Podcasts about Bahrain

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Kingdom on the Persian Gulf

  • 1,439PODCASTS
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  • Nov 28, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about Bahrain

Beyond Victory with Nico Rosberg
F1 Miracle: Romain Grosjean explains what changed after his Fireball Crash! – Episode 21

Beyond Victory with Nico Rosberg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 40:49


It's been a pleasure to speak to former F1 driver Romain Grosjean. He shared insights on his next steps after F1 and how he enjoys racing in IndyCar. Of course, he also shares insights on one of the biggest F1 Miracles so far: Romain Grosjean's F1 Fireball Crash in Bahrain 2020. I got goosebumps listening to his personal experiences and I'm so inspired by his strengths and life-lessons. I look forward to your feedback. Subscribe to my Podcast for my next episode with another F1 legend: https://linktr.ee/nicorosberg Check out the video version of the interview on my YouTube channel! Follow me online: Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/nicorosberg Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nico_rosberg Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nicorosberg Website: http://www.nicorosberg.com

PorscheCooled Podcast
Michaels 997, No miles you lose and the GT4RS

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 79:00


In today's PorscheCooled podcast Michael is home in Sydney for only a minute and his 997 has already gone to Autohaus Hamilton and Atlas Body for maintenance and repair. The list is long, but Steve agrees that pulling the trigger and getting everything done was the right thing. Steve has detailed his 997 GT3 so well he is now experiencing the precious phase. Michael and Steve agree that Maintenance is maintenance, whether you drive your Porsche or not. No miles on your 911 means you will always end up losing. Then there is the Cayman GT4Rs, a hot topic and a new Porsche. Who thinks they can get one? Welcome back to the PorscheCooled Podcast. Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. Become a PorscheCooled Exclusive member https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled Insta: @PorscheCooled @michael.bath @P997.1 The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your Podcasts. 

The John Batchelor Show
S4 Ep1825: The Submarine Fleet Gap; & What is to be done?. James Holmes, @NavalWarCollege. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 12:38


Photo:  U.S. sailors with the Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) Detachment of Commander, Task Group (CTG) 56.1 guide a UUV after lowering it into the water June 5, 2013, in the Persian Gulf off the coast of Bahrain. CTG 56.1 provided mine countermeasures, explosive ordnance disposal, salvage diving and force protection in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter Lewis/Released)   The Submarine Fleet Gap; & What is to be done?. James Holmes, @NavalWarCollege. @GordonGChang, Gatestone, Newsweek, The Hill https://www.19fortyfive.com/2021/11/how-uuv-swarms-could-unstealth-us-navy-submarines/

AP Audio Stories
US defense chief vows to counter Iran in visit to Bahrain

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 0:48


Player/Missile
Ep. 31: Dec 1982: Magazines, Part 1

Player/Missile

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 108:44


Coverage of Antic, Compute!, Creative Computing, Dec 1982. Chris Crawford on Legionnaire, first rumors of the IBM PCjr, and two articles predicting the future: Compute! does OK while Creative Computing gets a bunch of whammies. Also: Bullwinkle's restaurant, sexism and mansplaining about whether educational software should ask kids their gender, and Bahrain doctors, video games & epilepsy. Magazines Atari 8-bit magazines Antic Antic Vol 1, #5 Stratos by Neil Larimer ANTIC Podcast interview with Linda Schreiber Legionnaire by Chris Crawford Compute! Compute #31 IBM PCjr HP 85 Computer Xanadu, the Home of the Future Monrobot desk computer Creative Computing Creative Computing Vol 8, #12 CIA World Factbook on Bahrain Production Notes Music: Stef Animal's Bandcamp page Episode page: Episode 31 Twitter: @atari8bitgames

Nick Luck Daily Podcast
Ep 360 - The Drought and The Desert

Nick Luck Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 32:28


Nick is joined by Daily Mirror journalist David Yates to discuss the latest horseracing news from around the world. Nick is in Bahrain for the third running of the Bahrain International Trophy, where he catches up with trainer Richard Fahey, jockeys Jason Watson and Kieran Shoemark, and owner Linnett Woodward. Closer to home, Nick and Dave discuss the continuing impact of the dry weather on the quality of the racing, look ahead to an absorbing Betfair Chase, discuss the likely glacial progress of the Irish drugs case, and offer commentary on the recent stories involving jockey Finley Marsh and ex-jockey Kieren Fallon. James Willoughby offers great insight into Bahrain's big race through the prism of the global rankings, while explaining why the rankings must always have an element of recency bias.

In The Money Players' Podcast
Nick Luck Daily Ep 360 - The Drought and The Desert

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 32:28


Nick is joined by Daily Mirror journalist David Yates to discuss the latest horseracing news from around the world. Nick is in Bahrain for the third running of the Bahrain International Trophy, where he catches up with trainer Richard Fahey, jockeys Jason Watson and Kieran Shoemark, and owner Linnett Woodward. Closer to home, Nick and Dave discuss the continuing impact of the dry weather on the quality of the racing, look ahead to an absorbing Betfair Chase, discuss the likely glacial progress of the Irish drugs case, and offer commentary on the recent stories involving jockey Finley Marsh and ex-jockey Kieren Fallon. James Willoughby offers great insight into Bahrain's big race through the prism of the global rankings, while explaining why the rankings must always have an element of recency bias.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
The Sharaka Project and the Abraham Accords

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 74:47


Our distinguished, diverse panel will discuss the Abraham Accords, which began a new era of cooperation between the broader Middle East region and Israel, and inspired the development of entities such as the Sharaka Project. (Sharaka means "partnership" in Arabic.). The project was founded by young leaders in order to turn the vision of people-to-people peace into a reality and encourage citizen diplomacy. Sharaka is currently located in Bahrain, Israel, The UAE, the United States and soon will open in Morocco. The panelists will also share their personal stories and cultures that inspire them. MLF ORGANIZER Celia Menczel NOTES MLF: Middle East SPEAKERS Omar Al Busaidi CEO, Sharaka USA, Fulbright Scholar Hayvi Bouzo Journalist; Washington, D.C., Bureau chief, The Orient News Dan Feferman Director of Communications and Global Affairs, Sharaka; Fellow, The Jewish People Policy Institute Chama Mechtaly Artist; Founder and CEO, Moors and Saints Banafsheh Keynoush Ph.D., Vice-Chair, Commonwealth Club Middle East Member-Led Forum—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on November 10th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
The Sharaka Project and the Abraham Accords

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 74:47


Our distinguished, diverse panel will discuss the Abraham Accords, which began a new era of cooperation between the broader Middle East region and Israel, and inspired the development of entities such as the Sharaka Project. (Sharaka means "partnership" in Arabic.). The project was founded by young leaders in order to turn the vision of people-to-people peace into a reality and encourage citizen diplomacy. Sharaka is currently located in Bahrain, Israel, The UAE, the United States and soon will open in Morocco. The panelists will also share their personal stories and cultures that inspire them. MLF ORGANIZER Celia Menczel NOTES MLF: Middle East SPEAKERS Omar Al Busaidi CEO, Sharaka USA, Fulbright Scholar Hayvi Bouzo Journalist; Washington, D.C., Bureau chief, The Orient News Dan Feferman Director of Communications and Global Affairs, Sharaka; Fellow, The Jewish People Policy Institute Chama Mechtaly Artist; Founder and CEO, Moors and Saints Banafsheh Keynoush Ph.D., Vice-Chair, Commonwealth Club Middle East Member-Led Forum—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on November 10th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Milan Weekly Podcast
Milanismo World Wide Ep. 51 - Milan Fans Bahrain

Milan Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 23:05


Nick Luck Daily Podcast
Ep 359 - Will A Plus Tard say just that to Betfair rivals?

Nick Luck Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:15


Nick is joined by Racing Post writer and broadcaster Maddy Playle to take a look at what is happening in the world of horseracing today. They lead with this year's edition of the Betfair Chase, a thrilling race in prospect featuring Gold Cup runner-up A Plus Tard vs the 3-time winner of the race Bristol de Mai, whose rider Daryl Jacob joins Nick en route to riding at Market Rasen today. Nick and Maddy also discuss the Ascot comebacks of Lostintranslation, Goshen, Defi du Seuil and Dashel Drasher, while Nick is in Bahrain for the third running of the Bahrain International Trophy, where world renowned race caller Mark Johnson gives his perspective on the track and this year's line-up. Meanwhile, in the first of a new 12-part series, Godolphin Flying Start trainee Chris Moore explains his entry into the sport and what he has been learning on the course so far.

In The Money Players' Podcast
Nick Luck Daily Ep 359 - Will A Plus Tard say just that to Betfair rivals?

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:15


Nick is joined by Racing Post writer and broadcaster Maddy Playle to take a look at what is happening in the world of horseracing today. They lead with this year's edition of the Betfair Chase, a thrilling race in prospect featuring Gold Cup runner-up A Plus Tard vs the 3-time winner of the race Bristol de Mai, whose rider Daryl Jacob joins Nick en route to riding at Market Rasen today. Nick and Maddy also discuss the Ascot comebacks of Lostintranslation, Goshen, Defi du Seuil and Dashel Drasher, while Nick is in Bahrain for the third running of the Bahrain International Trophy, where world renowned race caller Mark Johnson gives his perspective on the track and this year's line-up. Meanwhile, in the first of a new 12-part series, Godolphin Flying Start trainee Chris Moore explains his entry into the sport and what he has been learning on the course so far.

PorscheCooled Podcast
PorscheCooled Owner Stories #58 - Gary 996.1 C2 and ‘07 997 C2 Aero

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 74:33


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael presents episode 58 of owner stories with Gary from New Jersey in the U.S. Gary's Porsche journey all started when his father gave him a poster of the iconic ‘80's Porsche 911 turbo. Gary was 7 at the time, living in Israel, and hoped one day he would own a Porsche. At the age of 10 Gary's family moved to the US, and then at 14 to Belgium. So, from the poster on the wall what was Gary's first car? Well, it was a Porsche! A red 1986 944 he bought in Belgium with his own hard-earned money at just over 17 years old. This was a car Gary enjoyed immensely and drove through Europe, a car that reinforced his love of not only Porsche but transaxle Porsches. Fast forward and Gary has owned a lot of Porsches, including 944s, 928GT, 994S2, 944 turbos and 968s. Gary's car journey also included a few special BMWs along the way as well as a Toyota MR2. Gary first 911 was an 80's Targa, followed by a 964 C4 Cabriolet. His 1999 Porsche 996 C2 came next, a well optioned 911 with GT3 wheels, LSD, Aero 2 kit wing and side skirts. Recently Gary added a 997 Carrera 2 to his garage, a full Aero kit 911 C2 in manual. Gary's garage is complete for now, a two car collection he is happy with and in his words has ‘hit the sweet spot.' Welcome back to the Porsche Cooled Podcast. Follow Gary on Insta @p997_996 Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. PorscheCooled Exclusive member Become a member of PorscheCooled and help support the Podcast. It will keep us talking! https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your podcasts.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Whose should respond to rise in settler youth violence?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 21:24


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Arab affairs correspondent Aaron Boxerman and military reporter Judah Ari Gross join Jessica Steinberg on today's podcast. Boxerman and Gross discuss the timing and recent wave of settler violence attacks against Palestinians, and how the IDF handles, or keeps their distance from the clashes between these two groups. Gross also looks at the recent joint exercise in the Red Sea by the navies of Israel, the United States, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain in response to their shared adversary Iran's presence in the waters of the Middle East, an exercise that would have been unheard of prior to the Abraham Accords. Boxerman comments on recent activities with regard to the Palestinians' dire financial situation, and how Israel takes part in the efforts to restore some balance to the Palestinian economy. Discussed articles include: Settlers assault Palestinians, Israeli activists in West Bank; several hurt Settlers said to attack Palestinians near evacuated outpost; IDF called in Israel, UAE, Bahrain, US hold major Red Sea drill ‘to counter Iran's aggression' Israel shows off defense tech at Dubai Air Show for first time ‘Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Illustrative photo of a member of the 'hilltop youth' rides a donkey at an illegal outpost in the northern West Bank. (Credit: Zman Emet, Kan 11)  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gladiatrix! Hear me Roar!
How taking naps and framily can help with Sona Nambiar

Gladiatrix! Hear me Roar!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 55:03


Sona Nambiar is the Founder/Editor-at-Large, Kimiyaa, a boutique editorial solutions firm based in Dubai Silicon Oasis, UAE. She is also a Research Contributor with Dubai Future Foundation.Prior to entrepreneurship, during her two decades in business and design journalism across three countries (Dubai, Bahrain and Mumbai), Sona has been Launch Editor for two architecture magazines, namely, Architecture+ (2001) and The Big Project (2006) in UAE.She was also the Projects Editor (MENA) at Thomson Reuters and Launch Editor of two B2B portals, namely, Zawya Projects and Thomson Reuters Projects (2013-2016). She was also Dubai Lead for CSR at Thomson Reuters for two years. Sona is passionate about New Urbanism and UN SDG 11 and 17 and uses her filmmaking and photography skills to create shorts of the cities she visits. She has presented the theme of Fire (Varanasi) as part of the Photowalk Connect Alumni's Five Elements session at the Xposure International Photography Festival Sharjah, 2017 and her Varanasi travel film and talk on "Why Women Must Travel Alone?" at Mojjtama3, an art community initiative in Dubai.Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nomad_urbanista/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sona-nambiar/YouTube: Varanasi - An Inner Journey

Cleared Hot
Episode 207 - Eric Oehlerich and Mick Mulroy

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 164:29


Olly is a retired 20+ year Navy SEAL Officer, ending his career while serving as the Commanding Officer (CO) of Naval Special Warfare Development Group- Squadron 2, from July of 2017-2019. At the pinnacle of a career as CO of this elite unit, he was responsible for the research and development of technology and tactics for SEALs to use against the nation's hardest problems. The geographic scope of responsibility spanned the Pacific, Africa and the Middle East. By galvanizing over 1,100 personnel combined with collection technology he provided a security blanket against extremism for the International Community. Olly is also a member of the Board of Directors for Grassroots Reconciliation Group, a nonprofit to help rehabilitate child soldiers. Olly graduated from the Naval Academy in 1999 and went straight to Basic Underwater Demolition (BUD) Seal training, a grueling program that pushes young service members to their limits. Out of 144 students who entered his training class, he was one of only 10 who finished. Michael "Mick" Patrick Mulroy is a former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (DASD) for the Middle East (Nov. 2017-Dec. 2019). As DASD for the Middle East, he was responsible for U.S. Department of Defense policy for Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates and Yemen. He is a retired Central Intelligence Agency Paramilitary Operations Officer and United States Marine. In addition, he is a member of the Board of Directors for Grassroots Reconciliation Group, a nonprofit to help rehabilitate child soldiers. He is also the co-founder of Lobo Institute, a private firm consulting, advising and teaching on current and future conflicts. https://athleticgreens.com/clearedhot https://magicspoon.com/clearedhot https://superbeets.com/clearedhot https://tenthousand.cc  

Endurance Chat
Endurance Chat S6E17 - The 2021 FIAWEC Bahrain Double-header Finale Review!

Endurance Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 118:32


Boy it's good to be back! Ollie and Michael catch up to review both legs of the Bahrain double-header finale for the WEC! We discuss the reasons for the shift, differing race formats, and break down all the big talking points from the two weeks of action PLUS we review and discuss the 2021 season! Timestamps; 0:05 The Bahrain 6 Hours - A race that happened 0:25 Championship Scenarios heading into the 8 Hours 0:30 Bahrain 8 hours - The Desert Finale 0:33 GTE-Pro - A season-long simmer boils over in 10 minutes 0:55 LMH - Alpine's long journey through the field 1:00 LMP2 - The usual suspects and teammate contact 1:13 GTE-Am - A championship tussle over on lap 1 1:22 Season 2021 discussion points! Thanks once again to TheRacingLine.App - Your Motorsport Calendar

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast
November 11th, 2021 Weekly Marvel News Review (A Marvel Comic Universe Podcast) LoS399

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 41:35


The Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Consultant Chris and Producer of the show Director SP discuss the Marvel screen related news of the week. The Team debriefs you on the penultimate Disney+ Day marvel news, Black Panther 2 production delays and questions about when production can resume, the Eternals opening weekend box office reports, continuing story regarding Eternals censorship worldship, how Marvel titles could possible be viewed better on Disney+ through IMAX formats now, how Ronin might impact the Hawkeye series, the impact of Ms Marvel's Inhuman superpowers on the MCU, and when the potential Young Avengers series or film could be coming. Stay tuned after the credits for a few minutes of Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. bonus audio.   THIS TIME ON LEGENDS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.:   Weekly Marvel News Information on the Black Panther sequel's filming delays The Marvel Eternal's film opening weekend box office numbers A Disney+ Ms. Marvel series update ...and much, much more.   WEEKLY MARVEL SCREEN RELATED NEWS [4:16]   TOP NEWS STORY OF THE WEEK   Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings is scheduled to premiere on September 3rd, 2021. Eternals is scheduled to premiere on November 5th, 2021. Disney+ Day on November 12th, 2021 including streaming premiere for Shang-Chi Hawkeye is scheduled to premiere on November 24th, 2021. There will be 6 episodes … I think.  Spider-Man: No Way Home is scheduled to premiere on December 17th, 2021. Ms Marvel is supposed to premiere late in 2021 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  Moon Knight is supposed to premiere late in 2022 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  She-Hulk is supposed to premiere late in 2022 on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (Mar 25th 2022?) Secret Invasion is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  Ironheart is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Thor: Love and Thunder (May 6th, 2022) Armor Wars  is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (July 8th, 2022) https://comicbook.com/marvel/amp/news/black-panther-riri-williams-ironheart-mcu-debut-dominique-thorne/ Echo is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.  An untitled Wakanda series is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced.    The Marvels (November 11th, 2022) Also, we know there will be a Loki season two at some point.   Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (February 17th, 2023)   Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (May 5th, 2023)   Fantastic Four  (???) I Am Groot is in development for release on Disney+ but no date has been announced. I've heard this will be a holiday special. Untitled (February 16th, 2024) Untitled (May 3rd, 2024) Untitled (July 26th, 2024) Untitled (November 8th, 2024) List of MCU films in production without premiere dates Fantastic Four Deadpool 3 Blade Avengers-Level Team up to end the phase (not confirmed in development) Could be linked to Russo Brothers story from last week Captain America Sequel Possible X-Men Projects that have NOT been announced yet Young Avengers   MCU – MARVEL STUDIOS   [4:16] ‘Black Panther: Wakanda Forever' Shutting Down Production as Letitia Wright Recovers From On-Set Injury (Exclusive) https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/black-panther-wakanda-forever-shutting-down-production-as-letitia-wright-recovers-from-on-set-injury-exclusive-1235041911/ BY BORYS KIT NOVEMBER 5, 2021 1:20PM Disney's highly anticipated Black Panther sequel has hit a new speed bump.   The Marvel feature, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, is temporarily shutting down due to the severity of the injury sustained by star Letitia Wright, sources close to the production tell The Hollywood Reporter.   Wright was injured in late August while the film was shooting a sequence involving a stunt rig on-location in Boston. At the time, Marvel Studios said Wright's injury would ultimately not impact the shooting schedule of the film.   After the injury, Wright left for London, where the star has been since, while the production shot around her character, Shuri, the sister of Black Panther T'Challa. Wright's Shuri became a fan-favorite breakout in the 2018 blockbuster, which grossed $1.3 billion and won three Oscars. When star Chadwick Boseman died from cancer in August 2020, the character was elevated as the lead of the sequel.   Wakanda Forever had been filming mostly in Atlanta for the last two months. Director Ryan Coogler is said to have shot all footage that his crew is able to without Wright.   Sources say the production is taking the hiatus to reconfigure the shoot to get things back on track for an early 2022 restart. The shutdown is expected to begin the week of Thanksgiving.   “Letitia has been recovering in London since September from injuries sustained on the set of Black Panther 2 and is looking forward to returning to work early 2022,” a representative for Wright said in a statement to THR. “Letitia kindly asks that you keep her in your prayers.”   Marvel already pushed back the release of Wakanda Forever in October, moving it from July 8, 2022, to Nov. 11, 2022. At this time, insiders say, that new release date remains intact   [10:11] Hollywood Studio Projects Get Stricter About COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/business/business-news/hollywood-studio-projects-get-stricter-about-covid-19-vaccine-mandates-1235045153/ https://www.cbr.com/black-panther-2-letitia-wright-unvaxxed-delay-filming/ Logistical challenges await for studios that are working with stars who haven't gotten the shot. Disney's Black Panther: Wakanda Forever star Letitia Wright — who portrays the lead Shuri, the sister of Black Panther T'Challa (the late Chadwick Boseman) — is not vaccinated, sources say. After sustaining an on-set injury in August, the Guyanese-born British actress went home to London.   Now, a return to the U.S. for a possible shoot in Atlanta, where Wakanda Forever is based, could be an issue. On Nov. 8, the CDC implemented rules that require all non-immigrant, non-citizen air travelers to the U.S. be fully vaccinated and provide proof of vaccination status before boarding a plane. Wright is not a U.S. citizen. Disney declined to comment.   Wright's U.K. rep pointed to a statement issued Nov. 5 to THR regarding the actress' injury, prompting a shutdown of production that will begin the week of Thanksgiving (director Ryan Coogler is said to have filmed everything he can without her). The rep notes: “Letitia has been recovering in London since September from injuries sustained on the set of Black Panther 2 and is looking forward to returning to work early 2022. Letitia kindly asks that you keep her in your prayers.”   [12:30] Box Office: ‘Eternals' Battles Its Way to $71M Opening, $161.7M Globally https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-news/eternals-box-office-opening-battles-1235043852/ BY PAMELA MCCLINTOCK NOVEMBER 7, 2021 8:41AM Chloé Zhao's Eternals battled its way to a $71 million debut from 4,090 theaters in North America — the low end of expectations — but fared better overseas for a worldwide start of $161.7 million, the second-biggest global opening of the pandemic era.   Eternals‘ domestic start is among the lowest of any of the 26 titles in the Marvel Cinematic Universe — the last film to open to less was Ant-Man in 2015 ($57.2 million) — and lower than the two other Marvel/Disney movies released during the COVID-19 pandemic, Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings and Black Widow.   The good news for Marvel Studios and Disney: Plenty of loyal fans still came out, and Eternals was able to make it past the $70 million mark (some analysts had it launching to $67 million).   And numbers were robust internationally, where the superhero offering opened to a better-than-expected $90.7 million from 46 material markets — excluding China and Russia, where a COVID surge has prompted another round of cinema closures.   Eternals opened No. 1 everywhere except for India. South Korea — where it scored the top opening of the pandemic era for a Western film — led with $14.1 million, followed by the U.K. ($7.1 million), France $6.7 million, Mexico ($5.7 million) and Australia ($5 million). Disney estimates that in like-for-like markets, Zhao's film is pacing 76 percent ahead of Shang-Chi and 26 percent ahead of Black Widow.   Heading into the weekend, Disney and Marvel Studios were hopeful that Eternals would hit $75 million in North America.   At the end of the summer, Shang-Chi opened to a dazzling $94.7 million domestically over the four-day Labor Day weekend, including $75.4 million for the three days Friday-Sunday. Black Widow opened to $80.4 million in late spring even though it was also available in the home via Disney+ Premier Access.   Eternals received a B CinemaScore. The previous lowest was the first Thor (B+), while the rest have earned a variation of an A. Similar to the CinemaScore grade, Eternals presently has the lowest Rotten Tomatoes score — 49 percent — of any MCU offering.   Eternals is the third entry in Marvel's Phase Four. The film stars a diverse ensemble cast, including Gemma Chan, Richard Madden, Kumail Nanjiani, Lia McHugh, Brian Tyree Henry, Lauren Ridloff, Barry Keoghan, Don Lee, Harish Patel, Kit Harington, Salma Hayek and Angelina Jolie. [17:26] Disney Removes Eternals Sex Scenes In International Markets https://thedirect.com/article/eternals-disney-sexy-censor-removal-international-release https://deadline.com/2021/11/eternals-banned-saudi-arabia-qatar-kuwait-bahrain-oman-1234867992/     Another first for the project is its introduction of sex scenes within the MCU . Chloé Zhao has spoken on this movie having the first true love story of the franchise , and that is evident in Ikaris and Sersi's late-night escapade in the Babylonian desert.   This carnal outing, along with Phastos' sexuality, has gotten the film in some hot water internationally. Eternals has been banned in certain markets because of this material with Disney denying requests to censor the project. Well, it seems an edited version of the film will see the light of day in some markets, but not others.   According to Deadline , an edited version of Eternals will release in various middle eastern markets like Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. This censored cut will remove any instances of intimacy, whether they be hetero or gay. This practice is common in these markets.   While it is a bummer that Disney has to edit the film to work in some markets, it is not as bad as it seems. Some will look at this headline, see it as the House of Mouse caving into a certain part of the world, and take to their Twitter accounts. But that isn't necessarily the case here.   Marvel Studios has already said it will not bend to a few requests of extreme censorship on the project. In places like Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and Oman, the studio was asked to make further cuts not only pertaining to the intimacy shown in the film, thus those nations were not issued distribution certificates.   Other middle eastern countries like Kuwait and Qatar have problems with depictions of prophets, gods, and other theological beings, so that is the reason the film will not be playing there.   Disney+   [20:38] Marvel Cinematic Universe Titles Arrive on Disney+ in IMAX's Expanded Aspect Ratio https://www.marvel.com/articles/movies/imax-expanded-aspect-ratio-mcu-disney-plus Want MORE out of the Marvel Cinematic Universe? That's about to come true as beginning November 12 — which also happens to be Disney+ Day — fans will be able to stream some of their favorite Marvel titles in IMAX's Expanded Aspect Ratio at home with IMAX Enhanced on Disney+.    IMAX's Expanded Aspect Ratio is 1:90:1, which offers up to 26% more picture for select sequences – meaning more of the action is visible on screen, just as the filmmakers intended. In the future, the collaboration will deliver even more enhanced audio and visual technology to Disney+, including immersive IMAX signature sound by DTS.   The 13 titles available at launch include: The Disney+ premiere of Marvel Studios' Shang-Chi and The Legend of The Ten Rings on November 12th as well as other fan-favorite MCU movies like  Iron Man Guardians of the Galaxy Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Captain America: Civil War Doctor Strange Thor: Ragnarok Black Panther Avengers: Infinity War Ant-Man and The Wasp Captain Marvel Avengers: Endgame And Black Widow (content availability varies by region)   [24:45] Hawkeye: Marvel's unexpected, absurd Christmas show Hawkeye Doesn't Ignore Clint's Dark Actions During the Blip https://www.gamesradar.com/hawkeye-marvel-disney-plus-show-interview-director/ https://www.cbr.com/hawkeye-ronin-dark-side/ By Tara Bennett  One of those things being Barton's murderous past as the vigilante Ronin who went on a rampage after his whole family was blipped by Thanos. While the series doesn't do an excessive deep dive of that time, Bert [aka Amber Templemore-Finlayson https://www.imdb.com/name/nm2134432/ of the “Bert and Bertie” duo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bert_and_Bertie ] says it's a part of who he is now and Renner didn't want to discount it.    "He wanted the darkness," she says. "He wanted to go there. And there are moments that the Ronin Clint resurfaces. It's very important to have those depths that you can explore, so that he can come out of it."   [26:39] Ms. Marvel, Star Wars: Andor Set 2022 Disney+ Release Window https://www.cbr.com/ms-marvel-star-wars-andor-set-2022-disney-release-window/ Disney+ has narrowed down a release window for two of its upcoming original series: Marvel Studios' Ms. Marvel and Lucasfilm's Star Wars spinoff Andor.   As revealed during The Walt Disney Company's Q4 earnings call for 2021, Ms. Marvel and Andor are currently slated to premiere on Disney+ during Q4 of 2022. In other words, both shows will hit the streaming service sometime next year between October and December, inclusive.   One of many Disney+ original series set within the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Ms. Marvel stars Iman Vellani as the Marvel Comics superhero Kamala Khan/Ms. Marvel and is slated to run for six episodes. Vellani will reprise her role as Kamala Khan opposite Brie Larson's Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel and Teyonah Parris' Monica Rambeau in the upcoming Marvel Studios film The Marvels, which is scheduled for release on Feb. 17, 2023. The Marvels serves as both a continuation of the Ms. Marvel Disney+ series and a sequel to the 2019 Larson-led film Captain Marvel.   In addition to Vellani, Ms. Marvel stars Aramis Knight as Kareem/Red Dagger, Saagar Shaikh as Amir Khan, Rish Shah as Kamran, Matt Lintz as Bruno Carrelli, Zenobia Shroff as Muneeba Khan, Mohan Kapur as Yusuf Khan and Laurel Marsden as Zoe Zimmer. Additionally, Yasmeen Fletcher, Laith Nakli, Azhar Usman, Travina Springer, Nimra Bucha, Alyy Khan and Alysia Reiner have been cast in undisclosed roles. Hulu Series   OUTRO [32:14]   We would love to hear back from you! Call the voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871.                    Join Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. next time as the hosts discuss the first ever Disney+ Day. You can listen in live when we record Thursday Evenings at 8:00 PM Eastern time at Geeks.live. Contact Info: Please see http://www.legendsofshield.com for all of our contact information or call our voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871   Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Is a Proud Member Of The GonnaGeek Network (gonnageek.com).   This podcast was recorded on Thursday November 11th, 2021.   Standby for your S.H.I.E.L.D. debriefing ---   Audio and Video Production by Stargate Pioneer of GonnaGeek.com.

PorscheCooled Podcast
Sonderwunsch, 997 Safari and Loud GT3‘s

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 69:15


Welcome back to the 150th episode of the PorscheCooled Podcast. In todays episode Michael and Steve are back chatting all things Porsche. Michael finds a 997 Safari for sale but doesn't get it. Michael thinks the 918 Spyder has become better with time, Steve reckons it always was. Plus, Sonderwunsch - any special wishes for your next Porsche? Oh, and why is Steve's 997 GT3 so loud? Welcome back to the PorscheCooled Podcast. Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. Become a PorscheCooled Exclusive member https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled Insta: @PorscheCooled @michael.bath @P997.1 The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your Podcasts. 

Kan English
News Flash November 11, 2021

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 6:59


Israel, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and United States holding joint naval exercise in Red Sea. Israel approves coronavirus vaccine for children aged 5-11. Bill to place term limits on prime minister to be submitted to committee on Sunday.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PorscheCooled Podcast
PorscheCooled Owner Stories #57 - Geoff 1957 356A Speedster, ‘73.5 911TE and 1967 912

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 79:07


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael presents episode 57 of owner stories with Geoff from Sydney, Australia. Growing up in Brisbane Geoff has been surrounded by cars since he was a kid. His father was a car enthusiast – owning Jaguars and even an Aston Martin DB4 when Geoff was in his teens. Not to mention his uncles who also had some special cars including Jaguar E Types and MGB's. Iconic sports cars that Geoff fondly remembers admiring and riding in as a kid. All great cars but it wasn't until his dad's friend turned up one day in a new 3.0 litre 911 Turbo that Geoff knew Porsche was his dream car. Geoff's early car journey included an MGB when he was 17 as well as the original Mini Cooper S. Porsche ownership was still out of reach. In his early 20's Geoff almost purchased a 1973 911E, a car he wanted (and could afford) but his father objected to. Fast forward a few years to the ‘90's and Geoff starts his Porsche ownership journey with a '82 911SC Targa. Since then, Geoff is now well and truly a ‘Porsche guy', having owned 19 Porsches to date. His current Porsche garage is very special. He has a 1956, '57 model year 356A speedster under restoration, a well optioned '73.5 Australian delivered RHD 911 TE and a ‘67 SWB 912 in RHD. All with a great back story. Geoff loves to search the history of all the Porsches he owns. This includes documenting the heritage of all the cars and tracking down and connecting with previous owners. Geoff really does uncover the hidden history of his cars. Geoff's passion and knowledge of Porsche is evident and a reason why I love recording the owner stories episodes. Welcome back to the Porsche Cooled Podcast.   Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. PorscheCooled Exclusive member Become a member of PorscheCooled and help support the Podcast. It will keep us talking! https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your podcasts.

Sportscar365 Double Stint Podcast
S6: E42: 8H Bahrain Recap; News Roundup

Sportscar365 Double Stint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:31


This week on Double Stint, John Dagys and Daniel Lloyd recap the FIA World Endurance Championship season-ending 8 Hours of Bahrain before discussing the latest sports car racing news.Have a sports car racing-related question for the show? Submit it via Twitter with the hashtag #AskDoubleStint, or submit it as a comment in this thread and it may be featured on next week's show. Please limit your submissions to two questions per week to ensure that we can get to everyone.Want to get the latest episode direct to your smart speaker? Enable the Sportscar365 Double Stint Podcast skill on Amazon Alexa and ask Alexa to “Play Double Stint Podcast”. Google Home users can use the same command line to access episodes on all Google Assistant-enabled devices.Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/sportscar365)

Unreached of the Day
Pray for the Kerinci in Bahrain

Unreached of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 1:01


  People Group Details:  htps://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/12640 Listen to "A Third of Us" podcast with Greg Kelley, produced by the Alliance for the Unreached: https://alliancefortheunreached.org/podcast/ Watch "Stories of Courageous Christians" w/ Mark Kordic https://storiesofcourageouschristians.com/stories-of-courageous-christians  

PorscheCooled Podcast
Porsche - the fun of driving nowhere

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 76:08


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Steve wants his GT3 back and Michael is excited about coming home. Michael has been doing his usual ‘Porsche Pottering', trying to find more things to buy for his 997. Steve is tired of talking Porsche values and Michael agrees he can't keep up with the Porsche hypermarket. Is it pandemic related or are we all in the midst of a midlife crisis? Michael and Steve dig deeper, all is not as it seems. Owning a Porsche is a special feeling. An enthusiasm that makes you want to take your Porsche / 911 and just drive it nowhere. A feeling everyone should experience. Steve worries that the cost of Porsche entry now limits this - being an enthusiast is not enough anymore. Michael and Steve end up chatting about GT3's - would you buy a 991.1? Lastly, engine mounts, short shifter tweaks, should you move away from OEM. Oh, and Steve drives his 911 GT3 in the rain testing his newly applied ceramic coating. Welcome back to the PorscheCooled Podcast. Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. Become a PorscheCooled Exclusive member https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled Insta: @PorscheCooled @michael.bath @P997.1 The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your Podcasts. 

The Marshall Pruett Podcast
MP 1185: Ant Davidson and Kaz Nakajima Ready to Retire

The Marshall Pruett Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 40:35


Veteran Formula 1 and FIA World Endurance Championship ace Anthony Davidson will bid farewell to his driving career this weekend in Bahrain, and he'll be joined by former Toyota Gazoo Racing teammate and triple Le Mans winner Kazuki Nakajima in retirement once the eight-hour contest is over. Graham Goodwin spoke with both about their decisions to step out of the cockpit, their illustrious careers, and what's next. Subscribe: https://marshallpruettpodcast.com/subscribe Join our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/MarshallPruettPodcast

Kan English
News Flash November 2, 2021

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 5:23


Prime Minister Bennett meets Bahrain's Crown Prince, India's prime minister on sidelines of UN climate summit in Glasgow. At least 80 workers from China test positive for coronavirus in outbreak in northern Israel. Syrian bunker filled with munitions from 1967 war uncovered on Golan Heights. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PorscheCooled Podcast
PorscheCooled Owner Stories #56 - Rich 997 Carrera S Cabriolet

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 75:54


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael presents episode 56 of owner stories with Rich from New Jersey. Ever since Rich was a kid he has been into cars. From the playing with matchbox to the favourite cars on TV including the Ferrari 308 GTS from Magnum PI. Another favourite of Rich's was the Porsche 944. After seeing one drive by he was hooked. A Red 944 poster on his wall followed and Rich told his dad, one day he is going to get one. Well that day came much quicker than Rich ever expected. For Rich's 16th birthday Rich's dad took him to the local Porsche dealer and bought him his dream Porsche – a brand new Red Porsche 944. A gift which Rich planed and to repay - which he did. His car during college was a E30 BMW coupe. A Mercedes CLK followed when Rich was working in the city. The Mercedes was a great city commute car, but Rich needed more. A 2001 Boxster followed with manual transmission. This was a car Rich loved to drive. Not only that, this car opened Rich up to the Porsche community.  A community where he made friends with the creator of the  ‘Gundo exhaust hack.' Rich owned his Boxster for 17 years, only trading it for his 911 in 2019. So Rich's third and current Porsche is a 2007 997.1 911 Carrera S Cabriolet, 6 speed in Midnight Blue. A car that took him a while to find but was definitely worth the wait. Welcome back to the Porsche Cooled Podcast   Follow Rich on Instagram @carreralicious Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. PorscheCooled Exclusive member Become a member of PorscheCooled and help support the Podcast. It will keep us talking! https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your podcasts.

Sportscar365 Double Stint Podcast
S6: E41: 6H Bahrain Recap; Listener Questions

Sportscar365 Double Stint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 40:01


This week on Double Stint, John Dagys and Daniel Lloyd recap the FIA World Endurance Championship 6 Hours of Bahrain before discussing the latest sports car racing news and answering listener questions.Have a sports car racing-related question for the show? Submit it via Twitter with the hashtag #AskDoubleStint, or submit it as a comment in this thread and it may be featured on next week's show. Please limit your submissions to two questions per week to ensure that we can get to everyone.Want to get the latest episode direct to your smart speaker? Enable the Sportscar365 Double Stint Podcast skill on Amazon Alexa and ask Alexa to “Play Double Stint Podcast”. Google Home users can use the same command line to access episodes on all Google Assistant-enabled devices.Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/sportscar365)

JBS: Jewish Broadcasting Service
In the News: Ebrahim Nonoo

JBS: Jewish Broadcasting Service

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 21:02


Ebrahim Nonoo, president of the Association of Gulf Jewish Communities and head of the Jewish community in Bahrain, talks about the Abraham Accords and its impact on the Jewish community in Bahrain.

The Martial Arts Show 2.0
Eps:686: Yoga,school teacher and 3 Cultures (Bahrain,Pakikstan and Canada)

The Martial Arts Show 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 54:48


In this episode I talk with Sharmeen about her journey into Yoga,being a school teacher and have 3 different cultural backgrounds. Follow me on Instagram:https://instagram.com/taekwondoartistnew?utm_medium=copy_link Follow Sharmeen:https://instagram.com/sharmeensyoga?utm_medium=copy_link

PorscheCooled Podcast
Porsche 911 - Service, Prep and Detailing

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 86:32


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael and Steve are back chatting all things, Porsche. After four months of lockdown in Sydney Steve had a great freedom drive in his 997 GT3 with Marco keeping the pace in his 996 Turbo. The cobwebs have well and truly been blown away. As we all know, owning a 911 is not just about the drive but the full ownership experience. This includes maintenance, detailing and general upkeep. That's what this weeks episode is all about. A detailing question from Benjamin (Insta @modclassiccars) starts it all off and allows Steve to dig deeper on his techniques and products used. Back to Maintenance, Michael reckons everyone should check out Friends Green Porsche on YouTube, great info about common maintenance items to check on your 996/997. Welcome back to the PorscheCooled Podcast. Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. Become a PorscheCooled Exclusive member https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled Insta: @PorscheCooled @michael.bath @P997.1 The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your Podcasts. 

Beyond the Headlines
How the Gulf is getting serious about climate change

Beyond the Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 21:43


Saudi Arabia, the word's largest oil exporter, has announced it is going net zero on carbon emissions by 2060. A day later Bahrain followed suit and the UAE has already committed to doing so by 2050 Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman also pledged $186 billion dollars towards cutting carbon emissions. Over 100 countries have so far made the promise that experts say is vital for all countries if humanity is to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Only two small nations – Bhutan and Suriname – have so far managed to achieve net zero. For larger economies, it will prove more of a challenge. On this weeks Beyond the Headlines, James Haines-Young looks at how the Gulf is getting serious about climate change. Hosted by James Haines-Young Produced by Ayesha Khan and Arthur Eddyson

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Geopolitics in the Middle East

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Steven A. Cook, Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at CFR, leads a conversation on geopolitics in the Middle East.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/Academic, if you want to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. Today's topic is geopolitics in the Middle East. Our speaker was supposed to be Sanam Vakil, but she had a family emergency. So we're delighted to have our very own Steven Cook here to discuss this important topic. Dr. Cook is the Eni Enrico Mattei senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies, and director of the International Affairs Fellowship for Tenured International Relations Scholars at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of several books, including False Dawn; The Struggle for Egypt, which won the 2012 Gold Medal from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy; and Ruling But Not Governing. And he's working on yet another book entitled The End of Ambition: America's Past, Present, and Future in the Middle East. So keep an eye out for that in the next year or so. He's a columnist at Foreign Policy magazine and contributor and commentator on a bunch of other outlets. Prior to coming to CFR, Dr. Cook was a research fellow at the Brookings Institution and a Soref research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. So, Dr. Cook, thank you for being with us. I thought you could just—I'm going to give you a soft question here, to talk about the geopolitical relations among state and nonstate actors in the Middle East. And you can take that in whatever direction you would like. COOK: Well, thanks so much, Irina. It's a great pleasure to be with you. Good afternoon to everybody who's out there who's on an afternoon time zone, good morning to those who may still be in the evening, and good evening to those who may be somewhere where it's the evening. It's very nice to be with you. As Irina mentioned, and as I'm sure it's plenty evident, I am not Sanam Vakil, but I'm happy to step in for her and offer my thoughts on the geopolitics of the Middle East. It's a small topic. That question that Irina asked was something that I certainly could handle effectively in fifteen to twenty minutes. But before I get into the details of what's going on in the region, I thought I would offer some just general comments about the United States in the Middle East. Because, as it turns out, I had the opportunity last night to join a very small group of analysts with a very senior U.S. government official to talk precisely about the United States in the Middle East. And it was a very, very interesting conversation, because despite the fact that there has been numerous news reporting and analytic pieces about how the United States is deemphasizing the Middle East, this official made it very, very clear that that was practically impossible at this time. And this was, I think, a reasonable position to take. There has been a lot recently, in the last recent years, about withdrawing from the region, from retrenchment from the region, reducing from the region, realignment from the region. All those things actually mean different things. But analysts have essentially used them to mean that the United States should deprioritize the Middle East. And it seems to me that the problem in the Middle East has not necessarily been the fact that we are there and that we have goals there. It's that the goals in the region and the resources Washington uses to achieve those goals need to be realigned to address things that are actually important to the United States. In one sense that sound eminently reasonable. We have goals, we have resources to meet those goals, and we should devote them to—and if we can't, we should reassess what our goals are or go out and find new resources. That sounds eminently reasonable. But that's not the way Washington has worked over the course of the last few decades when it comes to the Middle East. In many ways, the United States has been overly ambitious. And it has led to a number of significant failures in the region. In an era when everything and anything is a vital interest, then nothing really is. And this seems to be the source of our trouble. For example, when we get into trying to fix the politics of other countries, we're headed down the wrong road. And I don't think that there's been enough real debate in Washington or, quite frankly, in the country about what's important in the Middle East, and why we're there, and what we're trying to achieve in the Middle East. In part, this new book that I'm writing called the End of Ambition, which, as Irina pointed out, will be out hopefully in either late 2022 or early 2023, tries to answer some of these questions. There is a way for the United States to be constructive in the Middle East, but what we've done over the course of the last twenty years has made that task much, much harder. And it leads us, in part, to this kind of geostrategic picture or puzzle that I'm about to lay out for you. So let me get into some of the details. And I'm obviously not going to take you from Morocco all the way to Iran, although I could if I had much, much more time because there's a lot going on in a lot of places. But not all of those places are of critical importance to the United States. So I'll start and I'll pick and choose from that very, very large piece of geography. First point: There have been some efforts to deescalate in a region that was in the middle of or on the verge of multiple conflicts. There has been a dialogue between the Saudis and the Iranians, under the auspices of the Iraqis, of all people. According to the Saudis this hasn't yielded very much, but they are continuing the conversation. One of the ways to assess the success or failure of a meeting is the fact that there's going to be another meeting. And there are going to be other meetings between senior Iranian and Saudi officials. I think that that's good. Egyptians and Turks are talking. Some of you who don't follow these issues as closely may not remember that Turkey and Egypt came close to trading blows over Libya last summer. And they pulled back as a result of concerted diplomacy on the part of the European Union, as well as the Egyptian ability to actually surge a lot of force to its western border. Those two countries are also talking, in part under the auspices of the Iraqis. Emiratis and Iranians are talking. That channel opened up in 2019 after the Iranians attacked a very significant—two very significant oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, sort of scaring the Emiratis, especially since the Trump administration did not respond in ways that the Emiratis or the Saudis had been expecting. The Qataris and the Egyptians have repaired their relations. The Arab world, for better or for worse, is moving to reintegrate Syria into is ranks. Not long after King Abdullah of Jordan was in the United States, he and Bashar al-Assad shared a phone call to talk about the opening of the border between Jordan and Syria and to talk about, among other things, tourism to the two countries. The hope is that this de-escalation, or hope for de-escalation coming from this dialogue, will have a salutary effect on conflicts in Yemen, in Syria, in Libya, and Iraq. Thus far, it hasn't in Yemen, in particular. It hasn't in Syria. But in Libya and Iraq, there have been some improvements to the situation. All of this remains quite fragile. These talks can be—can break off at any time under any circumstances. Broader-scale violence can return to Libya at any time. And the Iraqi government still doesn't control its own territory. Its sovereignty is compromised, not just by Iran but also by Turkey. But the fact that a region that was wound so tight and that seemed poised to even deepen existing conflicts and new ones to break out, for all of these different parties to be talking—some at the behest of the United States, some entirely of their own volition—is, I think, a relatively positive sign. You can't find anyone who's more—let's put it this way, who's darker about developments in the Middle East than me. And I see some positive signs coming from this dialogue. Iran, the second big issue on the agenda. Just a few hours ago, the Iranians indicated that they're ready to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. This is sort of a typical Iranian negotiating tactic, to push issues to the brink and then to pull back and demonstrate some pragmatism so that people will thank for them for their pragmatism. This agreement to go back to the negotiating table keeps them on decent terms with the Europeans. It builds on goodwill that they have developed as a result of their talks with Saudi Arabia. And it puts Israel somewhat on the defensive, or at least in an awkward position with the Biden administration, which has very much wanted to return to the negotiating table in Vienna. What comes out of these negotiations is extremely hard to predict. This is a new government in Iran. It is certainly a harder line than its predecessor. Some analysts believe that precisely because it is a hardline government it can do the negotiation. But we'll just have to see. All the while this has been going on, the Iranians have been proceeding with their nuclear development, and Israel is continuing its shadow campaign against the Iranians in Syria, sometimes in Iraq, in Iran itself. Although, there's no definitive proof, yesterday Iranian gas stations, of all things, were taken offline. There's some suspicion that this was the Israelis showing the Iranians just how far and deep they are into Iranian computer systems. It remains unclear how the Iranians will retaliate. Previously they have directed their efforts to Israeli-linked shipping in and around the Gulf of Oman. Its conventional responses up until this point have been largely ineffective. The Israelis have been carrying on a fairly sophisticated air campaign against the Iranians in Syria, and the Iranians have not been able to mount any kind of effective response. Of course, this is all against the backdrop of the fact that the Iranians do have the ability to hold much of the Israeli population hostage via Hezbollah and its thousands of rockets and missiles. So you can see how this is quite worrying, and an ongoing concern for everybody in the region, as the Israelis and Iranians take part in this confrontation. Let me just continue along the line of the Israelis for a moment and talk about the Arab-Israeli conflict, something that has not been high on the agenda of the Biden administration, it hasn't been high on the agenda of many countries in the region. But since the signing of the Abraham Accords in September 2020, there have been some significant developments. The normalization as a result of the Abraham Accords continues apace. Recently in the Emirates there was a meeting of ministers from Israel, the UAE, Morocco, Bahrain, and Sudan. This is the first kind of face-to-face meeting of government officials from all of these countries. Now, certainly the Israelis and the Emiratis have been meeting quite regularly, and the Israelis and the Bahrainis have been meeting quite regularly. But these were broader meetings of Cabinet officials from all of the Abraham Accords countries coming together in the United Arab Emirates for talks. Rather extraordinary. Something that thirteen months—in August 2020 was unimaginable, and today is something that doesn't really make—it doesn't really make the headlines. The Saudis are actually supportive of the normalization process, but they're not yet willing to take that step. And they're not willing to take that step because of the Palestinian issue. And it remains a sticking point. On that issue, there was a lot of discussion after the formation of a new Israeli government last June under the leadership, first, of Naftali Bennett, who will then hand the prime ministership over to his partner, Yair Lapid, who are from different parties. That this was an Israeli government that could do some good when it comes to the Palestinian arena, that it was pragmatic, that it would do things that would improve the lives of Palestinians, whether in Gaza or the West Bank, and seek greater cooperation with both the United States and the Palestinian authority toward that end. And that may in fact turn out to be the case. This government has taken a number of steps in that direction, including family reunification, so that if a Palestinian on the West Bank who is married to a Palestinian citizen of Israel, the Palestinian in the West Bank can live with the family in Israel. And a number of other things. But it should also be clear to everybody that despite a kind of change in tone from the Israeli prime ministry, there's not that much of a change in terms of policy. In fact, in many ways Prime Minister Bennett is to the right of his predecessor, Benjamin Netanyahu. And Yair Lapid, who comes from a centrist party, is really only centrist in terms of Israeli politics. He is—in any other circumstances would be a kind of right of center politician. And I'll just point out that in recent days the Israeli government has declared six Palestinian NGOs—long-time NGOs—terrorist organizations, approved three thousand new housing units in the West Bank, and worked very, very hard to prevent the United States from opening a consulate in East Jerusalem to serve the Palestinians. That consulate had been there for many, many, many years. And it was closed under the Trump administration when the U.S. Embassy was moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. The Biden administration would like to reopen that consulate. And the Israeli government is adamantly opposed. In the end, undoubtably Arab governments are coming to terms with Israel, even beyond the Abraham Accords countries. Egypt's flag carrier, Egyptair, announced flights to Tel Aviv. This is the first time since 1979. You could—you could fly between Cairo and Tel Aviv, something that I've done many, many times. If you were in Egypt, you'd have to go and find an office that would sell you a ticket to something called Air Sinai, that did not have regular flights. Only had flights vaguely whenever, sometimes. It was an Egyptair plane, stripped of its livery, staffed by Egyptair pilots and staff, stripped of anything that said Egyptair. Now, suddenly Egyptair is flying direct flights to Tel Aviv. And El-Al, Israel's national airline, and possibly one other, will be flying directly to Cairo. And there is—and that there is talk of economic cooperation. Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi in Sharm al-Sheikh not long ago. That was the first meeting of Israeli leaders—first public meeting of Israeli leaders and Egyptian leaders in ten years. So there does seem to be an openness on the part of Arab governments to Israel. As far as populations in these countries, they don't yet seem to be ready for normalization, although there has been some traffic between Israel and the UAE, with Emiratis coming to see Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, and so on and so forth. But there are very, very few Emiratis. And there are a lot of Egyptians. So as positive as that all is, this is—this has not been a kind of broad acceptance among the population in the Arab world for Israel's legitimate existence. And the kind of issue du jour, great-power competition. This is on everybody's lips in Washington, D.C.—great-power competition, great-power competition. And certainly, the Middle East is likely to be an arena of great-power competition. It has always been an arena of great-power competition. For the first time in more than two decades, the United States has competitors in the region. And let me start with Russia, because there's been so much discussion of China, but Russia is the one that has been actively engaged militarily in the region in a number of places. Vladimir Putin has parlayed his rescue of Hafez al-Assad into influence in the region, in an arc that stretches from NATO ally Turkey, all the way down through the Levant and through Damascus, then even stretching to Jerusalem where Israeli governments and the Russian government have cooperated and coordinated in Syria, into Cairo, and then into at least the eastern portion of Libya, where the Russians have supported a Qaddafist general named Khalifa Haftar, who used to be an employee of the CIA, in his bid for power in Libya. And he has done so by providing weaponry to Haftar, as well as mercenaries to fight and support him. That episode may very well be over, although there's every reason to believe that Haftar is trying to rearm himself and carry on the conflict should the process—should the political process in Libya break down. Russia has sold more weapons to Egypt in the last few years than at any other time since the early 1970s. They have a defense agreement with Saudi Arabia. It's not clear what that actually means, but that defense agreement was signed not that long after the United States' rather chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, which clearly unnerved governments in the Middle East. So Russia is active, it's influential, its militarily engaged, and it is seeking to advance its interests throughout the region. I'll point out that its presence in North Africa is not necessarily so much about North Africa, but it's also about Europe. Its bid in Libya is important because its ally controls the eastern portion of Libya, where most of Libya's light, sweet crude oil is located. And that is the largest—the most significant reserves of oil in all of Africa. So it's important as an energy play for the Russians to control parts of North Africa, and right on Russia's—right on Europe's front doorstep. China. China's the largest investor and single largest trading partner with most of the region. And it's not just energy related. We know how dependent China is on oil from the Gulf, but it's made big investments in Algeria, in Egypt, the UAE, and in Iran. The agreement with Iran, a twenty-five-year agreement, coming at a time when the Iranians were under significant pressure from the United States, was regarded by many in Washington as an effort on the part of the Chinese to undercut the United States, and undercut U.S. policy in the region. I think it was, in part, that. I think it was also in part the fact that China is dependent in part on Iranian oil and did not want the regime there to collapse, posing a potential energy crisis for China and the rest of the world. It seems clear to me, at least, that the Chinese do not want to supplant the United States in the region. I don't think they look at the region in that way. And if they did, they probably learned the lesson of the United States of the last twenty-five years, which has gotten itself wrapped around the axle on a variety of issues that were unnecessary and sapped the power of the United States. So they don't want to get more deeply involved in the region. They don't want to take sides in conflicts. They don't want to take sides in the Arab-Israeli conflict. They don't take sides in the conflict between the United States and Iran, or the competition between Saudi Arabia and Iran. They want to benefit from the region, whether through investment or through extraction, and the security umbrella that the United States provides in the region. I'm not necessarily so sure that that security umbrella needs to be so expensive and so extensive for the United States to achieve its goals. But nevertheless, and for the time being at least, we will be providing that security umbrella in the region, from which the Chinese will benefit. I think, just to close on this issue of great-power competition. And because of time, I'm leaving out another big player, or emerging player in the region, which is India. I'm happy to talk about that in Q&A. But my last point is that, going back to the United States, countries in the region and leaders in the region are predisposed towards the United States. The problem is, is that they are very well-aware of the political polarization in this country. They're very well-aware of the political dysfunction in this country. They're very well-aware of the incompetence that came with the invasion of Iraq, the withdrawal from Afghanistan, or any number of disasters that have unfolded here in the United States. And it doesn't look, from where they sit in Abu Dhabi, in Cairo, in Riyadh, and in other places, that the United States has staying power, the will to lead, and the interest in remaining in the Middle East. And thus, they have turned to alternatives. Those alternatives are not the same as the United States, but they do provide something. I mean, particularly when it comes to the Chinese it is investment, it's economic advantages, without the kind of trouble that comes with the United States. Trouble from the perspective of leaders, so that they don't have to worry about human rights when they deal with the Chinese, because the Chinese aren't interested in human rights. But nevertheless, they remain disclosed toward the United States and want to work with the United States. They just don't know whether we're going to be there over the long term, given what is going on in the United States. I'll stop there. And I look forward to your questions and comments. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Steven, that was fantastic. Thank you very much. We're going to now to all of you for your questions. So the first raised hand comes from Jonas Truneh. And I don't think I pronounced that correctly, so you can correct me. Q: Yeah, no, that's right. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you, Dr. Cook, for your talk. I'm from UCL, University College London, in London. COOK: So it is—(off mic). Q: Indeed, it is. Yeah. That's right. COOK: Great. Q: So you touched on it there somewhat particularly with great-power competition, but so my question is related to the current energy logic in the Middle East. The Obama administration perhaps thought that the shale revolution allowed a de-prioritization, if I'm allowed to use that word, of the Middle East. And that was partly related to the pivot to Asia. So essentially does the U.S. still regard itself as the primary guarantor of energy security in the Persian Gulf? And if so, would the greatest beneficiary, as I think you indicated, would that not be China? And is that a case of perverse incentives? Is there much the U.S. can do about it? COOK: Well, it depends on who you ask, right? And it's a great question. I think that the—one of the things that—one of the ways in which the Obama administration sought to deprioritize and leave the region was through the shale revolution. I mean, the one piece of advice that he did take from one of his opponents in 2002—2008, which was to drill, baby, drill. And the United States did. I would not say that this is something that is specific to the Obama administration. If you go back to speeches of presidents way back—but I won't even go that far back. I'll go to George W. Bush in 2005 State of the Union addressed, talked all about energy independence from the Middle East. This may not actually be in much less the foreseeable future, but in really—in a longer-term perspective, it may be harder to do. But it is politically appealing. The reason why I say it depends on who you ask, I think that there are officials in the United States who say: Nothing has changed. Nothing has changed. But when the Iranians attacked those two oil processing facilities in Saudi Arabia, that temporarily took off 50 percent of supply off the markets—good thing the Saudis have a lot stored away—the United States didn't really respond. The president of the United States said: I'm waiting for a call from Riyadh. That forty years of stated American policy was, like, it did not exist. The Carter doctrine and the Reagan corollary to the Carter doctrine suddenly didn't exist. And the entirety of the American foreign policy community shrugged their shoulders and said: We're not going to war on behalf of MBS. I don't think we would have been going to war on behalf of MBS. We would have been ensuring the free flow of energy supplies out of the region, which is something that we have been committed to doing since President Carter articulated the Carter doctrine, and then President Reagan added his corollary to it. I think that there are a number of quite perverse incentives associated with this. And I think that you're right. The question is whether the competition from China outweighs our—I'm talking about “our”—the United States' compelling interest in a healthy global economy. And to the extent that our partners in Asia, whether it's India, South Korea, Japan, and our important trading partner in China, are dependent upon energy resources from the Gulf, and we don't trust anybody to ensure the free flow of energy resources from the Gulf, it's going to be on us to do it. So we are kind of hammered between that desire to have a healthy global economy as being—and being very wary of the Chinese. And the Chinese, I think, are abundantly aware of it, and have sought to take advantage of it. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question, which got an up-vote, from Charles Ammon, who is at Pennsylvania State University. And I think this goes to what you were building on with the great-power competition: What interests does India have in the Middle East? And how is it increasing its involvement in the region? COOK: So India is—imports 60 percent of its oil from the region. Fully 20 percent of it from Saudi Arabia, another 20 percent of it from Iran, and then the other 20 percent from other sources. So that's one thing. That's one reason why India is interested in the Middle East. Second, there are millions and millions of Indians who work in the Middle East. The Gulf region is a region that basically could not run without South Asian expatriate labor, most of which comes from India—on everything. Third, India has made considerable headway with countries like the United Arab Emirates, as well as Saudi Arabia, in counterextremism cooperation. This has come at the expense of Pakistan, but as relations between Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and relations between Pakistan and the UAE soured in recent years, the Indians have been able to take advantage of that. And Indian leaders have hammered away at the common interest that India and leaders in the region have in terms of countering violent extremism. And then finally, India and Israel have quite an extraordinary relationship, both in the tech field as well as in the defense area. Israel is a supplier to India. And the two of them are part of a kind of global network of high-tech powerhouse that have either, you know, a wealth of startups or very significant investment from the major tech players in the world. Israel—Microsoft just announced a huge expansion in Israel. And Israeli engineers and Indian engineers collaborate on a variety of projects for these big tech companies. So there's a kind of multifaceted Indian interest in the region, and the region's interest in India. What India lacks that the Chinese have is a lot more capacity. They don't have the kind of wherewithal to bring investment and trade in the region in the other direction. But nevertheless, it's a much more important player than it was in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Curran Flynn, who has a raised hand. Q: How do you envision the future of Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia politics for the next thirty years? Ethiopia controls the Nile dam projects. And could this dispute lead to a war? And what is the progress with the U.S. in mediating the talks between the three countries? COOK: Thank you. FASKIANOS: And that is coming from the King Fahd University in Saudi Arabia. COOK: Fabulous. So that's more than the evening. It's actually nighttime there. I think that the question of the great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is really an important one, and it's something that has not gotten as much attention as it should. And for those of you who are not familiar, in short the Ethiopians have been building a massive dam on the Blue Nile, which is a tributary to the Nile. And that if—when competed, threatens the water supply to Egypt, a country of 110 million people that doesn't get a lot of rainfall. Ethiopia, of course, wants to dam the Nile in order to produce hydroelectric power for its own development, something that Egypt did when it dammed the Nile River to build the Aswan High Dam, and crated Lake Nasser behind it. The Egyptians are very, very concerned. This is an existential issue for them. And there have been on and off negotiations, but the negotiations aren't really about the issues. They're talks about talks about talks. And they haven't gotten—they haven't gotten very far. Now, the Egyptians have been supported by the Sudanese government, after the Sudanese government had been somewhat aligned with the Ethiopian government. The Trump administration put itself squarely behind the Egyptian government, but Ethiopia's also an important partner of the United States in the Horn of Africa. The Egyptians have gone about signing defense cooperation agreements with a variety of countries around Ethiopia's borders. And of course, Ethiopia is engaged in essentially what's a civil war. This is a very, very difficult and complicated situation. Thus far, there doesn't seem to be an easy solution the problem. Now, here's the rub, if you talk to engineers, if you talk to people who study water, if you talk to people who know about dams and the flow of water, the resolution to the problem is actually not that hard to get to. The problem is that the politics and nationalism have been engaged on both sides of the issue, making it much, much more difficult to negotiate an equitable solution to the problem. The Egyptians have said in the past that they don't really have an intention of using force, despite the fact of this being an existential issue. But there's been somewhat of a shift in their language on the issue. Which recently they've said if red lines were crossed, they may be forced to intervene. Intervene how? What are those red lines? They haven't been willing to define them, which should make everybody nervous. The good news is that Biden administration has appointed an envoy to deal with issues in the Horn of Africa, who has been working very hard to try to resolve the conflict. I think the problem here however is that Ethiopia, now distracted by a conflict in the Tigray region, nationalism is running high there, has been—I don't want to use the word impervious—but not as interested in finding a negotiated solution to the problem than it might have otherwise been in the past. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Bob Pauly, who's a professor of international development at the University of Southern Mississippi. It got three up-votes. What would you identify as the most significant likely short and longer-term effects of Turkey's present domestic economic and political challenges on President Erdogan's strategy and policy approaches to the Middle East, and why? COOK: Oh, well, that is a very, very long answer to a very, very interesting question. Let's see what happens in 2023. President Erdogan is facing reelection. His goal all along has been to reelected on the one hundredth anniversary of the republic, and to demonstrate how much he has transformed Turkey in the image of the Justice and Development Party, and moved it away from the institutions of the republic. Erdogan may not make it to 2023. I don't want to pedal in conspiracy theories or anything like that, but he doesn't look well. There are large numbers of videos that have surfaced of him having difficulties, including one famous one from this past summer when he was offering a Ramadan greeting on Turkish television to supporters of the Justice and Development Party, and he seemed to fade out and slur his words. This is coupled with reports trickling out of Ankara about the lengths to which the inner circle has gone to shield real health concerns about Erdogan from the public. It's hard to really diagnose someone from more than six thousand miles away, but I think it's a scenario that policymakers in Washington need to think seriously about. What happens if Erdogan is incapacitated or dies before 2023? That's one piece. The second piece is, well, what if he makes it and he's reelected? And I think in any reasonable observer sitting around at the end of 2021 looking forward to 2023 would say two things: One, you really can't predict Turkish politics this far out, but if Turkish elections were held today and they were free and fair, the Justice and Development Party would get below 30 percent. Still more than everybody else. And Erdogan would have a real fight on his hands to get reelected, which he probably would be. His approaches to his domestic challenges and his approaches to the region are really based on what his current political calculations are at any given moment. So his needlessly aggressive posture in the Eastern Mediterranean was a function of the fact that he needed to shore up his nationalist base. Now that he finds himself quite isolated in the world, the Turks have made overtures to Israel, to the UAE, to Saudi Arabia. They're virtually chasing the Egyptians around the Eastern Mediterranean to repair their relationship. Because without repairing these relationships the kind of investment that is necessary to try to help revive the Turkish economy—which has been on the skids for a number of years—is going to be—is going to be more difficult. There's also another piece of this, which is the Middle East is a rather lucrative arms market. And during the AKP era, the Turks have had a significant amount of success further developing their defense industrial base, to the point that now their drones are coveted. Now one of the reasons for a Saudi-Turkish rapprochement is that the United States will not sell Saudi Arabia the drones it wants, for fear that they will use them in Yemen. And the Saudis are looking for drones elsewhere. That's either China or Turkey. And Turkey's seem to work really, really well, based on experience in Syria, Libya, and Nagorno-Karabakh. So what—Turkish foreign policy towards the region has become really dependent upon what Erdogan's particularly political needs are. There's no strategic approach to the region. There is a vision of Turkey as a leader of the region, of a great power in its own right, as a leader of the Muslim world, as a Mediterranean power as well. But that's nothing new. Turkish Islamists have been talking about these things for quite some time. I think it's important that there's been some de-escalation. I don't think that all of these countries now love each other, but they see the wisdom of pulling back from—pulling back from the brink. I don't see Turkey's position changing dramatically in terms of its kind of reintegration into the broader region before 2023, at the least. FASKIANOS: Great. Let's go next to, raised hand, to Caleb Sanner. And you need to unmute yourself. Q: Hello, my name is Caleb. I'm from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. So, Dr. Cook, you had mentioned in passing how China has been involved economically in North Africa. And my question would be, how is the U.S. taking that? And what are we doing, in a sense, to kind of counter that? I know it's not a military advancement in terms of that, but I've seen what it has been doing to their economies—North Africa's economies. And, yeah, what's the U.S. stance on that? COOK: Well, I think the United States is somewhat detached from this question of North Africa. North Africa's long been a—with the exception of Egypt, of course. And Egypt, you know, is not really North Africa. Egypt is something in and of itself. That China is investing heavily in Egypt. And the Egyptian position is: Please don't ask us to choose between you and the Chinese, because we're not going to make that choice. We think investment from all of these places is good for—is good for Egypt. And the other places where China is investing, and that's mostly in Algeria, the United States really doesn't have close ties to Algeria. There was a tightening of the relationship after the attacks on New York and Washington in 2001, recognizing that the Algerians—extremist groups in Algerian that had been waging war against the state there over the course of the 1990s were part and parcel of this new phenomenon of global jihad. And so there has been a security relationship there. There has been some kind of big infrastructure kind of investment in that country, with big companies that build big things, like GE and others, involved in Algeria. But the United States isn't helping to develop ports or industrial parks or critical infrastructure like bridges and airports in the same way that the Chinese have been doing throughout the region. And in Algeria, as well as in Egypt, the Chinese are building a fairly significant industrial center in the Suez Canal zone, of all places. And the United States simply doesn't have an answer to it, other than to tell our traditional partners in the region, don't do it. But unless we show up with something to offer them, I'm afraid that Chinese investment is going to be too attractive for countries that are in need of this kind of investment. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to a written question from Kenneth Mayers, who is at St. Francis College in Brooklyn. In your opinion, what would a strategic vision based on a far-sighted understanding of both resources and U.S. goals—with regard to peace and security, prosperity and development, and institutions and norms and values such as human rights—look like in the Middle East and North Africa? COOK: Well, it's a great question. And I'm tempted to say you're going to have to read the last third of my new book in order to get the—in order to get the answer. I think but let me start with something mentioned about norms and values. I think that one of the things that has plagued American foreign policy over the course of not just the last twenty years, but in the post-World War II era all the way up through the present day, you see it very, very clearly with President Biden, is that trying to incorporate American values and norms into our approach to the region has been extraordinarily difficult. And what we have a history of doing is the thing that is strategically tenable, but morally suspect. So what I would say is, I mean, just look at what's happened recently. The president of the United States studiously avoided placing a telephone call to the Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The Egyptians, as many know, have a terrible record on human rights, particularly since President Sisi came to power. Arrests of tens of thousands of people in the country, the torture of many, many people, the killings of people. And the president during his campaign said that he was going to give no blank checks to dictators, including to Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. And then what happened in May? What happened in May was that fighting broke out between Israel and Hamas and others in the Gaza Strip, a brutal eleven-day conflict. And Egypt stepped up and provided a way out of the conflict through its good offices. And that prompted the United States to—the president of the United States—to have two phone calls in those eleven days with the Egyptian leader. And now the United States is talking about Egypt as a constructive partner that's helping to stabilize the region. Sure, the administration suspended $130 million of Egypt's annual—$130 million Egypt's annual allotment of $1.3 billion. But that is not a lot. Egypt got most of—most of its military aid. As I said, strategically tenable, morally suspect. I'm not quite sure how we get out of that. But what I do know, and I'll give you a little bit of a preview of the last third of the book—but I really do want you to buy it when it's done—is that the traditional interests of the United States in the Middle East are changing. And I go through a kind of quasi, long, somewhat tortured—but very, very interesting—discussion of the origins of our interests, and how they are changing, and how we can tell they are changing. And that is to say that the free flow of energy resources may not be as important to the United States in the next twenty-five years as it was over the course of the previous fifty or sixty years. That helping to ensure Israeli security, which has been axiomatic for the United States, eh, I'd say since the 1960s, really, may not be as important as Israel develops its diplomatic relations with its neighbors, that has a GDP per capita that's on par with the U.K., and France, and other partners in Europe, a country that clearly can take care of itself, that is a driver of technology and innovation around the globe. And that may no longer require America's military dominance in the region. So what is that we want to be doing? How can we be constructive? And I think the answers are in things that we hadn't really thought of too systematically in the past. What are the things that we're willing to invest in an defend going forward? Things like climate change, things like migration, things like pandemic disease. These are things that we've talked about, but that we've never been willing to invest in the kind of the resources. Now there are parts of the Middle East that during the summer months are in-habitable. That's going to produce waves of people looking for places to live that are inhabitable. What do we do about that? Does that destabilize the Indian subcontinent? Does it destabilize Europe? Does it destabilize North Africa? These are all questions that we haven't yet answered. But to the extent that we want to invest in, defend and sacrifice for things like climate, and we want to address the issue—related issue of migration, and we want to deal with the issue of disease and other of these kind of functional global issues in the Middle East is better not just for us and Middle Easterners, but also in terms of our strategic—our great-power competition in the region. These are not things that the Chinese and the Russians are terribly interested in, despite the fact that the Chinese may tell you they are. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Ahmuan Williams, with a raised hand, at the University of Oklahoma. COOK: Oklahoma. Q: Hi. And thank you for being here. You kind of talked about the stabilization of northern Africa and the Middle East. And just a few days ago the Sudanese government—and they still haven't helped capture the parliamentarian there—have recycled back into a military—somewhat of military rule. And it's been since 2005 since the end of their last civil war, which claimed millions of innocent civilians through starvation and strife and, you know, the lack of being able to get humanitarian aid. There was also a huge refugee crisis there, a lot of people who evacuated Sudan. How's that going to impact the Middle East and the American take to Middle East and northern Africa policy, especially now that the Security Council is now considering this and is trying to determine what we should do? COOK: It's a great question. And I think that, first, let's be clear. There was a coup d'état in Sudan. The military overthrew a transitional government on the eve of having to hand over the government to civilians. And they didn't like it. There's been tension that's been brewing in Sudan for some time. Actually, an American envoy, our envoy to East Africa and Africa more generally, a guy named Jeff Feltman, was in Khartoum, trying to kind of calm the tension, to get the two sides together, and working to avert a coup. And the day after he left, the military moved. That's not—that doesn't reflect the fact that the United States gave a blessing for the military to overthrow this government. I think what it does, though, and it's something that I think we all need to keep in mind, it demonstrates the limits of American power in a variety of places around the world. That we don't have all the power in the world to prevent things from happening when people, like the leaders of the Sudanese military, believe that they have existential issues that are at stake. Now, what's worry about destabilization in Sudan is, as you point out, there was a civil war there, there was the creation of a new country there, potential for—if things got really out of hand—refugee flows into Egypt, from Egypt across the Sanai Peninsula into Israel. One of the things people are unaware of is the large number of Sudanese or Eritreans and other Africans who have sought refuge in Israel, which has created significant economic and social strains in that country. So it's a big deal. Thus far, it seems we don't—that the U.S. government doesn't know exactly what's happening there. There are protesters in the streets demanding democracy. It's very unclear what the military is going to do. And it's very unclear what our regional allies and how they view what's happening. What Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, what Saudi Arabia, what Israel—which Sudan is an Abraham Accords country now—what they are doing. How they view the coup as positive or negative will likely impact how effective the United States can be in trying to manage this situation. But I suspect that we're just going to have to accommodate ourselves to whatever outcome the Sudanese people and the Sudanese military come to, because I don't think we have a lot of—we don't have a lot of tools there to make everybody behave. FASKIANOS: OK. So I'm going to take the next question from Elena Murphy, who is a junior at Syracuse University's Maxwell School. And she's a diplomatic intern at the Kurdistan Regional Government's Representation in the United States. COOK: That's cool. FASKIANOS: That's very cool. So as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional hegemony has affected Erdogan's domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors policy? COOK: Great. Can I see that? Because that's a long question. FASKIANOS: Yeah, it's a long question. It's got an up-vote. Third one down. COOK: Third one down. Elena, as a follow up, how much do you believe neo-Ottomanism—I'm sorry, I'm going to have to read it again. How much do you believe neo-Ottomanism and attempting regional has affected Erdogan's both domestic and foreign policy, especially in consideration of Turkey's shift towards the MENA in their foreign policy, after a period of withdrawals and no problems with neighbors? OK. Great. So let us set aside the term “neo-Ottomanism” for now. Because neo-Ottomanism actually—it does mean something, but people have often used the term neo-Ottomanism to describe policies of the Turkish government under President Erdogan that they don't like. And so let's just talk about the way in which the Turkish government under President Erdogan views the region and views what Turkey's rightful place should be. And I think the Ottomanism piece is important, because the kind of intellectual framework which the Justice and Development Party, which is Erdogan's party, views the world, sees Turkey as—first of all, it sees the Turkish Republic as a not-so-legitimate heir to the Ottoman Empire. That from their perspective, the natural order of things would have been the continuation of the empire in some form or another. And as a result, they believe that Turkey's natural place is a place of leadership in the region for a long time. Even before the Justice and Development Party was founded in 2001, Turkey's earlier generation of Islamists used to savage the Turkish leadership for its desire to be part of the West, by saying that this was kind of unnatural, that they were just merely aping the West, and the West was never actually going to accept Turkey. Which is probably true. But I think that the Justice and Development Party, after a period of wanting to become closer to the West, has turned its attention towards the Middle East, North Africa, and the Muslim world more generally. And in that, it sees itself, the Turks see themselves as the natural leaders in the region. They believe they have a cultural affinity to the region as a result of the legacies of the Ottoman Empire, and they very much can play this role of leader. They see themselves as one of the kind of few real countries in the region, along with Egypt and Iran and Saudi Arabia. And the rest are sort of ephemeral. Needless to say, big countries in the Arab world—like Egypt, like Saudi Arabia—don't welcome the idea of Turkey as a leader of the region. They recognize Turkey as a very big and important country, but not a leader of the region. And this is part of that friction that Turkey has experienced with its neighbors, after an earlier iteration of Turkish foreign policy, in which—one of the earliest iterations of Turkish foreign policy under the Justice and Development Party which was called no problems with neighbors. In which Turkey, regardless of the character of the regimes, wanted to have good relations with its neighbors. It could trade with those neighbors. And make everybody—in the process, Turkey could be a driver of economic development in the region, and everybody can be basically wealthy and happy. And it didn't really work out that way, for a variety of reasons that we don't have enough time for. Let's leave it at the fact that Turkey under Erdogan—and a view that is shared by many—that Turkey should be a leader of the region. And I suspect that if Erdogan were to die, if he were unable to stand for election, if the opposition were to win, that there would still be elements of this desire to be a regional leader in a new Turkish foreign policy. FASKIANOS: Steven, thank you very much. This was really terrific. We appreciate your stepping in at the eleventh hour, taking time away from your book. For all of you— COOK: I'm still not Sanam. FASKIANOS: (Laughs.) I know, but you were an awesome replacement. So you can follow Steven Cook on Twitter at @stevenacook. As I said at the beginning too, he is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine. So you can read his work there, as well as, of course, on CFR.org, all of the commentary, analysis, op-eds, congressional testimony are there for free. So I hope you will follow him and look after his next book. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday November 3, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time on the future of U.S.-Mexico relations. In the meantime, I encourage you to follow us, @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. And stay well, stay safe, and thank you, again. COOK: Bye, everyone. FASKIANOS: Bye. (END)

new york japan europe russian university china chinese american mexico america future oklahoma indian south asian world war ii representation gdp west european france turkey iran council donald trump syria iraq united states vladimir putin russia washington gulf cia africa turkish pakistan african afghanistan needless egyptian indians middle east sudan barack obama struggle bush morocco cook muslims european union palestinians mediterranean tel aviv steven cook ethiopia arab ge trouble security council gold medal outreach assad joe biden nile saudi cabinet arab israeli horn pennsylvania state university jerusalem university college london foreign policy south korea foreign affairs ngos algeria united arab emirates saudi arabia foreign relations cfr ottoman empire turks academic hezbollah libya nato abu dhabi ethiopian syracuse university ambition state of the union southern mississippi fully webinars iraqi ucl oman embassy algerian intervene north africa mena bahrain gaza israelis saudis uae brookings institution sisi yemen east africa west bank iranians geopolitics arrests eastern mediterranean ramadan sudanese ankara george w bush levant benjamin netanyahu yair lapid suez canal riyadh khartoum washington institute near east policy damascus tigray hamas emiratis abdel fattah bashar akp hafez islamists broader mbs nile river eritreans east jerusalem emirates persian gulf recep tayyip erdogan turkish republic maxwell school algerians haftar blue nile false dawn egyptair sharm king abdullah nagorno karabakh gaza strip middle easterners cook it khalifa haftar national program qataris sheikhs sanam wisconsin whitewater kurdistan regional government development party naftali bennett egyptian president abdel fattah ottomanism abraham accords
PorscheCooled Podcast
PorscheCooled Owner Stories #55 - Devan 1969 Porsche 911T

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 86:16


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael presents episode 55 of owner stories with Devan from the Bay Area in U.S. Growing up in California Devan's father was into American cars. As a kid, Porsche was not on his radar. So how did it all begin? Devan's path to Porsche ownership started with a good friend and mentor – they would catch up, drink beers, and talk cars and Porsche. This friend, as Devan puts it, ‘moulded his perspective on the automotive front'. This is when Devan started goal setting and planning when to get his first Porsche. Devan's car journey included a Volvo 5 speed he learnt to drive stick on, a 66 Mustang at sixteen as well as Jaguars which he really enjoyed. Jaguar ownership made Devan look more at European cars. After that, a goal was set to buy his ‘dream car' and Devan started looking for his first Porsche. This turned out to be a 2001 911 Turbo Tiptronic. A transmission he thought he would get to love - but he didn't. Devan now had the taste for Porsche and knew this time he wanted a manual. His second Porsche was a 2007 997 Carrera 4S, a car he enjoyed more than the 996 Turbo. Wanting a rawer experience Devan's Porsche journey has come full circle. He now owns and is restoring a 1969 Porsche 911T long hood. A special car as it was owned by his late friend and mentor. Welcome back to the Porsche Cooled Podcast   Follow Devan on Instagram @devanvincent  Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. PorscheCooled Exclusive member Become a member of PorscheCooled and help support the Podcast. It will keep us talking! https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your podcasts.

In the Fast Lane
Episode 87: Dr Ian Roberts & Alan van der Merwe

In the Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 34:32


As part of National Safe Work Month in Australia, FIA Formula 1® Medical Rescue Co-ordinator Dr Ian Roberts and FIA Formula 1® Medical Car Driver Alan van der Merwe discuss their differing paths to their roles, the biggest safety advances in F1® and how they helped Romain Grosjean survive his dramatic crash in Bahrain last year, while we review Sunday's US Grand Prix won by Max Verstappen.

Highlights from Moncrieff
Michael Jackson's Secret Year in Bahrain...

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 9:34


Michael Jackson's Secret Year in Bahrain...

PorscheCooled Podcast
Porsche Wheelman

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 85:56


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael and Steve chat about all things Porsche.  Firstly, Steve wants to go buff and take off his pants. Michael is on a high as he is coming home to Sydney and his 911. His plans for servicing and fixing the 997's front bumper damage has already begun. What determines our Porsche direction? Classic or Modern? Michael takes it a bit further and wants to know how many Porsches you need to own before you become a true Porsche Wheelman. Plus, there's lots of other chat in between. Welcome back to the PorscheCooled Podcast Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. Become a PorscheCooled Exclusive member https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled Insta: @PorscheCooled @michael.bath @P997.1 The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your Podcasts. 

PorscheCooled Podcast
PorscheCooled Owner Stories #54 - Zander 2003 996 GT3 Cup Car

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 69:40


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael presents episode 54 of owner stories with Zander from Adelaide, Australia. As a kid Zander had an interest in Porsche. Not to mention growing up in Adelaide with The F1 and watching Motorsport on TV left a lasting impression. In particular, seeing Jim Richards and Peter Fitzgerald duelling it out in Porsches. This is when he realised that one day, he needed to have one. Zander's pre-Porsche car journey included a Fiat Abarth 850 TC, a few Japanese imports, BMWs including a couple of 2002's and a 90s Mercedes 180E which he still dailies. Zander's Porsche passion is strong. His first Porsche was a '66 912 which he spent 7 years restoring. This car is now owned by Steven from Owner Stories #38 having purchased it from Zander earlier this year. After selling his prized Porsche, Zander needed another one. He searched out a 996 GT3 road car which fell through, but his love of Australian Motorsport ultimately led him to a 2003 996 GT3 Cup car. Not just any 911 cup car, but one raced by Peter Fitzgerald.  Zander had only had his new 911 a few days when we recorded this, but his enthusiasm was contagious. Some of you may recall this GT3 as it was previously owned by James @porschplatz - a friend of PorscheCooled and from Owner Stories #8. James had done an amazing job of finding and restoring this 911 with period correct '04 livery. Zander is the new custodian of this amazing track day 911 GT3 and couldn't be happier.  Welcome back to the Porsche Cooled Podcast Follow Zander on Instagram @boys_own_garage Zanders ex 912 on 911kuhlture Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. PorscheCooled Exclusive member Become a member of PorscheCooled and help support the Podcast. It will keep us talking! https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your podcasts.

In the Fast Lane
Episode 85: Romain Grosjean

In the Fast Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:08


Romain Grosjean discusses the highs of his 10-year F1® career, his most successful season for Lotus in 2013, his incredible sixth place on debut for Haas in Australia in 2016, his recovery from the dramatic fireball crash in Bahrain last year, and his switch to IndyCar and oval racing as a 35-year-old 'rookie'.

Dreams Not Memes Podcast
Episode 307: Standing on Giant's Shoulders: A Conversation with Xenai

Dreams Not Memes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 35:15


Ashwin Shenoy is an Artist, Actor, Singer-Songwriter, Session Vocalist, Multi-instrumentalist, Producer, Voice-over artist and Recording/Live Sound Engineer. He also dances and acts in collaborations and other projects, eager to apply his talents in any means possible. The aims of this aspiring musician and actor are to bring together music of different cultures in his own experimental ways. Currently based in Boston, he has done a number of projects and is looking to continue working and performing wherever it takes him. He is best known for his versatility in various genres of music, striving to expand his repertoire, adding his own essence along the way. He recently released an EP series with a renowned Poet from Bahrain, Omar Ahmed Al Khulaqi a.k.a. ‘Beneath the Oak Tree' weaving his poetry into musical compositions. Simultaneously, Ashwin recently launched his Hip Hop/RnB Alias, ‘Xenai' having already released 36 singles and counting produced, mixed, mastered, engineered and written by him. In our conversation Xenai share's his story about how he has had to reshape his sound from personal experiences and what he plans to do with his music career in the future. Learn more on Dreams Not Memes. Social : https://www.instagram.com/xenaimuzik/?hl=en Website: https://www.ashwinxenai.com/

9yrspodcast
Episode 11: SNL: 17th October ‘21 - Guests: Nik Tzanev & Cheye Alexander

9yrspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 52:49


Stu, Anne-Marie & George are  joined by AFC Wimbledon First Team Players, Nik Tzanev & Cheye Alexander.Nik discusses his international trip to Bahrain with New Zealand, whilst Cheye discusses full on training in the English winter. We talk about Sheffield Wednesday result, the FA Cup 1st Round draw and the midweek trip to Lincoln City. 

Rogue Ways
Culture Shock in Istanbul & Bahrain - on Apocastastasis with John Coleman

Rogue Ways

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 70:26


I guest on John Coleman's channel, Apocastastasis, where we discuss irreverent travels and culture shock on reservations, in Istanbul, and in Bahrain. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkT2-dZQxmRcf2nOpwWSqMg/featured https://linktr.ee/LindseyScharmyn Apocatastasis is a place where the pristine ideal of a school has been restored: teacher and students gathered in discussion around serious texts. Shorn of childish props like grades, GPAs, and credentials, the school proudly rights two errors in contemporary education: the tendency to inculcate bourgeois sentiments, and predatory financing. Public or private, religious or secular, in a formal classroom or at the home-school kitchen table, all forms of schooling are guilty of these distortions.

PorscheCooled Podcast
The Essence of Porsche

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 85:40


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael and Steve are back again chatting about all things Porsche. Yep, Steve is back! Michael has sorted out his 997 insurance and is happy with the result. Steve has completed his paint correction and ceramic coat on his 997 GT3 and reflects on the 70+ hours to complete - the process and results. Looks like no more waxing for Steve from now on.   Michael wants to chat about the essence of Porsche and unticking the options boxes - let's go back to basics. Continuing the Porsche chat; is a Tiptronic transmission better than a manual? A post on a Porsche forum has started a discussion on todays episode. Is the Tip just something that needs to be learned to be enjoyed? Steve doesn't agree. Then Steve wants to talk about the ‘bog standard' 997.1 GT3 shifter. Steve wasn't impressed with his and changed it shortly after he purchased his GT3.    Welcome back to the PorscheCooled Podcast. Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. Become a PorscheCooled Exclusive member https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled Insta: @PorscheCooled @michael.bath @P997.1 The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your Podcasts. 

PorscheCooled Podcast
PorscheCooled Owner Stories #53 - Paul 2015 Porsche Cayman

PorscheCooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 75:19


In today's PorscheCooled Podcast Michael presents episode 53 of owner stories with Paul from the UK. Cars have been a part of Paul's life for ever. Since his mid-teens he has had his eye on Porsche. As a kid he drew a 993 engine and silhouette and sent it to a Dick Lovett - a well know Porsche dealer in the UK. Surprisingly he received a response as well as a stock of books for his passion. From that point onwards Paul was fascinated with Porsche, although it was still out of reach. Paul put his Porsche dreams aside ‘as one day' I will have a Porsche which most of us can relate to. Living in Cheltenham with an abundance of great driving roads this only fuelled Paul's passion, it's no wonder he has owned over 40 cars to date. From his first memorable car a mid-engine Mk1 Toyota MR2 sorted by Litchfield in the UK. A lot of drivers cars followed, including GTI's, Accord Type R, Lotus Elise and many others. Paul engineering background and being a ‘sucker for a special edition” has drawn him to very interesting cars. Today, Paul has come full circle with his first Porsche, a mid-engine well optioned 2015 Porsche 981 Cayman with manual transmission. Paul is also part of Reengineering where with his 2 partners will be leading a group of STEM grads through building a 550 Spyder (kit). This will be a modern interpretation of the '50's 550 with re-engineered parts and a carbon body built to a level that Paul would like to equal Singer. Not your average kit car. Welcome back to the Porsche Cooled Podcast. Follow Paul on Instagram @renngineeringuk Watch and Subscribe on YouTube Michael (@michael.bath) owns a first generation 997 Carrera, comes from Australia and currently resides in Bahrain. Steve (@gtst3ve) is a Porsche owner and enthusiast from Sydney, Australia. This podcast is part of a series with Steve where two mates chat about all things Porsche. Thanks for listening. PorscheCooled Exclusive member Become a member of PorscheCooled and help support the Podcast. It will keep us talking! https://www.patreon.com/porschecooled The PorscheCooled Podcast is available everywhere you get your podcasts.

Speaking Your Brand
246: Audience Engagement Strategies for In-Person Speaking with Ramona J. Smith

Speaking Your Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:14


We're continuing our series on in-person speaking with this episode to talk about audience engagement strategies you can use and how you can give your audience an experience. My guest is Ramona J. Smith, who holds the prestigious title of the 2018 World Champion of Public Speaking from Toastmasters, only the 2nd Black woman and 5th woman overall to win this award. Ramona and I talk about: How she created her award-winning speech The importance of using your body and the stage Handling nerves Fun strategies for audience engagement Setting your speaking fees   About My Guest: Ramona J. Smith is an international award-winning public speaker who holds the prestigious title of the 2018 World Champion of Public Speaking. She is a powerhouse, a gracious woman beyond measure, one who courageously surpassed over 30,000 people to receive such an illustrious honor. Her ubiquitous stage presence and poised intellectual delivery of various topics has made Ramona one of the most sought-after public speakers in the world. She has given keynote addresses in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Brazil and India. Ramona has a Bachelor's degree in Public Relations with a minor in Marketing from the famed Baldwin Wallace University, graduating Magna Cum Laude. She is currently pursuing an Executive MBA from Prairie View A&M University in Houston, Texas.   About Us: The Speaking Your Brand podcast is hosted by Carol Cox. At Speaking Your Brand, we help women entrepreneurs and professionals clarify their brand message and story, create their signature talks, and develop their thought leadership platforms. Our mission is to get more women in positions of influence and power because it's through women's stories and visibility that we challenge the status quo and change existing systems. Check out our coaching programs at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com.  Links: Show notes at https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/246/  Watch Ramona's winning speech at https://www.ramonajsmith.com/ Schedule a consult call to talk about creating your signature talk and thought leadership platform: https://www.speakingyourbrand.com/contact.    Connect on LinkedIn: Carol Cox = https://www.linkedin.com/in/carolcox Ramona J. Smith = https://www.linkedin.com/in/ramona-j-smith-61390743/    Related Podcast Episodes: Episode 244: Behind the Scenes of My Recent Keynote with Carol Cox Episode 245: How to Get Selected as a Speaker by Event Organizers with Sarah Soliman

The Steering Committee
Bond in Motion

The Steering Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 56:33


Episode 52: We're back in Colorado and back on the charts in Bahrain! Doug goes deep with James Bond and Ryan plays the student while questioning the teacher's pronunciation of “Aston Martin.” And... what's that smell? Do you smell that smell? Instagram: @ryanbahrke @cannonsrun @thesteeringcommitteepodcast First Dibs Podcast with John Dyste and Justin Underwood from Porsche of Colorado Springs: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/first-dibs-from-inside-porsche-colorado-springs/id1588746552 Blue Chip: bluechipfleet.com Bond in Motion at the the Petersen Automotive Museum: petersen.org/bond Please support those who support us! For the sunglasses of your dreams, shop goodr Sunglasses. Use the code STEERING15 at checkout for 15% off our first order at goodr.com Swisstrax - it's not just surface beauty! Use the code STEER15 at checkout for 15% off sitewide at swisstrax.com. And for bad-ass Belgian brews in Colorado, visit our friends at Bruz Beers: bruzbeers.com

Inside Running Podcast
205: Steve Moneghetti & the London Marathon

Inside Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 149:45


205: Steve Moneghetti & London Marathon   This week's episode of the Inside Running Podcast is brought to you by PILLAR Performance - Australia's first clinical sports micronutrition brand. Available now at selected pharmacies including Terry White Chemmart, specialty sports nutrition stores and online at pillarperformance.com.au   Julian & Bri welcome Pia Clementine to the world. Brad gets back into sessions with the Telford squad and cruises in a long run. Brady gets his heart rate calibrated along the easy runs. The London Marathon returned for the masses with its traditional course, Eloise Wellings ran the fastest debut marathon by an Australian woman, running 2:29:42 to place 14th with Sinead Diver 12th in 2:27:16, eight weeks after her 10th place in the Tokyo Olympic Marathon. Sissay Lemma won the event in 2:04:01 in a redemption race after coming third last year, while last year's winner Shura Kitata finished despite getting dropped by the lead pack in the early stages of the race. Jocelyn Chepkosgei won the event in 2:17:43  while defending champion Brigid Kosgei had to settle for fourth. https://www.instagram.com/p/CUk0NKKAgnK/ https://www.runnerstribe.com/latest-news/jepkosgei-lemma-win-london-marathon-as-wellings-posts-fastest-australian-debut-ever/?fbclid=IwAR3Od5HBz6zVSsLRvcZnJi4_RQJfFb6HrG53l-ANxJEGmjoYtOIN6cMxLAk    Olympic Silver medallist Kalkidan Gezahegne of Bahrain sets the 10k Road World Record at The Giants Geneva 10K. Results Reuters   Listener question from Dominic asks how to mentally recover and reset from a marathon DNF, then Moose asks the boys what the traits of a good running coach are.   Steve Moneghetti is back for another yarn, this time with his performances at the 1989 & 1995 London Marathons. After the debut in the distance in the 1986 Edinburgh Commonwealth Games winning the bronze medal and consistent selection for World Championship races, it was time to see how fast Steve was capable of in the distance. Steve chats about the allure of getting paid to travel and race at the 1989 London Marathon and taking his physio along for the ride, sharing in some of the misadventures in races during the training campaign. While highlighting some of the differences between training then and now, Steve enjoyed the low-key setting of Richmond between races, including 4th place at the World Cross Country Championships in Stavanger, Norway and even chipping in to help the organizers of the London Marathon, before the pressure really ramped up in the form of a young Bruce McAvaney, as well as other life circumstances. Steve shares how he handled that deep field and then recaps the race, including the drama at the drink station at 35k leading into the closing stages of that race and what doors that second place in 2:09:06 meant to him. From there they go to repeating the silver-medal performance in the 1995 edition of the race, bettering his time to 2:08:33 against Dionicio Ceron of Mexico and how the tactics of the race played out into the results, as well as just how many donuts Mona can eat at dessert. Closing out this conversation Mona gives his thoughts on the change in sports, touches on his current fitness and whether he'd pull on a Ballarat singlet right now, coaching and how he's staying engaged with the running community during the pandemic. Patreon Link: https://www.patreon.com/insiderunningpodcast Opening and Closing Music is Undercover of my Skin by Benny Walker. www.bennywalkermusic.com For shoes or running apparel contact Julian at: https://www.facebook.com/therunningcompanyballarat/ Join the conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/insiderunningpodcast/ To donate and show your support for the show: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=9K9WQCZNA2KAN

Anti-Neocon Report
Bahrain protesting israeli embassy

Anti-Neocon Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 15:28


Bahrain protesting israeli embassy presstv --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ryan-dawson01/support

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
568. News: Barclays and Anthemis backing female founders in the UK

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 56:24


Our expert hosts, Gwera Kiwana and Benjamin Ensor, are joined by some great guests to talk about the most notable fintech, financial services and banking news from the past week. This week's guests include: Katie Palencsar, Managing Director & Global Head of Venture Studio, Anthemis Dan Westgarth, COO, Deel We cover the following stories from the fintech and financial services space: Barclays and Anthemis bring female-focused fintech fund to UK and Europe Citi launches tech hub in Bahrain to develop its digital platforms Oraan raises $3M to increase financial inclusion Santander unplugs payments challenger PagoFX after 15 months Claro takes anti-BNPL campaign to London's streets FinTech Startup Highnote Launches and announces $54M in Funding Ant-Backed Ascend Money Becomes Thailand's First Fintech Unicorn A Crypto-Trading Hamster Performs Better Than Warren Buffett And The S&P This episode is sponsored by Temenos. Temenos is the world leader in banking software, serving over 3,000 financial institutions. SCALE 2021 is Temenos' dedicated, virtual developer event, including: insights from industry leaders on current technology trends and how they impact banking; customer presentations; product demonstrations and road-map sessions and opportunities to speak with Temenos experts. Whether you're a developer, consultant or business user, discover the latest technology opportunities and how this can help you deliver bigger, better, faster. Register to attend here. (https://tem.mn/3jYLZlm) This episode is sponsored by LetsDeel. There's a better way to hire internationally, and it starts with Deel. Everything from contract creation, record keeping, payments, and full-time employment is all in one place for teams all over the world. Companies anywhere can hire compliantly everywhere thanks to Deel. It's payroll and compliance built for today's worldwide workforce. To learn more, visit letsdeel/11fs (https://www.letsdeel.com/11fs), and redeem an exclusive offer of 3 months free when you hire a contractor and 20% for your first year when you hire an employee. This episode is sponsored by Blueshift Customers expect more from their digital experience and their personal finance is no exception. Blueshift empowers fintech and financial institutions to create secure customer profiles and intentional, relevant experiences for customers. Whether in app, on site, in branch, or anywhere else, Blueshift's SmartHub CDP helps brands like Lending Tree and ClearScore turn data into personalized experiences that increase retention, satisfaction, and revenue. Learn more about the Blueshift at blueshift.com/11fs. Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. Hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David Brear, Simon Taylor, Jason Bates and Sarah Kocianski and joined by a range of brilliant guests, we cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, alternatively email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Dan Westgarth and Katie Palencsar.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Israel sends message to Iran via Bahrain visit

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 17:38


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political writer Tal Schneider and diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman are today's guests with Jessica Steinberg hosting. Berman discusses foreign minister Lapid's day-long trip to Bahrain late last week, when he inaugurated the Israeli embassy. He also analyzes the deeper meaning behind Lapid's visit to the US Fifth Fleet, which operates in the Persian Gulf and Indian Ocean, where Iran has been stepping up operations and covert attacks. Schneider follows with a conversation about the opening session of the Knesset, where the opposition is back in power and the plenum discussions are expected to be intensive. Berman and Schneider also take a look at the recent headlines about the 'Pandora Papers,' which may implicate financial misdeeds by Jordan's King Abdullah and Likud lawmaker Nir Barkat. Discussed articles include: Lapid inaugurates Israeli embassy in Bahrain On Lapid's Bahrain visit, a photo op at a US Navy base meant for Iranian eyes Former justice minister, billionaire among Israelis named in ‘Pandora Papers' Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Israel's Foreign Minister Yair Lapid, center left, is met by his Bahraini counterpart, Abdullatif bin Rashid Alzayani, center right, for the first high-level visit in Manama, Bahrain, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021 (Shlomi Amshalem/GPO via AP) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.