Podcasts about Singapore

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Country in Southeast Asia

  • 9,410PODCASTS
  • 32,449EPISODES
  • 35mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 23, 2022LATEST
Singapore

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Best podcasts about Singapore

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Latest podcast episodes about Singapore

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani
Glover Teixeira, Valentina Shevchenko, Chase Hooper, Mariusz Pudzianowski, and more

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 219:53


Ariel Helwani opens the show by discussing UFC Vegas 55's close main event and open scoring, how the fighters could have “the power,” and more. Chase Hooper around (35:43) discusses his performance at UFC Vegas 55, his new hair, judging, fan noise, how the time off helped him, his recent marriage, his T-shirt, his tough childhood, how his coach is his manager, and more. Valentina Shevchenko around (1:04:33) discusses her upcoming title defense at UFC 275, why she is training in Florida, her reception back home, a traditional game, if she was shocked by recent loss by Amanda Nunes, if she might move to fight for 135-pound title next, Rose vs. Carla, the secret to her success, and more. Glover Teixeira around (1:31:46) discusses his life as UFC champion, how he feels about event in Singapore, if he is changing up his camp for the fight, his perfect plan for retirement, when he decided to give up hard liquor, if Jan Blachowicz could be next after UFC 275, Anderson Silva's recent boxing run, if Charles Oliveira should have been stripped of title, and more. Mariusz Pudzianowski around (2:01:17) discusses his lengthy MMA career, how his body has changed to do mixed martial arts, his least favorite Strongman event, how long he wants to compete in MMA, his daily routine and diet, his helicopters, if he ever has been approached by a major U.S. promotion, what convinced him to do MMA, and more. GC and Helwani around (2:30:50) look back at best bets from the previous weekend. Ariel Helwani, GC and NewYorkRic around (2:48:16) discuss who should be the next person to box Jake Paul, the next opponent for Holly Holm, and Valentina Shevchenko's next title shot. They also discuss future bets. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/NH/NJ/NY/OR/ PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. New customers only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Retrospect '60s Garage Punk Show
Retrospect '60s Garage Punk Show episode 520 - cool 60s garage from all over

Retrospect '60s Garage Punk Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 50:45


A cool mix of garage from the USA, Peru, Sweden, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan. Full playlist always posted via Retrospect 60s Garage Punk Show on Facebook and Insta

Every Nation Singapore Podcast
Encountering Jesus: Receiving From Jesus

Every Nation Singapore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022


How do we receive what Jesus has in store for us? Good news: it's so easy, even a child can do it.

My Steps to Sobriety
262 Lori Adams-Brown : How Inclusion is the Key to Solving Our World's Most Complex Challenges

My Steps to Sobriety

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 89:18


Lori Adams-Brown is a Business Leader, Podcast Host & Executive Producer of the A World of Difference podcast. Lori is a woman on a mission to bring systemic changes on a global scale by creating belonging and increasing inclusion where she pulls up a chair for new voices at the table. She worked in Indonesian tsunami relief in 2004, and learned that making a difference means listening, empathizing and rolling up our sleeves to make a significant impact together. She believes our stories are powerful to help us heal from trauma, and that our challenges are what motivate us to bring a much-needed change in our societies around the globe. Lori Adams-Brown works in Client Relations in a Silicon Valley startup. She grew up in Valencia, Venezuela where she learned to love city life, island life and merengue and salsa music. She worked for 20 years in international relief and development in Singapore and Indonesia. She has been a pastor at a large multi-site church in the San Francisco Bay Area, and Development Director of a nonprofit in the Silicon Valley. Lori speaks 6 languages. She holds an M.A. in Intercultural Studies from Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary and has B.A.s in Sociology and Spanish from Samford University. Her happy place is sipping a flat white coffee while having a deep conversation and enjoying either a beach or mountain vacation with the love of her life, Jason, their urbanite Third Culture Kids, and their Singaporean rescue dog. In Lori's words: Our world is polarized, sorted, and siloed in evho chambers that pit us against each other. The war in Eastern Europe is the culmination of what happens when we fail to listen, to see, and to include each other in solving our world's problems together. Learning to listen, crossing the street, crossing the aisle, and linking arms together in celebration of our differences will help us change the broken systems in our world. We need each other. 3 Top Tips 1. Listen to understand, and listen some more 2. Pro-actively seek out diverse voices to teach you 3. Link arms with people different from you to solve issues in your community, nation and world Social Media  loriadamsbrown.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/loriadamsbrown http://twitter.com/loriadbr https://www.instagram.com/aworldof.difference/ https://www.facebook.com/A-World-of-Difference-613933132591673/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7bPQfzq7kOZOk09QZWX7WA

Paul's Security Weekly TV
Windows GPU Display Vulns, NFT Discord Hack, Costa Rica Vs. Hackers, & Initial Access - PSW #741

Paul's Security Weekly TV

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 77:01


In the Security News for this week: Singapore launches safety rating system for e-commerce sites, Watch Out for Zyxel Firewalls RCE Vulnerability, New Bluetooth hack that can unlock your Tesla, Hackers Compromise a String of NFT Discord Channels, a pentester's attempt to be ‘as realistic as possible' backfires, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/psw741

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E64: The disturbing 'memeification' of Johnny Depp-Amber Heard's trial: #PopVultures

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 25:10


Synopsis: The Straits Times examines the ins and outs of pop culture in the Asian entertainment and Hollywood scene. The defamation suit between former Hollywood couple Johnny Depp and Amber Heard have put the ugly details of their marriage out for public scrutiny. The two stars were married briefly from 2015 to 2016, after dating for several years. In 2018, Heard wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post saying that she "became a public figure representing domestic abuse" in 2016. Depp sued for defamation over this and alleged instead that Heard was abusive towards him. The ensuing trial has become a media circus. Social media is flooded with memes, spliced and edited videos of the trial, pseudoscience analyses of Depp and Heard's body language and hashtags such as #JusticeForJohnnyDepp and #AmberHeardIsAPsychopath trending on Twitter.  PopVultures host Jan Lee gives her thoughts on why the public reaction to the trial has been deeply troubling and how the whole saga has been mired with backlash over the #MeToo movement.  Highlights (tap/click above):  03:04 Introduction of the Depp-Heard relationship and defamation suits Depp has embarked on  12:04 The disturbing memeification of the trial and why it needs to stop  21:03 How #MeToo ties into the trial  Produced by Jan Lee (janlee@sph.com.sg), Paxton Pang and Eden Soh Edited by: Paxton Pang Follow #PopVultures Podcast episodes here every month:  Channel: https://str.sg/JWad Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaA Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaP  Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/Ju47  SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Jan Lee on Instagram: https://str.sg/Jbxc Read Jan Lee's stories: https://str.sg/Jbxp --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://omny.fm/shows/st-bt/playlists/sg-extra Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

#PopVultures
S1E64: The disturbing 'memeification' of Johnny Depp-Amber Heard's trial: #PopVultures

#PopVultures

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 25:10


Synopsis: The Straits Times examines the ins and outs of pop culture in the Asian entertainment and Hollywood scene. The defamation suit between former Hollywood couple Johnny Depp and Amber Heard have put the ugly details of their marriage out for public scrutiny. The two stars were married briefly from 2015 to 2016, after dating for several years. In 2018, Heard wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post saying that she "became a public figure representing domestic abuse" in 2016. Depp sued for defamation over this and alleged instead that Heard was abusive towards him. The ensuing trial has become a media circus. Social media is flooded with memes, spliced and edited videos of the trial, pseudoscience analyses of Depp and Heard's body language and hashtags such as #JusticeForJohnnyDepp and #AmberHeardIsAPsychopath trending on Twitter.  PopVultures host Jan Lee gives her thoughts on why the public reaction to the trial has been deeply troubling and how the whole saga has been mired with backlash over the #MeToo movement.  Highlights (tap/click above):  03:04 Introduction of the Depp-Heard relationship and defamation suits Depp has embarked on  12:04 The disturbing memeification of the trial and why it needs to stop  21:03 How #MeToo ties into the trial  Produced by Jan Lee (janlee@sph.com.sg), Paxton Pang and Eden Soh Edited by: Paxton Pang Follow #PopVultures Podcast episodes here every month:  Channel: https://str.sg/JWad Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaA Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaP  Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/Ju47  SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Jan Lee on Instagram: https://str.sg/Jbxc Read Jan Lee's stories: https://str.sg/Jbxp --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://omny.fm/shows/st-bt/playlists/sg-extra Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts!   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Paul's Security Weekly (Video-Only)
Windows GPU Display Vulns, NFT Discord Hack, Costa Rica Vs. Hackers, & Initial Access - PSW #741

Paul's Security Weekly (Video-Only)

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 77:01


In the Security News for this week: Singapore launches safety rating system for e-commerce sites, Watch Out for Zyxel Firewalls RCE Vulnerability, New Bluetooth hack that can unlock your Tesla, Hackers Compromise a String of NFT Discord Channels, a pentester's attempt to be ‘as realistic as possible' backfires, & more!   Visit https://www.securityweekly.com/psw for all the latest episodes! Show Notes: https://securityweekly.com/psw741

Cruise Radio News
Cruise News Today — May 20, 2022

Cruise Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 2:33


Cruise News Today — May 20, 2022. Carnival Cruise Line has seen its two millionth guest since the cruise industry restarted. Resorts World Cruises starts next month in Singapore. MSC Cruises debuts its upcoming World Europa cruise ship. Cruise line stocks for CCL, RCL, and NCLH. 

The Coconuts Podcast
Indonesian preacher Abdul Somad a no-go in Singapore, with Carolyn Teo | The Coconuts Podcast | May 20, 2022

The Coconuts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 51:20


Indonesian celebrity preacher Abdul Somad can either be charismatic or controversial, depending on who you ask. But Singapore is apparently not a fan of his colorful preachings that they denied him and his party entry into the Little Red Dot, reportedly due to his “extremist and segregationist teachings,” an affront to the city-state's multi-ethnic and multi-religious society. Was the reaction a bit extreme or warranted? Coconuts Singapore's Carolyn Teo weighs in. Tune in![Embed Spotify player for this episode]Other stories include:Consumer Council finds traces of banned veterinary drug by-product in 3 sausage brands, prohibited fragrances in 4 hair mask models | Puppy ‘charged' with getting lost by Lumphini cops | Vegetable seller beats powerful political family to become town's mayor in the Philippines | Feel free to take off your mask outdoors: President Jokowi | Scorching weather, sweating Singapore to continue | Ubud chef returns home after being scammed and left in limbo for days in SingaporeThe Coconuts Podcast delivers impactful, weird, and wonderful reporting by our journalists on the ground in eight cities: Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Manila, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Yangon, and Bali. Listen to headline news and insightful interviews on matters large and small, designed for people located in – or curious about – Southeast Asia and Hong Kong.The Coconuts Podcast is available on Apple, Spotify, Google, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Subscribe today!

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E3: Inside Singapore's Covid-19 War Room: Singapore's War On Covid

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 24:28


Synopsis: This podcast series is based on selected chapters from a book, detailing Singapore's experience battling the Covid-19 pandemic. The book - written by journalists of The Straits Times and edited by ST's executive editor Sumiko Tan - is titled In This Together: Singapore's Covid-19 Story and is available in major bookstores now. Details online: https://www.stbooks.sg/ In this third episode of six instalments, ST's executive editor Sumiko Tan tells the exclusive story of how the decision-makers in Singapore's Covid-19 "war room" managed the pandemic and why it decided to be as transparent as they could with the public. Highlights (click/tap above): (Headphones recommended) 01:25 Singapore's then-Health Minister Gan Kim Yong on how he realised back in January 2020, that the new coronavirus outbreak was beyond the efforts of one ministry 03:53 How a high-powered group of civil servants led by permanent secretary of the Home Affairs Ministry - Mr Pang Kin Keong - worked to support the ministers 05:06 Mr Gan on why the multi-ministry task force (MTF) decided to be as transparent as possible about how it dealt with Covid-19 06:44 Senior Minister Teo Chee Hean on his role in creating a structure in how the crisis was managed 08:22 PM Lee Hsien Loong on the aim to be transparent, a chain of command, making decisions guided by data, and differing views in Cabinet 14:37 PM Lee reflects on painful national decisions, such as the closure of Changi Airport and Singapore's "circuit-breaker" lockdown in April 2020 19:50 PM Lee addresses a weary nation to explain the decision to move from a strategy of zero-Covid to living with Covid  Produced by: Sumiko Tan (sumiko@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Follow Singapore's War On Covid podcast series here: Playlist: https://str.sg/wsfD Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsPm Spotify: https://str.sg/wsPs Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsyN Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  Read Sumiko Tan's stories: https://str.sg/Jbhe  --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w  Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #stcovidbook See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E4: Lessons Singapore learnt from the Covid-19 Pandemic: Singapore's War On Covid

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 18:00


Synopsis: This podcast series is based on selected chapters from a book, detailing Singapore's experience battling the Covid-19 pandemic. The book - written by journalists of The Straits Times and edited by ST's executive editor Sumiko Tan - is titled In This Together: Singapore's Covid-19 Story and is available in major bookstores now. Details online: https://www.stbooks.sg/ In this fourth of six instalments, ST's executive editor Sumiko Tan looks back at the lessons Singapore learnt from fighting the pandemic. Two, in particular, stood out: The need to quickly adapt its policies as more was known about the coronavirus in the first half of 2020, and how being prepared helped its fight. Highlights (click/tap above): (Headphones recommended) 02:18 Two biggest lessons that Singapore's government learnt from the pandemic 04:25 Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong reflects on the U-turn on wearing masks 05:03 Then-Health Minister Gan Kim Yong on the importance of changing national direction when assumptions are no longer valid 06:20 Minister Lawrence Wong says the multi-ministry task force was guided by science but had to be flexible 09:00 The big bet on buying vaccines early during the coronavirus outbreak 14:53 Lessons on how to tweak future lockdowns 15:25 Using Covid-19 as a rehearsal for the Big One that is yet to come, the dreaded Disease X Produced by: Sumiko Tan (sumiko@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Follow Singapore's War On Covid podcast series here: Playlist: https://str.sg/wsfD Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsPm Spotify: https://str.sg/wsPs Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsyN Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  Read Sumiko Tan's stories: https://str.sg/Jbhe  --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wXz6 Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #stcovidbook See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E13: The US' and China's courtship of Asean: Power Play

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 11:30


Synopsis: On the third Friday of every month, The Straits Times examines various facets of the US-China rivalry and its implications for Asia.  Join Charissa Yong and Danson Cheong - ST's US and China correspondents respectively based in Washington DC and Beijing - as they chat about the US and China, and their ongoing courtship of South-east Asia and Asean. May 12 and 13 saw US President Biden hosting Asean leaders to a special summit, and most of them descended on Washington. Eight out of 10 were there, except for the Myanmar junta leader and the Philippines, which had just had an election. Highlights (click/tap above): 01:45 Why the US wants to show it can be a reliable partner to South-east Asia and Asean 02:45 Reading the view in Beijing towards this summit; why Asean countries don't want to choose between both powers 04:30 The 3 key outcomes from the summit; why the US is still playing a catch-up game 07:53 Why the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework - America's soon-to-be-released strategy for economic engagement in the region was the elephant in the room at the summit 08:55 Singapore PM Lee Hsien Loong said US participation in the Asia-Pacific must also consist of economic cooperation, not just security and defence Produced by: Charissa Yong (charyong@sph.com.sg), Danson Cheong (dansonc@sph.com.sg), Eden Soh and Hadyu Rahim Edited by: Eden Soh Follow our Asian Insider Podcast channel Mondays to Fridays and rate us: Channel: https://str.sg/JWa7 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa8 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wQsB  Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaX SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Charissa Yong's stories: https://str.sg/3xRa Read Danson Cheong's stories: https://str.sg/3xR2 Follow Danson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dansoncj Read ST's Power Play articles: https://str.sg/3xRE Register for Asian Insider newsletter: https://str.sg/stnewsletters --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w  Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL #STAsianInsider See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Moving Into The Future
Unique Personalities In Design and Building Client Relationships

Moving Into The Future

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 29:34


Moving Into The Future Episode 25: Unique Personalities In Design and Building Client Relationships Jack Macejka (The Advance Group) sits down with Sarah D'Annibale (Senior Client Services Manager at M Moser Associates) at The New York Design Center on Lexington Avenue in New York City. Sarah offers a very unique perspective on both the design world and how she goes about building strong, long lasting relationships. From living in the UK for 11 years and then coming back to the NYC Design Market, Sarah gives an intriguing first person glimpse into the differences between the two markets. Jack has spent his career in the moving, furniture installation, logistics, and warehousing industries. He has held various unique roles allowing him to develop invaluable knowledge that he provides his clients at The Advance Group. Jack has handled moves all over Europe, Brazil, Singapore, Tokyo, as well as all over the United States. He has helped countless clients throughout their various moves, whether local or long-distance, residential or commercial, big or small, Jack has made it his mission to simplify the process as best as he can. For more on The Advance Group visit https://www.theadvancegrp.com Get in touch with Jack and the podcast here https://www.theadvancegrp.com/podcast/ Follow us on social media Twitter - http://bit.ly/TAGtwtr Facebook - http://bit.ly/TAGfcbk LinkedIn - http://bit.ly/TAGlnkd     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus
242: Unusual, Different

Veterinary Podcast by the VetGurus

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 38:11


News These male spiders catapult away to avoid being cannibalized after sex The climate impact of wild pigs greater than a million cars Main Topic: Exotic Pet Practice Differences We often talk about how the approach to cases in Unusual & Exotic pet practice is similar to the approach for other species/practices. There are, however, aspects of exotic pet practice which are totally different to general practice and we discuss some of these this week. Sit back, grab your favourite beverage, enjoy (and embrace) the unusual aspects of exotic pet practice! VetGurus Merchandise - VetGurus Etsy Store VetGurus Shop Checkout the VetGurus range of quirky, distinctive branded items. All purchases help support our podcast , helping pay for our production costs. So the bonus for you is that you get some great merchandise and you feel good inside for supporting us - win:win. So click on this link and get shopping. Order now: VetGurus Shop. Say Hi! Send us an email: VetGurus@Gmail.com. We love hearing from our listeners - give us a yell now! Become a Patron Become a Patron of VetGurus: Support us by 'throwing a bone' to the VetGurus - a small regular donation to help pay for our production costs. It's easy; just go to our Patreon site. You can be a rabbit.. or an echidna.. one day we are hoping for a Guru level patron! https://www.patreon.com/VetGurus Support our Sponsors Specialised Animal Nutrition. Specialised Animal Nutrition is the Australian distributor of Oxbow Animal Health products. Used and recommended by top exotic animal veterinarians around the globe,  the Oxbow range comprises premium life-staged feeds and supportive care products for small herbivores. Chemical Essentials. Cleaning and disinfection products and solutions for a wide variety of industries throughout Australia, as well as specific markets in New Zealand, Singapore and Papua New Guinea. The sole importer of the internationally acclaimed F10SC Disinfectant and its related range of advanced cleaning, personal hygiene and animal skin care products. Microchips Australia: Microchips Australia is the Australian distributor for: Trovan microchips, readers and reading systems; Lone Star Veterinary Retractor systems and Petrek GPS tracking products. Microchips Australia is run by veterinarians experienced in small and large animal as well as avian and exotic practice, they know exactly what is needed for your practice. About Our Podcast The veterinary podcast about veterinary medicine and surgery, current news items of interest, case reports and anecdotes. Wait: It's not all about veterinary matters! We also discuss other areas we are passionate about, including photography and wildlife. Thanks for joining us - Brendan and Mark. Our podcast is for veterinarians, veterinary students and veterinary nurses/technicians. If you are at pet owner please search elsewhere - there are lots of great podcasts aimed specifically at pet owners. Disclaimer Any discussion of medical or veterinary matters is of a general nature. Consult a veterinarian with experience in the appropriate field for specific information relating to topics mentioned in our podcast or on our website.

Forward Guidance
Can Gold Withstand the Liquidity Drain? | Sean Fielder

Forward Guidance

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 68:32


Sean Fielder, chief investment officer at Equinox Partners, joins Jack Farley to discuss his views on gold, mining, inflation, the and Federal Reserve's continued tightening efforts, and the sell-off in long-duration tech stocks, diving into everything from ESG investing to a mine's lifecycle and lifestyle. __ Follow Jack on Twitter https://twitter.com/JackFarley96 Follow Blockworks: https://twitter.com/Blockworks_ -- Bit.com is a full-suite cryptocurrency exchange launched by Matrixport, an integrated financial services firm headquartered in Singapore. Since August 2020, Bit.com has been online supporting the spot, perpetual, futures, fixed income and options products, with a particular highlight being pioneers to launch BCH options. Bit.com is the second-largest in the BTC and ETH options market. Call to action: For any further enquiry, please contact vip@bit.com. Sign up URL: https://bit.ly/3KlgLR3 App download URL: https://bit.ly/3xer6uI -- (00:00) Intro (02:26) Emerging Markets And The Dollar (15:32) New Bretton Woods (17:19) How Far Can The Fed Go? (19:07) Is Gold An Inflation Hedge? (26:36) Bit.com Ad (27:06) Energy, Oil & Gas (39:44) ESG Investing (Environmental, Societal, and Governance) (46:08) Junior Gold Miners (53:16) Common Problems That Junior Gold Mining Companies Have (55:56) Jurisdictional Risk (1:05:05) Lifecycle Of A Mine (1:06:26) The Future Of Gold -- Disclaimer: Nothing discussed on Forward Guidance should be considered as investment advice. Please always do your own research & speak to a financial advisor before thinking about, thinking about putting your money into these crazy markets.

Talking OTC Commodities
Fit for 55 – is Shipping running out of time?

Talking OTC Commodities

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 38:31


In this episode, Michael Mervyn-Jones (EEX) and Richard Heath (EEX) discuss the ongoing transition to greener shipping with Tjard Juergens, Stefan Schindler and Patrick Schwinke from ZEABORN Ship Management and specifically examine just how ready the shipping industry is when it comes to EU ETS readiness.In the podcast, the panel chats on the progress made since the “Fit for 55” package was announced almost a year ago and highlights a number of key areas which require further clarification including transparency of the political process, the importance of credible MRV data and who is ultimately responsible when it comes to paying the costs. If you have any questions relating to this episode, please contact:Richard HeathHead of Business Development – Global Commodities (EEX)Email: richard.heath@eex.comLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/richardheatheex/ Michael Mervyn-JonesHead of Commercial Content – EEXEmail: michael.mervyn-jones@eex.comLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michael-mervyn-jones-42407818b/ Tjard JuergensVice President – Business Development – ZEABORN Ship ManagementEmail: Tjard.Juergens@zea-ship.comLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tjard-juergens-7878393b Stefan SchindlerSenior Vice President – Project & Performance – ZEABORN Ship ManagementEmail: Stefan.Schindler@zea-ship.comLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stefan-schindler-5ba06b6b Patrick SchwinkeBusiness Development Manager – Projects, Relations & Marketing – ZEABORN Ship ManagementEmail: Patrick.Schwinke@zea-ship.comLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/patrick-schwinke-923a1b11b About ZEABORN Ship ManagementZEABORN Ship Management is a pure third-party ship manager based in Hamburg and Singapore. We believe in the safety of people and ships, transparency towards our customers on financial and operational matters, asset protection so our customers can take advantage of the market, and reliability in performance.For further info visit: www.zea-ship.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Short Chute Triathlon Show
From Singapore to Yokohama, Reflecting on an 'Electric' Week of Racing: Short Chute Show Triathlon Podcast

Short Chute Triathlon Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 78:14


Will McCloy is joined by Annie Emmerson and Chris McCormack for the latest episode of The Short Chute Show, brought to you by Humango, Super League Triathlon's official training partner. In this week's episode the team discuss an incredible week of racing with the Arena Games Triathlon Powered by Zwift finale in Singapore, and the first race WTCS race of 2022 in Yokohama, Japan. Are we entering a new era of dominance in triathlon, as Alex Yee and Hayden Wilde appear untouchable on the men's side? Meanwhile, in the women's race, there was heart break for some, and euphoria for others, as Jess Learmonth battled injury and Zsanett Bragmayer stormed to a shock victory in Singapore, out running Beth Potter in the final stage. To round things off, long distance legend Tim Don gives us the low down on all things St. George from the IRONMAN World Championships. Once again, we are also joined by expert triathlon coach Lance Watson from Humango. From 12 minute Super League racing to 8 hr plus long distance epics, Lance gives us insight into different distances and different conditions, and discusses the 'once in a generation' athletes that exceed in all racing formats.

The Country
The Country 18/05/22: Michael Every talks to Jamie Mackay

The Country

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 6:02


He's one of The Country's most popular and controversial correspondents - a Singapore-based Global Strategist for Rabobank. Today we ask if there's an end in sight for the Russian/Ukraine War, whether there's an end in sight for the Chinese zero-covid policy and associated lockdowns and he tells us why the food business is a good one to be in. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ParentEd
If Consistency is Key, What Happens When There are no Mid-Year Exams?

ParentEd

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:14


With the recent government announcement regarding removing mid-year examinations for all primary and secondary school students, what have parents made of this decision? Would it mean less practice for examinations or one less opportunity to track their child's academic progress? Joining our host, June Yong, is mother of two, Judith, who shares her honest thoughts about what is truly important in a child's academic journey and aptly reminds parents that each unique child learns and excels differently, with holistic growth being of greater priority and importance. Judith is a family-life advocate and work-life consultant who believes that strong marriages and sound parenting make for resilient families. Judith began her career in market research before moving to pursue a passion in family life education. Currently, Judith splits her time between championing for families through training and writing, and raising her two sons, Micah and Ezra. --- If you want to better support your child's mental health as they take their exams, join Focus on the Family Singapore for our PSLE Special webinar on being Empowered to be a Parent-Coach. This webinar is suitable for parents of Primary 4 to Primary 6 children. At the webinar you get to role-play and practice how to handle real-life scenarios with experienced facilitators. You'll also hear from an insightful and candid sharing how a mum supported her son through PSLE last year. PSLE Special: Empowered to be a Parent-Coach Sat, 9 Jul 2022 | 10 AM - 12 PM | Via Zoom Use early bird promo code EARLY15 to attend at $35* (Limited to the first 40 registrations, Regular rate: $50) For more details and registration for the webinar, head to https://www.family.org.sg/rfrkpsle (www.family.org.sg/rfrkpsle)! --- If you have enjoyed this episode, please leave us a rating and review on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1498022898 (Apple Podcast) or https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/parented-1010477 (Podchaser). It'll be very helpful for others to find our podcast. You can also help us by copying this link https://www.family.org.sg/parentedpodcast (www.family.org.sg/parentedpodcast) to share with your friends. You can also support us by https://www.family.org.sg/givenow (giving monthly). We appreciate your generous giving as every dollar helps to sustain our efforts in strengthening families. Do note that if you are based in Singapore, one-time gifts above SGD$50 or monthly donations above SGD$10 are eligible for 250% tax-deductible benefits.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E83: Does the secret of good sleep lie only with you? - Health Check

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 14:54


Synopsis: Every first and third Wednesday of the month, The Straits Times helps you make sense of health matters that affect you. Today, there are countless distractions keeping us up at night and stopping us from having a good night's sleep. Yet, sleep is one of the three pillars of a healthy lifestyle (nutrition and exercise are the other two), and in recent years, there has been much interest in how we can sleep better. But are personal measures enough to improve sleep? This, given he erosion of work-life boundaries and the overwhelming amount of digital distractions today. In Part 2, ST senior health correspondent Joyce Teo continues the conversation on sleep with Professor Michael Chee, the director of the Centre for Sleep and Cognition at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore. Prof Chee has spent close to two decades studying sleep and its impact on cognition and behaviour.   Highlights (click/tap above): 00:49 Balancing structural measures with personal commitment to improve sleep 04:10 Benefits of starting school later in Singapore; effects of sleep for students 07:38 Consequence of chronic short sleep for adults and the elderly 09:12 Tips for effective short naps; should you avoid exercise at night? 10:23 Why alcohol at night really affects sleep quality; debate on caffeinated drinks Produced by: Joyce Teo (joyceteo@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Hadyu Rahim Edited by: Eden Soh Follow our previous episodes on sleep issues here: https://str.sg/w8TE Follow Health Check Podcast episodes out here every first and third Wednesday of the month: Channel: https://str.sg/JWaN Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWRX Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaQ Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6Wv  SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Joyce Teo's stories: https://str.sg/JbxN --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://omny.fm/shows/st-bt/playlists/sg-extra Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Daily Compliance News
May 17, 2022 the When Customers Complain Edition

Daily Compliance News

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 7:06


In today's edition of Daily Compliance News: ·      When customers complain. (WSJ)   ·      1st case against crypto for sanctions evasions. (WaPo) ·      Former Trump official brags about corruption on the campaign trail.  (NY Magazine) ·      6 banks settle Singapore rate violations action.  (Reuters) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E3: The ghost ship in the Strait of Malacca: The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 22:09


Synopsis: In this special series, The Straits Times dives into some of the greatest unsolved mysteries in South-east Asia, and examines the underlying issues that they exposed. In this episode, we find out what might have happened to 'Ourang Medan' a distressed vessel sailing the Strait of Malacca in the 1930s - 1940s and the gruesome but mysterious death of its crew. ST's Indonesia correspondent Linda Yulisman speaks with Mr Sayed Fauzan Riyadi, maritime researcher from the Raja Ali Haji Maritime University in Riau, Indonesia, and former commander of Indonesian Navy Admiral Bernard Kent Sondakh. She also interviewed Mr Siswanto Rusdi, executive director of Indonesia's National Maritime Institute, and Dr Eric Frecon, adjunct fellow at the French Naval Academy who has written a book on piracy in Indonesian waters titled Chez les Pirates d'Indonésie. Highlights (click/tap above): (Headphones recommended) 3:30 A bizarre SOS message being traced to S.S. Ourang Medan 9:43 Admiral Bernard Kent Sondakh says the crew could have inhaled poisonous gases leaked from its cargo. 14:12 Mr Sayed Fauzan believes it was likely an attack by Indonesian freedom fighters against a Dutch-owned asset. 17:45 Mr Siswanto says the Strait of Malacca has been a perennially piracy hotspot for more than a millennium. 20:00 Dr Frecon describes the more ambitious sea robbers as town pirates who aren't afraid to steal a cargo ship to sell it again. 20:50 Even with improved safety measures, seafarers in the Strait of Malacca remain vulnerable to extreme weather conditions and other dangers. Produced by: Tan Jia Ning (jianing@sph.com.sg), Linda Yulisman (ylinda@sph.com.sg), Magdalene Fung (magfung@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Teo Tong Kai Edited by: Teo Tong Kai Follow The Unsolved Mysteries Of South-east Asia podcast series here every third Tuesday of the month till July: Unsolved Mysteries Playlist: https://str.sg/ws76 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsCb Spotify: https://str.sg/wsCa Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsCE SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Linda Yulisman's articles: https://str.sg/wBeC --- Follow Asian Insider Podcast channel: Channel: https://str.sg/JWa7 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa8 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wQsB  Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaX --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #AsianInsider #unsolved See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

MedicalMissions.com Podcast
Exploring the Journey to Full Time Missions: A Panel of Docs and Nurses

MedicalMissions.com Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Hear healthcare missionaries share their journeys. In the first hour hear a panel of two docs and two nurses answer your questions as well as: How do I find God’s guidance in the journey? Why and how do I connect with a mentor or agency or team or training? What about student loans, raising financial support? What if my spouse or family are not supportive of me doing missions? The second hour will be small discussion group with a missionary coach and others like you in your current stage: Exploring whether or not to consider full-time missions Heading towards full-time missions Single or married Here are some comments from a previous GMHC: “My group leader was great and answered a lot of the questions that I had.” “My leader did a great job being open and honest about her experiences.”

god united states canada australia china europe france japan mexico germany russia africa united kingdom italy ukraine new zealand ireland single spain north america south africa afghanistan brazil turkey argentina iran vietnam sweden portugal muslims thailand iraq colombia chile cuba singapore netherlands panel nigeria switzerland indonesia greece venezuela reunions philippines kenya poland peru south america norway nurses syria missions denmark south korea finland haiti belgium costa rica austria taiwan pakistan jamaica exploring saudi arabia north korea heading iceland ghana buddhist uganda guatemala ecuador malaysia lebanon nepal ethiopia romania sri lanka full time congo panama qatar hungary bahamas el salvador zimbabwe bolivia honduras morocco bangladesh dominican republic tanzania nicaragua cambodia rwanda uruguay hindu croatia malta sudan monaco belarus mali bulgaria czech republic yemen tribal serbia libya greenland senegal estonia somalia madagascar cyprus barbados fiji kazakhstan mongolia zambia kuwait docs paraguay armenia angola macedonia lithuania bahrain luxembourg slovenia belize namibia oman sierra leone mozambique liberia slovakia united arab emirates tunisia malawi cameroon laos latvia botswana south pacific papua new guinea albania burkina faso tonga azerbaijan togo guyana niger algeria guinea south sudan bhutan moldova maldives mauritius burundi andorra eritrea gambia uzbekistan benin grenada vanuatu gabon kyrgyzstan san marino suriname brunei palau solomon islands liechtenstein turkmenistan lesotho tajikistan seychelles swaziland djibouti mauritania timor leste central african republic nauru marshall islands kiribati cape verde new caledonia french polynesia guinea bissau tuvalu equatorial guinea saint lucia trinidad and tobago french guiana comoros bosnia and herzegovina unreached people groups western samoa gmhc democratic republic of the congo
Green Pulse
S1E77: How safe and green is nuclear energy now that it's an option for S'pore: Green Pulse

Green Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 19:16


Synopsis: The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change. Nuclear energy is a controversial source of energy that is gaining prominence globally,  including in Singapore as a potential solution to tackling climate change. Nuclear is considered a clean form of energy as the generation process does not release any greenhouse gases, unlike the traditional mode of energy generation from burning fossil fuels.  But following the nuclear disasters in Chernobyl in 1986 and Fukushima in 2011, how safe is this form of energy now? In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss these questions with Dr Matthew Lloyd, a research fellow at the Singapore University of Technology and Design, who does research on materials that can be used in the nuclear process. Read the article here: https://str.sg/wBTR Highlights of conversation (click/tap above): 01:13 How do nuclear reactions generate energy?  03:30 Why is nuclear energy considered clean, and how safe is it?  10:10 Why is nuclear fusion considered safer than fission? 13:35 How do small modular reactors contribute to safety of nuclear energy? 15:56 Are rising energy prices causing countries to warm to the idea of nuclear power? Produced by: Audrey Tan (audreyt@sph.com.sg), David Fogarty (dfogarty@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis, Hadyu Rahim and Eden Soh Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps: Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV  Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2 Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6 Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wXz6 Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E77: How safe and green is nuclear energy now that it's an option for S'pore: Green Pulse

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 19:16


Synopsis: The Straits Times analyses the beat of the changing environment, from biodiversity conservation to climate change. Nuclear energy is a controversial source of energy that is gaining prominence globally,  including in Singapore as a potential solution to tackling climate change. Nuclear is considered a clean form of energy as the generation process does not release any greenhouse gases, unlike the traditional mode of energy generation from burning fossil fuels.  But following the nuclear disasters in Chernobyl in 1986 and Fukushima in 2011, how safe is this form of energy now? In this episode, The Straits Times environment correspondent Audrey Tan and climate change editor David Fogarty discuss these questions with Dr Matthew Lloyd, a research fellow at the Singapore University of Technology and Design, who does research on materials that can be used in the nuclear process. Read the article here: https://str.sg/wBTR Highlights of conversation (click/tap above): 01:13 How do nuclear reactions generate energy?  03:30 Why is nuclear energy considered clean, and how safe is it?  10:10 Why is nuclear fusion considered safer than fission? 13:35 How do small modular reactors contribute to safety of nuclear energy? 15:56 Are rising energy prices causing countries to warm to the idea of nuclear power? Produced by: Audrey Tan (audreyt@sph.com.sg), David Fogarty (dfogarty@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis, Hadyu Rahim and Eden Soh Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Subscribe to Green Pulse Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps: Channel: https://str.sg/JWaf Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWaY Spotify: https://str.sg/JWag Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/J6EV  Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Follow Audrey Tan on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLMB Read her stories: https://str.sg/JLM2 Follow David Fogarty on Twitter: https://str.sg/JLM6 Read his stories: https://str.sg/JLMu --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wXz6 Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E2: General Yamashita's lost gold: The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 19:24


Synopsis: In this special series, The Straits Times dives into some of the greatest unsolved mysteries in South-east Asia, and examines the underlying issues that they exposed. In this episode, we follow the trail of fabled treasure stashed in tunnels and caves by retreating Japanese soldiers who found themselves with nowhere else to go as World War II drew to a close. ST correspondent Raul Dancel speaks to Mr Arnel Cruz, spokesman of the Treasure Hunters Association of the Philippines, and archaeologist Jose Eleazar Bersales. He also interviewed political analyst Lucio Pitlo III and retired US Navy officer Manny Paez, who was with a team of experts commissioned by the History Channel for a series on the mysterious buried treasure. Highlights (click/tap above): (Headphones recommended) 02:21 General Tomoyuki Yamashita's capture and conviction 04:58 Mr Rogelio Roxas, a common locksmith, discovers a golden Buddha in a network of tunnels 06:19 Word of Mr Roxas' find reaches the ears of the late Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos 08:59 Mr Manny Paez believes the missing golden Buddha is sitting inside a luxury apartment in New York 13:19 Mr Lucio Pitlo says it might be difficult to recover the dictator's plundered wealth if his son becomes the president 15:25 Mr Arnel Cruz claims there are 17 more golden Buddhas still waiting to be found 16:14 Filipinos' indiscriminate treasure hunting is hurting the country, says Professor Jose Eleazar Bersales Produced by: Tan Jia Ning (jianing@sph.com.sg), Raul Dancel (rdancel@sph.com.sg), Magdalene Fung (magfung@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Teo Tong Kai Edited by: Teo Tong Kai Follow The Unsolved Mysteries Of South-east Asia podcast series here every third Tuesday of the month till July: Unsolved Mysteries Playlist: https://str.sg/ws76 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsCb Spotify: https://str.sg/wsCa Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wsCE SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Raul Dancel's articles: https://str.sg/w7CR --- Follow Asian Insider Podcast channel: Channel: https://str.sg/JWa7 Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWa8 Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/wQsB  Spotify: https://str.sg/JWaX --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w  Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! #AsianInsider #unsolved See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E31: Reviewing the nominees for the International Booker Prize: Bookmark This!

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 17:09


Synopsis: A monthly literary podcast by The Straits Times featuring titles in the headlines and sizzling reads. In the latest episode of this literary podcast, The Straits Times journalists Olivia Ho and Toh Wen Li take on six books shortlisted for the International Booker Prize – from Nobel laureate Olga Tokarczuk's sweeping novel The Books Of Jacob to Geetanjali Shree's Tomb Of Sand, the first Hindi-language novel shortlisted for the award. Highlights(click/tap above): 01:31 The Books of Jacob, by Olga Tokarczuk 09:10: Cursed Bunny, by Bora Chung 10:34 A New Name: Septology Six to Seven, by Jon Fosse 11:58 Heaven, by Mieko Kawakami 12:20 Elena Knows, by Claudia Pineiro 12:53 The Tomb of Sand, by Geetanjali Shree Produced by: Olivia Ho (oliviaho@sph.com.sg), Toh Wen Li (tohwenli@sph.com.sg), Paxton Pang and Eden Soh Edited by: Paxton Pang Subscribe to Bookmark This! Podcast series and rate us on your favourite audio apps: Channel: https://str.sg/JWas Apple Podcasts: https://str.sg/JWae Spotify: https://str.sg/JWan Google Podcasts: https://str.sg/Ju4n   Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg Read Olivia Ho's stories: https://str.sg/JbhW Follow Olivia Ho on Instagram: @ohomatopoeia Read Toh Wen Li's stories: https://str.sg/Jbhm --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Southeast Asia Radio
Indonesian Public Opinion with Ben Bland, Natasha Kassam, and Evan Laksmana

Southeast Asia Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 34:19


Greg and Elina talk with Ben Bland, Director of the Asia-Pacific Program at Chatham House, Natasha Kassam, director of the Lowy Institute's Public Opinion and Foreign Policy program, and Evan Laksmana, senior research fellow at the National University of Singapore's Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy about the Lowy Institute's latest poll of Indonesian public opinion on foreign policy, U.S.-China competition, and democracy. Simon is joined by Hazen Williams, intern for the Southeast Asia Program at CSIS to cover the results of the Philippine presidential election, Aung San Suu Kyi's kangaroo court trial, and the U.S.-ASEAN Special summit. 

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E4: Does a family of 4 in Singapore really need $6,426 a month for basic standard of living? (Pt 1): In Your Opinion

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 16:45


Synopsis: The Straits Times' opinion editor Grace Ho takes a hard look at political and social issues of the day with her expert guests.  In this episode, the first of two parts, she looks at whether a family of four in Singapore needs $6,426 a month for a basic standard of living.  In the studio to explain the study and its methodology are Associate Professor Teo You Yenn, associate professor at the School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University; and Dr Ng Kok Hoe, Senior Research Fellow and Head of the Case Study Unit at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy.  Highlights (click/tap above): 00:41: Is there a household budget that captures the lived realities of Singaporeans? What is the Minimum Income Standard? 04:55: Addressing criticisms of the study and its methodology 10:00 How is the Minimum Income Standard applied in the United Kingdom, and how does the UK decide what is a living wage? Read the article here: https://str.sg/wBJ3 Produced by: Grace Ho (graceho@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Teo Tong Kai Edited by: Hadyu Rahim Follow In Your Opinion Podcast each month here: Channel: https://str.sg/w7Qt Spotify: https://str.sg/w7sV SPH Awedio app: https://www.awedio.sg/ Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  Grace Ho's articles: https://str.sg/w7sr Read ST's Opinion section: https://str.sg/w7sH --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wXz6 Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Forward Guidance
The “Everything Risk” Is Here | Ed Harrison

Forward Guidance

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:54


Ed Harrison, senior editor at Bloomberg and author of The Everything Risk, joins Jack Farley to share his outlook on inflation, the Federal Reserve's ongoing tightening efforts, and the sell-off in long-duration tech stocks. Harrison shares his outlook on China, commodities, the FAANG stocks, and why he sees the makings for a new era for markets. __ Follow Ed Harrison on Twitter https://twitter.com/edwardnh Follow Jack on Twitter https://twitter.com/JackFarley96 Follow Blockworks: https://twitter.com/Blockworks_ -- Bit.com is a full-suite cryptocurrency exchange launched by Matrixport, an integrated financial services firm headquartered in Singapore. Since August 2020, Bit.com has been online supporting the spot, perpetual, futures, fixed income and options products, with a particular highlight being pioneers to launch BCH options. Bit.com is the second-largest in the BTC and ETH options market. Call to action: For any further enquiry, please contact vip@bit.com. Sign up URL: https://bit.ly/3KlgLR3 App download URL: https://bit.ly/3xer6uI -- (00:00) Introduction (02:36) Is The Era of East Money Over? (04:56) Comparisons to the 2000s Tech Album (13:30) Valuing Companies With Network Effects (16:23) Markets Reaction To Monetary Policy (18:46) ARKK (22:25) Fed Rate Hikes & Credit Markets (27:26) Where Is The Fed Put? (31:53) Bit.com Ad (32:25) A Shift From Deflation to Inflation? (37:31) FANTAMAN Stocks (40:28) How China is Exporting Stagflation (41:55) Russia's Invasion of Ukraine & The Effect On Energy Markets (46:19) Will High Energy Prices Cause Demand Destruction? (50:05) 5YR Breakeven Inflation (51:40) Inflation in Europe (52:58) The Global Dollar Wrecking Ball (56:06) Final Thoughts -- Disclaimer: Nothing discussed on Forward Guidance should be considered as investment advice. Please always do your own research & speak to a financial advisor before thinking about, thinking about putting your money into these crazy markets.

Raoul Pal: Real Vision
Darius Sit Breaks Down a Key Development in Crypto

Raoul Pal: Real Vision

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 30:51


Darius Sit is the co-founder and Managing Partner at QCP Capital, a digital asset trading firm headquartered in Singapore. He joins Raoul to explain what option vaults are and how they're being traded in the crypto community. For more on the series, visit Raoul Pal: Real Vision

Brave Dynamics: Authentic Leadership Reflections
Jonathan Ng: Doctor to Founder, Car Accident That Changed Everything & True Founder Community

Brave Dynamics: Authentic Leadership Reflections

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 37:16


Jonathan Ng is the CEO and Founder of Iterative Scopes, a pioneer in the application of artificial intelligence-based precision medicine to gastroenterology with the aim of establishing a new standard of care for the detection, and ultimately, treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Iterative Scopes is a startup that spun out of MIT, recently raised $150 million in Series B financing to accelerate development of its core algorithmic innovations.  Jon has spent over 10 years working in various healthcare systems around the world and training at top healthcare institutions such as Massachusetts General Hospital. Through his work and experiences, he has been inspired to bring an appropriately focused application that could potentially eliminate the barriers within healthcare around the world. Prior to his work at Iterative Scopes, Jon has established two large pediatric facilities in Cambodia, as chairman and founder of Children of Cambodia. Children of Cambodia is a philanthropic organization that provides valuable healthcare training programs and establishes advanced pediatric facilities throughout southeast Asia. The foundation has helped establish Cambodia's first neonatal ICUs, pediatric burns units, and pediatric cardiothoracic surgery units at Angkor Hospital for Children. Jon is the Strategic Director and Founder of Optimimed, a medical services startup in Singapore which works in partnership with large public hospitals to deliver optimized healthcare solutions through technological advancements. Jon also serves as a Medical officer in the Ministry of Health Singapore in hopes to transform healthcare delivery in Southeast Asia. Show notes at: https://www.jeremyau.com/blog/jonathan-ng You can find the community discussion for this episode at: https://club.jeremyau.com/c/podcasts/jonathan-ng

The Straits Times Audio Features
S1E4: Desk, don't go. Stay with me? - Work Talk Podcast

The Straits Times Audio Features

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 18:26


Synopsis: This is a podcast series by The Straits Times to help you work smarter, think deeper, and get ahead in your work life. In this episode, we talk about hot-desking, the changing out of permanent desks for workers to shared furniture and spaces.  One wouldn't guess that workers could get all emotional over desk space, but that is exactly what is happening in some companies that are thinking of removing what is seen as a benefit to some employees. What is hot-desking? Is it suitable for everybody? How should workers respond when they lose their desks?  ST's senior correspondent Krist Boo hosts Chen Tang, the strategy principal at Unispace, a workplace consultancy.  Her other guest is Mr Joseph Khong, assistant director at ACE, the national trade association for startups . Join us as we discover just how hot this potato of hot-desking could get. And get tips that help bosses avoid getting burnt! Highlights (click/tap): 02:19 Mr Chen on how hot-desking is catching on in Singapore  03:56 How much savings hot-desking could bring 07:04 Why workers resist hot-desking 12:45 To hot-desk or not, it comes down to your business 15:37 Executive-asks-expert time: how office space might look in a year's time  Read Krist Boo's Work/Life columns: https://str.sg/wX79 Register for ST's Heart Start newsletter:  https://str.sg/stnewsletters Produced by: Krist Boo (kristb@sph.com.sg), Ernest Luis and Teo Tong Kai Edited by: Teo Tong Kai Follow ST Podcasts: Channel: https://str.sg/JWVR Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Lu4rPP Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2PwZCYU Google Podcasts: http://str.sg/googlestbt Website: http://str.sg/stpodcasts Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  --- Discover ST's special edition podcasts: Singapore's War On Covid: https://str.sg/wsfD The Unsolved Mysteries of South-east Asia Embed: https://str.sg/ws76 Stop Scams: https://str.sg/wnBi --- Discover more ST podcast series: In Your Opinion Podcast: https://str.sg/w7Qt SG Extra Podcast: https://str.sg/wX8w  Asian Insider Podcast: https://str.sg/JWa7 Green Pulse Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaf Health Check Podcast: https://str.sg/JWaN #PopVultures Podcast: https://str.sg/JWad ST Sports Talk Podcast: https://str.sg/JWRE Bookmark This! Podcast: https://str.sg/JWas Lunch With Sumiko Podcast: https://str.sg/J6hQ Discover BT Podcasts: https://bt.sg/pcPL Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Software Sessions
Ant Wilson on Supabase

Software Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 59:08


This episode originally aired on Software Engineering Radio.A few topics covered Building on top of open source Forking their GoTrue dependency Relying on Postgres features like row level security Adding realtime support based on Postgres's write ahead log Generating an API layer based on the database schema with PostgREST Creating separate EC2 instances for each customer's database How Postgres could scale in the future Monitoring postgres Common support tickets Permissive open source licenses Related Links @antwilson Supabase Supabase GitHub Firebase Airtable PostgREST GoTrue Elixir Prometheus VictoriaMetrics Logflare BigQuery Netlify Y Combinator Postgres PostgreSQL Write-Ahead Logging Row Security Policies pg_stat_statements pgAdmin PostGIS Amazon Aurora Transcript You can help edit this transcript on GitHub. [00:00:00] Jeremy: Today I'm talking to Ant Wilson, he's the co-founder and CTO of Supabase. Ant welcome to software engineering radio.[00:00:07] Ant: Thanks so much. Great to be here. [00:00:09] Jeremy: When I hear about Supabase, I always hear about it in relation to two other products. The first is Postgres, which is a open source relational database. And second is Firebase, which is a backend as a service product from Google cloud that provides a no SQL data store.It provides authentication and authorization. It has a functions as a service component. It's really meant to be a replacement for you needing to have your own server, create your own backend. You can have that all be done from Firebase. I think a good place for us to start would be walking us through what supabase is and how it relates to those two products.[00:00:55] Ant: Yeah. So, so we brand ourselves as the open source Firebase alternativethat came primarily from the fact that we ourselves do use the, as the alternative to Firebase. So, so my co-founder Paul in his previous startup was using fire store. And as they started to scale, they hit certain limitations, technical scaling limitations and he'd always been a huge Postgres fan.So we swapped it out for Postgres and then just started plugging in. The bits that we're missing, like the real-time streams. Um, He used the tool called PostgREST with a T for the, for the CRUD APIs. And sohe just built like the open source Firebase alternative on Postgres, And that's kind of where the tagline came from.But the main difference obviously is that it's relational database and not a no SQL database which means that it's not actually a drop-in replacement. But it does mean that it kind of opens the door to a lot more functionality actually. Um, Which, which is hopefully an advantage for us. [00:02:03] Jeremy: it's a, a hosted form of Postgres. So you mentioned that Firebase is, is different. It's uh NoSQL. People are putting in their, their JSON objects and things like that. So when people are working with Supabase is the experience of, is it just, I'm connecting to a Postgres database I'm writing SQL.And in that regard, it's kind of not really similar to Firebase at all. Is that, is that kind of right?[00:02:31] Ant: Yeah, I mean, the other thing, the other important thing to notice that you can communicate with Supabase directly from the client, which is what people love about fire base. You just like put the credentials on the client and you write some security rules, and then you just start sending your data. Obviously with supabase, you do need to create your schema because it's relational.But apart from that, the experience of client side development is very much the same or very similar the interface, obviously the API is a little bit different. But, but it's similar in that regard. But I, I think, like I said, we're moving, we are just a database company actually. And the tagline, just explained really, well, kind of the concept of, of what it is like a backend as a service. It has the real-time streams. It has the auth layer. It has the also generated APIs. So I don't know how long we'll stick with the tagline. I think we'll probably outgrow it at some point. Um, But it does do a good job of communicating roughly what the service is.[00:03:39] Jeremy: So when we talk about it being similar to Firebase, the part that's similar to fire base is that you could be a person building the front end part of the website, and you don't need to necessarily have a backend application because all of that could talk to supabase and supabase can handle the authentication, the real-time notifications all those sorts of things, similar to Firebase, where we're basically you only need to write the front end part, and then you have to know how to, to set up super base in this case.[00:04:14] Ant: Yeah, exactly. And some of the other, like we took w we love fire based, by the way. We're not building an alternative to try and destroy it. It's kind of like, we're just building the SQL alternative and we take a lot of inspiration from it. And the other thing we love is that you can administer your database from the browser.So you go into Firebase and you have the, you can see the object tree, and when you're in development, you can edit some of the documents in real time. And, and so we took that experience and effectively built like a spreadsheet view inside of our dashboard. And also obviously have a SQL editor in there as well.And trying to, create this, this like a similar developer experience, because that's where Firebase just excels is. The DX is incredible. And so we, we take a lot of inspiration from it in, in those respects.[00:05:08] Jeremy: and to to make it clear to our listeners as well. When you talk about this interface, that's kind of like a spreadsheet and things like that. I suppose it's similar to somebody opening up pgAdmin, I suppose, and going in and editing the rows. But, but maybe you've got like another layer on top that just makes it a little more user-friendly a little bit more like something you would get from Firebase, I guess.[00:05:33] Ant: Yeah.And, you know, we, we take a lot of inspiration from pgAdmin. PG admin is also open source. So I think we we've contributed a few things and, or trying to upstream a few things into PG admin. The other thing that we took a lot of inspiration from for the table editor, what we call it is airtable.And because airtable is effectively. a a relational database and that you can just come in and, you know, click to add your columns, click to add a new table. And so we just want to reproduce that experience again, backed up by a full Postgres dedicated database. [00:06:13] Jeremy: so when you're working with a Postgres database, normally you need some kind of layer in front of it, right? That the person can't open up their website and connect directly to Postgres from their browser. And you mentioned PostgREST before. I wonder if you could explain a little bit about what that is and how it works.[00:06:34] Ant: Yeah, definitely. so yeah, PostgREST has been around for a while. Um, It's basically an, a server that you connect to, to your Postgres database and it introspects your schemas and generates an API for you based on the table names, the column names. And then you can basically then communicate with your Postgres database via this restful API.So you can do pretty much, most of the filtering operations that you can do in SQL um, uh, equality filters. You can even do full text search over the API. So it just means that whenever you obviously add a new table or a new schema or a new column the API just updates instantly. So you, you don't have to worry about writing that, that middle layer which is, was always the drag right.When, what have you started a new project. It's like, okay, I've got my schema, I've got my client. Now I have to do all the connecting code in the middle of which is kind of, yeah, no, no developers should need to write that layer in 2022.[00:07:46] Jeremy: so this the layer you're referring to, when I think of a traditional. Web application. I think of having to write routes controllers and, and create this, this sort of structure where I know all the tables in my database, but the controllers I create may not map one to one with those tables. And so you mentioned a little bit about how PostgREST looks at the schema and starts to build an API automatically.And I wonder if you could explain a little bit about how it does those mappings or if you're writing those yourself. [00:08:21] Ant: Yeah, it basically does them automatically by default, it will, you know, map every table, every column. When you want to start restricting things. Well, there's two, there's two parts to this. There's one thing which I'm sure we'll get into, which is how is this secure since you are communicating direct from the client.But the other part is what you mentioned giving like a reduced view of a particular date, bit of data. And for that, we just use Postgres views. So you define a view which might be, you know it might have joins across a couple of different tables or it might just be a limited set of columns on one of your tables. And then you can choose to just expose that view. [00:09:05] Jeremy: so it sounds like when you would typically create a controller and create a route. Instead you create a view within your Postgres database and then PostgREST can take that view and create an end point for it, map it to that.[00:09:21] Ant: Yeah, exactly (laughs) . [00:09:24] Jeremy: And, and PostgREST is an open source project. Right. I wonder if you could talk a little bit about sort of what its its history was. How did you come to choose it? [00:09:37] Ant: Yeah.I think, I think Paul probably read about it on hacker news at some point. Anytime it appears on hacker news, it just gets voted to the front page because it's, it's So awesome. And we, we got connected to the maintainer, Steve Chavez. At some point I think he just took an interest in, or we took an interest in Postgres and we kind of got acquainted.And then we found out that, you know, Steve was open to work and this kind of like probably shaped a lot of the way we think about building out supabase as a project and as a company in that we then decided to employ Steve full time, but just to work on PostgREST because it's obviously a huge benefit for us.We're very reliant on it. We want it to succeed because it helps our business. And then as we started to add the other components, we decided that we would then always look for existing tools, existing opensource projects that exist before we decided to build something from scratch. So as we're starting to try and replicate the features of Firebase we would and auth is a great example.We did a full audit of what are all the authorization, authentication, authentication open-source tools that are out there and which one was, if any, would fit best. And we found, and Netlify had built a library called gotrue written in go, which did pretty much exactly what we needed. So we just adopted that.And now obviously, you know, we, we just have a lot of people on the team contributing to, to gotrue as well.[00:11:17] Jeremy: you touched on this a little bit earlier. Normally when you connect to a Postgres database your user has permission to, to basically everything I guess, by default, anyways. And so. So, how does that work? Where when you want to restrict people's permissions, make sure they only get to see records they're allowed to see how has that all configured in PostgREST and what's happening behind the scenes?[00:11:44] Ant: Yeah, we, the great thing about Postgres is it's got this concept of row level security, which actually, I don't think I even rarely looked at until we were building out this auth feature where the security rules live in your database as SQL. So you do like a create policy query, and you say anytime someone tries to select or insert or update apply this policy.And then how it all fits together is our auth server go true. Someone will basically make a request to sign in or sign up with email and password, and we create that user inside the, database. They get issued a URL. And they get issued a JSON, web token, a JWT, and which, you know, when they, when they have it on the, client side, proves that they are this, you, you ID, they have access to this data.Then when they make a request via PostgREST, they send the JWT in the authorization header. Then Postgres will pull out that JWT check the sub claim, which is the UID and compare it to any rows in the database, according to the policy that you wrote. So, so the most basic one is you say in order to, to access this row, it must have a column you UID and it must match whatever is in the JWT.So we basically push the authorization down into the database which actually has, you know, a lot of other benefits in that as you write new clients, You don't need to have, have it live, you know, on an API layer on the client. It's kind of just, everything is managed from the database.[00:13:33] Jeremy: So the, the, you, you ID, you mentioned that represents the user, correct. [00:13:39] Ant: Yeah. [00:13:41] Jeremy: Is that, does that map to a user in post graphs or is there some other way that you're mapping those permissions?[00:13:50] Ant: Yeah. When, so when you connect go true, which is the auth server to your Postgres database for the first time, it installs its own schema. So you'll have an auth schema and inside will be all start users with a list of the users. It'll have a uh, auth dot tokens which will store all the access tokens that it's issued.So, and one of the columns on the auth start user's table will be UUID, and then whenever you write application specific schemers, you can just join a, do a foreign key relation to the author users table. So, so it all gets into schema design and and hopefully we do a good job of having some good education content in the docs as well.Because one of the things we struggled with from the start was how much do we abstract away from SQL away from Postgres and how much do we educate? And we actually landed on the educate sides because I mean, once you start learning about Postgres, it becomes kind of a superpower for you as a developer.So we'd much rather. Have people discover us because we're a firebase alternatives frontend devs then we help them with things like schema design landing about row level security. Because ultimately like every, if you try and abstract that stuff it gets kind of crappy. And maybe not such a great experience. [00:15:20] Jeremy: to make sure I understand correctly. So you have GoTrue, which is uh, a Netlify open-source project that GoTrue project creates some tables in your, your database that has like, you've mentioned the tokens, the, the different users. Somebody makes a request to GoTrue. Like here's my username, my password go true.Gives them back a JWT. And then from your front end, you send that JWT to the PostgREST endpoint. And from that JWT, it's able to know which user you are and then uses postgres' built in a row level security to figure out which rows you're, you're allowed to bring back. Did I, did I get that right?[00:16:07] Ant: That is pretty much exactly how it works. And it's impressive that you garnered that without looking at a single diagram (laughs) But yeah, and, and, and obviously we, we provide a client library supabase JS, which actually does a lot of this work for you. So you don't need to manually attach the JJ JWT in a header.If you've authenticated with supabase JS, then every request sent to PostgREST. After that point, the header will just be attached automatically, and you'll be in a session as that user. [00:16:43] Jeremy: and, and the users that we're talking about when we talk about Postgres' row level security. Are those actual users in PostgreSQL. Like if I was to log in with psql, I could actually log in with those users.[00:17:00] Ant: They're not, you could potentially structure it that way. But it would be more advanced it's it's basically just users in, in the auth.users table, the way, the way it's currently done. [00:17:12] Jeremy: I see and postgrest has the, that row level security is able to work with that table. You, you don't need to have actual Postgres users.[00:17:23] Ant: Exactly. And, and it's, it's basically turing complete. I mean, you can write extremely complex auth policies. You can say, you know, only give access to this particular admin group on a Thursday afternoon between six and 8:00 PM. You can get really, yeah. really as fancy as you want. [00:17:44] Jeremy: Is that all written in SQL or are there other languages they allow you to use?[00:17:50] Ant: Yeah. It's the default is plain SQL. Within Postgres itself, you can useI think you can use, like there's a Python extension. There's a JavaScript extension, which is a, I think it's a subsets of, of JavaScripts. I mean, this is the thing with Postgres, it's super extensible and people have probably got all kinds of interpreters.So you, yeah, you can use whatever you want, but the typical user will just use SQL. [00:18:17] Jeremy: interesting. And that applies to logic in general, I suppose, where if you were writing a rails application, you might write Ruby. Um, If you're writing a node application, you write JavaScript, but you're, you're saying in a lot of cases with PostgREST, you're actually able to do what you want to do, whether that's serialization or mapping objects, do that all through SQL.[00:18:44] Ant: Yeah, exactly, exactly. And then obviously like there's a lot of awesome other stuff that Postgres has like this postGIS, which if you're doing geo, if you've got like a geo application, it'll load it up with a geo types for you, which you can just use. If you're doing like encryption and decryption, we just added PG libsodium, which is a new and awesome cryptography extension.And so you can use all of these, these all add like functions, like SQL functions which you can kind of use in, in any parts of the logic or in the role level policies. Yeah.[00:19:22] Jeremy: and something I thought was a little unique about PostgREST is that I believe it's written in Haskell. Is that right?[00:19:29] Ant: Yeah, exactly. And it makes it fairly inaccessible to me as a result. But the good thing is it's got a thriving community of its own and, you know, people who on there's people who contribute probably because it's written in haskell. And it's, it's just a really awesome project and it's an excuse to, to contribute to it.But yeah. I, I think I did probably the intro course, like many people and beyond that, it's just, yeah, kind of inaccessible to me. [00:19:59] Jeremy: yeah, I suppose that's the trade-off right. Is you have a, a really passionate community about like people who really want to use Haskell and then you've got the, the, I guess the group like yourselves that looks at it and goes, oh, I don't, I don't know about this.[00:20:13] Ant: I would, I would love to have the time to, to invest in uh, but not practical right now. [00:20:21] Jeremy: You talked a little bit about the GoTrue project from Netlify. I think I saw on one of your blog posts that you actually forked it. Can you sort of explain the reasoning behind doing that?[00:20:34] Ant: Yeah, initially it was because we were trying to move extremely fast. So, so we did Y Combinator in 2020. And when you do Y Combinator, you get like a part, a group partner, they call it one of the, the partners from YC and they add a huge amount of external pressure to move very quickly. And, and our biggest feature that we are working on in that period was auth.And we just kept getting the question of like, when are you going to ship auth? You know, and every single week we'd be like, we're working on it, we're working on it. And um, and one of the ways we could do it was we just had to iterate extremely quickly and we didn't rarely have the time to, to upstream things correctly.And actually like the way we use it in our stack is slightly differently. They connected to MySQL, we connected to Postgres. So we had to make some structural changes to do that. And the dream would be now that we, we spend some time upstream and a lot of the changes. And hopefully we do get around to that.But the, yeah, the pace at which we've had to move over the last uh, year and a half has been kind of scary and, and that's the main reason, but you know, hopefully now we're a little bit more established. We can hire some more people to, to just focus on, go true and, and bringing the two folks back together. [00:22:01] Jeremy: it's just a matter of, like you said speed, I suppose, because the PostgREST you, you chose to continue working off of the existing open source project, right? [00:22:15] Ant: Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And I think the other thing is it's not a major part of Netlify's business, as I understand it. I think if it was and if both companies had more resource behind it, it would make sense to obviously focus on on the single codebase but I think both companies don't contribute as much resource as as we would like to, but um, but it's, it's for me, it's, it's one of my favorite parts of the stack to work on because it's written in go and I kind of enjoy how that it all fits together.So Yeah. I, I like to dive in there. [00:22:55] Jeremy: w w what about go, or what about how it's structured? Do you particularly enjoy about the, that part of the project?[00:23:02] Ant: I think it's so I actually learned learned go through, gotrue and I'm, I have like a Python and C plus plus background And I hate the fact that I don't get to use Python and C plus posts rarely in my day to day job. It's obviously a lot of type script. And then when we inherited this code base, it was kind of, as I was picking it up I, it just reminded me a lot of, you know, a lot of the things I loved about Python and C plus plus, and, and the tooling around it as well. I just found to be exceptional. So, you know, you just do like a small amounts of conflig. Uh config, And it makes it very difficult to, to write bad code, if that makes sense.So the compiler will just, boot you back if you try and do something silly which isn't necessarily the case with, with JavaScript. I think TypeScript is a little bit better now, but Yeah, I just, it just reminded me a lot of my Python and C days.[00:24:01] Jeremy: Yeah, I'm not too familiar with go, but my understanding is that there's, there's a formatter that's a part of the language, so there's kind of a consistency there. And then the language itself tries to get people to, to build things in the same way, or maybe have simpler ways of building things. Um, I don't, I don't know.Maybe that's part of the appeal.[00:24:25] Ant: Yeah, exactly. And the package manager as well is great. It just does a lot of the importing automatically. and makes sure like all the declarations at the top are formatted correctly and, and are definitely there. So Yeah. just all of that tool chain is just really easy to pick up.[00:24:46] Jeremy: Yeah. And I, and I think compiled languages as well, when you have the static type checking. By the compiler, you know, not having things blow up and run time. That's, that's just such a big relief, at least for me in a lot of cases,[00:25:00] Ant: And I just loved the dopamine hits of when you compile something on it actually compiles this. I lose that with, with working with JavaScript. [00:25:11] Jeremy: for sure. One of the topics you mentioned earlier was how super base provides real-time database updates. And which is something that as far as I know is not natively a part of Postgres. So I wonder if you could explain a little bit about how that works and how that came about.[00:25:31] Ant: Yeah. So, So Postgres, when you add replication databases the way it does is it writes everything to this thing called the write ahead log, which is basically all the changes that uh, have, are going to be applied to, to the database. And when you connect to like a replication database. It basically streams that log across.And that's how the replica knows what, what changes to, to add. So we wrote a server, which basically pretends to be a Postgres rep, replica receives the right ahead log encodes it into JSON. And then you can subscribe to that server over web sockets. And so you can choose whether to subscribe, to changes on a particular schema or a particular table or particular columns, and even do equality matches on rows and things like this.And then we recently added the role level security policies to the real-time stream as well. So that was something that took us a while to, cause it was probably one of the largest technical challenges we've faced. But now that it's in the real-time stream is, is fully secure and you can apply these, these same policies that you apply over the CRUD API as well.[00:26:48] Jeremy: So for that part, did you have to look into the internals of Postgres and how it did its row level security and try to duplicate that in your own code?[00:26:59] Ant: Yeah, pretty much. I mean it's yeah, it's fairly complex and there's a guy on our team who, well, for him, it didn't seem as complex, let's say (laughs) , but yeah, that's pretty much it it's just a lot of it's effectively a SQL um, a Postgres extension itself, uh which in-in interprets those policies and applies them to, to the, to the, the right ahead log.[00:27:26] Jeremy: and this piece that you wrote, that's listening to the right ahead log. what was it written in and, and how did you choose that, that language or that stack?[00:27:36] Ant: Yeah. That's written in the Elixir framework which is based on Erlang very horizontally scalable. So any applications that you write in Elixir can kind of just scale horizontally the message passing and, you know, go into the billions and it's no problem. So it just seemed like a sensible choice for this type of application where you don't know.How large the wall is going to be. So it could just be like a few changes per second. It could be a million changes per second, then you need to be able to scale out. And I think Paul who's my co-founder originally, he wrote the first version of it and I think he wrote it as an excuse to learn Elixir, which is how, a lot of probably how PostgREST ended up being Haskell, I imagine.But uh, but it's meant that the Elixir community is still like relatively small. But it's a group of like very passionate and very um, highly skilled developers. So when we hire from that pool everyone who comes on board is just like, yeah, just, just really good and really enjoy is working with Elixir.So it's been a good source of a good source for hires as well. Just, just using those tools. [00:28:53] Jeremy: with a feature like this, I'm assuming it's where somebody goes to their website. They make a web socket connection to your application and they receive the updates that way. How have you seen how far you're able to push that in terms of connections, in terms of throughput, things like that?[00:29:12] Ant: Yeah, I don't actually have the numbers at hand. But we have, yeah, we have a team focused on obviously maximizing that but yeah, I don't I don't don't have those numbers right now. [00:29:24] Jeremy: one of the last things you've you've got on your website is a storage project or a storage product, I should say. And I believe it's written in TypeScript, so I was curious, we've got PostGrest, which is in Haskell. We've got go true and go. Uh, We've got the real-time database part in elixir.And so with storage, how did we finally get to TypeScript?[00:29:50] Ant: (Laughs) Well, the policy we kind of landed on was best tool for the job. Again, the good thing about being an open source is we're not resource constrained by the number of people who are in our team. It's by the number of people who are in the community and I'm willing to contribute. And so for that, I think one of the guys just went through a few different options that we could have went with, go just to keep it in line with a couple of the other APIs.But we just decided, you know, a lot of people well, everyone in the team like TypeScript is kind of just a given. And, and again, it was kind of down to speed, like what's the fastest uh we can get this up and running. And I think if we use TypeScript, it was, it was the best solution there. But yeah, but we just always go with whatever is best.Um, We don't worry too much uh, about, you know, the resources we have because the open source community has just been so great in helping us build supabase. And building supabase is like building like five companies at the same time actually, because each of these vertical stacks could be its own startup, like the auth stack And the storage layer, and all of this stuff.And you know, each has, it does have its own dedicated team. So yeah. So we're not too worried about the variation in languages.[00:31:13] Jeremy: And the storage layer is this basically a wrapper around S3 or like what is that product doing?[00:31:21] Ant: Yeah, exactly. It's it's wraparound as three. It, it would also work with all of the S3 compatible storage systems. There's a few Backblaze and a few others. So if you wanted to self host and use one of those alternatives, you could, we just have everything in our own S3 booklets inside of AWS.And then the other awesome thing about the storage system is that because we store the metadata inside of Postgres. So basically the object tree of what buckets and folders and files are there. You can write your role level policies against the object tree. So you can say this, this user should only access this folder and it's, and it's children which was kind of. Kind of an accident. We just landed on that. But it's one of my favorite things now about writing applications and supervisors is the rollover policies kind of work everywhere.[00:32:21] Jeremy: Yeah, it's interesting. It sounds like everything. Whether it's the storage or the authentication it's all comes back to postgres, right? At all. It's using the row level security. It's using everything that you put into the tables there, and everything's just kind of digging into that to get what it needs.[00:32:42] Ant: Yeah. And that's why I say we are a database company. We are a Postgres company. We're all in on postgres. We got asked in the early days. Oh, well, would you also make it my SQL compatible compatible with something else? And, but the amounts. Features Postgres has, if we just like continue to leverage them then it, it just makes the stack way more powerful than if we try to you know, go thin across multiple different databases.[00:33:16] Jeremy: And so that, that kind of brings me to, you mentioned how your Postgres companies, so when somebody signs up for supabase they create their first instance. What's what's happening behind the scenes. Are you creating a Postgres instance for them in a container, for example, how do you size it? That sort of thing.[00:33:37] Ant: Yeah. So it's basically just easy to under the hood for us we, we have plans eventually to be multi-cloud. But again, going down to the speed of execution that the. The fastest way was to just spin up a dedicated instance, a dedicated Postgres instance per user on EC2. We do also package all of the API APIs together in a second EC2 instance.But we're starting to break those out into clustered services. So for example, you know, not every user will use the storage API, so it doesn't make sense to Rooney for every user regardless. So we've, we've made that multitenant, the application code, and now we just run a huge global cluster which people connect through to access the S3 bucket.Basically and we're gonna, we have plans to do that for the other services as well. So right now it's you got two EC2 instances. But over time it will be just the Postgres instance and, and we wanted. Give everyone a dedicated instance, because there's nothing worse than sharing database resource with all the users, especially when you don't know how heavily they're going to use it, whether they're going to be bursty.So I think one of the things we just said from the start is everyone gets a Postgres instance and you get access to it as well. You can use your Postgres connection string to, to log in from the command line and kind of do whatever you want. It's yours.[00:35:12] Jeremy: so did it, did I get it right? That when I sign up, I create a super base account. You're actually creating an two instance for me specifically. So it's like every customer gets their, their own isolated it's their own CPU, their own Ram, that sort of thing.[00:35:29] Ant: Yeah, exactly, exactly. And, and the way the. We've set up the monitoring as well, is that we can expose basically all of that to you in the dashboard as well. so you can, you have some control over like the resource you want to use. If you want to a more powerful instance, we can do that. A lot of that stuff is automated.So if someone scales beyond the allocated disk size, the disk will automatically scale up by 50% each time. And we're working on automating a bunch of these, these other things as well.[00:36:03] Jeremy: so is it, is it where, when you first create the account, you might create, for example, a micro instance, and then you have internal monitoring tools that see, oh, the CPU is getting heady hit pretty hard. So we need to migrate this person to a bigger instance, that kind of thing.[00:36:22] Ant: Yeah, pretty much exactly. [00:36:25] Jeremy: And is that, is that something that the user would even see or is it the case of where you send them an email and go like, Hey, we notice you're hitting the limits here. Here's what's going to happen. [00:36:37] Ant: Yeah.In, in most cases it's handled automatically. There are people who come in and from day one, they say has my requirements. I'm going to have this much traffic. And I'm going to have, you know, a hundred thousand users hitting this every hour. And in those cases we will over-provisioned from the start.But if it's just the self service case, then it will be start on a smaller instance and an upgrade over time. And this is one of our biggest challenges over the next five years is we want to move to a more scalable Postgres. So cloud native Postgres. But the cool thing about this is there's a lot of.Different companies and individuals working on this and upstreaming into Postgres itself. So for us, we don't need to, and we, and we would never want to fork Postgres and, you know, and try and separate the storage and the the computes. But more we're gonna fund people who are already working on this so that it gets upstreamed into Postgres itself.And it's more cloud native. [00:37:46] Jeremy: Yeah. So I think the, like we talked a little bit about how Firebase was the original inspiration and when you work with Firebase, you, you don't think about an instance at all, right? You, you just put data in, you get data out. And it sounds like in this case, you're, you're kind of working from the standpoint of, we're going to give you this single Postgres instance.As you hit the limits, we'll give you a bigger one. But at some point you, you will hit a limit of where just that one instance is not enough. And I wonder if there's you have any plans for that, or if you're doing anything currently to, to handle that.[00:38:28] Ant: Yeah. So, so the medium goal is to do replication like horizontal scaling. We, we do that for some users already but we manually set that up. we do want to bring that to the self serve model as well, where you can just choose from the start. So I want, you know, replicas in these, in these zones and in these different data centers.But then, like I said, the long-term goal is that. it's not based on. Horizontally scaling a number of instances it's just a Postgres itself can, can scale out. And I think we will get to, I think, honestly, the race at which the Postgres community is working, I think we'll be there in two years.And, and if we can contribute resource towards that, that goal, I think yeah, like we'd love to do that, but yeah, but for now, it's, we're working on this intermediate solution of, of what people already do with, Postgres, which is, you know, have you replicas to make it highly available.[00:39:30] Jeremy: And with, with that, I, I suppose at least in the short term, the goal is that your monitoring software and your team is handling the scaling up the instance or creating the read replicas. So to the user, it, for the most part feels like a managed service. And then yeah, the next step would be to, to get something more similar to maybe Amazon's Aurora, I suppose, where it just kind of, you pay per use.[00:40:01] Ant: Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Aurora was kind of the goal from the start. It's just a shame that it's proprietary. Obviously. [00:40:08] Jeremy: right. Um, but it sounds, [00:40:10] Ant: the world would be a better place. If aurora was opensource. [00:40:15] Jeremy: yeah. And it sounds like you said, there's people in the open source community that are, that are trying to get there. just it'll take time. to, to all this, about making it feel seamless, making it feel like a serverless experience, even though internally, it really isn't, I'm guessing you must have a fair amount of monitoring or ways that you're making these decisions.I wonder if you can talk a little bit about, you know, what are the metrics you're looking at and what are the applications you're you have to, to help you make these decisions?[00:40:48] Ant: Yeah. definitely. So we started with Prometheus which is a, you know, metrics gathering tool. And then we moved to Victoria metrics which was just easier for us to scale out. I think soon we'll be managing like a hundred thousand Postgres databases will have been deployed on, on supabase. So definitely, definitely some scale. So this kind of tooling needs to scale to that as well. And then we have agents kind of everywhere on each application on, on the database itself. And we listen for things like the CPU and the Ram and the network IO. We also poll. Uh, Postgres itself. Th there's a extension called PG stats statements, which will give us information about what are, the intensive queries that are running on that, on that box.So we just collect as much of this as possible um, which we then obviously use internally. We set alerts to, to know when, when we need to upgrade in a certain direction, but we also have an end point where the dashboard subscribes to these metrics as well. So the user themselves can see a lot of this information.And we, I think at the moment we do a lot of the, the Ram the CPU, that kind of stuff, but we're working on adding just more and more of these observability metrics uh, so people can can know it could, because it also helps with Let's say you might be lacking an index on a particular table and not know about it.And so if we can expose that to you and give you alerts about that kind of thing, then it obviously helps with the developer experience as well.[00:42:29] Jeremy: Yeah. And th that brings me to something that I, I hear from platform as a service companies, where if a user has a problem, whether that's a crash or a performance problem, sometimes it can be difficult to distinguish between is it a problem in their application or is this a problem in super base or, you know, and I wonder how your support team kind of approaches that.[00:42:52] Ant: Yeah, no, it's, it's, it's a great question. And it's definitely something we, we deal with every day, I think because of where we're at as a company we've always seen, like, we actually have a huge advantage in that.we can provide. Rarely good support. So anytime an engineer joins super base, we tell them your primary job is actually frontline support.Everything you do afterwards is, is secondary. And so everyone does a four hour shift per week of, of working directly with the customers to help determine this kind of thing. And where we are at the moment is we are happy to dive in and help people with their application code because it helps our engineers land about how it's being used and where the pitfalls are, where we need better documentation, where we need education.So it's, that is all part of the product at the moment, actually. And, and like I said, because we're not a 10,000 person company we, it's an advantage that we have, that we can deliver that level of support at the moment. [00:44:01] Jeremy: w w what are some of the most common things you see happening? Like, is it I would expect you mentioned indexing problems, but I'm wondering if there's any specific things that just come up again and again,[00:44:15] Ant: I think like the most common is people not batching their requests. So they'll write an application, which, you know, needs to, needs to pull 10,000 rows and they send 10,000 requests (laughs) . That that's, that's a typical one for, for people just getting started maybe. Yeah. and, then I think the other thing we faced in the early days was. People storing blobs in the database which we obviously solve that problem by introducing file storage. But people will be trying to store, you know, 50 megabytes, a hundred megabyte files in Postgres itself, and then asking why the performance was so bad.So I think we've, we've mitigated that one by, by introducing the blob storage.[00:45:03] Jeremy: and when you're, you mentioned you have. Over a hundred thousand instances running. I imagine there have to be cases where an incident occurs, where something doesn't go quite right. And I wonder if you could give an example of one and how it was resolved.[00:45:24] Ant: Yeah, it's a good question. I think, yeah, w w we've improved the systems since then, but there was a period where our real time server wasn't able to handle rarely large uh, right ahead logs. So w there was a period where people would just make tons and tons of requests and updates to, to Postgres. And the real time subscriptions were failing. But like I said, we have some really great Elixir devs on the team, so they were able to jump on that fairly quickly. And now, you know, the application is, is way more scalable as a result. And that's just kind of how the support model works is you have a period where everything is breaking and then uh, then you can just, you know, tackle these things one by one. [00:46:15] Jeremy: Yeah, I think any, anybody at a, an early startup is going to run into that. Right? You put it out there and then you find out what's broken, you fix it and you just get better and better as it goes along.[00:46:28] Ant: Yeah, And the funny thing was this model of, of deploying EC2 instances. We had that in like the first week of starting super base, just me and Paul. And it was never intended to be the final solution. We just kind of did it quickly and to get something up and running for our first handful of users But it's scaled surprisingly well.And actually the things that broke as we started to get a lot of traffic and a lot of attention where was just silly things. Like we give everyone their own domain when they start a new project. So you'll have project ref dot super base dot in or co. And the things that were breaking where like, you know, we'd ran out of sub-domains with our DNS provider and then, but, and those things always happen in periods of like intense traffic.So we ha we were on the front page of hacker news, or we had a tech crunch article, and then you discover that you've ran out of sub domains and the last thousand people couldn't deploy their projects. So that's always a fun a fun challenge because you are then dependent on the external providers as well and theirs and their support systems.So yeah, I think. We did a surprisingly good job of, of putting in good infrastructure from the start. But yeah, all of these crazy things just break when obviously when you get a lot of, a lot of traffic[00:48:00] Jeremy: Yeah, I find it interesting that you mentioned how you started with creating the EC2 instances and it turned out that just work. I wonder if you could walk me through a little bit about how it worked in the beginning, like, was it the two of you going in and creating instances as people signed up and then how it went from there to where it is today?[00:48:20] Ant: yeah. So there's a good story about, about our fast user, actually. So me and Paul used to contract for a company in Singapore, which was an NFT company. And so we knew the lead developer very well. And we also still had the Postgres credentials on, on our own machines. And so what we did was we set up the th th the other funny thing is when we first started, we didn't intend to host the database.We, we thought we were just gonna host the applications that would connect to your existing Postgres instance. And so what we did was we hooked up the applications to, to the, to the Postgres instance of this, of this startup that we knew very well. And then we took the bus to their office and we sat with the lead developer, and we said, look, we've already set this thing up for you.What do you think. know, when, when you think like, ah, we've, we've got the best thing ever, but it's not until you put it in front of someone and you see them, you know, contemplating it and you're like, oh, maybe, maybe it's not so good. Maybe we don't have anything. And we had that moment of panic of like, oh, maybe we just don't maybe this isn't great.And then what happened was he didn't like use us. He didn't become a supabase user. He asked to join the team. [00:49:45] Jeremy: nice, nice.[00:49:46] Ant: that was a good a good kind of a moment where we thought, okay, maybe we have got something, maybe this is maybe this isn't terrible. So, so yeah, so he became our first employee. Yeah. [00:49:59] Jeremy: And so yeah, so, so that case was, you know, the very beginning you set everything up from, from scratch. Now that you have people signing up and you have, you know, I don't know how many signups you get a day. Did you write custom infrastructure or applications to do the provisioning or is there an open source project that you're using to handle that[00:50:21] Ant: Yeah. It's, it's actually mostly custom. And you know, AWS does a lot of the heavy lifting for you. They just provide you with a bunch of API end points. So a lot of that is just written in TypeScript fairly straightforward and, and like I said, you never intended to be the thing that last. Two years into the business.But it's, it's just scaled surprisingly well. And I'm sure at some point we'll, we'll swap it out for some I don't orchestration tooling like Pulumi or something like this. But actually the, what we've got just works really well.[00:50:59] Ant: Be because we're so into Postgres our queuing system is a Postgres extension called PG boss. And then we have a fleet of workers, which are. Uh, We manage on EC ECS. Um, So it's just a bunch of VMs basically which just subscribed to the, to the queue, which lives inside the database.And just performs all the, whether it be a project creation, deletion modification a whole, whole suite of these things. Yeah. [00:51:29] Jeremy: very cool. And so even your provisioning is, is based on Postgres.[00:51:33] Ant: Yeah, exactly. Exactly (laughs) . [00:51:36] Jeremy: I guess in that case, I think, did you say you're using the right ahead log there to in order to get notifications?[00:51:44] Ant: We do use real time, and this is the fun thing about building supabase is we use supabase to build supabase. And a lot of the features start with things that we build for ourselves. So the, the observability features we have a huge logging division. So, so w we were very early users of a tool called a log flare, which is also written in Elixir.It's basically a log sync backed up by BigQuery. And we loved it so much and we became like super log flare power users that it was kind of, we decided to eventually acquire the company. And now we can just offer log flare to all of our customers as well as part of using supabase. So you can query your logs and get really good business intelligence on what your users um, consuming in from your database.[00:52:35] Jeremy: the lock flare you're mentioning though, you said that that's a log sink and that that's actually not going to Postgres, right. That's going to a different type of store.[00:52:43] Ant: Yeah. That is going to big query actually. [00:52:46] Jeremy: Oh, big query. Okay. [00:52:47] Ant: yeah, and maybe eventually, and this is the cool thing about watching the Postgres progression is it's become. It's bringing like transactional and analytical databases together. So it's traditionally been a great transactional database, but if you look at a lot of the changes that have been made in recent versions, it's becoming closer and closer to an analytical database.So maybe at some point we will use it, but yeah, but big query works just great. [00:53:18] Jeremy: Yeah. It's, it's interesting to see, like, I, I know that we've had episodes on different extensions to Postgres where I believe they change out how the storage works. So there's yeah, it's really interesting how it's it's this one database, but it seems like it can take so many different forms. [00:53:36] Ant: It's just so extensible and that's why we're so bullish on it because okay. Maybe it wasn't always the best database, but now it seems like it is becoming the best database and the rate at which it's moving. It's like, where's it going to be in five years? And we're just, yeah, we're just very bullish on, on Postgres.As you can tell from the amount of mentions it's had in this episode.[00:54:01] Jeremy: yeah, we'll have to count how many times it's been said. I'm sure. It's, I'm sure it's up there. Is there anything else we, we missed or think you should have mentioned.[00:54:12] Ant: No, some of the things we're excited about are cloud functions. So it's the thing we just get asked for the most at anytime we post anything on Twitter, you're guaranteed to get a reply, which is like when functions. And we're very pleased to say that it's, it's almost there. So um, that will hopefully be a really good developer experience where also we launched like a, a graph QL Postgres extension where the resolver lives inside of Postgres.And that's still in early alpha, but I think I'm quite excited for when we can start offering that on the on the hosted platform as well. People will have that option to, to use GraphQL instead of, or as well as the restful API.[00:55:02] Jeremy: the, the common thread here is that PostgreSQL you're able to take it really, really far. Right. In terms of scale up, eventually you'll have the read replicas. Hopefully you'll have. Some kind of I don't know what you would call Aurora, but it's, it's almost like self provisioning, maybe not sharing what, how you describe it.But I wonder as a, as a company, like we talked about big query, right? I wonder if there's any use cases that you've come across, either from customers or in your own work where you're like, I just, I just can't get it to fit into Postgres.[00:55:38] Ant: I think like, not very often, but sometimes we'll, we will respond to support requests and recommend that people use Firebase. they're rarelylike if, if they really do have like large amounts of unstructured data, which is which, you know, documented storage is, is kind of perfect for that. We'll just say, you know, maybe you should just use Firebase.So we definitely come across things like that. And, and like I said, we love, we love Firebase, so we're definitely not trying to, to uh, destroy as a tool. I think it, it has its use cases where it's an incredible tool yeah. And provides a lot of inspiration for, for what we're building as well. [00:56:28] Jeremy: all right. Well, I think that's a good place to, to wrap it up, but where can people hear more about you hear more about supabase?[00:56:38] Ant: Yeah, so supeabase is at supabase.com. I'm on Twitter at ant Wilson. Supabase is on Twitter at super base. Just hits us up. We're quite active on the and then definitely check out the repose gets up.com/super base. There's lots of great stuff to dig into as we discussed. There's a lot of different languages, so kind of whatever you're into, you'll probably find something where you can contribute. [00:57:04] Jeremy: Yeah, and we, we sorta touched on this, but I think everything we've talked about with the exception of the provisioning part and the monitoring part is all open source. Is that correct? [00:57:16] Ant: Yeah, exactly.And as, yeah. And hopefully everything we build moving forward, including functions and graph QL we'll continue to be open source.[00:57:31] Jeremy: And then I suppose the one thing I, I did mean to touch on is what, what is the, the license for all the components you're using that are open source?[00:57:41] Ant: It's mostly Apache2 or MIT. And then obviously Postgres has its own Postgres license. So as long as it's, it's one of those, then we, we're not too precious. I, As I said, we inherit a fair amounts of projects. So we contribute to and adopt projects. So as long as it's just very permissive, then we don't care too much.[00:58:05] Jeremy: As far as the projects that your team has worked on, I've noticed that over the years, we've seen a lot of companies move to things like the business source license or there's, there's all these different licenses that are not quite so permissive. And I wonder like what your thoughts are on that for the future of your company and why you think that you'll be able to stay permissive.[00:58:32] Ant: Yeah, I really, really, rarely hope that we can stay permissive. forever. It's, it's a philosophical thing for, for us. You know, when we, we started the business, it's what just very, just very, as individuals into the idea of open source. And you know, if, if, if AWS come along at some point and offer hosted supabase on AWS, then it will be a signal that where we're doing something.Right. And at that point we just, I think we just need to be. The best team to continue to move super boost forward. And if we are that, and I, I think we will be there and then hopefully we will never have to tackle this this licensing issue. [00:59:19] Jeremy: All right. Well, I wish you, I wish you luck.[00:59:23] Ant: Thanks. Thanks for having me. [00:59:25] Jeremy: This has been Jeremy Jung for software engineering radio. Thanks for listening.