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Citizens of the Latin American countries and dependencies

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Latest podcast episodes about latin american

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)
Former President of Mexico Vicente Fox on Compassionate and Purposeful Leadership

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 22:59


666: In this interview, Pres. Vicente Fox, former President of Mexico and President of Centro Fox, covers the topic of leadership and the key traits that determine a successful leader. He starts by giving a thumbnail sketch of the state of politics currently in Mexico and other Latin American countries and describes the evolution that Mexico has undergone to become a hub for technology and talent in the global economy. Pres. Fox also shares his perspective on the current war in Ukraine and why leadership needs to be both compassionate and purposeful in order for it to work. Finally, Pres. Fox talks about what makes him optimistic for the future and the work that he is doing now to make it a better place for everyone.

Know Your Enemy
UNLOCKED: A New Pink Tide? (w/ Thea Riofrancos & David Adler)

Know Your Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 83:53


A conversation with David Adler and Thea Riofrancos about the return of the Latin American left — unlocked from Patreon in advance of hugely consequential elections in Colombia this weekend!! (Originally published May 15, 2022.)Hope for the American left is at a fairly low ebb, at the moment, but our counterparts in Latin America are on the march and succeeding at beating back repressive right wing governments across the region. What can we learn from them? And given extremely volatile global conditions — and the continued role of the US in defending the interests of capital in the region — what can these new left-wing governments hope to accomplish?Sam is joined by political scientist Thea Riofrancos and David Adler, the General Coordinator of the Progressive International, to discuss left populism in Chile, Colombia, Brazil, and elsewhere. Further Reading: Thea Riofrancos & David Adler, "Gabriel Boric and Latin America's new pink tide," New Statesman, Mar 11, 2022.Thea Riofrancos, "The rush to ‘go electric' comes with a hidden cost: destructive lithium mining," Guardian, Jun 14, 2021.— "The View from Latin America," Boston Review, Apr 27, 2020. — "Ecuador After Correa," n+1, Fall 2017.John Bartlett, "Chilean journalist dies after being shot while covering Workers' Day marches," Guardian, May 12, 2022...and don't forget to subscribe to Know Your Enemy on Patreon for access to all of our bonus episodes!

The Expat Money Show - With Mikkel Thorup
189: The Good, Bad, & Ugly Of Latin America – Fergus Hodgson

The Expat Money Show - With Mikkel Thorup

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 50:03


Today's guest on the Expat Money Show is Fergus Hodgson, a New Zealand native who grew up on a sheep farm on the North Island.  University took him to the USA where he learned the importance of free speech, becoming the founding editor in chief of the PanAm Post and is the founder and director of Econ Americas, a financial consultancy devoted to Latin America.  He has travelled to 19 of 20 nations in Latin America, with stays of more than a year each in Argentina and Guatemala.   SNEAK PEEK INTO TODAY'S CONVERSATION WITH FERGUS, Are you frustrated by government institutions or feeling like you're not free in certain ways, you will enjoy this conversation I have with Fergus. Listen in to the hear which country in Central America Fergus likes the best…and which is the ugliest…You might be surprised! Best tips and tricks to fit into a country as an expat and not feel like an outsider. Why learning a new language is so important when you move to a new country, and how best to accomplish this in the shortest period of time. Fergus recounts the dystopian reality of living and working in Venezuela at the peak of the conflict…crazy times. I chat with Fergus about what a complete totalitarian, psychopathic government can do to its beautiful people and a nation. Learn about a country where if you are a foreigner, earning a foreign income, you can have a really great life, with amazing culture and breathtaking landscapes. If you're a meat-eater like me, we talk about the very best country to get your beef, they are #1 in my book. We talk openly about Canada and why the necessity for using cryptocurrency for financial sovereignty and privacy. This will shock you, especially if you are Canadian. Have you become a bit fat and happy or become lulled into a false sense of security, those days are over my friends. Listen as we discuss what the future could look like if things don't change right now. I talk with Fergus about the insights and directions of Argentina. Will they keep going in the direction of socialism and Marxism? Very interesting for sure. And the last country we discuss is Peru…the question is, are they going down that Marxist route?   RELATED EPISODES  https://expatmoneyshow.com/episodes/best-foreign-language-learning-techniques-strategies-and-methods-for-shortcutting-your-language-learning-journey (169: Best Foreign Language Learning Techniques, Strategies, And Methods For Shortcutting Your Language Learning Journey) https://expatmoneyshow.com/episodes/medical-tourism-in-colombia/ (164: Medical Tourism in Colombia ) https://expatmoneyshow.com/episodes/six-months-in-florianpolis-brazil-update/ (150: Six Months In Florianópolis, Brazil – Complete Update)   HOW TO CONTACT FERGUS HODGSON https://twitter.com/FergHodgson (https://twitter.com/FergHodgson) http://www.econamericas.com (www.econamericas.com)   CONCLUSION Very knowledgeable guy Fergus is. He's been to 19 of the 20 Latin American countries and really knows and understands them. I learned a ton from him and I know you will, don't miss this episode.  

The Expat Files: Living in Latin America
The Expat Files - 05.22.22

The Expat Files: Living in Latin America

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 28:00


#1- Airport trials tribulations and shakedowns:  #2- The common Latin American class differences and distinctions- for better and for worse… usually for worse:  #3- The Spanish guilt over historical new world crimes:   #4- The 10 entitled wealthy Latino families we just love to hate:  #5- Latino oligarchs and their entitled parasite kids:  #6- The problems gringos have with the tropical sun:  #7- Out of control kids on the plane that you'd like to toss out the window…..  #8- Do you want to get into the exploding Crypto-currency world but don't feel quite confident enough to dive in? Our own Captain Mango has developed a unique one-on-one Crypto consulting and training service (he's been deep into crypto since 2013). To get started, email him at: bewarecaptainmango@gmail.com #9- Be sure to pick up my newly updated, "LATIN AMERICAN HEALTHCARE REPORT": The new edition for 2022 (and beyond) is available now, including the latest "Stem Cell Clinic" info and data and my top picks for the best treatment centers for expats and gringos. Just go to www.ExpatPlanB.com and click on the "Latin American Healthcare Report”.

Heat Death of the Universe
148 - Change the Currency to Oak Leaves, Greenspan!

Heat Death of the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 75:16


Biden's in our neck of the woods. Some weird facts interspersed for palate cleansing. Let's hope Lula can displace Bolsonaro (whom Musk is courting in dangerous ways). Sonic inflation, don't even look it up. The NYT claims that the good times are upon us! Mayor Pete accidentally critiques capitalism on TV. A German will make a movie about the subtle and all-equalizing majesty of Japanese restrooms.Commiserate on Discord: discord.gg/aDf4Yv9PrYSupport: patreon.com/heatdeathpodGeneral RecommendationsJD's Recommendations: Everything Everywhere All At OnceJNM's Recommendation: 1) Law & Order S21E08 "Severance" (about Havana Syndrome) / S21E09 "The Great Pretender" (about the Sackler family) & 2) The NorthmanFurther Reading, Viewing, ListeningSouth Koreans protest Biden's visit to Seoul amid heavy police presencePro-, anti-Biden demonstrations to be held in front of Hyatt hotelVIDEO: Brazil's Lula proposes creating Latin American currency to ‘be freed of US dollar' dependencyARTICLE: Brazil's Lula proposes creating Latin American currency to ‘be freed of US dollar' dependencyBrazil's Most Popular President Returns From Political Exile With a Promise to Save the NationThe Neocolonial Game Behind Musk-Bolsonaro RendezvousTwitter Bait Tricks People into Looking Up Bizarre Sonic Fan ArtFor Tens of Millions of Americans, the Good Times Are Right NowNo Way Out But WarThe Inflation Crisis: a Tool of the CapitalistsPete Buttigieg: Hungry Babies, Regrettably, Are Just the Price of the Free MarketWenders making a film about fancy public restrooms in JapanLocationless Locationsheatdeathpod.comEvery show-related link is corralled and available here.Twitter: @heatdeathpodPlease send all Letters of Derision, Indifference, Inquiry, Mild Elation, et cetera to: heatdeathoftheuniversepodcast@gmail.comAlso, check out our newly updated YouTube channel for the hell of it

Homebrew Happy Hour
Sycamore brewing vs Stone lawsuit update, Homebrewers Opening Prodigy Brewing in Utah, & Latin American Brewers Go Direct #BNW

Homebrew Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 18:06


On this episode of Booze News weekly – Sycamore brewing vs Stone lawsuit update, Homebrewers Opening Prodigy Brewing in Utah, & Latin American Brewers Go Direct Welcome to Booze News Weekly; your source for weekly beverage industry news & commentary delivered quickly and conveniently. Make sure you subscribe to the show! Click that like button […]

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese
Alternative Formations Challenge Biden's Sham 'Summit For The Americas'

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 60:01


From June 6 to 10, the Biden administration will host the 9th 'Summit of the Americas.' The event, organized by the US-dominated Organization of American States (OAS), is turning out to be another huge foreign policy embarrassment for President Biden. In response to the exclusion of Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela, an unprecedented number of Latin American and Caribbean Nations are refusing to attend. Clearing the FOG speaks with Claudia de la Cruz about this new era of solidarity and opposition to US hegemony. Social movements are organizing a counter summit, the People's Summit, in Los Angeles and a Workers' Summit in Tijuana. Countries are beginning to abandon the OAS and meet using CELAC (the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States) as an alternative formation. This is another nail in the coffin of the US' unipolar power and a sign that the multipolar world has arrived. For more information, visit PopularResistance.org.

The History of Literature
410 What Is American Literature? (with Ilan Stavans)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 58:10


America, America, America... a continent, a nation, a people, and a whole lotta books. But how does America define itself? Who defines it? Where did the idea of American exceptionalism come from? And how does literature fit into any of this? In this episode, Jacke talks to Professor Ilan Stavans about his new book, What Is American Literature? ILAN STAVANS is Lewis-Sebring Professor of Humanities and Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College, the publisher of Restless Books, and the host of the NPR podcast "In Contrast". The recipient of numerous international awards, his work, adapted into film, theatre, TV, and radio, has been translated into twenty languages.  Additional listening suggestions: Literary Battle Royale 2 - The Cold War (U.S. vs. U.S.S.R.) 120 The Astonishing Emily Dickinson 111 Ralph Waldo Emerson - The Americanest American Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Cloudcast
Managing Thru Economic Donwturns

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 31:28


As we wade into global economic uncertainty, let's look at what we can learn from previous (2001, 2008) economic downturns and how they impacted the tech industry. SHOW: 619CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:strongDM - Secure infrastructure access for the modern stack. Manage access to any server, database, or Kubernetes instance in minutes. Fully auditable, replayable, secure, and drag-and-drop easy. Try it free for 14 days - www.strongdm.com/signupDatadog Kubernetes Solution: Maximum Visibility into Container EnvironmentsStart monitoring the health and performance of your container environment with a free 14 day Datadog trial. Listeners of The Cloudcast will also receive a free Datadog T-shirt.Revelo: Sidestep the competitive US talent market by hiring remote engineers in Latin America. Source, hire, and pay Latin American engineers in US time zones with one service. Revelo manages all the paperwork including benefits, payroll, and compliance. Hire a full-time engineer with a 14-day trial. Revelo.com/cloudcastSHOW NOTES:WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM PAST ECONOMIC DOWNTURNS AND HOW THEY IMPACT THE TECH INDUSTRYLESSONS FROM PREVIOUS ECONOMIC DOWNTURNSGet your finances in orderMake sure you're aligned to near-term business needsInvest in yourself (health, family, learning, etc.)Align with communities and mentorsFEEDBACK?Email: show at the cloudcast dot netTwitter: @thecloudcastnet

Jacobin Radio
Dig: Center and Periphery w/ Margarita Fajardo

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 120:00


Historian Margarita Fajardo on her book The World That Latin America Created: The United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America in the Development Era. Fajardo discusses the Latin American economists at the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (CEPAL) who conceptualized the division of the global economy between center and periphery, and how that later gave rise to dependency theory and world systems theory. Plus Cuban Revolution and the Alliance for Progress, Allende's democratic road to socialism and right-wing coups in Chile and Brazil—and more.Support The Dig at Patreon.com/TheDig See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Yinz Are Good
Ep. 54 GLOBAL LINKS and NTN: Greentree or Sharpsburg?

Yinz Are Good

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:13


Based in Pittsburgh, Global Links is a non-profit dedicated to improving health in communities with need both domestically and in 15 Latin American and Caribbean countries. Tressa chats with Executive Director, Angela Garcia, about all they do and how it all works. GLOBAL LINKS https://globallinks.org/ Phone: (412) 361-3424 Email: info@globallinks.org Have a story of GENEROSITY or KINDNESS to share with us? Please email us: yinzaregood@gmail.com To request a KINDNESS CRATE drop off at your business or school: yinzaregood@gmail.com Please visit our website and follow us on Instagram and Facebook: www.yinzaregood.com Instagram: @yinzaregood Facebook: @YinzAreGood

Heat Death of the Universe
147 - Technical Difficulties in the Beautiful Sinkhole's Ancient Forest

Heat Death of the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 30:58


Well we had a major recording problem in which Josh's track stopped recording about 20 minutes in and wasn't realized until about 90 minutes into the podcast. So we released those first 20 minutes, tacked on an explanation and some recommendations. Sorry 'bout that. We were actually keeping the mood relatively light for once, too, which paradoxically makes me think there's some deeper force out there dictating that our overall tenor be one of doom. Not really, but, ya know, just feels like something beyond bad luck. Anyway, our Discord is newly open to all comers. Check it out.Commiserate on Discord: discord.gg/aDf4Yv9PrY Support: patreon.com/heatdeathpodGeneral RecommendationsJD's Recommendations: Don't relapse with nicotine and take up running.JNM's Recommendation: Phantoms in the Brain by V.S. RamachandranFurther Reading, Viewing, ListeningThere's A Failed Mount Rushmore In The Middle Of VirginiaBrazil's Lula proposes creating Latin American currency to ‘be freed of US dollar' dependencyWorld's most boring person revealed - so boring it's not worth read…A Town's Covid Money Was Sent to One Man in Error. He Gambled It All Away.Giant sinkhole with a forest inside found in ChinaGlass delusionVERIFY: If an American is charged with a war crime, would the US invade the Netherlands?U.S.: 'Hague Invasion Act' Becomes LawG.Dubya.Bush's Massive Freudian SlipLocationless Locationsheatdeathpod.comEvery show-related link is corralled and available here.Twitter: @heatdeathpodPlease send all Letters of Derision, Indifference, Inquiry, Mild Elation, et cetera to: heatdeathoftheuniversepodcast@gmail.comAlso, check out our newly updated YouTube channel for the hell of it

FT News Briefing
US tensions with Latin America are a boon for China

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 10:58


Canada is banning Chinese telecom giant Huawei from its 5G network, US plans to host the Summit of Americas are in disarray as Latin American heads of state refuse to attend. Plus, the California-based asset manager Pimco is trying to adapt to an era of rising interest rates and passive investing.Mentioned in this podcast:Canada to ban Chinese telecoms Huawei and ZTE from 5G networksUS summit struggles in Latin America are a boon to ChinaPimco: navigating the end of the bond bull marketThe FT News Briefing is produced by Fiona Symon, Sonja Hutson and Marc Filippino. The show's editor is Jess Smith. Additional help by Peter Barber, Michael Lello, David da Silva and Gavin Kallmann. The show's theme song is by Metaphor Music. Topher Forhecz is the FT's executive producer. The FT's global head of audio is Cheryl Brumley.Read a transcript of this episode on FT.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Living for the Cinema
PREDATOR (1987)

Living for the Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 17:34


Arnold Schwarzenegger stars as Dutch, the head of an elite mercenary extraction squad who are sent deep into the Latin American jungle to “rescue” some high-level US diplomats.  And they are quite the crew also including CIA operative Dillon played by Carl Weathers, Mac played by Bill Duke, Billy played by Sonny Landham, and Blaine played by Jesse “The Mind” Ventura – they have all of the firepower they could possibly need plus a cast including TWO future governors, so what could go wrong?  Well there happens to be a special visitor from WAY out of town who's on the hunt….for human skulls. :o And this visitor has his own firepower, including laser guns which can dismember his victims along with cloaking technology allowing him to sneak up on them among the trees.  What results is ONE hell of a battle between Man AND Alien directed by genre master John McTiernan who would go on to direct Die Hard the following year! Host: Geoff GershonProducer: Marlene Gershonhttps://livingforthecinema.com/Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/Living-for-the-Cinema-Podcast-101167838847578Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/livingforthecinema/Letterboxd:https://letterboxd.com/Living4Cinema/

Destination Freedom's podcast
S2 EP18 - The Eclectic - Interview with Colorado 2021 Teacher of The Year Gerardo Munzo

Destination Freedom's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 36:48


Gerardo Muñoz, 2021 Colorado Teacher of the Year. Gerardo A. Muñoz of Denver, Colorado, is a high school and middle school social studies teacher at the Denver Center for International Studies (DCIS) at Baker in the Denver Public Schools (DPS) district. He has taught every grade from 6-12 and currently teaches grades 7 and 10-to 12. His classes include concurrent enrollment in ethnic studies, Advanced Placement world history, and 5280 Challenge/Student Board of Education through DPS's Student Voice and Leadership program. Mr. Muñoz has been involved in numerous programs, initiatives, campaigns, and organizations to promote equity and antiracism, including EduColor, Choose, the National Education Association's Racial and Social Justice Conference, and the University of Colorado's Teachers of Color and Allies Summit. Muñoz holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and Latin American studies from the University of Colorado (1999), as well as a Master of Arts in curriculum and instruction from the University of Denver (2009). The Eclectic is a companion podcast to Destination Freedom Black Radio Days that features interviews with difference makers, artists, authors, bold thinkers, and people we love who get stuff done. Produced and hosted by donnie l. betts of No Credits Productions, LLC. Follow @nocreditsproductions on Facebook and Instagram, and @donniebetts on Twitter. #Blackradiodays #socialjustice #destinationfreedomblackradiodays #donniebetts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Give The People What They Want!
Give The People What They Want! Israeli forces assassinate Palestinian journalist Shireen Abu Aqleh, Crisis in Sri Lanka

Give The People What They Want!

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 31:01


Join Vijay Prashad, Zoe Alexandra and Prasanth R for a new episode as they bring you the analysis you need on last week's developments. Stories this episode:

New Books in Latin American Studies
Irune del Rio Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in Native American Studies
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books in Gender Studies
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Environmental Studies
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Critical Theory
Irune Gabiola, "Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres" (Peter Lang, 2020)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:07


In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh legacy of colonialism, indigenous communities continue suffering from territorial displacements, dispossession, and human rights abuses due to extractivist projects that are violently destroying their land and, therefore, the environment. In particular, the Lenca communities in Honduras have been negatively affected by Western ideas of progress and development that have historically eliminated ancestral knowledges and indigenous ecological cosmologies while reinforcing Eurocentrism. Nevertheless, by reflecting on and articulating strategies for resisting neoliberalism, COPINH and its cofounder Berta Cáceres' commitment to environmental activism, ecofeminism, and intersectional struggles has contributed affectively and effectively to the production of democratic encounters in pursuit of social justice. In homage to Berta, who was brutally assassinated for her activism in 2016, this book takes the reader on an affective journey departing from the violent affects experienced by the Lencas due to colonial disruption, contemporary industrialization, and criminalization, towards COPINH's political and social intervention fueled by outrage, resistance, transnational solidarity, care, mourning, and hope. In this way, subaltern actors nurture the power to--in line with Brian Massumi's interpretation of affect--transform necropolitics into natality with the aim of creating a fairer and better world The host, Elize Mazadiego, is a Marie Skłodowska Curie Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and author of Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art: Experimental Forms in Argentina, 1955-1968 (Brill, 2021). She works on Modern and Contemporary art, with a specialization in Latin American art history.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

Draws in Spanish |  Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers
18: Colombian Illustrator Natalia Cardona Puerta

Draws in Spanish | Conversations with Latinx Visual Artists and Designers

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 55:35


Sometimes one decision can completely change the trajectory of your life! That's what happened to Natalia Cardona Puerta when she decided to follow her dreams of being an illustrator and uproot her life in Colombia.In this episode, I chat with Colombian illustrator Natalia Cardona Puerta who creates colorful and playful illustrations inspired by her ‘90s upbringing, her love for the outdoors, and her innermost feelings.Natalia “never in a million years” expected to leave Colombia, but after graduating with a Bachelor's degree in Industrial Design she took a break and realized she wanted to reconnect with her creative voice. Eventually, her mom encouraged her to pursue a Master's degree and it all happened very quickly from there. One thing lead to the next and she was on a one-way flight to Georgia to pursue a Master's degree in Illustration at the Savannah College of Art and Design.Nowadays, Natalia is going through the permanent residency process here in the U.S. to be able to live and work here long term. The legal process has been slow and frustrating. She feels it slowed down her post-grad momentum but she is taking this time to ”plant a lot of seeds” that are sure to blossom in the future.Tune into this episode to hear Natalia and I talk about growing up in Bogota, why she decided to immigrate to the U.S., and how she developed her illustration style after graduating.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, iHeartRadio, or on your favorite podcast platform.EPISODE LINKS:Listener Survey: Take the survey to help me improve Season 2!Guest Links: Check out Natalia's Instagram and Portfolio.Host Links: Check out Fabiola Lara on Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok. Topics Covered:Living a sheltered life in turbulent Bogota in the early 90sRejecting a fine art career path for an undergraduate degree in Industrial DesignPursuing a Master's in Illustration at SCAD after learning about the program a few week priorThe difficulties of being an artist in the US pursuing a Permanent Resident Card (greencard)The impacts of not being able to work in the US as an artistThe pros and cons of receiving an art school educationHer current creative routine after graduatingFinding a better work-life balance after graduationDeveloping her personal illustration style and tailoring her portfolioThe feeling of languishing during slow creative seasonsWorking with an illustration agent for editorial and publishing projectsCompleting a large-scale mural for a dream clientWorking with The Washington Post on an editorial illustration

Destination Everywhere
Philadelphia: For The Culinary And Art Enthusiasts With Chef Jose Garces And The Logan Hotel's JoAnn Wrenn

Destination Everywhere

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 34:04


Thinking of traveling to Philadelphia but don't know where to start? Andy McNeill has brought in experts to help you straighten out your Philly travel plans! Chef Jose Garces is an Iron Chef, father, husband, James Beard Award-winner, entrepreneur, and food innovator. As a child of immigrants and a leader in the diverse and inclusive hospitality industry, the well-being of his community in Philadelphia has always been dear to Chef Garces' heart. He shares his favorite spots in the area and where you can visit him for top-tier Spanish and Latin-American food. JoAnn Wrenn is the General Manager of The Logan Hotel and oversees all day-to-day operations of the 391-room address on Logan Square in downtown Philadelphia. Tune in as she shares her favorite vacation spots and fun activities you can try out even within their hotel premises. Find out why Philadelphia might be the ideal place for your next event destination.Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! http://americanmeetings.com/podcast

The Portia Project
Michelle Hanlon

The Portia Project

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 41:31


Michelle Hanlon is a maven of all things involving space law. She is Co-Director of the Center for Air and Space Law at Ole Miss and an instructor of aviation and space law. She is also a co-founder and the President of For All Moonkind, Inc., a nonprofit corporation that is the only organization in the world focused on protecting human cultural heritage in outer space. Prior to space law, she conducted complex international transactions, including the restructuring of sovereign debt for a number of South and Latin American countries and evolved into the negotiation and implementation of cross-border technology mergers and acquisitions. Listen in as Michelle Hanlon describes what is so exciting about space law, the importance of maintaining space history and cultural property, and the impact of New Space on the legal landscape.

The Cloudcast
Logging Governance and Sensitive Data

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:59


Pranay Kamat (Prod Mgmt @datadoghq) talks about the challenges is protecting sensitive data, internal vs. external attacks, evolution of DLP, the role of Governance in DevSecOps. SHOW: 617CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:Revelo: Sidestep the competitive US talent market by hiring remote engineers in Latin America. Source, hire, and pay Latin American engineers in US time zones with one service. Revelo manages all the paperwork including benefits, payroll, and compliance. Hire a full-time engineer with a 14-day trial. Revelo.com/cloudcastMonitor CI Pipelines and Tests with Datadog CI VisibilityDatadog CI Visibility supports shift-left testing Identify and resolve front-end issues on your web applications before your customers notice. Start a free trial today.strongDM - Secure infrastructure access for the modern stack. Manage access to any server, database, or Kubernetes instance in minutes. Fully auditable, replayable, secure, and drag-and-drop easy. Try it free for 14 days - www.strongdm.com/signupSHOW GIVEAWAY CONTEST - "AWS Cookbook"AWS Cookbook: Recipes for Success on AWSGitHub Chapters (free)30 O'Reilly Free TrialSHOW NOTES:Datadog Sensitive Data ScannerBest practices for reducing sensitive data blindspots and riskBuilding a Modern Compliance Strategy [video]Topic 1 - Welcome to the show. Let's talk about your background and the areas where you focus at Datadog. Topic 2 - We continuing to see headlines about critical data being stolen, which is a trend that doesn't seem to be slowing down. Give us a picture of where we are with the problems that are still causing this, and what new things companies can do to prevent it.Topic 3 - Where are some of the differences between traditional Data Loss Prevent (DLP) strategies and strategies that proactively look at logs to identify data access and breaches? Topic 4 - We often think about attacks coming from the outside, but oftentimes attacks happen from inside the house (directly or indirectly). How important is it to be able to control access to logs and what is visible within logs to prevent internal attacks and vulnerabilities?  Topic 5 - What are some of the more dynamic, modern ways to identify sensitive traffic and tag it properly so systems can act on it? Topic 6 - It's often said that security is everyone's issue. In modern teams (DevOps, DevSecOps, etc.), where are you seeing as the owner of this Governance and Sensitive data?

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
May 14, 2022 - PBS News Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 24:30


Saturday on PBS News Weekend, while the U.S. awaits a Supreme Court ruling that could overturn Roe v. Wade, Latin American countries are expanding abortion access. Then, a social media project memorializes some of the 1 million Americans who have died from COVID-19. Plus, as the Premier League's fight for the title comes down to the wire, we explore how this season has been unlike any other. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
Why a growing number of Latin American countries are legalizing abortion

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:03


As Americans contemplate living in a country where Roe versus Wade is overturned, a very different story is playing out in many parts of Latin America. In recent years, countries throughout the region have relaxed abortion restrictions. Alicia Yamin, senior fellow for the Global Health and Rights Project at Harvard Law School, joins Ali Rogin to discuss what's changed and why. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Why a growing number of Latin American countries are legalizing abortion

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:03


As Americans contemplate living in a country where Roe versus Wade is overturned, a very different story is playing out in many parts of Latin America. In recent years, countries throughout the region have relaxed abortion restrictions. Alicia Yamin, senior fellow for the Global Health and Rights Project at Harvard Law School, joins Ali Rogin to discuss what's changed and why. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Why a growing number of Latin American countries are legalizing abortion

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:03


As Americans contemplate living in a country where Roe versus Wade is overturned, a very different story is playing out in many parts of Latin America. In recent years, countries throughout the region have relaxed abortion restrictions. Alicia Yamin, senior fellow for the Global Health and Rights Project at Harvard Law School, joins Ali Rogin to discuss what's changed and why. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

通勤學英語
回顧星期天LBS - 拉丁美洲相關時事趣聞 All about Latin America

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:52


Topic: 對現狀不滿拉美從傾右變傾左 Leftists Replacing Right-Wing Leaders Across Latin America   In the final weeks of 2021, Chile and Honduras voted decisively for leftist presidents to replace leaders on the right, extending a significant, multiyear shift across Latin America. 在2021年的最後幾周,智利和宏都拉斯果斷地投票支援 左翼總統取代右翼領導人,延續 了整個拉丁美洲長達數年的重大轉變。 This year, leftist politicians are the favorites to win presidential elections in Colombia and Brazil, taking over from right-wing incumbents, which would put the left and center-left in power in the six largest economies in the region, stretching from Tijuana to Tierra del Fuego. 今年,左翼政客是贏得哥倫比亞和巴西總統選舉的最愛,他們接替了右翼現任者,這將使左翼和中左翼在該地區從蒂華納到火地島的六大經濟體中掌權。 Economic suffering, widening inequality, fervent anti-incumbent sentiment and mismanagement of COVID-19 have all fueled a pendulum swing away from the center-right and right-wing leaders who were dominant a few years ago. 經濟困境、不斷擴大的不平等、狂熱的反現任情緒以及對COVID-19的管理不善,都助長了幾年前佔主導地位的中右翼和右翼領導人的鐘擺擺動。 The left has promised more equitable distribution of wealth, better public services and vastly expanded social safety nets. But the region's new leaders face serious economic constraints and legislative opposition that could restrict their ambitions — and restive voters who have been willing to punish whoever fails to deliver. 左翼承諾更公平地分配財富,提供更好的公共服務,並大大擴展社會安全網。但該地區的新領導人面臨著嚴重的經濟限制和立法反對,這可能會限制他們的野心-以及願意懲罰任何未能兌現承諾的人的不安分選民。 The left's gains could buoy China and undermine the United States as they compete for regional influence, analysts say, with a new crop of Latin American leaders who are desperate for economic development and more open to Beijing's global strategy of offering loans and infrastructure investment. The change could also make it harder for the United States to continue isolating authoritarian leftist regimes in Venezuela, Nicaragua and Cuba. 分析人士說,左翼的收益可能會提振中國,削弱美國,因為他們在爭奪地區影響力時,新一批拉丁美洲領導人迫切希望經濟發展,並對北京的全球戰略持更開放的態度, 提供貸款和 基礎設施投資。這一變化還可能使美國更難繼續孤立委內瑞拉、尼加拉瓜和古巴的獨裁左翼政權。 With rising inflation and stagnant economies, Latin America's new leaders will find it hard to deliver real change on profound problems, said Pedro Mendes Loureiro, a professor of Latin American studies at the University of Cambridge. To some extent, he said, voters are “electing the left simply because it is the opposition at the moment.” 隨著通貨膨脹率上升和經濟停滯,拉丁美洲的新領導人將發現很難在深刻的問題上實現真正的變革,劍橋大學拉丁美洲研究教授佩德羅·門德斯·洛雷羅(Pedro Mendes Loureiro)說。他說,在某種程度上,選民正在"選舉左翼,僅僅是因為它目前是反對派。" Unlike the early 2000s, when leftists won critical presidencies in Latin America, the new officeholders are saddled by debt, lean budgets, scant access to credit and, in many cases, vociferous opposition. 與2000年代初不同,當時左翼分子在拉丁美洲贏得了關鍵的總統職位 ,而新的官員則背負著債務,預算緊張, 信貸匱乏以及在許多情況下大聲反對的負擔。 Eric Hershberg, director of the Center for Latin American and Latino Studies at American University, said the left's winning streak is born out of widespread indignation. 美國大學拉丁美洲和拉丁裔研究中心主任埃裡克·赫什伯格(Eric Hershberg )表示,左翼的連勝源於 廣泛的憤怒。 “This is really about lower-middle-class and working-class sectors saying, ‘Thirty years into democracy, and we still have to ride a decrepit bus for two hours to get to a bad health clinic,'”Hershberg said. "這實際上是關於中下層階層和工人階層部門說,'民主三十年後,我們仍然必須乘坐破舊的公共汽車兩個小時才能到達一個糟糕的健康診所,'"赫什伯格說。Source article: https://udn.com/news/story/6904/6092284   Next Article   Topic : Venezuela, Once an Oil Giant, Reaches the End of an Era   For the first time in a century, there are no rigs searching for oil in Venezuela. 百年來,委內瑞拉首次沒有鑽油平台在鑽探石油。 Wells that once tapped the world's largest crude reserves are abandoned or left to flare toxic gases that cast an orange glow over depressed oil towns. 曾自全球最大原油礦藏採油的油井,不是廢棄,就是任由洩漏的毒性氣體逕自燃燒,使附近蕭條的石油城鎮蒙上一層橘光。 Refineries that once processed oil for export are rusting hulks, leaking crude that blackens shorelines and coats the water in an oily sheen. 先前把石油加工出口的煉油廠成了生鏽的殘骸,洩漏的原油染黑了海岸線,並在海面形成一層油光。 Fuel shortages have brought the country to a standstill. At gas stations, lines go on for miles. 燃料短缺使這個國家陷入癱瘓。在加油站,排隊加油的車輛綿延數哩。 Venezuela's colossal oil sector, which shaped the country and the international energy market for a century, has come to a near halt, with production reduced to a trickle by years of gross mismanagement and U.S. sanctions. The collapse is leaving behind a destroyed economy and a devastated environment and, many analysts say, bringing to an end the era of Venezuela as an energy powerhouse. 委內瑞拉龐大的石油業曾形塑這個國家和國際能源市場長達百年,如今卻幾近停頓,由於多年來管理不善和遭受美國制裁,產量只剩一丁點。石油業崩潰導致經濟慘淡,環境重創,且如許多分析家所言,為委國作為能源大國的時代畫下句點。 The country that a decade ago was the largest producer in Latin America, earning about $90 billion a year from oil exports, is expected to net about $2.3 billion by this year's end — less than the aggregate amount that Venezuelan migrants who fled the country's economic devastation will send back home to support their families, according to Pilar Navarro, a Caracas, Venezuela-based economist. 長駐委國首都卡拉卡斯的經濟學家納瓦洛說,當地10年前是拉丁美洲最大產油國,每年出口石油賺進900億美元,但到今年年底,預計可進帳23億美元,還不及為逃避經濟崩潰而出國的國民匯回養家的金錢總額。 Production is the lowest in nearly a century after sanctions forced most oil companies to stop drilling for or buying Venezuelan oil — and even that trickle could dry up soon, analysts warn. 分析家警告,制裁迫使許多石油公司停止鑽探或購買委國石油,以致其產量降到近百年來最低,甚至最後這點生產也可能即將停止。 The decline has diminished beyond recognition a country that just a decade ago rivaled the United States for regional influence. It is also unraveling a national culture defined by oil, a source of cash that once seemed endless; it financed monumental public works and pervasive graft, generous scholarships and flashy shopping trips to Miami. 石油業衰落,使十年前與美國享有同等區域影響力的委內瑞拉面目全非,還破壞了以石油為基礎的的國家文化,石油曾經是看似取之不盡的現金來源:支應大型公共工程,助長普遍存在的貪腐,用以發放豐厚的獎學金,也讓人們享受到美國佛州邁阿密的豪華購物之旅。 Crippling gasoline shortages have led to an outbreak of dozens of daily protests across most Venezuelan states in recent weeks. 汽油嚴重短缺,導致最近幾周委內瑞拉多數州每天總共爆發數十場抗議。 More than 5 million Venezuelans, or 1 in 6 residents, have fled the country since 2015, creating one of the world's greatest refugee crises, according to the United Nations. The country now has the highest poverty rate in Latin America, overtaking Haiti this year, according to a recent study by Venezuela's three leading universities. 聯合國資料顯示,2015年起已有逾500萬,也就是六分之一委國人逃離,是全球最大難民潮之一。委國三所頂尖大學最近的調查顯示,委國今年取代海地,成為拉美貧困率最高的國家。 Source article: https://paper.udn.com/udnpaper/POH0067/358363/web/

Edge of NFT Podcast
Anton Glotser Of DelNorte Terravision - Global Blockchain-Based Property Titles, Plus James Fink & Jeannine Penn Of Kinder Hearts, And More...

Edge of NFT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 53:17


Before the pandemic, many Latin American governments thought blockchain-based property was a scam but nowadays crypto and NFTs are beginning to look like a doorway to opportunity for the region. Jeff Kelley, Eathan Janney, and Josh Kriger sit with Anton Glotser of DelNorte Terravision. Anton shares how he diligently tried for years to educate politicians about crypto real estate and to create the right blockchain real estate business with the right partners. The pandemic created many 2nd, 3rd and even higher order effects that nobody would have dreamed of, not lease of which is increased awareness of the value of digitalized real estate. With this greater awareness, DelNorte was bound to take off. Anton explained how an initial focus on smaller deals made it feasible to transform the economies of multiple countries. James Fink & Jeannine Penn of Kinder Hearts also come in to share the massive impact they create with art and cryptocurrency. Don't miss this episode!

Afropop Worldwide
Bomba, Plena and Puerto Rican Protest Music

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 59:00


On this program, we look at Puerto Rican protest songs over the past two centuries, including Paracumbé's subversive bomba dances from the time of slavery, Las Barrileras 8M, an all-women drumming group demanding an end to violence against women and a new plena from Hector Tito Matos about the death of George Floyd. The past three years have been incredibly traumatic for Puerto Rico: two hurricanes followed by slow recovery efforts that led to the death of 3,057 on the island, a text message scandal mocking women's rights that eventually brought down a governor, the deaths of more unarmed Black men, women and children across the United States and of course the coronavirus pandemic. Producer Dan Rosenberg looks at how artists across Puerto Rico including Plena Libre helped in the healing process after Hurricane Maria by performing for those who lost their homes in the storm. We'll hear music from marches that led to the resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosello. “We've been under attack from nature and bad governments and so many things since 2017, and from before, but 2017 made us more aware,” explains Nelie Lebron-Robles. “Here we are. One nation with a very distinct Latin American identity, very proud of who we are. We've discovered we can do anything that we propose ourselves to do.” APWW #816 Originally broadcast in 2020

Success Made to Last
Success Made to Last with Arturo Chavez, a career built on dedicated colleagues and hard work-a leading film distributor for Hispanic films.

Success Made to Last

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 36:11


Our special guest on today's show is a great storyteller and a leader of film distribution of hispanic films. He is Arturo Chavez, Managing Partner of DelArt Distribution. Arturo has more than three decades of experience in the Hispanic television and entertainment market in the United States. Starting as the Spanish Product Manager for Studio Latino at Ventura Distribution and later as the main Spanish product manager for Lionsgate acquiring titles such as, Amores Perros, Abre los Ojos, Buena Vista Social Club and many more, the last 11 years has been dedicated to the launch of channels for pay television and OTT, AVOD, SVOD, FAST Channels and all digital platforms, we have the largest portfolio of content providers in the entire Latin American region and Spain. Hear his story of coming to the city with nine siblings and his rise to significance through hard work, mentors and building trusting relationships. Arturo Chavez regularly attends film festivals and TV markets for movie acquisitions. Arturo has over three decades of experience in the entertainment industry. He is widely recognized and considered one of the most knowledgeable experts of Spanish-language films in the U.S. market. Prior to this, Arturo was Director of the Latino Division for Lionsgate where he was responsible for the division's product development, product management, and release schedule planning-- including all Spanish-language products and related brands released by Lionsgate. He played an instrumental role in Lionsgate's assessment, qualification, and acquisition of all product lines and a significant role in the development of the company's overall Latino category strategy and positioning. Arturo began his career at Mexcinema Video Corp., an independent video publisher that catered to Spanish-language accounts in the U.S.A. He is a graduate from University of Aguascalientes in Mexico, Arturo holds a B.A. in Business Development and Administration.

American Prestige
E29 - Cuba's American History, Pt. 2 w/ Ada Ferrer

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 81:46


In recognition of Ada Ferrer receiving the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in History, we’re re-posting the two episodes in which she’s the featured guest.Danny and Derek begin by talking about Havana Syndrome (1:44), the Houthi attack in Abu Dhabi (7:31), U.S. diplomacy with regards Ukraine (17:14), and the recent North Korean missile tests (28:02). They are then again joined by Ada Ferrer (32:50), professor of history and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU, to discuss the history of Cuba in the first half of the twentieth century. They talk about a variety of issues, including Guantanamo Bay, Cuba's political economy, the U.S. (re)occupation of the island, Gerardo Machado and Fulgencio Batista, and more. Grab Ada's book here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.americanprestigepod.com/subscribe

American Prestige
E19 - Cuba's American History, Pt. 1 w/ Ada Ferrer

American Prestige

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 79:34


In recognition of Ada Ferrer receiving the 2022 Pulitzer Prize in History, we’re re-posting the two episodes in which she’s the featured guest. Danny and Derek talk about the Nicaraguan elections, MBS and his pro-Republican oil policy, and last weekend's attack on the Iraqi prime minister. They then speak with Ada Ferrer (21:00), professor of history and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at NYU, about the history of Cuba from the precolonial period until the Spanish-American War/War of 1898.Grab Ada's book here: https://bit.ly/3CevBUK This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.americanprestigepod.com/subscribe

Design in Transition/Diseño en Transición
EP.25 Jorge Camacho: Transiciones, diseños y futuros, visiones latinoamericanas [ESP]

Design in Transition/Diseño en Transición

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 39:58


ESP Para el episodio final de nuestra segunda temporada quisimos retomar el tema de diseño, transiciones y futuros, ahora desde una perspectiva latinoamericana. Charlamos con Jorge Camacho, docente e investigador mexicano que enfoca su práctica en el diseño prospectivo y estratégico. Invitamos a Jorge a escuchar el primer episodio de esta segunda temporada grabado con Terry Irwin y Gideon Kossoff como punto de partida para tener una conversación sobre las posibilidades del Transition Design en América Latina. En este episodio completamente en español, Jorge nos cuenta sobre su trabajo en temas de futuros y diseño. Además, nos invita a reflexionar sobre América Latina como un terreno fertil para nuevas prácticas del diseño donde el cambio ha sido una constante. La producción de audio fue hecha por Kyle Leve. En este episodio, Sofía Bosch Gómez, Silvana Juri y Marysol Ortega Pallanez entrevistaron a Jorge Camacho. La producción de este podcast se hizo con el apoyo de la Escuela de Diseño de la Universidad Carnegie Mellon. ENG For the final episode of our second season, we wanted to circle back to the connection between design, transitions, and futures from a Latin American perspective. We spoke to Jorge Camacho, Mexican researcher, professor and designer whose practice focuses on prospective and strategic design. We invited Jorge to listen to the first episode of this second season, recorded with Terry Irwin and Gideon Kossoff, as a starting point to have a conversation about the possibilities of Transition Design in Latin America. In this episode, entirely in Spanish, Jorge talks about his work on futures and design. In addition, he opens the conversation on Latin America as a fertile ground for new design practices, a ground where change has been a constant. Audio production by Kyle Leve. In this episode, Sofía Bosch Gómez, Silvana Juri and Marysol Ortega Pallanez interviewed Jorge Camacho. The production of this podcast was carried out with the support of the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University.

Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences
Making sense of African-Brazilian History, with Isis Barra Costa

Voices of Excellence from Arts and Sciences

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 28:37


Isis Barra Costa is an assistant professor in Contemporary Brazilian Cultural and Literary Studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese with research interests in Brazilian literature and culture, cyber literature and art activism in the Americas performance studies, and Latin American cinema, among others. Her research started with the question of how religious men and women from different parts of the African continent would explain what happened historically in the new world and how it changed expressions like sacred oratory. On this week's Voices of Excellence, she discusses with host David Staley how to gain recognition for the best parts of the culture that are not recognized by historiography or in literature.

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
Brazilians Tried of Racism | CONMEBOL

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 3:42


CONMEBOL has finally started to take action against racism in Latin American football; as Brazilian clubs and fans continue to face racism in both Copa Libertadores and Copa Sudamericana. The South American Football Confederation is the continental governing body of football in South America, and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay, near Asunción. The CONMEBOL Libertadores, also known as the Copa Libertadores de América, is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 1960. It is the highest level of competition in South American club football. The CONMEBOL Sudamericana, named as Copa Sudamericana, is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 2002. It is the second-most prestigious club competition in South American football. CONCACAF clubs were invited between 2004 and 2008.

Democracy in Danger
S4 E12. Criminal Laws

Democracy in Danger

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 33:48


Entering the United States without permission is a crime. But should it be? This time on the show, we hear from a couple of lawyers who have been fighting to decriminalize unauthorized immigration. They say federal law unfairly targets Latin Americans — locking up hundreds of thousands of migrants who cross America's southern border, costing billions of dollars each year. Plus, Will speaks with a University of Virginia historian who has helped make the case that those laws have patently racist origins.

Midnight Train Podcast
Creepy Portugal

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 102:58


Become a Patreon supporter at www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com   This week we're taking the train across the pond for another creepy adventure. That's right, we are doing one of our creepy episodes! It's been a while so we figured it was time. This week we are headed to what some people say is one of the top scariest countries in the world! Not only that…we know we have some awesome listeners here. This week we are headed to creepy Portugal! We are gonna try our best to find the coolest, creepiest places for you guys. I'm just going to assume there's going to be a bridge in here someplace.  So without further Ado.. Let's fucking rock and roll!!!   So first up we're gonna do a little history lesson. Will keep it somewhat sorry and sweet since if we got into the complete history of a country of the age of Portugal, it would be an entire episode on its own. To get there history of this country we went to the source, portugal.com and an article written by Goncarlo Costa.    The history of Portugal starts many ages ago, when the so-called Iberian tribes inhabited the territory of today's Portugal. Then, in the beginning of the first millennium BC, Celtic tribes invaded and intermarried with the local Iberians, creating what is now known as the Celtiberians.   The Lusitanians, who inhabited the interior region of Portugal since the Iron Age, are considered the forefathers of the Portuguese nation. This is why today we have names like Lusophone, someone who speaks Portuguese, or Luso-American, a Portuguese American person. They were known for successfully fending off the Roman armies until the death of their leader, Viriathus, known as a hero in Portugal.   The tribe was considered a worthy adversary by the Romans, so much that they named the province of the whole territory of modern Portugal (south of the Douro River) and part of western Spain after them.   The Romans left various works, such as baths, temples, bridges, roads, theaters and statues; some of them are still found in different parts of the country.   This lasted until the Barbarian invasions, when Germanic tribes migrated to various parts of the Roman Empire. In Portugal, the territory became controlled by the Germanic in the 5th century. The Kingdom of the Suebi controlled Galicia and the North and Center of Portugal, while the Visigothic Kingdom controlled the rest of the Iberian Peninsula, including the rest of Portugal, until eventually conquering the Suebi and, consequently, the whole of Iberia. This is when the rigid class structure appeared in the country, with a Nobility and Clergy getting more and more political and social power.   In the 8th century, the Islamic Umayyad Caliphate invaded the Iberian Peninsula from the North of Africa. Al-Andalus, the Islamic name for the Peninsula, became a part of the Caliphate, and Portugal with it. The Portuguese kept lots of things from their Muslim past, like many of their words, architecture and the famous ‘azulejos'.   The Christians held on in the North of the Peninsula, creating the Kingdom of the Asturias. This was until the Reconquista, when they reconquered the lands from the Moors, the Muslims.   In this Kingdom, at the end of the 9th century, a county based in the now north of Portugal was established, the County of Portugal. The county grew in power and, at the end of the 11th century, a Burgundian knight named Henry, who was fighting in the Reconquista, was crowned as ‘Count of Portugal' and merged it with the County of Coimbra.   Henry's son, Afonso Henriques, proclaimed himself King of Portugal in 1139 with Guimarães as its capital. This city remains known until this day as the “Cradle of the Nation' by the Portuguese.   However, it was only in 1179 that a papal bull officially recognized Afonso I as king. The Reconquista continued with the Algarve, the south of the country, finally being conquered in 1249, and Lisbon becoming the capital in 1255. Since then, Portugal's land borders have remained almost unchanged, being considered one of the longest standing borders in Europe.   The Kingdom of Portugal remained very important in Europe's (and especially Iberian) politics, waging several wars against Spain, creating an alliance with England (the longest standing alliance in the world, lasting until today) and starting the “Age of Discovery”.   In this Age, the country built a vast empire, having territory all over the world, from South America to Oceania. They started by exploring their coast and adventuring into the Moroccan coast, hoping to continue the Reconquista to the North of Africa. Then, the Portuguese sailors started to adventure into the open sea, when they discovered the islands of the Canaries, Madeira, Azores and Cape Verde. Subsequently, the Portuguese explored the coast of Africa, setting trading ports, and tried to discover the maritime route to India, which they did in 1498, under the explorer Vasco da Gama.   They continued to explore and look for trade around the world, from Africa, passing through Arabia, and reaching Japan, setting several outposts, many of them having developed into colonies later on. In 1500, they reached South America and started the colonization of Brazil.   The Empire started to decline, however, when the Dutch, English, and French got in the game. They started to surround or conquer the scattered Portuguese trading posts and territories, diminishing their power. On the Battle of Alcácer-Quibir, in 1578, Portugal lost its king, becoming part of a dynastic union with Spain that lasted until 1640, when it finally gained its independence again.   After that, the country never became the great power it once was. It lost several colonies (including its largest one, Brazil) and trade routes, it saw its capital being destroyed by an earthquake in 1755 and it was occupied during the Napoleonic Wars.   From then on, Portugal was a minor power in Europe, having just some colonies in Africa and Asia and never becoming an economic powerhouse.   Then, in 1910, due to corruption, dissatisfaction with the several Kings and the loss of claimed African lands to the English, the monarchy ended and a Republic was created. Fiercely secular, to the point where it was antichurch, filed with corruption, government instability and near to bankruptcy, the regime came to an end with a military coup in 1926.   A military dictatorship was installed and then, a fascist-like regime, the ‘Estado Novo' (‘New State'), headed by António de Oliveira Salazar. This period was marked by authoritarianism, lack of freedom and, from 1961, by the Portuguese Colonial War.   All of this ended when, in April 25th 1974, the Carnation Revolution happened, carried out by the Armed Forces Movement (Movimento das Forças Armadas – MFA), a movement of young left-leaning captains of the Portuguese Armed Forces. With the Revolution, democratic reforms were made and the first free elections with multiple parties happened, as well as the independence of all of Portugal's colonies.   It also started the PREC (Processo Revolucionário Em Curso – Ongoing Revolutionary Process), a period when conservative and left-leaning forces inside the MFA confronted each other, marked by political turmoil, violence, instability, and the nationalization and expropriation of private lands. It came to an end on the 25 November 1975, when the MFA moderates appeared as the main force.   Nevertheless, revolutionary achievements were not forgotten, with the Constitution pledging until this day to realize socialism, as well as declaring extensive nationalizations and land seizures as irreversible, many, however, now overturned.   Nowadays, Portugal is one of 15 most sustainable states in the world and considered the third most peaceful. It has high living standards and a good economy. It was a founding member of NATO, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and the Community of Portuguese Language Countries. It entered the European Economic Community (now the European Union) in 1986 and is one of its fiercest supporters, even having produced a European Commission President.   Ok so that's a brief…incredibly brief mini history of Portugal. Really the take aways are…super old, plenty of things happened to make the place creepy over that many years. So let's see what creepy stuff Portugal has to offer!   What better way to start than with a sanatorium! Valongo Sanatorium to be exact. The construction of the Mont'Alto Sanatorium began in 1932. Due to the appearance of a large number of people who had contracted tuberculosis, there was a need to expand the facilities, and these expansion works were completed in 1958. construction of these hospital units were carried out in high altitude places, due to the purity of the air, and also because they were away from the populations to avoid the effects of contagion. The sanatorium only operated for a short period, having been inaugurated in 1958 and closed in 1975, after which it entered a profound state of disrepair. Due to its dimensions, it is considered one of the most imposing buildings of its type in Portugal.Its building is large, with an area of ​​approximately 88,000 m², having been built with a view to housing about 300 patients. The building was designed by the architect José Júlio de Brito , who was also responsible for other prominent structures in the city of Porto, such as the Coliseu or Teatro Rivoli . The sanatorium complex, which occupied nine hectares, also included a school, a laundry room, a water reservoir, and a chapel dedicated to Our Lady of the Sick.    The installation of the Sanatorium in Valongo was part of a phase in the history of health in Portugal, during which the government undertook the construction of several specialized establishments to combat tuberculosis, a disease that was ravaging the country at the time. This period began in 1899, with the foundation of the National Institute of Assistance to Tuberculosis, which began the construction of several sanatoriums in different parts of the national territory. In 1930, efforts against tuberculosis were renewed in the north of the country, with the creation of the Assistance to Tuberculosis of Northern Portugal by António Elísio Lopes Rodrigues, and at that time, planning began to build a sanatorium that would house the sick in that region, who had lower economic resources.  Serra de Santa Justa was chosen, where the air was healthier, in addition to being isolated from urban centers, in order to reduce the risk of contagion.   Shortly after, the Sá family donated a plot of land in Serra de Santa Justa, allowing the construction of the building, whose works began in 1932.  However, the works were suspended due to lack of funding, having been resumed due to the support of the local populations.  On July 5, 1940, ATNP began building the Casa de Nossa Senhora da Conceição, to support the children of the sanatorium's patients. According to the Diário Popular of 3 January 1956, the finishing works and equipping of the sanatorium were already under way, and it was expected to be completed during the following year, and that it would have a capacity for 350 beds.  However, the works were only completed in 1958.  Another reason for the delay in the work may have been the opposition by the Companhia das Minas de São Pedro da Cova to the construction of the building, because it was being installed inside an area destined for coal mining, a few kilometers away from the mines.  However, at the time of the sanatorium's inauguration, mining was already entering its final phase, ending up closing in 1970.  Some of the users of the hospital were the mine workers themselves, who suffered from occupational diseases such as tuberculosis and silicosis . The Sanatorium of Monte Alto was inaugurated on 1 November 1958,  being the last one to be opened in Portugal. The inauguration ceremony included a religious service at the Chapel of Nossa Senhora dos Enfermos, the unveiling of a commemorative tombstone, a tribute to the League of Combatants of theFirst World War, and concluded with a port of honor offered by the board of directors. of the sanatorium.  During the ceremony, the admission and accommodation process of the first clients, all veterans of the First World War, was also carried out. Although it was planned for three hundred patients,  its initial capacity was only fifty beds, and during its operation it accommodated 350 people.    In the early 1970s, there began to be greater control over the tuberculosis disease, which began to be fought in a different way, through the outpatient system.  In this way, the sanatoriums ceased to be useful, and were progressively abandoned or underwent a process of readaptation for other purposes.  In the case of the Montalto Sanatorium, the closure process began in 1972,  due to the low number of tuberculosis patients in the Porto District.  At that time, the building already had only a few patients, having been thought of its adaptation as a psychiatric hospital or for the returnees from overseas, which did not advance.  Due to the process of closing the Sanatorium, Casa Nossa Senhora da Conceição ceased to function as a boarding school, starting to support only external students. The building was abandoned after the April 25 Revolution , when the last employee left, although it was only officially closed in 1975.  Following its closure, it was completely looted, being a of the main reasons its connection to the Estado Novo, as it was mostly built and used during that regime.  This connection to the Estado Novo also had a negative impact on the collection of funds, making it impossible to carry out works on the building. It was also used as a training ground by firefighters and civil protection, who performed drills there and destroyed some walls.  Later, the sanatorium was used for paintball games and photo shoots, and various ceremonies related to the supernatural, such as rituals, were also performed there. The building was also hit by several fires, accentuating its degradation. History is awesome and fun and you know we love it but…. The reason we're here is for creepiness! There are stories abound of how haunted this place is. Given the numerous people who died there it makes sense to us! So what kind of stuff are we talking about here ? Well, let's look.    Well paranormal investigators have been spending time here for years, when there's no paintball matches going on, to try and find crazy shit! There have been numerous reports of strange noises and things moving around. There have been entities seen and apparitions spotted. It's hard to find much in English so finding pages from Portuguese websites and trying to find studies was tough but we managed to find one study where a group of friends were exploring the abandoned hospital and had some interesting things happen. They talked about how they started hearing strange noises while they were exploring. The noises seemed to be following them around the building. They talked about how they had a heavy feeling around them as they explored. The sounds seemed to keep getting closer to them. They claim that things started getting knocked over and moved on their own. At one point, one of the group claimed they saw a shadowy figure seemingly watching them. At that point they all decided it was time to go! Sounds like a pretty crazy experience!  True or not? We like to think so!   Can't go and episode without fucking tuberculosis… Teatro Lethes:   The building that today is called Teatro Lethes, began as a Jesuit College – Colégio de Santiago Maior, founded by the then Bishop of the Algarve, D. Fernando Martins Mascarenhas -, whose license was granted to them on 8 February 1599. of learning, above all of a religious nature – the “first university in the Algarve”, as someone has called it. In 1759, the Society of Jesus was banned from the country and its goods were confiscated. The College of Santiago Maior closed its doors. With the occupation of Napoleonic troops commanded by General Junot, the premises of the former College were raided and desecrated in order to enlist the soldiers there. Years later, in 1843, the College was auctioned off by Dr. Lazaro Doglioni, who had publicly expressed his intention to build a theater in Faro similar to S.   The Latin inscription on the facade of the building, monet oblectando , can be translated as “instructing, playing”, thus emphasizing the cultural concerns of the promoter of the construction of this concert hall.   The inauguration of Teatro Lethes took place on 4 April 1845, as part of the celebrations for the birthday of Queen Maria II. Later, in 1860, it was expanded by Dr. Justino Cumano, nephew of Lázaro Doglioni. On September 11, 1898, the so-called animatograph was exhibited for the first time in Faro., installed in the Lethes Theater as it is the largest and most distinguished cultural space in the city. It was restored between 1906 and 1908 to improve acoustics and comfort. The decline of the shows and, consequently, of the hall, begins in 1920, with the Theater closing in 1925, having sold the property to the Portuguese Red Cross, in whose possession it still remains. The Lethes Theater room was later ceded, by protocol, to the Algarve Regional Delegation of the Ministry of Culture. In the North wing, restored and adapted in 1991, the regional services of the Ministry of Culture operated. On October 5, 2012, by protocol between the Municipality of Faro and the Portuguese Red Cross, Teatro Lethes recovered its initial design. The Algarve Theater Company – ACTA was installed as a resident structure. ACTA, in addition to presenting shows of its own creation, also promotes hospitality at the Lethes Theater, and is also responsible for managing the equipment. this history was taken directly from the theatre website!   There are a couple stories about this place that prettier day lead to its hauntings. The first is the story of a ballerina who was in love but was not loved back. She was so distraught that she hung herself in the middle of the stage. Some versions say that she was driven to the brink by the demands of theater life. The second is that of a soldier's body that was found inside one of the walls. There isn't as much info on that story as the ballerina. Staff and visitors claim you can hear the ballerinas footsteps in the theater to this day. There are also reports of a shadowy figure moving about as well. Could this be the ballerina still performing for the people? Or the soldier patrolling the theater? Who knows but it sounds like a cool place to visit!! The Castelinho of Sao Joao, Estoril   The area between Estoril and Cascais, out on Lisbon's Atlantic coast, is rife with buildings of character. Many of them are designed to give the impression of miniature castles, indeed some of them were fortified because they were built during times of instability within the Iberian peninsula.   In the 1980s, a wealthy socialite, José Castelo Branco, was looking for just such a property and found one that seemed ideal in Sao Joao, a district on the edge of Estoril. The day he went to view the property was a beautiful sunny one and so he decided to walk along the cliff path which adjoined the property. As he was walking back to the building, he saw a young girl. She didn't speak, but simply stared at him. In his own account of the events of that day, Mr Castelo Branco said that he felt a compulsion to jump from the edge. This feeling was, he believed, coming from the young girl. He immediately elected to leave the property and ruled out buying it.   On hearing what had happened, someone from the local town hall did some research into the building and discovered that a young blind girl had fallen from the cliffs to her death in the eighteenth century and that several people had reported seeing her at the castelinho since, each claiming that they felt a strong will to jump while she looked at them.   Let's check out a cemetery now…cus those are always fun!    This one is called the cemetery of pleasures. After the city of Lisbon was hit by an outbreak of cholera in 1833, causing thousands of deaths,  it was urgent to create a large cemetery for both rich and poorer victims. It has the weird name of  Cemetery of ‘Pleasures', called after the nearby neighborhood (Prazeres) with the same name. Many of its tombs are big mausoleums, some with the size of small chapels.    Most of the Prazeres mausoleums belong to rich, old or ‘important' families, like  the Palmela family. Many of the mausoleums are richly elaborate, have fine sculptures and decorations. There are also statues of the deceased. It's like a ‘city in a city' for the dead, with well-defined lanes (70! ) and funerary chapels that were built to look like little houses.   The unusual thing about a lot of these graves is that they have little “front doors” with glass windows through which you can see the caskets and remnants of the dead and their visitors. Most of the trees are a species of cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), much used in Portuguese cemeteries.   The cemetery is one of the largest in Lisbon.    The Autopsy Room , which was in the chapel until the Morgues were created in 1899, is one of the curiosities that can be seen, as well as the Sala do Acervo , where some of the oldest funeral records can be consulted. This is another way of helping the visitor to interpret the different ways that human beings have had to culturally, socially and psychologically approach Death, throughout different times.   As with the many famous families and celebrities, another thing that adds to some people thinking there's more going on at this place is the presence of many freemason symbols and you know how that gets people talking!    At any rate, being a cemetery you can imagine the tales of hauntings surrounding this place! Everything from apparitions being seen wandering the grounds, to Disembodied voices. People have seen orbs in person and in pictures. I mean being able to see into these little houses and see the caskets and remains is creepy enough…add haunting to that…and it's definitely a place we want to go!   Next up, Quinta Das Conchas   The Quinta das Conchas (or the garden of shells) in Lisbon is best known for its expansive parkland, just to the north of the city centre. Families can be found playing here during the warmer months and countless dog walkers can be seen at any time of the year. The house at the heart of the estate though has a darker past which is lesser known. In the early part of the twentieth century, when Portugal was still a colonial power, the owner of the estate was a wealthy man called Francisco Mantero Belard. Like many of his countrymen, he was accustomed to having servants who took care of the running of his home. So, when he moved into the quinta, he acquired the services of a slave from Sao Tomé and Principe. There was nothing unusual about this at the time, other than that he elected to keep this slave woman in a small cage. She was made to live like an animal and, according to local myth, subjected to a variety of cruel treatment for several years. People working in the manor house in modern times have reported hearing wailing coming from empty rooms, as well as dramatic changes in temperature.   Let's switch it up and talk a little about Portuguese folklore! We're gonna talk about the coco or coca. There are also many other names for this guy or gal including Cucuy, Cuco, Cuca, Cucu or Cucuí. It is a mythical ghost-monster, equivalent to the bogeyman, found in many Hispanophone and Lusophone countries. It can also be considered an Iberian version of a bugbear as it is a commonly used figure of speech representing an irrational or exaggerated fear. A bugbear is described as  a legendary creature or type of hobgoblin comparable to the boogeyman and other creatures of folklore, all of which were historically used in some cultures to frighten disobedient children. The Cucuy is a male being while Cuca is a female version of the mythical monster. In Spain, Portugal, and Latin America, parents sometimes invoke the Coco or Cuca as a way of discouraging their children from misbehaving; they sing lullabies or tell rhymes warning their children that if they don't obey their parents, el Coco will come and get them and then eat them.    Continuing with the mystery surrounding this child scarer, the Coco also does not take on a specific physical form. For the Portuguese it is a dragon that is represented every year in the celebration of Corpus Christi…at least that is what I've source says.. another says: "In Portuguese côco, refers to a ghost with a pumpkin head. The male form is known as Coco, and the female form as Coca. It is said it's hard to tell the difference between the two. It seems that parents are to blame for the invocation of the Coco as a way of punishment for their wayward children. They would sing rhymes warning their children if they did not obey their parents the Coco would come and eat them.".... So a pumpkin headed goblin… Although the Coco was ghostly monster like in appearance, that wasn't the most frightening thing about them. Children would be scared out of their wits at the idea of a monster that could eat them and not leave a trace. So imagine being a child forced to sleep with a lullaby of a monster that was coming to devour them.    Duermete niño, duermete ya…que viene el cuco y te comerá (sleep child, sleep now…or else comes the coco to eat you).   Creepy, so this folk tale seems to have many different versions depending on where you look. We think that due to the fact that many Latin American countries also use this in folklore as well as there being a certain in Brazil, it's hard to actually put the facts together. Every place we looked about this tale had a little bit of a different take, hopefully we got it close as we mean no disrespect to the tales!   You know what else Portugal has…aliens, at least a few. He's a couple stories!    On September 4, 1957, four Portugal Air Force pilots claimed to have seen and chased some UFOs. They took off with their bomber aircraft from the Ota Air Base in Portugal under Captain José Lemos Ferreira leadership (the others pilots were sergeants Alberto Gomes Covas, Salvador Alberto Oliveira e Manuel Neves Marcelino). When they were heading towards the city of Portalegre, Captain Ferreira noticed a light above the horizon and warned the others. The light changed its own sizes a couple of times, first increasing, then shrinking. After several minutes the pilots noticed a small yellow circle getting out of the craft, and 3 more circles appeared later. When the UFOs were near Coruche, the bigger aircraft climbed out of the Earth as the smaller ones disappeared. The bombers landed without any problems and Captain Ferreira declared: "after this, do not come to us with that Venus, weather balloons, aircraft and similar stuff which have been being used as general explanations for almost every case of UFOs".   On September 10, 1990, around 9:30AM and for about 50 minutes, a small "balloon" was seen hovering towards a small football field, on a small village called Alfena in the outskirts of Porto. The object was described as "a small turtle with long legs" with a metallic shine. The people present got scared and a group of construction workers started throwing stones at it, and the object hovered backed away, leaving the site. An amateur photographer took several pictures of the shapeshifting object; the pictures were considered by several experts as real and the witness accounts by the simple folks were not considered hoax.    We also found this first hand account.. "My name is Cristina Marto de Pimental. I am a reporter. On New Year's Eve, December 31, 1997, my husband and I were at a seaside party in Funchal, which is on the South shore of Madeira Island, in the Atlantic Ocean, 912 kilometres East of Morocco. We were watching the New Year's festivities, all the fireworks in the sky. Then several people at the party called my attention to a red and motionless light above Funchal. The OVNI suddenly made a very tight circle, returned to its initial position, and, a few seconds later, it accelerated at great speed in a vertical direction. We were all quite amazed at the sight. A British couple at the festival videotaped the UFO as it hovered. The next day I telephoned the Fuerzas Aereas Portugeses (FAP) headquarters in Lisboa. The Portuguese air force told me that they'd had no flights, neither planes nor helicopters, and no satellites were over Madeira at that time."   Whoooooo aliens!!!   Time for some quick hitters, you beautiful bastards!   Quinta da Paulicea, Agueda:   Not far from the city center of Águeda, Quinta da Paulicea sits in the middle of large unkept plot of land surrounded by a wrought iron fence. It is the classic image of what a Hollywood haunted house should look like. It was inhabited by an Águedense family, who had moved to Brazil in the late 1800s, but returned in the early 1900s, naming the home after the city of São Paulo. Much of the family succumbed to the influenza pandemic in 1918, with the exception of Neca Carneiro. He was a patron of the community's sports and cultural programs but died childless at the young age of 37. The home has sat vacant ever since, due to legal constraints with the family back in Brazil. Although not certified as haunted, there are many reports of supernatural encounters at Quinta da Paulicea. Some have heard the neighing of horses where the stables once stood. Others have been frightened by the sound of a shotgun blast or a gentle pulling on hair. A worker in the garden suddenly experienced such an intense headache that he fled and never returned. Whether haunted or not, this beautiful home has many stories to tell.   Mines of São Pedro de Cova – Gondomar:   The village of São Pedro da Cova was largely an agricultural community until the discovery of coal in the 1802. The exhausting and dangerous industry of mining soon took over. Several generations of miners worked here until low oil prices forced the mines to shut down in the 1970's. All that's left of the mines are these ruins. Neighbors say spirits of the miners protect the ruins and the mine shafts. Others claim to hear screaming from the deep holes.   Termas de Água Radium, Sortelha:    Legend has it that this beautiful structure, in the Guarda District, was built by Spanish Count Don Rodrigo after learning that the natural “healing waters” might cure his daughter's skin disease. News of the waters quickly spread. In the 1920s, the site became a restorative spa known as the Hotel Serra da Pena. In actuality, the waters were radioactive, seeping from a uranium mine not far away. Radioactivity was all the rage in the 20's and 30's, so the site bottled the spring water and sold it under the name “Radium Water.” Of course, after radioactivity was studied further in the 40's, it became apparent that the healing qualities of radium water actually carried the opposite effect. The hotel went out of business in the 50's and has been abandoned ever since. It is said the site is haunted by the many people who drank from the contaminated spring.   Sanatório da Serra da Estrela – near Covilhã:   This massive structure was built in 1936 by Portugal's railway department as a treatment facility for its employees suffering from Tuberculosis. The building was later leased to the Portuguese Society of Sanatoriums on condition of receiving all patients needing treatment.  However it was closed in the 1980's and left to deteriorate for decades to come.  Rumors circulate that it is haunted by its many former patients.  The Sanatório has now been refurbished and transformed into the luxurious new Pousada Serra da Estrella.   Quinta da Juncosa – Penafiel, Rios de Monihos:    This old farmhouse was home to the Baron of Lages and his family.  The Baron was very jealous, and suspected his wife of infidelities.  Legends have it, the Baron tied his wife to a horse and dragged her around the farm until she died.  After discovering his wife was innocent, the Baron killed his children and committed suicide.  They say the Baron's guilt keeps him from resting in peace.  Ghosts of the Baron and his wife are said to be seen around the property.   So we did this episode in honor of our Portuguese listeners who have keep us in the top 10 in Portugal for quite some time. We thank you guys so much for that. But we have one request for you…in every creepy episodes so far until this one…we've found a haunted bridge, Texas had like 50. In all of my searching the recesses of the Internet, I could not find a single reference to a haunted bridge in Portugal, we need our Portuguese listeners to hit us up and let us know any stories about haunted bridges. It was tough to find a ton of information on a lot of these places so hopefully we did them right! If we made any mistakes or got anything wrong, you know what we say…blame the Internet!! Movie list   https://www.indiewire.com/gallery/best-body-horror-movies/