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(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] "If we just fix the Super-Emitters we directly reduce Biogas Emissions by 62%!" - Semra Bakkaloglu - Imperial College London

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 0:59


Semra Bakkaloglu is a Research Associate at the Imperial College of London. She recently showed in her research how the methane emissions along the biosolids supply chain were vastly underestimated and proposed straightforward actions to correct it swiftly. Sure, wastewater treatment plants gobble a lot of energy. But if you equip them with sludge digesters, they also produce a good chunk of power in the form of biogas.  So, when you do the exercise of a mass carbon balance over the sewage treatment chain, you don't get to zero yet. Still, you're not that far - even more so if you go for advanced biogas production approaches, such as the ones we've covered on that microphone with Cambi, EMG, or anytime soon, Anaergia, and yes, that's a spoiler. Yet, there may well still be a silent killer in your plant. Because there's as much carbon in one molecule of carbon dioxide as in one molecule of methane. But releasing methane into the atmosphere has 27.2 times higher global warming potential!  And as Semra demonstrated in her research, the total global biogas and biomethane emissions to the atmosphere today are about twice as high as previously estimated! But where's that gas leaking from? Well, here again, Semra and her team looked into a full range of emitters to identify the culprits along the supply chain. And then again, they identified a subgroup of super-emitters responsible for 62% of the emissions. Do you have one or several wastewater treatment plants within your area of responsibility? Then you'll want to double-check if you're not one of the bad pupils. And if you're a technology provider - be it in sensors or along the biosolids supply chain - it looks like the challenge you're solving just got twice more pressing.  I'll leave the floor to Semra for you to get the entire story and the plentiful insights about the underlooked biosolids and biomass treatment chain in a second. Just allow me to remind you that, if you like what you hear, you can help me tremendously by sharing that content around you.  Please tell your friends, colleagues, or LinkedIn network what surprised you in what Semra reveals today, and if you don't like what you hear, please reach out to me and tell me what I should be doing differently or better. Come on, do it, and I'll meet you on the other side.  The Underestimated Hidden Threat of Biomethane Production. Time to Act?

USSC Live
Universal voting: Can Australia's experience work in America?

USSC Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 61:17


The simple act of voting – who can vote, how easy it is to vote, who counts the votes, who certifies the votes, and whether the people accept the legitimacy of the outcome of an election – is at the heart of the crisis of confidence in democracy in the United States. After studying voting practices in dozens of countries, E.J. Dionne Jr. and Miles Rapoport found Australia to be one of the most compelling and effective voting systems in the world. What will it take to begin to apply lessons from Australia of Universal Civic Duty Voting to the American experience? Are such fundamental reforms even remotely feasible? To discuss these issues, the United States Studies Centre hosted a webinar featuring co-authors of the new book, 100% Democracy: The case for universal voting, E.J. Dionne Jr., Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and syndicated columnist for The Washington Post and Miles Rapoport, Senior Practice Fellow at the Ash Centre at Harvard Kennedy School in conversation with USSC Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Bruce Wolpe and Research Associate, Victoria Cooper.

MedNotes el Podcast
SOY NEUROSURGERY RESEARCH ASSOCIATE!!!

MedNotes el Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 43:43


Aquí te cuento sobre mi experiencia con el USMLE STEP2CK, mi mudanza a Houston Texas , y por qué no fue un error haber esperado.

AgriTalk PM
AgriTalk-September 30, 2022 PM

AgriTalk PM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 40:57


Ben Brown is a Sr. Research Associate, Agricultural and Applied Economics department at the University of Missouri and he joins us to dissect the Quarterly Grain Stocks Report released today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Southeast Asia Radio
Data Governance in Southeast Asia with Elina Noor

Southeast Asia Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 29:56


Greg talks with co-host Elina Noor on her latest report, “Raising Standards: Data and Artificial Intelligence in Southeast Asia.” Andreyka is joined by Karen Lee, the new Research Associate here at CSIS's Southeast Asia Program, to cover the latest developments from the region.

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #91: LPAA Internationally - A Conversation with Ilias Papathanasiou

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 40:00


Welcome to this edition of Aphasia Access Conversations, a series of conversations about topics in aphasia that focus on the LPAA model. My name is Janet Patterson, and I am a Research Speech Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Health Care System in Martinez, California. These Show Notes follow the conversation between Dr. Papathanasiou and myself, but are not an exact transcript.   Dr. Ilias Papathanasiou is a Professor of Speech and Language Therapy at the Department of Speech and Language Therapy, University of Patras, and a Research Associate at the Voice and Swallowing Clinic, the First ENT Clinic of the Medical School of the National Kapodistrian University of Athens Greece. He is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and has received numerous awards and recognition for his tireless efforts on behalf of aphasia awareness and rehabilitation research in the international community.  In today's episode you will hear about: considering LPAA values across social, cultural and international norms, increasing aphasia awareness through actions in the local community, mentoring speech-language pathologists who are learning about aphasia and LPAA in countries initiating aphasia rehabilitation services. Dr. Janet Patterson: As Ilias and I start this podcast, I want to give you a quick reminder that this year we are sharing episodes that highlight at least one of the gap areas in aphasia care identified in the Aphasia Access, State of Aphasia report, authored by Dr. Nina Simmons-Mackie. For more information on this report, check out Podversations episode # 62 with Dr. Liz Hoover, as she describes these 10 gap areas or go to the Aphasia Access website. This episode with Dr. Papathanasiou focuses on gap area number seven, insufficient or absent communication access for people with aphasia or other communication disorders, and gap area 10, failure to address family and caregiver needs including information, support, counseling, and communication training. I hope our conversation today sheds additional light on these gap areas.    With that introduction, I would like to extend a warm welcome to my friend and noted aphasiologist, Dr. Ilias Papathanasiou. Welcome Ilias and thank you for joining me today on Aphasia Access Podversations.   Dr. Ilias Papathanasiou: Thank you very much for this kind invitation. I'm thrilled to be with you and speak about aphasia from a rather international perspective. As you know, I have been trained in UK, I work in Greece, and have been active in many places around the world and working with developing countries, for people with aphasia.   Janet: Ilias, I'm just thrilled to have you here, and as a side note to our listeners, Ilias and I have already been talking for about an hour sharing wonderful stories about aphasia and international aphasia. Sadly, most of that won't be caught on this particular tape, but I hope a good bit of it will, because Ilias, you are a fount of information, not only about aphasia, but also about aphasia and the international community. Let me start by saying that our listeners, Ilias, are likely very familiar with the LPAA model, which as we all know, places the person with aphasia at the center of decision-making, to support them in achieving their real-life goals and reduce the adverse consequence of aphasia. How do you think social and cultural norms play a role in understanding the LPAA model?   Ilias: This is a very interesting question, which we'll have to answer. But first of all, I think we have to start with what is aphasia and how the implications of aphasia start in the community. I will say, aphasia is a language impairment, first of all, which is related from the focal lesion, which has, of course, great effects on the person with aphasia, on the quality of life, on the social network and the person, on the making friendships, on how the person functions, and the everyday environment. Now, how the person functions in the everyday environment, is related to many, many social norms. I have been working for 15 years in UK and then back to Greece. And I think that's changed my perspective. What is the social role? What the social model can offer in aphasia, because we have two different societies so they believe there are too many different societies around the world which can see aphasia as a different perspective. Taking the example from Greece, I think Greece has got a much-closed family network and supportive network comparing with other developing countries. I mean, the traditional Greece accepted that people will live with or very near their children, will have family nearby, they have their friends nearby, and they will try to - the family - to take the leadership support of the person with aphasia. This is something which might be a bit different with the USA. So in this way, the decision relies on the person and their LPAA approach of getting together and having a chat, which is not what it is for me. It is totally different, it is different in that there you have to help the participation for these people. From this perspective, I will say that life participation approach, if you take a very more wide perspective, is how we take behavior. How we take behaviors doing therapy, not only to the linguistic background because we have to start from there, you know, it's a language impairment, but also to changing behaviors of the people surrounding, to the society, and even to the government policy some time. And there's not only you know, intervening to the benefit to the person and facilitated the person which of course is correct, it's not only that. I will bring the examples. How many hospitals around the world are aphasia friendly? How many documents used by the government are aphasia friendly? And they think this access to solve this information is restricted to the people with aphasia. That is not only in USA, but I think is around the world and even you know, in different parts of the world. Some other movements of people with special skills, for example, people with visual impairment, or hearing impairment, they have been around much longer than the people with aphasia, and perhaps their network, their lobby has achieved much more changes on their policy or in the government. But for people with aphasia, this has not been the case as yet. I think this is something which can work because life participation has to be multi-directional. It is not only to change. The direction of a life participation approach, as I have to say, is a market direction, is multimodal. It has to start even from changing the attitude of the person with aphasia, changing the attitudes of the people surrounding aphasia. Telling you that you are of the society in which they move. Perhaps look at the activities which there are. But most important, changing also the government issues, the policy issues, so to make the environment to enable the person with aphasia to participate. It is very different that in Greece, perhaps, we do not have this approach as you expect in USA. Because as I said in the beginning, there is very close family network, which take that role quite importantly, and there are cases that the family will take out the person, because their close family relations, the person will continue to participate in everyday activities with the family, and perhaps helping them to be as active in the social roles as they were before.   Janet: That makes a lot of sense. You really need to think about the LPAA model with respect to the culture where a person with aphasia lives and where their families are. Let me ask you also, Ilias, in Greece, where you live and practice, how do persons with aphasia participate in speech-language treatment, and you've talked about there isn't really a practice model like LPAA, but it's more of folding the person with aphasia into the family. How do people with aphasia participate in speech-language pathology, and then move into the family?   Ilias: Speech-language pathology in Greece is very new. So, some of the public hospitals do not have a speech pathologist, yet. The first graduates from the Greek programs is about 20 years ago. It's really new and most of them have been focused on pediatrics. The rehabilitation of adults and especially with aphasia is very new in Greece. Also now we have started having some rehabilitation centers. People with aphasia are facing rehabilitation on the acute states in the hospitals, people will stay there for three or four days, having the medical checkup, and then move to a rehab unit. In the rehab unit, which will stay for two or three months, they will have more impairment-based one to one therapy on a daily basis. And then, but surrounding them at the rehabilitation center, is always the family member, which will be visit them daily, taking them to activities and whatever. And then in most of the cases the person will move back to the family. They might continue rehabilitation with an outpatient, private speech therapist, which the family supports at home. This setup will help them integrate within the family network. And usually, you know, people are still looking after, say, if they are married and live as a couple, the woman or the man will look after them, take them out to activities that simply would come around, and help, and take them to the different activities and everyday events, helping them to go out and socialize within the family network. We are still in the network that people are visiting each other, you know, the social events and the family events very often, which is quite important. The person still carries on the routine, and there is the physical disability that might restrict the person to go out, but the family will find a way to communicate and have some activities of what they want to do. And usually, I will say, that the integration after is more related to the family. Now, that can happen, I will say about 70%, 75% to 80% of the cases. Still there will be cases with no family and no support or whatever. In that case, there will be some nursing homes. They're very limited, the nursing homes. Someone would go to a nursing home if they are totally dependent on physical abilities, like they cannot walk, not take food and tube fed or whatever. The rest will be with supports in the family.    On the other hand, what has happened in the last years is that people pay privately, a carer to be with the person with aphasia, or an elderly person. Most likely the carer be an immigrant from another country and perhaps they do not speak the language. From that perspective, the family will go in and help this person. And that's how it helps. You have to look at what is a norm for an elderly person with aphasia. Not another person with aphasia, but what is known for an elderly patient in Greece. Say if someone retired, then what she likes to do usually in Greece, is to be close to the family and see the grandchildren, to be close to do some activities. Some of them they might have a summer house with they go and spend some time with the grandchildren there. So again, for a person without aphasia the activities will be surrounded the family. This continues to exit. So, if someone with aphasia has the grandchildren coming to his house and play, and he wants them, that will be a quality of life for him, to see them and play and communicate. This is very nice because this will give him a motive to do things for himself. But also, the kids will be aware of what is aphasia, and what happened, and that will increase in some ways awareness.   Janet: It sounds like there is a lot of responsibility the family members assume for integrating the person with aphasia into the daily activities and their daily roles, and the fun and the work of family life.   Ilias: This is happening in all aspects. The elderly people stay with the family, stay connected. You know, I will not think that Greek person will leave the parents away from them. It's like you know, they will help and will support them. They might not live together but there will be close family support   Janet: Ilias, you work in a university clinic. At that clinic how do you implement the ideas of client- centered practice or LPAA in your work and your work with students,   Ilias: I don't work directly with aphasia at the university clinic, I work on the voice and swallowing clinic. I teach about aphasia with my students. What I say to them is give them is examples from every day. Usually in my classes there is discussion of the psycholinguistic, cognitive neuro model. And also, there are different lectures of putting them into their functional or community participation approach with aphasia. There are no projects in Greece, like clubs with people with aphasia and community settings where they can go. And from one perspective, I'm not sure if we need that. First is from the family, from the personal view. You don't take the people who have aphasia and put them in another place with people with aphasia, to interact only among them. The point is to integrate them in the community activities and not to you know, go from the house to another room because they will meet another 10 people, unless there are community activities for them to do.  The community activities surrounding it are doing the things which you can do before. What I tried to do with my students is first to teach them to find out what an elderly person needs; how the elderly person communicates. It is very common in Greece to have the coffee shops where people go and have a coffee and play cards. I said to them, go and play cards with your grandfather to see how he communicates, to see what he feels, to see what he needs. If you learn to play cards with your grandfather and your grandparents, you will learn to communicate with a person with an aphasia, because really you have to approach the level and the needs of that person. That is my philosophy with my students - go interact with the people on different events and not be so centered to yourself, and what you think. Go and find out what they want. So we tried to create activities within the class, which we will look on these different perspectives. There is no settings like nursing homes, which they have got people with aphasia in Greece, because people are living in their own homes, about 80% - 90%. The family is there. What we mean by the life participation approach is going back to the family life, going back to the community, because that is the most important to the person's needs and he wants to be close with a family.   Janet: As you're doing that, and teaching your students and role modeling, I imagine you might find some obstacles to actually implementing client-centered care. What obstacles do speech pathologists in Greece face? How do you and your colleagues work to mitigate those obstacles and implement the care principles similar to those of LPAA, when you're working with the patients with aphasia,   Janet: First, you know, there are some physical obstacles. For example, if you live in a big city like Athens, in a block of flats, not all of them are accessible. For people to get out of the house is not always very easy. That is an issue, in general and is not like the United States, where you have homes on one level; people can park outside their houses and get in and out. Here it is totally different. It is like having access in place in New York City with steps to go up in one of these big townhouses. It is not easy for a person with aphasia. Think about it, if you live in a townhouse in New York with ten steps to climb and go in, a person with aphasia cannot do that easily; with a stroke, not with aphasia. This is a similar situation in most places in Greece. Even the new buildings have to have access for people with disabilities, but still, we have flats from the 1960s and 1970s, who do not have access. There are physical obstacles for people to come out and get involved.    Then the other big thing which you have to change is the awareness of aphasia. For people to understand that this person does not have intelligence problem, and this is just a communication problem. And that the people, you know, have the executive function, to function and to communicate. People who do not have that in mind, you have to change this way of thinking. A few years back in Greece, people were saying, ”Oh, he had a stroke, now he lost his mind.” I believe this is nothing new, what's happened in Greece, this happened in other parts of the world, the thinking that aphasia affected the intelligence of the person. We tried to change that, to say that aphasia is something which you have. You lost the ability to use your language and to communicate, but still you are the same person, nothing has changed. You still have got your thoughts, your feelings, your loved ones, this has not changed. And as I told you, there is also some natural recovery in different ways. The example, which I gave you before, when we had the chat, when I saw my person from the village where I was born in Greece, when I was living in UK, there was no service for aphasia in Greece. He never had therapy and he was someone with Broca's Aphasia and severe apraxia. His wife was taking him every day to the coffee shop, which he used to do, to see the same people and watching the people play cards, and he has found the natural way of communicating. That I think, is very important because he kept the activities. He kept the roles and that is the social model of the life of the patient. It does not mean life participation is to go to a club to meet other people with aphasia. Life participation means to return back to what you want, and what is your everyday activities, your family, and what it is important to you to do. That's what I tried to do with my students, tried to put them into this modality of thinking that you have to take into account what the person of aphasia is, and what the environment they live. It says a person should return to these roles are soon as they can.   Janet: Those are wise words very, very wise words Ilias, I think, especially the idea about going into the coffee shop. That makes perfect sense is a way of beginning to communicate and establish a pattern between the two of you for communication.   Ilias: Yeah, but this person did develop a pattern of communication with no intervention. You will say then, what would a speech-language pathologist do in this situation. And I will say, the speech-language pathologist will go there from the beginning, might work on the linguistic impairment at the same time, show his wife and facilitate all these changes in the life they knew, and perhaps, if she found a way, two months or three months down the line, to take him to the coffee shop. She should start doing that earlier, taking him out to everyday activities which he used to do before. Sometimes, you know, we have to think we are overreacting. Perhaps we have things in our mind, the therapist, which we say, “oh, you should do that, you should do that, you should do that.” The person really is not aware of what we're suggesting, you know, what I mean? We're very motivated for people to do more things and more things and get involved. But actually, the person, that is not what you want. Some simple things in life can make these changes.   Janet: Exactly.    Ilias: Give them this space to make the choices of what is meaningful to them. The thing, you have to take that into account, and that's what I say from the beginning. The behavior changes, not only the linguistic skills and on the family, but also to us. How we're able to understand as clinicians where to stop participating in the social interaction with them. Some people are lazy, some have got a different network. It's not all you know, what we want to push them to do?   Janet: You're exactly right, because you may have wonderful ideas as a speech-language pathologist, but they don't match with what the person with aphasia would like to do. You must respect their ideas and their wishes.   Ilias: It is not only respect them, because we do, I want to believe that we respect the wishes. We have to teach ourselves to take that into account when we give these wonderful ideas. It is a skill not to push the people, you know, not to push people too far. You have to give them the space, and I think that is quite important, too.   Janet: Let me take this conversation in a slightly different direction. What you've been talking about a lot is really awareness and support and understanding the culture of where a person and how a person with aphasia lives, and how their family lives. But let me take you in a slightly different direction by asking about the papers that you have published on several topics helping people understand aphasia. I'm thinking mostly about your papers on public awareness of aphasia and assessing quality of life for persons with aphasia. Will you tell us a little bit about this line of research that you've been doing, and how you see it informing clinical practice for speech-language pathologists who believe in the LPAA model and patient-centered care   Ilias: Now, you are speaking with someone who has got a very wide background in research. I have to say that my first research and my Ph.D. was about neuroplasticity and connectivity. I did that back in London at the Institute of Neurology, with TMS and connectivity in the middle 1990s, before all this idea about plasticity and connectivity came out.  It was very lovely to work with them. At that point, this was not very popular. I don't know why, but now it is. Perhaps people are not aware about all this work I have done with connectivity in neuroplasticity, back in the 1990s, even though it is published. But it's written in different way.    But coming back to Greece, I have to say, you have to start from a different perspective. Why is that? Because I come from a country who has totally different needs, comparing with UK who have more organized research. I will take that as a guidance or an advice to people who are going back to their countries of developing. There are countries who do not have, you know, the research programs you have in USA, and that are still developing countries. When I came back to Greece, I had to start from somewhere. The things which I needed were tests to evaluate aphasia, I need to see what the public knows about aphasia, and even what are some networks about aphasia, I need to start from epidemiological data. Because unless you work on an epidemiological data, you will not be able to go to the government and say the policies, how many people with aphasia exist and what changed. At the same time, Katerina Hilari in UK was doing the work on quality of life. We did a project with her here in Greece on the validation of the quality-of-life approach, which Katerina has developed, and has been used in Greece as well. With Katerina, we developed the first efficacy study in the Greek language, because we have to prove that the linguistic difference makes a difference. We took the semantic feature analysis in a different perspective, which is more approachable to the Greek. It will do the semantic analysis work, which has been published.    So really, coming back from here, you have to start from the basic and it is important for the local community in the country because you got to start. That's why I have the work which changed my direction some ways. We might speak about different approaches to aphasia in developing countries, when you go to the small countries, this is totally different. At the same time, because people have been starting my position in other countries, I have been invited to help them out in a different perspective. I have been working with Slovenia, for example, helping them to develop the test, and they are doing education about aphasia. Now I have contact with people from Middle East and they want the similar. Through my work with the International Association of Language and Communication Sciences and Disorders, IALP, as part of the Education Committee, we have a mentorship program for clinicians working with aphasia, something which perhaps you don't know. IALP and Tavistock trust, have put together a program and aphasia committee and we are mentors of clinicians in the developing countries. Right now, the IALP program has about twenty clinicians being mentored around the world. I have someone in Vietnam, which is very interesting. And the same time, from my role as the Education Committee, I have been involved in many of these places, which they asked you know, how to develop materials, how to do all this work to change the life of communication disorders. I think aphasia is part of that, because I have all that experience. I think you have to start off at that point with the research, you know, develop the tests, the materials to assess, and then go to the different aspects which we need of recovery. Taking in the national perspective, regarding tests, I will say, you do not have to translate the test, you don't translate the test, you adopt the test. And sometimes it's not possible to do that. Even some of the notes of the quality of life which you have, or the social approach, which you have in the case of the life participation approach with what we have talked before, might not be appropriate in a different country. But you have to think the principles behind that.   Janet: You talk about awareness, and it makes me think that it really is foundational to so much of what we think about with LPAA. You're talking about awareness of aphasia in government areas, in policy areas, in writing documents, in how families engage with people with aphasia, how the shopkeepers around the area engage with people with aphasia. Awareness is important and those of us who are enmeshed in aphasia, we just may take it for granted that everybody knows what aphasia is, or everybody knows how to talk with the person with aphasia, and that's just not so. You're telling me, and I believe you're right, that building awareness is so important to the foundation of building a successful aphasia culture, whether it's the rehabilitation culture, or the family culture, or the government culture,   Ilias: I want to say aphasia-friendly society, instead of culture.   Janet: That's a great way to think about it – aphasia-friendly society, larger than just the speech language-pathology community.   Ilias: Larger than that. With the Bruce Willis and all the issues these days about aphasia, it's a great opportunity to go out and speak what is aphasia. People now might know the word aphasia, but what actually is the effect on life and how we'll live with that. I don't think that people are aware of that, unless it is something they have experienced from their own household. I think we have to get involved, taking the opportunities not only to go to the TV channels or going to the media and speaking about it, using this opportunity to get involved to the changes in the society. I think that is what will be the opportunity. The media help up to one level, but speaking to the media, they will know what is aphasia but that will not change that of the society 100%. People have to be in phase with a person with aphasia, and they have to say, to interact, with a person with aphasia to understand what it is. In the smaller communities, that might be easier, because each knows each other, and that will be much easier. That is why Greece, who is a smaller community, this small village, in a small town is more acceptable, comparing where the neighborhood network and the neighborhood community is still very close, comparing with big cities, which we don't know who lives next to you. That helps people understand what's going on and helping the person with aphasia. We have to start from the local people instead of going to the media. They're here, and you go out and take the people with aphasia to breakfast. I say, going to the coffee shop, that will be another 15 people there, these people will know what happend and speak with them. These 15 people will go to a different level. This is how you spread the word of aphasia. It is not always that the media will do the best thing. That's what I think.   Janet: I think you're right; it takes many perspectives. And people working from many points of view to really build this foundation and the media, especially with the attention it's given in the last couple of weeks about Bruce Willis. The media certainly plays a point, but you're right, not the most important point or not the only point. We are the advocates, and we are the ones who need to lay the foundation for awareness,   Ilias: I think we have to go a step further. Like, yes, the media brought this case up, go to the governor, go to the policies, insist that there is a need there. It is the media in different ways. Go and speak with the politicians, the lobby. I don't think this has happened.    Janet: It happens in some places, but we can certainly do more. Which leads me actually to my next question. So in addition to being a leader in aphasia, in your country of Greece, Ilias, you also have a large international presence in the aphasia community. You've alluded to that, and that presence in the discussion today. But I want to take you a little bit further into that by asking, how do you see the LPAA model influencing aphasia services throughout the international community? I know you've already talked about it with respect to your Greek community, but what are you thinking about, or what are you speculating about with the larger international community?   Ilias: I think that we will be involved in the very international community, but we have to take into account their special social network, which every community has got, which is totally different. Perhaps the life participation approach will be different from one community to another globally, from one country to another. Each community has got different norms, so it has to be adopted to the different norms of the community. How that will happen, I think, is local people will take the history of it and try to disseminate, and they will adopt it locally. It has to be adopted locally, and how it will be applied with different societal structures, that also will be very interesting to see. As I say, working with these developing countries, I will be very interested to see how that will evolve, and how they will respect. Some of the countries think that aphasia therapy is only linguistic because they have different norms, or I don't know if there are some countries which think about intelligence. There must be. So it's a lot of education which has to happen in all these countries to do all this information.    Janet: That's a good perspective and again, brings us back to the work we need to do in terms of aphasia awareness, talking with our colleagues internationally, and connecting with people with aphasia and their families.   Ilias: It's very important because I think the world that will change as well, because the world is getting smaller. I think communication between different countries at different perspectives, now, it's much easier. Look at the different ways which this podcast works. This can have access to different people around the world, they can speak, have communication, have Zoom meeting. It's much easier to communicate and have access to different information. I think that will help to change. But on the other hand, you don't know how ready a culture is to accept this approach, because some technology is going too fast for some countries and cannot be persuaded to go faster in some modalities. I think it's much easier than it used to be 20 years ago to have access to all this information directly. I think this is a positive sign for more countries to approach to life participation approach.   Janet: Certainly, we've had some podcasts on this topic, and people are thinking about how do you connect, to do a group therapy for people with aphasia, using technology or Zoom or some other platform? Certainly, that is exciting and if it helps persons with aphasia, that's a great thing.   Ilias: Can we have a podcast with people with aphasia speaking from different countries?   Janet: I think that would be a terrific idea. We've had one podcast with some people with aphasia speaking, but they have been in the same location. We have had not podcasts, but I've been part of activities where people in different parts of the United States have been talking together on Zoom. I think that's an excellent idea, people with aphasia from different parts of the world gathering together to talk about their aphasia, I'm going to propose that topic to our team,   Ilias: I'm happy to facilitate that.   Janet: Excellent, I'll sign you up Ilias. As we bring this interview to a close, Ilias, I wonder if you have some pearls of wisdom or lessons learned about LPAA and aphasia services in Greece and around the world that you will share with our listeners.   Ilias: I will say first of all, listen to the person. Just note what the person wants. That is the most important thing. A person with aphasia, as Audrey Holland said, is able to communicate even if he has got the linguistic impairment. So as clinicians, as family, try to find the strong points of this person, and make the most of it, to make him an active member of the society. According to what he wants, she wants, do not impose things on the person, give them the opportunity. I think that is applied everywhere. With the different societal rules, people need different things. Just listen to this person, what he wants, and just use the stroke skills which they have, and facilitate to be an active member of the society. Don't ignore the linguistic impairment, change the behavior allowed at all different levels that we have discussed so far. That's what I want to give out of this perspective.   Janet: I think those very important pearls of wisdom, especially the idea of listening to the patient. It's not huge, it doesn't take a lot of effort, but it's so very, very important because it can form the foundation of the relationship that we have and the success that the person with aphasia can feel. Thank you for those, I will take them to heart and take them into our minds as well. I do appreciate Ilias, your insights and your dedication to serving people with communication disorders. Thank you very much for talking to me today.    This is Janet Patterson, and I am speaking from the VA in Northern California. Along with Aphasia Access, I would like to thank my guest, Dr. Ilias Papathanasiou, for sharing his knowledge about aphasia and his experiences in the international aphasia community. I am grateful to you, Ilias, for reflecting on LPAA and international aphasia services, and sharing your thoughts with us today.   You can find references and links in the Show Notes from today's podcast interview with Ilias Papathanasiou at Aphasia Access under the Resource tab on the homepage. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of the Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. If you have an idea for a future podcast topic, please email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org Thank you again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.                 References   Papathanasiou, I. (Ed.). (2000). Acquired Neurogenic Communication Disorders: A Clinical Perspective. London: Whurr Publishers.  Papathanasiou, I. & De Bleser, R. (Eds.).  2010 (2nd ed.). The Sciences of Aphasia: From Therapy to Theory. London: Emerald Group Publishing. Papathanasiou, I., Coppens, P. & Potagas, C. (Eds.).  2022 (3rd ed.). Aphasia and Related Neurogenic Communication Disorders, Burlington MA: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.   International Association of Communication Sciences and Disorders.  https://ialpasoc.info  Tavistock Trust for Aphasia. https://aphasiatavistocktrust.org/  Ilias Papathaniou@facebook.com

Scott Thompson Show
Climate change policy NEEDS to be found in the centre

Scott Thompson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 81:25


The Hamilton Today Podcast with Scott Thompson: Russia continues to threaten Ukraine and the West with Nukes. They're also preparing to annex the areas of Ukraine it's taken to be a part of Russia. And now suddenly the Nord Stream gas pipeline to Germany has incurred massive damage. Russia is in a peculiar place, and Scott digs into that with Ian Lee, Sprott School of Business, and Stephen Saideman of Carleton University. It is not often that you can say “We have impact” and it is a wholly positive outcome! NASA's mission to hit an asteroid as a potential solution to Earth threatening meteors worked! A man known simply as “Orbax” joins Scott for that. It is all coming up on the Hamilton Today Podcast. Guests: Jamie Maraucher, Digital Broadcast Journalist. Marianne Meed-Ward, Mayor, Burlington. Orbax, Lecturer, Department of Physics, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Guelph, co-founder of Royal City Science, and one-half of Orbax and Pepper Do Science, an educational science-based platform  Ian Lee, Associate Professor with the Sprott School of Business at Carleton University. Jon Roe, Research Associate, Angus Reid Institute. Howard Levitt, Senior Partner, Howard Levitt. Stephen Saideman, Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University's Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Director of the Canadian Defence and Security Network, and author of the book “For Kin or Country: Xenophobia, Nationalism, and War.” Cody Battershill, founder and chief spokesperson, Canada Action, national resource advocacy group. Scott Radley, Host of The Scott Radley Show, Columnist with the Hamilton Spectator. Host – Scott Thompson Content Producer – Elizabeth Russell Technical/Podcast Producer - William Webber Podcast co-producer – Ben Straughan News Anchors – Dave Woodard, Diana Weeks Want to keep up with what happened in Hamilton Today? Subscribe to the podcast! https://megaphone.link/CORU8835115919

New Books in American Studies
On F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby"

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 33:03


“America” means something different to everyone. American novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald published The Great Gatsby, his account of the roaring twenties, the decade of economic growth and social change that followed the devastation of World War I. It's a text that powerfully describes a country in flux, but it also captures something deeper and more enduring about American culture. David Alworth is a professor at Stony Brook University (SUNY), Associate of the Department of English at Harvard University, and Research Associate in the Harvard Kennedy School. He has written Site Reading: Fiction, Art, Social Form and The Look of the Book: Jackets, Covers, and Art at the Edges of Literature. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
On F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby"

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 33:03


“America” means something different to everyone. American novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald published The Great Gatsby, his account of the roaring twenties, the decade of economic growth and social change that followed the devastation of World War I. It's a text that powerfully describes a country in flux, but it also captures something deeper and more enduring about American culture. David Alworth is a professor at Stony Brook University (SUNY), Associate of the Department of English at Harvard University, and Research Associate in the Harvard Kennedy School. He has written Site Reading: Fiction, Art, Social Form and The Look of the Book: Jackets, Covers, and Art at the Edges of Literature. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
On F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 33:03


“America” means something different to everyone. American novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald published The Great Gatsby, his account of the roaring twenties, the decade of economic growth and social change that followed the devastation of World War I. It's a text that powerfully describes a country in flux, but it also captures something deeper and more enduring about American culture. David Alworth is a professor at Stony Brook University (SUNY), Associate of the Department of English at Harvard University, and Research Associate in the Harvard Kennedy School. He has written Site Reading: Fiction, Art, Social Form and The Look of the Book: Jackets, Covers, and Art at the Edges of Literature. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Naked Pravda
What if Vladimir Putin dies tomorrow?

The Naked Pravda

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 42:00


Save Meduza!https://support.meduza.io/enAs acting president, elected president, prime minister, and then president again, Vladimir Putin has now ruled Russia for almost 23 years. And it doesn't look like he plans to retire any time soon. Following amendments to the Russian constitution in 2020, Putin is now able to run in two more presidential elections. This means he could potentially remain in power until 2036, at which point he'll be turning 83.  Putin is indeed getting old, and ever since he ordered a full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February, there's been a lot of speculation about his future. With his seventieth birthday coming up on October 7, reports and rumors about the state of Putin's health abound. But death by old age is probably years (if not decades) away for a man whose physical survival is one of Russia's greatest national security priorities. Of course, no one lives forever, and just like Mikhail Gorbachev and Queen Elizabeth II, Vladimir Putin will one day pass away. But what if he dies suddenly, while still in office? What happens then? The Naked Pravda turns to three experts for insights into the potential domestic and global consequences of Putin's death. Timestamps for this episode: (6:08) Fabian Burkhardt, a post-doctoral Research Associate at the Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, on how Putin's death would impact Russia's domestic politics — and political elites — in the short term.  (16:04) Ronald Grigor Suny, the William H. Sewell Jr. Distinguished University Professor of History and a Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, on the death of Stalin and the Soviet Union's transfer of power problem.  (25:06) Domitilla Sagramoso, Senior Lecturer in Security and Development in the Department of War Studies at King's College London, on Putin's foreign policy legacy and what it means for the future trajectory of Russia's relations with the wider world. 

Astor Investment Management
Breaking down the latest Fed meeting

Astor Investment Management

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:07


Astor's CIO, John Eckstein, and Research Associate, Nick Porter, break down the latest fed meeting. The post Breaking down the latest Fed meeting appeared first on Astor Investment Management.

River Talks
PFAS in Tennessee - An Emerging Concern for Water Quality (with Erin Kanzig from River Network)

River Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 34:34


Check our blog for full resources mentioned in this episode: https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/09/21/pfas-tennessee/ You may never have heard of PFAS, but this emerging contaminant is getting more and more attention. Although it's considered "emerging", it's actually a chemical pollutant that has been around for decades, and remains in the environment as a "forever chemical". Research now links PFAS to many health issues and the public discourse around PFAS is increasing. Policies for PFAS regulation are becoming increasingly prevalent at the state level, while the federal government is developing its own framework for action. In this River Talk, we are joined by Erin Kanzig who is the River Programs Policy and Research Associate at River Network and based in Detroit, Michigan. River Network is a national nonprofit that empowers and unites people and communities to protect and restore rivers and other waters that sustain all life. In this conversation, Erin helps us navigate the current PFAS landscape including regulations, health advisories, and federal funding. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thecompact/message

The Future Of
Vitamin D | Dr Eleanor Dunlop

The Future Of

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 21:49


Nine out of 10 Aussies have low vitamin D intakes, but why do we need vitamin D and why aren't we getting enough of it? In this episode, Sarah is joined by Dr Eleanor Dunlop to talk about the role vitamin D plays in our bodies and why some of us are vitamin D deficient. Dr Dunlop also discusses how her research could help inform nutrition policy in Australia and increase our intake of the ‘sunshine vitamin'. Why Aussies are vitamin D deficient [04:17]Factors that impact vitamin D uptake [07:14]Australia's first vitamin D database [08:40]Vitamin D-fortified foods [11:36]Vitamin D in Aboriginal populations [15:33]Learn moreNine out 10 Aussies have low vitamin D intakes, Curtin study shows2021 Premier Science AwardsBush tucker and vitamin DConnect with our guestDr Eleanor Dunlop, Research Associate, Curtin School of Population Health.Dr Eleanor Dunlop is an accredited practising dietitian and postdoctoral researcher focusing on vitamin D, food composition and the role of diet in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis. Her PhD project, Investigating dietary vitamin D in Australia, was completed in 2022 and received the Curtin Chancellor's commendation. Eleanor is an active research communicator and was a finalist in the 2021 Premier's Science Awards.Connect with Eleanor: LinkedInTwitterFacebookStaff profileJoin Curtin UniversityThis podcast is brought to you by Curtin University. Curtin is a global university known for its commitment to making positive change happen through high-impact research, strong industry partnerships and practical teaching.Work with usStudy a research degreeStart postgraduate educationGot any questions, or suggestions for future topics?Email thefutureof@curtin.edu.auSocial mediaTwitterFacebookInstagramYouTubeLinkedInTranscriptRead the transcript here.Behind the scenesHost: Sarah TaillierResearcher, Recorder and Editor: Zoe TaylorExecutive Producers: Anita Shore and Jarrad LongAssistant Producer: Alexandra EftosSocial Media Coordinator: Amy HoskingFirst Nations AcknowledgementCurtin University acknowledges the traditional owners of the land on which Curtin Perth is located, the Whadjuk people of the Nyungar Nation, and on Curtin Kalgoorlie, the Wongutha people of the North-Eastern Goldfields; and the First Nations peoples on all Curtin locations.MusicOKAY by 13ounce Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 Music promoted by Audio Library.Curtin University supports academic freedom of speech. The views expressed in The Future Of podcast may not reflect those of Curtin University.

All Things Policy
Online Privacy 101 to Commemorate 5 Years of the Puttaswamy Judgement

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 23:59


It's been 5 years since the Puttaswamy judgement on privacy. India's data protection bill which came about as a result of this judgement has been in the works for the past 4 years. There has been a lot of pushback against some sections of the bill by privacy advocates and tech companies. This bill was recently withdrawn from parliament citing the need for a more comprehensive review. While we wait for a comprehensive data protection framework, Bharath Reddy talks with Bhavya Birla about what you can do to safeguard your data and privacy online.Bhavya Birla is a Research Associate at The Dialogue. He pursued his undergraduate degree in law from Symbiosis Law School, Noida and holds diplomas in Cyber Law and International Law & Diplomacy from GLC, Mumbai and Indian Society of International Law respectively. His areas of interest cover informational privacy, privacy regulation, data flows, encryption etc. He is a proponent of digital privacy, freedom, and safety for all.You can follow Bhavya on twitter: https://twitter.com/bhavyabirlaYou can follow Bharath on twitter: https://twitter.com/bharath_redCheck out Takshashila's courses: https://school.takshashila.org.in/You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/featuredDo follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.https://twitter.com/IVMPodcastshttps://www.instagram.com/ivmpodcasts/?hl=enhttps://www.facebook.com/ivmpodcasts/Follow the show across platforms:Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, JioSaavn, Gaana, Amazon MusicDo share the word with you folks!

YXE Underground
Season Five - Episode One - Phillip Harder

YXE Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 41:29


Every superhero has an origin story. For hydrologist Phillip Harder, who I consider a water superhero, his origin story traces back to when he first saw a culvert sticking straight up in the air near his farm at the age of seven.Phillip wanted to know why there was fresh water at the bottom of that odd-looking culvert when there was an alkali body of water nearby. To a seven year-old kid growing up on a farm southeast of Saskatoon, this question needed an answer.The answer to this question, and the great story that surrounds it, is in this episode of YXE Underground.Season 5 of YXE Underground begins with Phillip Harder. He is a hydrologist and a Research Associate for the Centre for Hydrology at the University of Saskatchewan. He is also a member of a national team called the Global Water Futures research project. Phillip is helping communities on the prairies, and especially farmers, learn to best use their fresh water resources. He's doing this through careful research, flying expensive drones and engaging with people on social media. I really admire the work Phillip is doing for our communities. I think the issue of fresh water will become more prominent in the years to come here in Saskatoon as we continue to see the impact of climate change and how it impacts the South Saskatchewan River. We rely so much on the South Saskatchewan River here in Saskatoon, but as Phillip points out in the podcast, so do many people in Saskatchewan and Alberta. We are going to need to share this valuable resource and Phillip's research will help guide us in how best to do so. You will also hear from Jay Famiglietti in this episode. Jay is the Executive Director for the Global Institute of Water Security at the University of Saskatchewan and hosts a wonderful podcast called What About Water which is produced here in Saskatoon. Jay does an excellent job of putting Phillip's work into a larger context and discusses the challenges of sharing research with people who are set in their ways when it comes to using water. This was such a fun episode to produce! I spent a very hot August afternoon with Phillip on his family's land just south of Clavet, Saskatchewan, which is about 15 minutes southeast of Saskatoon. He not only took me to the infamous vertical culvert but also to a research site where some of his work is taking place. Phillip is passionate about educating people on issues surrounding fresh water and is gifted at explaining things in clear and understandable ways. I hope you enjoy the Season 5 debut of YXE Underground and I want to thank you for supporting a local, independent podcast! When I started this podcast in September of 2018, I had no idea it would find such a caring and engaged audience, and I sure didn't think I would make it to a fifth season! Thank you so much for your continued support as I really love sharing the stories of people who are making a difference in Saskatoon but are flying under the radar.Cheers…Eric  

Budget Watchdog All Federal
Ep 29 Venting & Flaring

Budget Watchdog All Federal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 20:07


The curious and potentially catastrophic case of your tax dollars being lit on fire. Oil and gas companies waste billions of cubic feet of natural gas extracted from federal lands, royalty-free, every year by just venting it or burning it off. Hit play for the facts about how methane waste on federal lands is causing economic damage to all taxpayers – and the climate.  Host Steve Ellis is joined by TCS Vice President, Autumn Hanna; Mia Huang, TCS Research and Data Analyst; and Tyler Work, TCS Development and Research Associate.

The Boardwalk
Episode 49: WTF is Happening in Iraq with Zineb Riboua

The Boardwalk

Play Episode Play 29 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 53:06


We took a break from talking about Afghanistan to chat with Zineb Riboua, Research Associate and Program Manager for the Center for Peace and Security in the Middle East at the Hudson Institute, about the recent intrareligious fighting between Shia political factions in Iraq that boiled over into 2 days of violence in the streets of Baghdad and Basra. We also dive into the role Iran plays in destabilizing the Iraqi government and what it could mean for the region._________________________________________ Where to Listen:Apple: https://bit.ly/theboardwalkapple Spotify: https://bit.ly/theboardwalkspotify Pandora: https://bit.ly/3xZ8bk9 Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3gbZ6ya Amazon Music: https://amzn.to/37UuZXQ Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3AQNadj  iHeart Radio: https://bit.ly/3y0Vfdw TuneIn: https://bit.ly/2W1VEPN Buzzsprout: https://bit.ly/37PIdoy  Be sure to like, follow, subscribe, rate, review, and share wherever you listen to our podcast. New episodes of The Boardwalk are published every Saturday morning.  Our Social Media Sites:Instagram: @theboardwalkpodcast Facebook: @TheBoardwalkPodcastTwitter: @theboardwalkpod You can also reach us by email at: theboardwalkpodcast@gmail.com  Podcast Theme Song"KMAG YOYO"by Hayes Carllwww.hayescarll.comThe views expressed by the hosts and guests of this podcast do not represent the views of the United States Government or the United States Department of Defense. 

DAOn the Rabbit Hole
S2 E10: Breaking Down The Merge and Why it's Just the Beginning for Ethereum (Jon Charbonneau)

DAOn the Rabbit Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 40:13


On this episode of DAOn the Rabbit Hole, we're talking with Jon Charbonneau, a Research Associate at the crypto research platform Delphi Digital. If you're trying to wrap your head around The Merge or Ethereum itself, Jon has you covered in this conversation.We kickoff the episode getting to know Jon, his background, and how he fell down the crypto rabbit hole. As a prominent writer, Jon is the perfect guest to take us on a deep dive on Ethereum, its innerworkings, and of course, The Merge. As we peel back the layers of the largest smart contract blockchain, we also discuss Ethereum's vision, core values, community, functionality, and why Jon is so excited about it. Turning to The Merge itself, Jon breaks down topics such as proof of work vs. proof of stake, the beacon chain, the reasoning behind the merge, energy efficiency, and more. He also debunks some common misconceptions regarding The Merge and clarifies what users and validators should expect in the coming weeks. As we close our conversation, we touch on some delicate Ethereum issues, including what it means to scale Ethereum, the correlation between security and decentralization, incentives for validators, censorship, regulation, and other important topics. To continue this conversation and stay up to date on all things DAOn the Rabbit Hole, you can follow Anay on Twitter @anay_sim and RabbitHole @rabbithole_gg. You can also follow Jon @jon_charb. ⌛ TIMESTAMPS:0:00 Intro0:52 Jon's background2:44 Why Jon is excited about Ethereum4:18 Core values of Ethereum6:07 Ethereum's dazzling functionality7:47 The Merge10:50 The Beacon Chain12:33 Will proof of work continue?14:45 Why merge? 17:45 Scaling Ethereum19:19 What will change for Ethereum users?19:55 What will change for Ethereum validators?21:53 Security and decentralization25:16 Financial requirements for validators26:50 Censorship 32:01 Regulation35:44 The future of Ethereum39:20 Follow Jon! 

Jim Bohannon
Jim Bohannon Show 09-08-22

Jim Bohannon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 113:45


Guests: Mary Jordan, Former London Bureau Chief for the Washington Post, On to discuss the death of Queen Elizabeth II Bruce Gilley, Professor of Political Science at Portland State University, On to discuss the death of Queen Elizabeth II Lauren Conlin, Entertainment Commentator, On to discuss the death of Queen Elizabeth II Jonathan Hofer, Research Associate at the Independent Insutute, On to discuss faulty license plate reading software in use in California.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Next Page
How Anthropology Helps Us Understand Multilateralism

The Next Page

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 46:35


In this episode of the #NextPagePod, we are joined by Professor Miia Halme-Tuomisaari, Associate Professor in Human Rights studies at Lund University in Sweden, and Research Associate at the Global Governance Centre at the Geneva Graduate Institute. Professor Halme-Tuomisaari is a social anthropologist with a background in international law, whose focus is on the study of the contemporary human rights phenomenon.   Why does anthropology matter to the study of International Organisations and multilateralism? Our Director at the UN Library and Archives Geneva, Francesco Pisano, joins Professor Halme-Tuomisaari to find out what her research reveals.  Resources   Visit Professir Halme-Tuomisaari's website: https://miiahalmetuomisaari.net/, as well as her Instagram https://www.instagram.com/observari/  and Twitter: https://twitter.com/HalmeTuomisaari   Visit the Allegra Lab website: https://allegralaboratory.net/   Where to listen to this episode   Apple podcasts:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-next-page/id1469021154  Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/10fp8ROoVdve0el88KyFLy  Youtube:   Content     Speakers: Miia Halme-Tuomisaari  Host: Francesco Pisano   Editors & Producers: Alma Selvaggia Rinaldi & Natalie Alexander Social media designs: Alma Selvaggia Rinaldi & Natalie Alexander Recorded & produced at the United Nations Library & Archives Geneva  

The Wolf Connection
Episode #89 Kira Cassidy & Connor Meyer - Toxoplasmosis in Wolves

The Wolf Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 74:00


Kira Cassidy has been a Biologist and Research Associate for Yellowstone Forever for over a decade. Connor Meyer is a PhD Student in Wildlife Biology at the University of Montana. They are working on new research pertaining to Toxoplasmosis in wolves around Yellowstone National Park. Kira and Connor discussed what Toxoplasmosis is, the relationship between cougars and wolves with this disease, and the effects of it on wolf behavior.@kira_cassidy@connor__meyer@thewolfconnectionpod

The Buff Show
Cowering No More 9-7-22

The Buff Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 74:49


Austin Ruse, the President of the ‘Center for Family and Human Rights', and author of ‘Under Siege: No Finer Time to be a Faithful Catholic' resolution just passed by the United Nations which acknowledges access to abortion as a “human right”, and the lack of support from even some professed Pro-Life nations in standing against it. Michael Warren Davis is an editor and spokesman for Sophia Institute Press. He is also a contributing editor for The American Conservative. He previously served as editor-in-chief of Crisis Magazine and U.S. editor of the Catholic Herald. He is the author of The Reactionary Mind (Regnery, 2021) and a forthcoming book The Times Are Wretched (Sophia, 2024). Scarlett Johnson , Moms for Liberty Chapter Chair from Ozaukee, WI. Comprehensive Sex Ed and why it's so critical to stand up right now. CSE is the new CRT but on steroids. Jonathan Hofer, is a Research Associate at the Independent Institute. He is author of the new report, The Pitfalls of Law Enforcement License Plate Readers in California and Safeguards to Protect the Public. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-buff-show/support

The Locked up Living Podcast
Home as a continuing site of conflict. Veterans' experiences of 21st century warfare and the return to post-conflict life, Hannah Wilkinson

The Locked up Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 64:55


Hannah Wilkinson recently joined the University of Nottingham as Assistant Professor of Criminology and is a member of the Criminal Justice Research Centre. Prior to that, she was a Lecturer in Criminology at Keele University. Hannah's research interests lie in the areas of war, state crime and social harm. In particular, she is interested in the complex implications of 21st century conflict for former military personnel. You can find her most recent publication here https://t.co/haB3aOapDJ and you can see her talking at the Argentine Ambassador's residence this summer here https://www.academia.edu/video/l8bW8j Hannah completed her doctoral research under the supervision of Professor Ronnie Lippens, Dr. Evi Girling, and Dr. Samantha Weston at Keele University. The PhD thesis is entitled: ‘No Man's Land? Veterans' experiences of 21st century warfare and the return to post-conflict life'. Hannah uses in-depth qualitative and visual methodology, drawing theoretical inspiration from the works of Pierre Bourdieu on the (re)production of power and inequality within society, and from Zygmunt Bauman on the fluidity and precariousness of modern life.  She has worked with Staffordshire and Birmingham based charities to support criminalised veterans. This has involved sharing research findings and developing a training programme for practitioners. In addition, Hannah has worked as a Research Associate alongside Dr. Samantha Weston on projects with Re-Solv – around early intervention and prevention of volatile substance abuse, and with Staffordshire Police, evaluating the child sexual exploitation (CSE) prevention programme.  Hannah is a member of the European Society of Criminology, the British Society of Criminology, the Defence Research Network, and the European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control. Her current work explores the embodied traces of the ‘war on terror' and lived experience of austerity for former British military personnel. She is also working on an article that draws attention to the warning signs of fascism amid the UK government's response to Covid-19.

Chain Reaction
How Censorship Resistant is Ethereum? With Jon Charbonneau

Chain Reaction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 72:52


In this episode, we dive into Ethereum's censorship resistance with Jon Charbonneau, Research Associate at Delphi Digital. We discuss the effects of OFAC sanctions on Tornado Cash, MEV & builder centralization, mechanisms to mitigate censorship, and much more. Show Notes: (00:00:00) – Introduction. (00:00:42) – Censorship, Tornado Cash, & OFAC sanctions. (00:03:46) – New actors under Proof-of-Stake (PoS). (00:12:50) – Economics for builders, relayers, & validators. (00:15:47) – MEV on rollups. (00:20:50) – Block builder and relayer centralization. (00:27:49) – Types of censoring on Ethereum. (00:31:00) – Censoring on PoW vs. PoS. (00:35:33) – How does it all play out? (00:46:43) – Building in a quasi-permissioned world. (00:51:07) – Censorship mitigating mechanisms. (00:59:19) – What comes after The Merge? (01:10:22) – Risks of private order flow. Resources: Jon's Twitter The Hitchhiker's Guide to Ethereum The Complete Guide to Rollups More

Business Innovators Radio
Interview With Jeff Stukey & Jay Olshansky, Ph.D with of Wealthspan Advisors Discussing How Aging Science Impacts Retirement

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 25:15


Jeff has been in the financial services business for over 20 years. Most of his time has been spent in executive-level roles helping train hundreds of financial advisors around the country on how to better plan for and serve their clients. He deeply understands financial planning and the financial products that can be used to create the desired outcome for clients.After watching his parents work hard, but struggle financially for most of his childhood and early adult life, Jeff set out to help clients become more educated and get better advice to help them grow and protect their wealth so they could live their best lives.Because of the experience gained over the last 20+ years, Jeff has been able to communicate well with clients, understand what they are trying to accomplish, and help put them in a position to really thrive in and throughout retirement.S. Jay Olshansky received his Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Chicago in 1984. He is currently a Professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Research Associate at the Center on Aging at the University of Chicago and at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Chief Scientist at Lapetus Solutions, Inc.The focus of his research to date has been on estimates of the upper limits to human longevity, exploring the health and public policy implications associated with individual and population aging, forecasts of the size, survival, and age structure of the population, pursuit of the scientific means to slow aging in people (The Longevity Dividend), and global implications of the re-emergence of infectious and parasitic diseases.Dr. Olshansky is on the Board of Directors of the American Federation of Aging Research.Get a copy of our book, “Pursuing Wealthspan: How Science is Revolutionizing Wealth Management” visit: https://www.wealthspanadvisors.com/ Investment Advisory Services are offered through Wealthspan Investment Management, LLC, a state-registered investment adviser. The commentary is for informational purposes only and should not be deemed as a solicitation to invest, or increase investments in any Wealthspan Investment Management, LLC products, or affiliated products. The information contained herein is not intended to provide any investment advice or provide the basis for any investment decisions. Please consult a qualified professional before making decisions about your financial situation. Information and commentary provided by Wealthspan Investment Management, LLC are opinions and should not be construed as facts. There can be no guarantee that any of the described objectives can be achieved. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-jeff-stukey-jay-olshansky-ph-d-with-of-wealthspan-advisors-discussing-how-aging-science-impacts-retirement

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview With Jeff Stukey & Jay Olshansky, Ph.D with of Wealthspan Advisors Discussing How Aging Science Impacts Retirement

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 25:15


Jeff has been in the financial services business for over 20 years. Most of his time has been spent in executive-level roles helping train hundreds of financial advisors around the country on how to better plan for and serve their clients. He deeply understands financial planning and the financial products that can be used to create the desired outcome for clients.After watching his parents work hard, but struggle financially for most of his childhood and early adult life, Jeff set out to help clients become more educated and get better advice to help them grow and protect their wealth so they could live their best lives.Because of the experience gained over the last 20+ years, Jeff has been able to communicate well with clients, understand what they are trying to accomplish, and help put them in a position to really thrive in and throughout retirement.S. Jay Olshansky received his Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Chicago in 1984. He is currently a Professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Research Associate at the Center on Aging at the University of Chicago and at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and Chief Scientist at Lapetus Solutions, Inc.The focus of his research to date has been on estimates of the upper limits to human longevity, exploring the health and public policy implications associated with individual and population aging, forecasts of the size, survival, and age structure of the population, pursuit of the scientific means to slow aging in people (The Longevity Dividend), and global implications of the re-emergence of infectious and parasitic diseases.Dr. Olshansky is on the Board of Directors of the American Federation of Aging Research.Get a copy of our book, “Pursuing Wealthspan: How Science is Revolutionizing Wealth Management” visit: https://www.wealthspanadvisors.com/ Investment Advisory Services are offered through Wealthspan Investment Management, LLC, a state-registered investment adviser. The commentary is for informational purposes only and should not be deemed as a solicitation to invest, or increase investments in any Wealthspan Investment Management, LLC products, or affiliated products. The information contained herein is not intended to provide any investment advice or provide the basis for any investment decisions. Please consult a qualified professional before making decisions about your financial situation. Information and commentary provided by Wealthspan Investment Management, LLC are opinions and should not be construed as facts. There can be no guarantee that any of the described objectives can be achieved. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-jeff-stukey-jay-olshansky-ph-d-with-of-wealthspan-advisors-discussing-how-aging-science-impacts-retirement

The Sweaty Penguin
99. Avocados

The Sweaty Penguin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 47:32


Avocados are rising in popularity fast. Over the past two decades, consumption of avocados in the United States tripled to more than eight pounds per person per year. Unfortunately, the avocado industry is up against several challenges, from high water demand to deforestation to extortion and violence at the hands of Mexican drug cartels. Today, we explore what issues avocados face, how climate change may exacerbate some of them, and how to improve the production of this beloved, valuable fruit. With special guest Dr. Roman Grüter: Research Associate at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences' Geography of Food Research Group. The Sweaty Penguin is presented by Peril and Promise: a public media initiative from The WNET Group in New York, reporting on the issues and solutions around climate change. You can learn more at pbs.org/perilandpromise. Support the show and unlock exclusive merch, bonus content, and more for as little as $5/month at patreon.com/thesweatypenguin. CREDITS Writers: Ysabel Wulfing, Maddy Schmidt, Ethan Brown Editor: Will Andronico Producers: Ethan Brown, Shannon Damiano Ad Voiceover: Naomi Rubin Music: Brett Sawka The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the host and guests. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of Peril and Promise or The WNET Group.

The Rational Reminder Podcast
Understanding Crypto 14: Prof. John Cochrane: Money, (Fiscal) Inflation, and Political Freedom

The Rational Reminder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 104:04


Welcome to our limited edition crypto series. In this episode, we welcome back Professor John Cochrane, who was a guest on the Rational Reminder series, to talk everything money. Professor Cochrane has immense experience on the topic and is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford, as well as Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. He is also a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, and was a professor of finance at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He is also the author of several books and writes a popular blog called The Grumpy Economist. In this episode, we take a deep dive into the concept of money. We learn what numeraire is, how a numeraire is defined, and explore some of the intricacies of money. We also discuss and unpack the differences between fiscal theory and monetary theory, along with other ideas regarding the value of money. We then delve into how all this relates to cryptocurrencies, what future he sees for crypto, and much more. Tuning into this episode, listeners will challenge their thinking about the economy and how economic relations work.   Key Points From This Episode:   Professor John Cochrane explains to us the short version of fiscal theory. [0:04:35] Find out the definition of numeraire and how it is determined within an economy. [0:05:21] Learn whether government backing is required to define a numeraire. [0:07:05] What Professor John Cochrane thinks is the primary function of money. [0:08:55] Whether money needs to be a medium of exchange that stores value. [0:09:45] He explains why money is valuable according to fiscal theory. [0:11:22] The role of taxes in adding to the value of money according to fiscal theory. [0:12:59] How fiscal theory's explanation for why money is valuable differs from the monetarist explanation. [0:13:33] Find out whether the term ‘fiat' is still a good adjective to describe money in a fiscal world. [0:17:24] We learn if ‘fiat' is an appropriate term to describe money according to the monetarist view. [0:19:10] What the government debt valuation equations suggest about the stability of the price level. [0:20:21] An outline of what happens when discount rates become volatile. [0:23:29] Ways in which sticky prices affect the stability of the price level. [0:27:24] Whether the supply of money is still a useful perspective today. [0:31:01] Why monetarism theory has gained so much traction. [0:33:51] He unpacks the purpose of monetarism theory. [0:35:21] How fiscal and monetary actions set expected and unexpected inflation regarding fiscal theory. [0:37:10] The level of fiscal and monetary coordination required for price stability. [0:39:58] Whether the level of coordination needed is realistic considering the independence of the central bank. [0:42:10] Ways in which monetary policy debt sales and fiscal policy debt sales differ. [0:45:02] What effect the size of the central bank's balance sheet has on the price level. [0:49:52] Repercussions of inside money issued by private banks on the price level. [0:53:06] Statistical tests available that can be used to prove fiscal theory. [0:58:55] Find out why COVID-related effects on the economy lead to inflation. [1:04:17] Breakdown of the fiscal explanation for the US inflation of the 1970s. [1:11:24] Reasons why inflation targets have been successful in some countries and not in others. [1:16:14] A discussion about whether we have always lived in a fiscal-based economy. [1:19:24] Whether citizens should behave differently living in a fiscal world. [1:27:51] How the value of the dollar will be affected if more people buy cryptocurrencies. [1:28:49] Professor John Cochrane shares if he thinks anonymous digital cash is a good thing. [1:30:51] We discuss what the future has in store with regard to fiscal theory. [1:39:31]

Imperium
Sanctions, neo-liberalism, American exceptionalism and the Global South

Imperium

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 36:11


In this episode of Imperium, Mubashar Rizvi (Data Analyst & Research Associate, RSIL) discusses sanctions, their use in an increasingly multipolar global world and possible pathways for #Pakistan with Noor Fatima Iftikhar (Senior Research Associate, RSIL).Watch in video.

BFM :: General
Droughts, Wreaking Havoc Across The Globe

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 9:52


The summer of 2022 saw major, sustained drought over the globe, from Europe to China to the United States and Africa, with dire ramifications ranging from energy shortages to food insecurity. Dr. Mariam Zachariah, Research Associate working with the World Weather Attribution initiative, at the Grantham Institute for Climate change and the Environment of Imperial College London helps us understand what is driving these dry spells and what we can do about it.

BFM :: Morning Brief
Droughts, Wreaking Havoc Across The Globe

BFM :: Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 9:52


The summer of 2022 saw major, sustained drought over the globe, from Europe to China to the United States and Africa, with dire ramifications ranging from energy shortages to food insecurity. Dr. Mariam Zachariah, Research Associate working with the World Weather Attribution initiative, at the Grantham Institute for Climate change and the Environment of Imperial College London helps us understand what is driving these dry spells and what we can do about it.

The CGAI Podcast Network
Battle Rhythm: Excellence Scholars

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 39:23


In the fourth episode of Battle Rhythm, Season 2 with co-host Linna Tam-Seto, Research Associate in the Trauma and Recovery Lab at McMaster University, and former post-doc fellow of the CDSN. Steve & Linna discuss the CDSN Summer Institute highlights, Veterans Affairs MAiD recommendation and the CBSA discrimination survey. For today's feature interview, Steve speaks with last year's Undergraduate Excellence scholars, Safia Hafid and Alex Rizkallah about their MINDS funded projects.

History Behind News
S2E26: Fed's Monetary Policy & A Strong Dollar, A History

History Behind News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 64:20


Is a strong U.S. dollar good for us Americans? Is it good for Europeans, specifically those whose currency is the Euro? How about emerging countries? Is a strong U.S. dollar good for them? What if those emerging markets borrow in dollars? Then, wouldn't a strong dollar make servicing those debts more difficult for them? And if so, should the Federal Reserve - America's central bank, take the economic well-being of other countries, e.g., developing nations, into consideration when it sets and changes its monetary policies? Hm! Believe it or not, this issue has been raised in international conferences. For answers to all these questions, we speak with Professor Barry Eichengreen, the Chair and Distinguished Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science at UC Berkeley. Dr. Eichengreen has won many prestigious awards for teaching and his scholarship, and he was named one of Foreign Policy Magazine's 100 Leading Global Thinkers in 2011. He is a past president of the Economic History Association, and a Research Associate of the NBER. In this episode, Dr. Eichengreen talks about the history of the dollar's valuation - from its zenith to its nadir, and provides many anecdotes that liven the discussions (think pizza coins). And here is the link to my previous conversation with Dr. Eichengreen about cryptocurrency (S2E12). I hope you enjoy these two episodes, Adel Host of the History Behind News podcast HIGHLIGHTS: get podcast highlights in your inbox. SUPPORT: please click here and join our other supporters in the news peeler community. Thank you.

JeffMara Paranormal Podcast
Brain Scientist Becomes Vegetarian After His Near Death Experience

JeffMara Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 79:13 Very Popular


Near-death experience podcast 542 guest Dr. Karl Simanonok, Former Scientist who worked at Nasa that had a near death experience. During this podcast we talk about his NDE experience and what he learned from it. Dr. Karl Simanonok received his Ph.D. in Physiology (the study of the body) from the University of California at Davis, where his research involved the development of a new countermeasure to the headward fluid shift problem that astronauts experience in weightlessness. His postdoctoral work followed up on that research with computer modeling of the countermeasure at the NASA Johnson Space Center's Cardiovascular Laboratory as a Research Associate for the National Research Council, and later as a Visiting Scientist with the Universities Space Research Association. During his time at NASA JSC he also performed human research on other countermeasures which could be used to help dehydrated Shuttle astronauts returning from space retain more fluid volume upon landing, and he discovered significant statistical correlations in the historical astronaut biomedical data that linked for the first time, preflight variables relating to fluid shifts with the space sickness problem that affects many astronauts, sometimes severely and even dangerously. Dr. Simanonok was also invited to attend the first meeting between Russian and American space physiologists in history, in Vienna after the fall of the Soviet Union. In semi-retirement, Dr. Simanonok is developing and writing about the Nexus Theory of consciousness, the first and so far the only end-to-end physical description of how consciousness may be enabled in our brains, leaving no 'explanatory gaps'. Nexus Theory describes how the light our own living cells emit at very low levels called 'biophotons' are used in our brains to construct a 3D holographic 'nexus' (connection point) within the spaces of our brains that 'tunes in' resonantly to the holographic Source of consciousness spanning the entire volume of the universe in the Zero Point Energy, to enable consciousness in us. The inspiration for Nexus Theory arose from Dr. Simanonok's Near Death Experience many years before, and it explains in physical terms exactly HOW we are all One with that Light that so many NDErs report seeing or even merging with, as Dr. Simanonok did. You can find out more about the nexus theory at his website below. https://brainandconsciousness.com/ Dr. Simanonok's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbbEOsCjCTXJwn7WVyCDU5A Dr. Simanonok's Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/groups/BrainAndConsciousness --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-s-reynolds/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-s-reynolds/support

New Books in Communications
Eswar S. Prasad, "The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution Is Transforming Currencies and Finance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 40:26


The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution is Transforming Currencies and Finance (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2021) provides a cutting-edge look at how accelerating financial change, from the end of cash to the rise of cryptocurrencies, will transform economies for better and worse. We think we have seen financial innovation. We bank from laptops and buy coffee with the wave of a phone. But these are minor miracles compared with the dizzying experiments now underway around the globe, as businesses and governments alike embrace the possibilities of new financial technologies. As Eswar Prasad explains, the world of finance is at the threshold of major disruption that will affect corporations, bankers, states, and indeed all of us. The transformation of money will fundamentally rewrite how ordinary people live. Above all, Prasad foresees the end of physical cash. The driving force won't be phones or credit cards but rather central banks, spurred by the emergence of cryptocurrencies to develop their own, more stable digital currencies. Meanwhile, cryptocurrencies themselves will evolve unpredictably as global corporations like Facebook and Amazon join the game. The changes will be accompanied by snowballing innovations that are reshaping finance and have already begun to revolutionize how we invest, trade, insure, and manage risk. Prasad shows how these and other changes will redefine the very concept of money, unbundling its traditional functions as a unit of account, medium of exchange, and store of value. The promise lies in greater efficiency and flexibility, increased sensitivity to the needs of diverse consumers, and improved market access for the unbanked. The risk is instability, lack of accountability, and erosion of privacy. A lucid, visionary work, The Future of Money shows how to maximize the best and guard against the worst of what is to come. Eswar Prasad is the Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy at Cornell University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he holds the New Century Chair in International Economics, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was previously chief of the Financial Studies Division in the International Monetary Fund's Research Department and, before that, was the head of the IMF's China Division. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books Network
Eswar S. Prasad, "The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution Is Transforming Currencies and Finance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 40:26


The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution is Transforming Currencies and Finance (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2021) provides a cutting-edge look at how accelerating financial change, from the end of cash to the rise of cryptocurrencies, will transform economies for better and worse. We think we have seen financial innovation. We bank from laptops and buy coffee with the wave of a phone. But these are minor miracles compared with the dizzying experiments now underway around the globe, as businesses and governments alike embrace the possibilities of new financial technologies. As Eswar Prasad explains, the world of finance is at the threshold of major disruption that will affect corporations, bankers, states, and indeed all of us. The transformation of money will fundamentally rewrite how ordinary people live. Above all, Prasad foresees the end of physical cash. The driving force won't be phones or credit cards but rather central banks, spurred by the emergence of cryptocurrencies to develop their own, more stable digital currencies. Meanwhile, cryptocurrencies themselves will evolve unpredictably as global corporations like Facebook and Amazon join the game. The changes will be accompanied by snowballing innovations that are reshaping finance and have already begun to revolutionize how we invest, trade, insure, and manage risk. Prasad shows how these and other changes will redefine the very concept of money, unbundling its traditional functions as a unit of account, medium of exchange, and store of value. The promise lies in greater efficiency and flexibility, increased sensitivity to the needs of diverse consumers, and improved market access for the unbanked. The risk is instability, lack of accountability, and erosion of privacy. A lucid, visionary work, The Future of Money shows how to maximize the best and guard against the worst of what is to come. Eswar Prasad is the Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy at Cornell University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he holds the New Century Chair in International Economics, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was previously chief of the Financial Studies Division in the International Monetary Fund's Research Department and, before that, was the head of the IMF's China Division. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Eswar S. Prasad, "The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution Is Transforming Currencies and Finance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 40:26


The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution is Transforming Currencies and Finance (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2021) provides a cutting-edge look at how accelerating financial change, from the end of cash to the rise of cryptocurrencies, will transform economies for better and worse. We think we have seen financial innovation. We bank from laptops and buy coffee with the wave of a phone. But these are minor miracles compared with the dizzying experiments now underway around the globe, as businesses and governments alike embrace the possibilities of new financial technologies. As Eswar Prasad explains, the world of finance is at the threshold of major disruption that will affect corporations, bankers, states, and indeed all of us. The transformation of money will fundamentally rewrite how ordinary people live. Above all, Prasad foresees the end of physical cash. The driving force won't be phones or credit cards but rather central banks, spurred by the emergence of cryptocurrencies to develop their own, more stable digital currencies. Meanwhile, cryptocurrencies themselves will evolve unpredictably as global corporations like Facebook and Amazon join the game. The changes will be accompanied by snowballing innovations that are reshaping finance and have already begun to revolutionize how we invest, trade, insure, and manage risk. Prasad shows how these and other changes will redefine the very concept of money, unbundling its traditional functions as a unit of account, medium of exchange, and store of value. The promise lies in greater efficiency and flexibility, increased sensitivity to the needs of diverse consumers, and improved market access for the unbanked. The risk is instability, lack of accountability, and erosion of privacy. A lucid, visionary work, The Future of Money shows how to maximize the best and guard against the worst of what is to come. Eswar Prasad is the Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy at Cornell University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he holds the New Century Chair in International Economics, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was previously chief of the Financial Studies Division in the International Monetary Fund's Research Department and, before that, was the head of the IMF's China Division. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in Economics
Eswar S. Prasad, "The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution Is Transforming Currencies and Finance" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 40:26


The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution is Transforming Currencies and Finance (The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2021) provides a cutting-edge look at how accelerating financial change, from the end of cash to the rise of cryptocurrencies, will transform economies for better and worse. We think we have seen financial innovation. We bank from laptops and buy coffee with the wave of a phone. But these are minor miracles compared with the dizzying experiments now underway around the globe, as businesses and governments alike embrace the possibilities of new financial technologies. As Eswar Prasad explains, the world of finance is at the threshold of major disruption that will affect corporations, bankers, states, and indeed all of us. The transformation of money will fundamentally rewrite how ordinary people live. Above all, Prasad foresees the end of physical cash. The driving force won't be phones or credit cards but rather central banks, spurred by the emergence of cryptocurrencies to develop their own, more stable digital currencies. Meanwhile, cryptocurrencies themselves will evolve unpredictably as global corporations like Facebook and Amazon join the game. The changes will be accompanied by snowballing innovations that are reshaping finance and have already begun to revolutionize how we invest, trade, insure, and manage risk. Prasad shows how these and other changes will redefine the very concept of money, unbundling its traditional functions as a unit of account, medium of exchange, and store of value. The promise lies in greater efficiency and flexibility, increased sensitivity to the needs of diverse consumers, and improved market access for the unbanked. The risk is instability, lack of accountability, and erosion of privacy. A lucid, visionary work, The Future of Money shows how to maximize the best and guard against the worst of what is to come. Eswar Prasad is the Tolani Senior Professor of Trade Policy at Cornell University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he holds the New Century Chair in International Economics, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was previously chief of the Financial Studies Division in the International Monetary Fund's Research Department and, before that, was the head of the IMF's China Division. Caleb Zakarin is the Assistant Editor of the New Books Network (Twitter: @caleb_zakarin).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

Babel
Accountability in Syria

Babel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 36:29 Very Popular


This week on Babel, Jon speaks with Ambassador Beth van Schaack, the State Department's ambassador-at-large for Global Criminal Justice. They talk about holding perpetrators of atrocities accountable in Syria, how accountability and justice fit into U.S. foreign policy, and the ways in which accountability looks different the for winners and losers of conflicts. Then, Jon continues the conversation with Natasha Hall and Lubna Yousef, the Middle East Program's new Research Associate. Beth van Schaack, Imagining Justice for Syria (UK: Oxford University Press, 2020). Natasha Hall and Will Todman, "Lessons Learned from a Decade of Humanitarian Operations in Syria," CSIS, April 22, 2021. Beth van Schaack, “Good Governance Paper No. 13: Atrocities Prevention and Response,” Just Security, October 29, 2020.  Transcript, "Accountability in Syria," CSIS, August 9, 2022.

Public Theologians
Peter Cole - Wobblies: solidarity as religion

Public Theologians

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 45:08


Union organizing is in the news for the first time in many of our lifetimes. Christian Smalls and the Amazon Labor Union has inspired workers at Starbucks, Chipotle and brought into focus the traditional unions like the Warrior Met coal miners on strike in Brookwood, Alabama. But what if all of these workers got together - all of us - in the states and internationally - and stood up together against the 1%?  That was the Wobblies' idea at the beginning of the 20th Century.  Dr. Peter Cole joins the conversation to talk about the legacy and relevance of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW).  Peter Cole is Professor of History at Western Illinois University and Research Associate at the Society, Work and Development Institute, University of the Witwatersrand. He is the author of Wobblies on the Waterfront (University of Illinois Press, 2007) and editor of Wobblies of the World (Pluto, 2017). Support Dissident Orthodoxy on Patreon Rate/Review Dissident Orthodoxy on Apple Podcasts Follow Casey's substack  

On the Media
Handle with Care

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 50:06 Very Popular


A group of climate scientists warn that the potential for humanity's mass extinction has been dangerously underexplored. On this week's On the Media, we hear how facing our planet's fragility could inspire hope, instead of despair, and a physicist explains how creation stories are essential for understanding our place in the universe. Luke Kemp [@LukaKemp], a Research Associate at Cambridge's Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, on a new study that says we need to put more attention on the possibility of human extinction and other climate catastrophes. Bryan Walsh [@bryanrwalsh], editor of Vox's ‘Future Perfect,' also explains why our brains have a hard time processing catastrophes like climate change. Listen. Charles Piller [@cpiller], investigative reporter for Science Magazine, on his six month investigation into how faulty images may invalidate groundbreaking advancements in Alzheimer's research. Listen. Guido Tonelli, a particle physicist at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, on the importance of creation myths, and what scientists can tell us about the fragility of the universe. Listen.

PBE Podcast
Episode 122: Dr. Toti Larson from the BEG

PBE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022


Dr. Toti Larson is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator of the Mudrock Systems Research Laboratory (MSRL) consortium at the University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology. As PI of the MSRL since 2019, Toti coordinates with Energy companies to identify knowledge gaps and develop subsurface geology characterization projects that leverage the MSRL research team strengths. In his own research Toti applies geochemistry, geology, and machine learning tools to develop predictive subsurface characterization models. Toti built a Python package (CorePy) for open source sharing of subsurface characterization tools and geological characterization workflows he has developed.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
08-03-2022 Liberty RoundTable with Sam Bushman

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 109:40


Hour 1 * Guest: James Edwards – Race, Politics & Hypocrisy in 21st Century America – thepoliticalcesspool.org * Aesop's Fables: A man is known by the company he keeps! * Ammon Bundy is guilty of Nothing! * What Is a Research Associate? Hour 2 * Eric Trump appears on radio program that sparked controversy for his brother – Daniella Diaz, CNN. * Right-wing U.S. sheriffs vow to probe 2020 voter-fraud claims – Peter Eisler, Reuters * The Six Degrees of Separation Theory and How it Works! * The Ass and His Purchaser! * The CNN Mack Attack! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

An American Conversation Podcast
Kallie Fell Executive Director | Center for Bioethics & Culture | Discusses Surrogacy

An American Conversation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 55:40


Kallie Fell (MS, BSN, RN) started her professional career as a scientist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center utilizing a Master of Science degree in Animal Sciences with an emphasis on Reproductive Physiology and Molecular Biology from Purdue University. While assisting in the investigation of endometriosis and pre-term birth, Kallie simultaneously pursued a degree in nursing with hopes of working with women as a perinatal nurse. After meeting Jennifer at a conference, Kallie became interested in the work of the Center for Bioethics and Culture and started volunteering with the organization. It is obvious that Kallie is passionate about women's health. She continues to work, as she has for the past 6 years, as a perinatal nurse and has worked with the CBC since 2018, first as a volunteer writer, then as our staff Research Associate, and now as the Executive Director.  In 2021, Kallie co-directed the CBC's newest documentary, Trans Mission: What's the Rush to Reassign Gender?  Kallie also hosts the popular podcast Venus Rising and is the Program Director for the Paul Ramsey Institute. https://cbc-network.org