails in every category. A report from the Pentagon inspector general found the agency has failed to make much progress tackling its sexual abuse/harassment issues. As many as half of all women who serve report being targets. Despite sexual abuse being an issue that multiple Pentagon heads promised to tackle, almost no progress has been made.  Kyle updates the 2022 NDAA's progress in the Senate. The vote on the massive funding bill is expected to take place this week. A provision that requires women to register for the draft will likely make it into the bill.  Kyle breaks down the recent Biden-Xi talks. The talks netted some very minor successes. However, the Biden administration followed up the talks by announcing deeper ties with Taiwan and war games in the South China Sea. This will likely prevent any building of diplomacy.  Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Sam Faddis

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 29:41


SAM FADDIS, Former Clandestine Operations Officer, CIA, former Congressional Candidate, Editor, ANDMagazine.com, Author, “Beyond Repair: The Decline and Fall of the CIA,” @RealSamFaddis Former CIA Operative Sam Faddis: The primary job of a case officer in the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency is to recruit spies - If you look at the “Biden Crime Family,” it could not be more clear that the Chinese Communists bought off the President a long time ago What did then Vice President Biden do when President Obama appointed him as the “point man” for dealing with Chinese adventurism in the South China Sea? What should the world expect from Joe Biden's virtual summit with Xi Jinping?

Diary of an Apartment Investor
First Deal Episode with Scott Kidd

Diary of an Apartment Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 31:05


 Choosing the right contractors with Scott Kidd  as he talks about closing on a 187-unit apartment complex in Columbus, Ohio.Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and TwitterFor more educational content, visit our website at www.diaryofanapartmentinvestor.comInterested in investing with Four Oaks Capital?  First step is to schedule a call with us. ----Scott KiddScott Kidd has over 25 years of maritime experience, including new builds, refits, project management and yacht managment.  He is a licensed USCG Master of 1600 US tonnage / 3000 international all oceans. With a background in IT and a strong mechanical background in maritime, transportation, machinery and heavy equipment. Scott Kidd is very positive and energetic.  His cruising includes the Mediterranean, Gulf Coast including Mexico, Great Lakes, Atlantic Canada to Florida, Caribbean, Bahamas and South China Sea, onboard vessels of many types and sizes.  Scott Kidd has been a real estate investor for the past 10 years, and recently moved into the Multi-family apartment space. In the past 6 months he has invested as a Limited Partner in a 187 unit apartment in the Colombus, Ohio area along with a 13 unit apartment in the Daytona area, and an 8 unit apartment in the West Palm Beach area.  The limited partnership is a syndication and the two smaller deals are Joint Ventures.  He also runs a meetup group called Yachtie Real Estate Investors in Fort Lauderdale. info@yachtierei.comhttps://www.facebook.com/groups/212640527139275/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrB5QxaDmVSb-kBu6BzgGwg ----Your host, Brian Briscoe, is a co-founder and principal in the real estate investing firm Four Oaks Capital.  He and his team currently have 629 units worth $36 million in assets under management and are continuing to grow.  He will retire as a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps in 2021. Learn more about him and the Four Oaks team at www.fouroakscapital.com  or contact him at brianbriscoe@fouroakscapital.com - be sure to let him know where you found him.Connect with him on LinkedIn or Facebook.vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv> Check out our multifamily investing community!> The Tribe of Titans> Get exclusive access to the Four Oaks Team!> Find it at https://www.thetribeoftitans.info^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

The Aerospace Advantage
Episode 49 - China‘s Global Intent and Tactics: Adversary Insights

The Aerospace Advantage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 46:00


Episode 49 – China's Global Intent and Tactics: Adversary Insights Episode Summary: In Episode 49 of the Aerospace Advantage podcast China's Global Intent and Tactics: Adversary Insights, host John “Slick” Baum is joined by Dr. Brendan Mulvaney of the China Aerospace Studies Institute (CASI), the former Director of Research at CASI. Ken Allen, and Mitchell Institute research analyst Daniel Rice to discuss the big question on everyone's mind, “What is China's global intent, and what are they doing to achieve these goals?” You see it in the news all of the time, China is fielding a new capability, or chartering vectors into a new area of the globe, so we need to make sense of it all and frame the way that we think about China. Today, the team explains what are China's fundamental goals, and sheds some light on Chinese actions in the South China Sea, around Taiwan, and the Chinese military buildup. You can find episode 18 of the podcast with Col Keith "Ghost" Butler and the B-2 here. Links: The Mitchell Institute Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Mitchell.Institute.Aerospace The Mitchell Institute LinkedIn Page: https://linkedin.com/company/mitchellaerospacepower The Mitchell Institute Twitter: @MitchellStudies The Mitchell Institute Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/themitchellinstituteforaero/ @themitchellinstituteforaero Credits: Host: Douglas Birkey, Executive Director, The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies Producer: Daniel C. Rice Executive Producer: Douglas Birkey Guest: Dr. Brendan Mulvaney, Director, The China Aerospace Studies Institute Guest: Ken Allen, former Director of Research, The China Aerospace Studies Institute Guest: Daniel Rice, Research Analyst, The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies

Ridiculous Romance
Zheng Yi Sao & Cheung Po Tsai

Ridiculous Romance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 61:06


The most dangerous and successful pirate in the world was a woman named Zheng Yi Sao who, together with her lover Cheung Po Tsai, united pirates under a single banner in the South China Sea. To end her bloody reign, the Qing Dynasty would have to negotiate, and her tongue was as sharp as her sword. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

By Any Means Necessary
From Unhoused Residents To Student Protesters, Solidarity Must Be Central To Our Organizing

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 111:31


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Zoe Pepper-Cunningham, a journalist with People's Dispatch to discuss the empty rhetoric pushed by Joe Biden at the COP26 conference, the policies that push the limits of the climate that Biden is pushing at home, and the future of the climate movement.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by K.J. Noh, a geopolitical analyst, a member of Veterans for Peace, and senior correspondent with Flashpoints on KPFA to discuss allegations made from the Pentagon claiming that China is building missile silos and stockpiling nuclear weapons, the broader context of China's possession of nuclear weapons and the United States' record on using such weapons and real threat to the world, and the mystery surrounding the collision of a US nuclear submarine in the South China Sea.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Justin Williams, co-host of Red Spin Sports to discuss the 2015 film “Across The Line” and the individualist, bootstrap ideology that the film advances, the privilege that the film fails to examine and how it connects to the real-world issue of Aaron Rodgers' misleading statements about his vaccination status, and the looming labor battle and potential strike in Major League Baseball.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Maurice Cook, founder of Serve Your City to discuss the Virginia gubernatorial election and the political reality of Virginia that contributed to Glenn Youngkin's victory, Washington, DC Muriel Bowser's announcement that she will be running for a third term as mayor, and the ongoing protest at Howard University

By Any Means Necessary
US Attempting To Start A Nuclear Arms Race With China

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 15:49


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by K.J. Noh, a geopolitical analyst, a member of Veterans for Peace, and senior correspondent with Flashpoints on KPFA to discuss allegations made from the Pentagon claiming that China is building missile silos and stockpiling nuclear weapons, the broader context of China's possession of nuclear weapons and the United States' record on using such weapons and real threat to the world, and the mystery surrounding the collision of a US nuclear submarine in the South China Sea.

The Daily Break
Tensions in the South China Sea with Tom O'Connor

The Daily Break

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 19:08


Newsweek senior foreign policy writer Tom O'Connor joins host Naveed Jamali to discuss the implications of a new report showing that China now has the worlds largest Navy.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Departures with Robert Amsterdam
Preparing for the geopolitical conflicts of tomorrow

Departures with Robert Amsterdam

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 25:15


It was once the dream of starry-eyed proponents of globalization that the increasing pace of trade, travel, and exchanges of ideas would lead to a "borderless" world of reduced conflict and cosmopolitanism. Instead, the opposite has happened, as the lines and demarcations between nations struggling to manage their conflicts have become paramount and subject to escalating risk. Whether it's China building islands in the South China Sea or Russia seizing the arctic or even the UK having a Northern Ireland problem after Brexit, borders are increasingly becoming more hostile environments. Professor Klaus Dodds explores the issue with tremendous clarity in his fascinating new book, "Border Wars: The Conflicts that Will Define Our Future." Joining Robert Amsterdam on this episode of Departures, Prof. Dodds argues that even though we have international legal frameworks such as the Law of the Sea, it has already been demonstrated that some countries pick and choose legal principles as lawfare (such as building islands), we don't always choose to penalize violations, while there is a constant reshaping and reinterpretation of borders making it much more difficult to separate and demarcate sovereign territories with clarity. Dodds' book provides a fascinating look into the future, where climate change, pandemics, and digital surveillance are all contributing to changes in our physical world that are certain to be the source of challenging conflicts in the years to come.

Plausibly Live! - The Official Podcast of The Dave Bowman Show
Update On USS Connecticut... I think...

Plausibly Live! - The Official Podcast of The Dave Bowman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 43:24


Eric Ryle of The SubVet.com is back to talk with Dave about their expert opinions of the latest news on the USS Connecticut. First off, the Navy had kind of admitted that the submarine hit the bottom, somewhere in the South China Sea. Then the Navy sort of released an official picture of the boat, although technically it's a picture of the SecNav talking last week with the Captain of the Tender in Guam. The Connecticut just happens to be in the background. But it's clear from the accidental photo that the boat didn't surface under anything. On Thursday the Navy announced that the Commanding Officer, Executive Officer and the Chief of the Boat had all been relieved for loss of confidence. And hinted that there was some bit of procedural non-compliance. Since Dave and Eric are both Strategic Weapons Weenies and have extensive knowledge of SSN operations, they are clearly the guys to listen to for the latest updates on what happened. And some sea stories about mouth wash, Swimming Sasquatches and Unidentified Flying (and Submerged) objects, none of which have anything to do with USS Connecticut. Set condition 1SQ for Strategic Launch and strap in for a typical submarine ride!

China In Focus
US nuclear submarine accident in South China Sea; Lockdown in Chinese city leaves locals trapped

China In Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:41


1.Lockdown in Chinese city leaves locals trapped 2.China reduces intl. passenger flights by 20%+ 3.32 countries may end GSP trade with China 4.U.S. nuclear submarine accident in South China Sea

China In Focus
US nuclear submarine accident in South China Sea; Lockdown in Chinese city leaves locals trapped

China In Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 21:41


1.Lockdown in Chinese city leaves locals trapped2.China reduces intl. passenger flights by 20%+3.32 countries may end GSP trade with China4.U.S. nuclear submarine accident in South China Sea

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast
With Robert Spencer, Bill Walton and Col. John Mills

Secure Freedom Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 52:59


ROBERT SPENCER, Director, Jihad Watch, Weekly Columnist, PJ Media and FrontPage Magazine, Author, "Mass Migration in Europe: A Model for the U.S.?," and "Islamophobia and the Threat to Free Speech," @jihadwatchRS  What happens to Afghan refugees when they leave U.S. bases? Robert Spencer: The rules just don't apply to the elites For those who interpret the Quran literally: The Quran does not always preach tolerance. Rather, it teaches that Muslims should wage war against all non-believers BILL WALTON, Chairman, Resolute Protector Foundation, Host, The Bill Walton Show, Senior Fellow, Discovery Institute's Center on Wealth, Poverty and Morality, @billwaltonshow Bill Walton recaps on President Joe Biden's trip to the COP26 conference in Glasgow, Scotland In what ways is Wall Street cozying up to Communist China? COL. (RET.) JOHN MILLS, Former Director, Cybersecurity Policy, Strategy, and International Affairs, Office of the Secretary of Defense Col. John Mills delves into election integrity efforts underway in Virginia Col. Mills: “Once again, a fraud has been perpetrated on the American people by a culture in this current occupant of the White House of haplessness…” Col. Mills: The Chinese mimic and read everything we do in the South China Sea and beyond

The History of Literature
354 Treasure Island Remixed (with C.B. Lee)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 65:06


Robert Louis Stevenson's classic adventure Treasure Island gave the world a number of familiar pirate tropes, like parrots on shoulders and X marks the spot. But it also helped lock us into a somewhat limited view of life on the high seas. Pirates and piracy have existed in many eras in many different oceans--and not every would-be adventurer is a young English boy living in the nineteenth century. C.B. Lee's exciting new novel A Clash of Steel: A Treasure Island Remix provides a fresh look at a familiar tale. In this YA novel, two intrepid girls hunt for a legendary treasure on the deadly waters of the South China Sea. In this episode, C.B. joins Jacke for a discussion of what it means to remix a classic, her research into the ruthless pirate queen known as "the Head of the Dragon," and more. C.B. Lee is a Lambda Literary Award nominated writer of young adult and middle grade fiction. Her works include A Clash of Steel: A Treasure Island Remix (Feiwel and Friends), the Sidekick Squad series (Duet Books), Ben 10 graphic novels (Boom! Studios), Out Now: Queer We Go Again (HarperTeen), Minecraft: The Shipwreck (Del Rey Books), and From A Certain Point Of View: The Empire Strikes Back (Del Rey Books). Lee's work has been featured in Teen Vogue, Wired Magazine, Hypable, Tor's Best of Fantasy and Sci Fi and the American Library Association's Rainbow List. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Survival and Basic Badass Podcast
Understanding The U.S. Involvement In The South China Sea

Survival and Basic Badass Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 42:17


The Survival and Basic Badass Podcast Episode: Understanding The U.S. Involvement In The South China Sea Get Badass Gear Here Email us @ preppingbadass@gmail.com  

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: China Test-Fires A Hypersonic Missile: What This Means For Taiwan And The U.S.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 3:28


News from the Pacific region is disturbing as China successfully tested a hypersonic missile that can carry nuclear weapons. What does this mean for Taiwan and for the U.S.? Steve Forbes on how the U.S. should respond to China's supersonic missile test and why it should be made clear that we are not merely going to stand by if Taiwan is attacked.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
October 11, 2021:  John Rothmann and the drama in the South China Sea

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:00


As tensions flare over Taiwan, China and the United States are both trying to lay down firm markers. A crucial question is whether the nuclear-armed powers know what level of pressure is just right. Among the slew of disputes between the world's two largest economies, Taiwan is often seen as the only one that could bring hot conflict as Beijing considers the self-ruling US-aligned democracy a province awaiting reunification. What will be the outcome? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Our Big Dumb Mouth
OBDM944 - Submarine Hits Mystery Object | Bigfoot Named Kevin | Ghost Stories | Spirit Mirrors

Our Big Dumb Mouth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 104:23


Mike and Cretched join the show / Joe is out on assignment /  Christmas is canceled / Mike misses Spanky / US Submarine Hits Mystery Object / UFOs underwater / Russian USO Encounters / The Taiwan Agreement / The Bigfoot Named Kevin / Creepy Paranormal Stories from Reddit / The house for The Exorcist / Aliens caused the Facebook crash / Open Lines / Rob from NY? No PA . / Mike still cant see / Nerds and bullies / Chris #23 from Teen / Landmine in the Sea / Postal Worker Pees / The Royal Spirit Mirror / End End Song: "Skull Valley Serenade" by Mike, Spanky, Nic, and Ricky : Song Link: https://youtu.be/WUkvAOL9UzI UPDATED: Attack Submarine USS Connecticut Suffers Underwater Collision in South China Sea https://news.usni.org/2021/10/07/breaking-attack-submarine-uss-connecticut-suffers-underwater-in-pacific Uri Geller: Facebook crash was caused by aliens https://www.israelhayom.com/2021/10/07/uri-geller-facebook-crash-was-caused-by-aliens/   Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. ▀▄▀▄▀ CONTACT LINKS ▀▄▀▄▀ ► Phone: 614-388-9109 ► Skype: ourbigdumbmouth ► Website: http://obdmpod.com ► Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/obdmpod ► DLive: https://dlive.tv/obdm ► Odysee: https://odysee.com/@obdm:0 ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/obdmpod ► Instagram: obdmpod ► Email: ourbigdumbmouth at gmail ► RSS: http://ourbigdumbmouth.libsyn.com/rss ► iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/our-big-dumb-mouth/id261189509?mt=2 ▀▄▀▄▀ DONATE LINKS ▀▄▀▄▀ ► Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/obdm ► Subscribe Star: https://www.subscribestar.com/obdm ► Crypto: https://streamlabs.com/ourbigdumbmouth/tip send obdm bitcoin: 14DGZFByT5U35ZVVvo9SpzbJV6bHuNVJRa send obdm ether: 0x9A16c85CcB3A1B3c8073376b316Cd45F4B359413 send obdm steller: GB3LGRWRLLPCWPKJSYNGMUQIZWCQ35UD3LCQIZJRPTFJOHHM7G4AOOKI send obmd DogeCoin: D6XLEX89ybc55B4eQqz4cyfoctSaorFK9w

Speak The Truth
Death to America Ep:30

Speak The Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:48


Don't California my Texas: homicide rates rise 96% as police officers continue to resign. US Special Operations aid Taiwan's forces in face of serious Chinese threats in the South China Sea.

The Common Sense Show
HOSTLITIES IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA- SAM HONNOLD

The Common Sense Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 58:53


Drinkin' Bros Podcast
Fake News 121 - NFL Ratings Through The Roof

Drinkin' Bros Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 85:11


NFL ratings are through the roof after several years of decreasing ratings, Chinese state media threatens the United States over the South China Sea, a Colorado hospital is denying organ transplants to the unvaccinated, and NASA is ready to fight asteroids in space.   Go to ghostbed.com/drinkinbros and use code DRINKINBROS for 30% off EVERYTHING (Mattresses, Adjustable Base, and more) -- plus a 101 Night Sleep Trial and Mattresses Made in the USA!   Go to CardoMAX.com and use promo code DB, and you get Buy One Get One FREE on your first order.   Start moving forward with a single message. Match with a licensed therapist when you go to Talkspace.com and get $100 off your first month with the promo code DRINKINBROS.   Head to Policygenius.com/DRINKINBROS to get started right now. When it comes to insurance, it's nice to get it right. In minutes you can work out how much life insurance coverage you need, and compare personalized quotes to find your best price.

The John Batchelor Show
1722: Admiral Harry Harris USN (ret.) and the Great Wall of Sand. @FRoseDC @FedScoop

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 10:55


Photo: Some of Hong Kong's New Territories were created with landfill. Today, Beijing is using an updated method to create militarized islands where never there was one before in order to arrogate enormous swaths of ocean to the south, southwest and southeast of the Chinese mainland.   Photo here: British take over the New Territories CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Admiral Harry Harris USN (ret.) and the Great Wall of Sand. @FRoseDC @FedScoop https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/17-adm-harry-harris-usn-ret-on-the-aukus-agreement/id1567303578?i=1000536541844 "Great Wall of Sand" is a name first used in March 2015 by US Admiral Harry Harris, who was commander of the Pacific Fleet, to describe a series of uniquely large-scale land reclamation (the process of creating new land from oceans, seas, riverbeds or lake beds) projects by the People's Republic of China (PRC) in the Spratly Islands area of the South China Sea in the period from late 2013 to late 2016.