Podcasts about Republican Party

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    Best podcasts about Republican Party

    Show all podcasts related to republican party

    Latest podcast episodes about Republican Party

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
    Erick Erickson Show: S11 EP121: Hour 2 – Hispanic Women Scare Democrats

    The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022


    Democrats are in full meltdown mode over new data suggesting that Hispanics are moving to the Republican Party.

    The Erick Erickson Show
    S11 EP121: Hour 2 - Hispanic Women Scare Democrats

    The Erick Erickson Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 37:39


    Democrats are in full meltdown mode over new data suggesting that Hispanics are moving to the Republican Party.

    Rising
    Kamala Harris Visits Highland Park Calls For Stricter Gun Laws, Joe Rogan Refuses Trump On Podcast. A Dangerous Precedent? Kim, Robby, Olayemi Debate, And More: Rising 7.6.22

    Rising

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 102:02


    Today on Rising, Kamala Harris rolled for “SERIOUSLY” word salad, calls for stricter gun laws after July 4th shooting (00:00)Hunter Biden LAPTOP question goes UNANSWERED by WH Press Sec Karnne Jean-Pierre (12:16)Biden CLUELESS on impact of MANDATES, LOCKDOWNS on kids, Caused math & reading losses: Robby Soave (21:30)Biden BLAMES gas station owners for high prices, 2/3 Americans experiencing FINANCIAL HARDSHIP (34:19)Pete Buttigieg doing NOTHING as airlines STEAL MILLIONS. It's an UNMITIGATED DISASTER: Matt Stoller (47:12)Joe Rogan refuses TRUMP on podcast. A dangerous precedent? Kim, Robby, Olayemi DEBATE (59:41)Kim Iversen: State Senator Tiara Mack TWERKS half-naked for VOTES in Tik Tok video (1:09:30)CHANGING 'your parts' doesn't make you a woman: Macy Gray CANCELLED over trans comment (1:25:32)Where to tune in and follow: https://linktr.ee/risingthehillMore about Rising:Rising is a weekday morning show hosted by Ryan Grim, Kim Iversen, and Robby Soave. It breaks the mold of morning TV by taking viewers inside the halls of Washington power like never before, providing outside-of-the-beltway perspectives. The show leans into the day's political cycle with cutting edge analysis from DC insiders and outsiders alike to provide coverage not provided on cable news. It also sets the day's political agenda by breaking exclusive news with a team of scoop-driven reporters and demanding answers during interviews with the country's most important political newsmakers.

    The Dispatch Podcast
    Goodbye Red Brick Road

    The Dispatch Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 68:00


    Tim Miller, writer-at-large at The Bulwark, joins Steve to talk about his new book: Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell. Miller gives listeners a breakdown of the Washington, D.C. political culture and how it's not what you might think. Plus: the book sparks a lively debate about the divides within the Republican Party, and whether there's a way forward in the midst of the murk. Is there a place for center-right journalism to thrive? Show Notes:-Why We Did It: A Travelogue from the Republican Road to Hell

    The Brian Nichols Show
    538: Beware of Common Good Conservatives! - Why 'Common Good' Conservatism Is a Recipe for Failure

    The Brian Nichols Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 30:44


    Common good conservatives argue that America's economic and cultural problems are rooted in libertarianism. They believe the Republican Party and the conservative movement has failed to address the needs of the American people because they have “outsourced” their economic policy to libertarians. Today, Charles Sauer (President of The Market Institute) joins the program and makes his case how it's not the libertarians who are failing, but rather, the failed policies of the common good conservatives like Josh Hawley, Tom Cotton, and JD Vance. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik
    Joey Gilbert is Proving the Nevada GOP Primaries Were Rigged

    Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 33:52


    Joey Gilbert is the kind of firebrand America First conservative political candidate that we need. He's not afraid to speak his mind and take on the Establishment Republican Party. However, his impact on the future of this country could be even more than he realizes.Gilbert is a candidate for Governor of Nevada. A few weeks ago, he was declared the loser in the GOP primary election, with the nomination going to the RINO candidate, Sheriff Joe Lombardo. For those of you who have been following Mindy Robinson's investigation of the Las Vegas shooting, Sheriff Lombardo was allegedly actively involved in covering up who really was behind the mass shooting. Given that Gilbert has said that he would investigate the coverup of the shooting, it's no surprise that the powers-that-be felt the need to rig the election to ensure that he had zero chance of getting into the Governor's Mansion.Fortunately, Joey Gilbert and his team were expecting “f***ery and shenanigans” as he called it, making sure that they had people in place to observe the polls, the counting and the chain of custody. And boy, was it a s***show, to put it mildly.They have the receipts and documentation proving that the chain of custody was not followed, that signatures were not checked and a host of other issues. But the one issue that he says is most important is the chain of custody. The fact that procedures were not followed should invalidate the entire election, or at the very least the ballots of those that were submitted without following the letter of the law.According to Gilbert, they have evidence that the chain of custody was not followed, which would require two people transporting ballots and several other steps to ensure the integrity and source of the ballots. Given that this was not enforced, there was no way to know which of the boxes are legit or not. All it would take would be one or two boxes added to the mix to completely change the outcome of the election.While they are simply going through a recount right now, which is only recounting the rigged results, the real challenge will be when they contest the procedures that were not followed, which should invalidate the election.The reality, however, is that if Joey Gilbert's team can overturn the rigged GOP Primary, this can be the path forward to ensuring we have clean and fair elections around the country. In my opinion, it could also help us to make headway in fixing the 2020 Election. While everyone is focusing on the voter fraud, the simplest path forward is to prove the election fraud through the illegal changing of rules and not following the election laws, which it's clear were not followed during the GOP Primaries in Nevada.Joey Gilbert is someone we need to rally behind. He could be that tip of the spear to expose the widespread election fraud needed to overturn the 2020 Election. To see how you can support Joey Gilbert for Governor and expose the rigged GOP Primary Election, go to https://gilbertforgovernor.com.Allowing the Establishment to retain control will have direct impact on our health, given that they are releasing bioweapons on us trying to force us to get injected with “vaccines” that are nothing more than Poison Death Shots. One of the best things you can do is to build up your immune system through the late Dr Zev Zelenko's Z-Stack and Z-DTOX. Plus, 10% of your purchase will go the Zelenko Freedom Foundation. Use code FREEDOM for a discount when you order at https://zstacklife.com/freedom. This interview with Joey Gilbert was originally aired on The Breakdown with Jeff Dornik on Freedom First TV. To catch the entire episode or to watch the show live everyday at 9am PT, become a Freedom First TV subscriber. Use code JEFF for 25% off when you sign up at https://freedomfirst.tv/subscribe.

    Jesse Lee Peterson Show Highlights
    Voters BETRAYED Again but Politicians Yuck It Up in Congress 'Cause They Keep Getting Voted In | JLP

    Jesse Lee Peterson Show Highlights

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 8:58


    Clipped from June 22nd, 2022: It's hard for people to be an individual and stand alone. JLP became a Republican after his heart changed. But now we don't have a Republican Party. The Republicans don't represent the best interests of the voters. They passed a "gun violence" bill along with Democrats. The Jesse Lee Peterson Show (M-F 6-9am PT) http://jlptalk.com Call-in: 888-77-JESSE (1-888-775-3773)

    Rising
    July 4th Massacre Suspect Robert Crimo in CUSTODY, Had History of Disturbing Social Media Posts, And More: Rising 7.5.22

    Rising

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 104:05


    Today on Rising, July 4th massacre suspect Robert Crimo in CUSTODY, had history of disturbing social media posts (00:00)Urgency is a WHITE SUPREMACY value'; BONKERS Oregon officials embrace 'antiracism': Robby Soave (12:31)POLICE STATE? Jayland Walker shot 60 TIMES over simple traffic stop: Olayemi Olurin (25:04)71% DON'T WANT Biden to tun in 2024, HAMMERED by Trump in hypothetical matchup (40:05)Trump support WANING as he abandons Populist ideals revealed by Jan 6 hearings: Batya Ungar-Sargon (51:41)Mass flight cancellations due to OVERREGULATION? Kim, Olayemi, and Robby debate (1:09:58)Kim Iversen: MASSIVE Dutch farmer protest puts Canadian freedom convoy to SHAME (1:19:09)Gavin Newsom TARGETS Floridians, ‘join us in California!' Effective? Kim, Robby, Olayemi debate (1:32:18)Where to tune in and follow: https://linktr.ee/risingthehillMore about Rising:Rising is a weekday morning show hosted by Ryan Grim, Kim Iversen, and Robby Soave. It breaks the mold of morning TV by taking viewers inside the halls of Washington power like never before, providing outside-of-the-beltway perspectives. The show leans into the day's political cycle with cutting edge analysis from DC insiders and outsiders alike to provide coverage not provided on cable news. It also sets the day's political agenda by breaking exclusive news with a team of scoop-driven reporters and demanding answers during interviews with the country's most important political newsmakers.

    All Of It
    Frederick Douglass's Fight for Abolition and Suffrage

    All Of It

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 15:17


    [REBROADCAST FROM February 25, 2021] For the fifth installment of February's “Full Bio” series, historian David W. Blight discusses Frederick Douglass's political work fighting for abolition and suffrage. We look at his allegiance to the Republican Party, including his working relationship with Abraham Lincoln, and why Andrew Johnson was so dismissive of Douglass.

    American Conservative University
    Ann Coulter, John Zmirak, Eric Metaxas. French Revolution and the American Revolution were Exact Opposites. Pro-Choice Demons Go to War. Judas Gun Stealing Republicans.

    American Conservative University

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 59:33


    Ann Coulter, John Zmirak, Eric Metaxas. French Revolution and the American Revolution were Exact Opposites. Pro-Choice Demons Go to War. Judas Gun Stealing Republicans.   The American History You Don't Know HAPPY JULY 4TH!!! Ann Coulter Ann Coulter, AUTHOR OF 13 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERS, chats about politics, religion, war, crime, history, sex, race, soccer (even real sports!) – all the things we're told it's impolite to raise in polite company. Coulter's UNSAFE podcast is the Rapid Response Team to the Democratic Party and its subsidiaries, The New York Times, The Washington Post, MSNBC, CNN, et al — as well as 90 percent of the Republican Party. Listen here first – and be 3 days ahead of all the cable news channel hosts, who will undoubtedly be listening too   The Eric Metaxas Show John Zmirak  Jul 01 2022   Big Bad John Zmirak brings his usual thunder and lightning with focus on new articles at Stream.org, including, "Pro-Choice Arguments Are Dead, Now We See the Demons" and "Can SCOTUS Save Our Gun Rights from Republicans in the Senate?"   The Eric Metaxas Show The Eric Metaxas Show- https://metaxastalk.com/podcasts/   Book Mentioned- Death by Government by RJ Rummel. Get yours free at- https://www.hawaii.edu/powerkills/DBG.CHAP1.HTM   About the Author- Rudolph Rummel From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   Rudolph Rummel   Born Rudolph Joseph Rummel October 21, 1932 Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. Died March 2, 2014 (aged 81) Kaneohe, Hawaii, U.S. Education University of Hawaiʻi (B.A., political science, 1959) (M.A., political science, 1961) Northwestern University (Ph.D., political science, 1963) Occupation Political scientist Employer Indiana University (1963–1964) Yale University (1964–1966) University of Hawaiʻi (1966–1995) Known for Research on war and conflict resolution Website hawaii.edu/powerkills Rudolph Joseph Rummel (October 21, 1932 – March 2, 2014)[1] was an American political scientist and professor at the Indiana University, Yale University, and University of Hawaiʻi. He spent his career studying data on collective violence and war with a view toward helping their resolution or elimination. Contrasting genocide, Rummel coined the term democide for murder by government, such as the genocide of indigenous peoples and colonialism, Nazi Germany, the Stalinist purges, Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution, and other authoritarian, totalitarian, or undemocratic regimes, coming to the conclusion that democratic regimes result in the least democides.[2] Rummel estimated that a total of 212 million people were killed by all governments during the 20th century,[3] of which 148 million were killed by Communist governments from 1917 to 1987.[4] To give some perspective on these numbers, Rummel stated that all domestic and foreign wars during the 20th century killed in combat around 41 million. His figures for Communist governments have been criticized for the methodology which he used to arrive at them, and they have also been criticized for being higher than the figures which have been given by most scholars.[5][6][7][8][9][10][11] In his last book, Rummel increased his estimate to over 272 million innocent, non-combatant civilians who were murdered by their own governments during the 20th century.[12] Rummel stated that his 272 million death estimate was his lower, more prudent figure, stating that it "could be over 400,000,000."[13] Rummel came to the conclusion that a democracy is the form of government which is least likely to kill its citizens because democracies do not tend to wage wars against each other.[2] This latest view is a concept, which was further developed by Rummel, known as the democratic peace theory.[14] Rummel was the author of twenty-four scholarly books, and he published his major results between 1975 and 1981 in Understanding Conflict and War (1975).[15] He spent the next fifteen years refining the underlying theory and testing it empirically on new data, against the empirical results of others, and on case studies. He summed up his research in Power Kills (1997).[16] His other works include Lethal Politics: Soviet Genocides and Mass Murders 1917–1987 (1990),[17] China's Bloody Century: Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1900 (1991),[18] Democide: Nazi Genocide and Mass Murder (1992),[19] Death by Government: Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1900 (1994),[20] and Statistics of Democide (1997).[21] Extracts, figures, and tables from the books, including his sources and details regarding the calculations, are available online on his website. Rummel also authored Applied Factor Analysis (1970)[22] and Understanding Correlation (1976).[23]

    The Owen Jones Podcast
    Is This The End of American Democracy?

    The Owen Jones Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 58:24


    Is US democracy in a death spin? That's now an increasingly mainstream debate as a radicalised Republican Party abandon democratic norms, the Supreme Court not only strikes down Roe v. Wade but facilitates the rigging of the electoral system, while an already heavily caveated US democracy increasingly enforces minority rule. Why is the Democratic response to this crisis so dire? What can be done to prevent the slide of the US into right-wing authoritarianism - all under the watch of a Democratic president? And how far fetched is talk of civil war?We're joined by US journalists and podcasts Francesca Fiorentini and Matthew Sitman.Please subscribe - and help us take on the right-wing media: https://patreon.com/owenjones84Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-owen-jones-podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Talkin‘ Politics & Religion Without Killin‘ Each Other
    BONUS EPISODE: Faithful Politics - Gaslighting America with Special Guest Amanda Carpenter

    Talkin‘ Politics & Religion Without Killin‘ Each Other

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 65:12


    This is a bonus TP&R episode of Faithful Politics with our good friends Josh Burtram and Will Wright when they interviewed Amanda Carpenter of The Bulwark. Gaslighting is a tactic in which a person or entity, in order to gain more power, makes a victim question their reality. Enter former-President Trump. Over the last four years, America has been under the influence of a person who seemingly graduated from Gaslighting University with a Ph.D. in Alternative Facts. Whether Trump knows it or not, he is masterful in the art of gaslighting-jitsu. The guest this week may know a thing or two about being gaslit, as she has been the target of this Trump tactic, Amanda Carpenter joins Will and Josh to discuss her book, Gaslighting America: Why We Love It When Trump Lies to Us. They also discuss the future of the Republican Party, and how faith played a key role in her life during one of the most heinous acts perpetrated by the Trump campaign during 2016 primaries. Amanda Carpenter is a political commentator for CNN and author of GASLIGHTING AMERICA: Why We Love It When Trump Lies To Us. Prior to CNN she was the Communications Director for Senator Ted Cruz and previously served as Senior Communications Advisor and Speechwriter to Sen. Jim DeMint. For both senators, Carpenter crafted countless op-eds, speeches, talking points, briefing papers, jokes, press releases, tweets, Facebook posts, and other materials on a range of subjects before the United States Senate, including but not limited to economics, campaigns, healthcare, foreign affairs, and constitutional matters. Her work for them has been published in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, and other outlets. Roll Call featured her in a 2014 front-page profile, "Ted Cruz's Twitter Torrent: Outspoken GOP Aide Takes on Own Party" calling her "Capitol Hill's most-followed staffer" on Twitter with more than 56,000 followers. In 2013, she led the creation of Cruz's viral #MakeDCListen speech and campaign that pollster Frank Luntz said produced "the best political sound-byte of 2013.” In 2011, she was named by the Washington Post as one of the "Top 10 Capitol Hill Staffers to Watch."  https://www.faithfulpoliticspodcast.com/ https://www.thebulwark.com/author/amanda-carpenter/ https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/gaslighting-america-amanda-carpenter/1126314531?ean=9780062748003

    Theory of Change podcast
    Theory of Change #043: Nicole Hemmer on how right-wing media holds American reaction together

    Theory of Change podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 57:48


    Politics in the United States have been so incredibly erratic since 2015 when Donald Trump began his political career in earnest. His Much has been written and spoken about how Trump has transformed the Republican Party by empowering its large extremist faction, but it's also the case that Donald Trump transformed the complex and large advocacy media apparatus that the American right has been building for itself since the 1940s. In fact, could argue that while more than a few Republican politicians are trying to copy Trump's angry and conspiratorial rhetoric, his political ascent in the GOP actually had more of an impact on the right-wing media. While conspiracy websites, talk hosts, and writers have always found some success among American conservatives, the ultra-reactionary dynamic that now prevails in right-wing media is unparalleled in our history. Joining the show to discuss all this is Nicole Hemmer, she's a historian of American media who wrote a terrific book called “Messengers of the Right” about the emergence of right-wing media. She's also a contributor to a new book that just came out called “The Presidency of Donald J. Trump: A First Historical Assessment.” And she has another book that will be released soon called “Partisans: The Conservative Revolutionaries Who Remade American Politics in the 1990s.” FULL AUDIO TRANSCRIPT https://flux.community/matthew-sheffield/2022/07/how-right-wing-media-became-the-glue-that-holds-the-republican-party-together/ GUEST INFO Nicole Hemmer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/pastpunditry BOOK LIST "Partisans: The Conservative Revolutionaries Who Remade American Politics in the 1990s" https://bookshop.org/books/partisans-the-conservative-revolutionaries-who-remade-american-politics-in-the-1990s/9781541646889 "Messengers of the Right: Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics" https://bookshop.org/books/messengers-of-the-right-conservative-media-and-the-transformation-of-american-politics/9780812224306 "The Presidency of Donald J. Trump: A First Historical Assessment" https://bookshop.org/books/the-presidency-of-donald-j-trump-a-first-historical-assessment-9780691228945/9780691228945 ABOUT THE SHOW Theory of Change is hosted by Matthew Sheffield and is part of the Flux network, a new content community of podcasters and writers. Please visit us at https://flux.community to learn more and to tell us about what you're doing. We're constantly growing and learning from the great people we meet. Theory of Change website: https://theoryofchange.show Theory of Change on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheoryChange Matthew Sheffield on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mattsheffield SUPPORT THE SHOW PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/theorychange Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/discoverflux If you're not able to support financially, please help us by subscribing and/or leaving a nice review on your favorite podcast app. Doing this helps other people find Theory of Change and our great guests. Thanks for your help!

    The Republican Professor
    The Man, the Myth, the Legend Professor Harry V. Jaffa, Ph.D. of The Claremont Colleges: "The Soul of Politics" by Dr. Glenn Ellmers Ph.D.

    The Republican Professor

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 114:47


    Dr. Glenn Elmers, Ph.D. has written a definitive biography, based on a wide swath of primary sources (innumerable letters, publications, other writings) of the late great Dr. Harry Jaffa, Ph.D. It's called "The Soul of Politics: Harry V. Jaffa and the Fight for America." Jaffa was a preeminent scholar of the birth of the Republican Party, what that had to do with the US Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, and before that classical philosophy, Jerusalem, the end of slavery in America, as well its enduring relevance to the modern disputes over the nature and size of the administrative state, e.g., during the Republican Convention at Cow Palace, San Fransisco in 1964. Love him or hate him, it's impossible to be indifferent to the man and the weighty issues he made the subject of his life's work. Dr. Glenn Elmers has done the careful spade work and shares it gladly on this special July 4th episode of The Republican Professor (2022). Please support your local bookstore. If you must , here is a link to the book on Amazon : https://www.amazon.com/Soul-Politics-Harry-Jaffa-America/dp/164177200X/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=the+soul+of+politics+harry+v.+jaffa&qid=1656706654&sprefix=the+soul+of+poli%2Caps%2C524&sr=8-1 The Republican Professor is a pro-rightly-contemplating-the-nexus-of-Philosophy-and-American-Politics, pro-correctly-articulating-the-nature-of-the -Constitution-given-the-Declaration, pro-ending-slavery, pro-birth-of-the-Republican-Party, pro-man-myth-legend-Harry-v-Jaffa-warts-and-all podcast. Therefore, welcome Dr. Glenn Ellmers, Ph.D., Harry V. Jaffa biographer ! The Republican Professor podcast is produced and hosted by Dr. Lucas J. Mather, Ph.D.

    The FOX News Rundown
    From Washington: Will The Trump Effect Drive A Red Wave?

    The FOX News Rundown

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 29:15


    As history shows, midterm elections tend to serve as a referendum on the party in power and as inflation and gas prices hit record highs, President Joe Biden's approval ratings fall even lower, and Democrats are losing their edge. Co-Anchor of America's Newsroom Bill Hemmer shares his thoughts on how Republicans can put their best foot forward to take back the House and the Senate in November.   Voter turnout is looking to be a driving force in the 2022 Midterm Elections, especially in key swing districts and former President Donald Trump has seen some success in endorsing candidates in races across the country, who have won their races. Republican National Committee Spokesperson Paris Dennard touches on the Trump Effect and explains how the Republican Party is diversifying its pool of candidates to flip more seats from blue to red. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Florida This Week
    Which political party does a better job defending freedom?

    Florida This Week

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 27:06


    Host, Rob Lorei, talks about important news from Florida this week and gets political insights from guests: Christian Ziegler, Sarasota County Commissioner, District 2, Vice Chair, Republican Party of FloridaTara Newsom, Attorney, Political Science Professor, St. Petersburg CollegeDeborah Tamargo, Immediate Past President, Florida Federation of Republican WomenMike Deeson, Author, Independent JournalistThis week we discuss:The Supreme Court decision on abortionMask and vaccine mandatesLimits on what can be taught about race and gender in schoolsCorporations being sanctioned by governmentThe debate over guns and public safetyWhich major political party does better standing for personal freedom?To learn more about Florida This Week, visit www.wedu.org/floridathisweek 

    Firing Line with Margaret Hoover
    Christine Todd Whitman

    Firing Line with Margaret Hoover

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 36:49


    Former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman joins Margaret Hoover to discuss the ramifications of the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old decision that had granted a constitutional right to an abortion. “Women will die,” the pro-choice Republican warns as GOP-led states race to restrict abortion access. She also expresses concerns that the Supreme Court's conservative majority is pursuing a political agenda rather than a legal one, and that the rollback of rights will not stop here. Whitman, an advocate of moderate conservatism and outspoken critic of former President Donald Trump, reflects on how her party has changed in recent years and why both Republicans and Democrats are increasingly reluctant to pursue popular bipartisan solutions on contentious issues. The former governor also offers her perspective on the midterm elections, a potential Trump 2024 run, and the uncertain future of the Republican Party. Support for “Firing Line for Margaret Hoover” is provided by Stephens Inc., Robert Granieri, Charles R. Schwab, The Fairweather Foundation, Asness Family Foundation, The Rosalind P. Walter Foundation, Damon Button, and The Marc Haas Foundation.

    Hacks & Wonks
    Week in Review: July 1, 2022

    Hacks & Wonks

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 48:55


    On today's week-in-review, Crystal is joined by Executive Director of The Urbanist, Doug Trumm. They start by looking at research that shows Seattle is continuing to grow faster than the suburbs around it. Next, they discuss the future of a Tukwila ballot initiative to raise the city's minimum wage. In policing news, Crystal and Doug examine the troubling future of funding for non-police public safety and crime prevention programs in Seattle, and how despite the documented success of those programs, the city seems to dismiss their impact. After that, Doug explains what the city's Comprehensive Plan is, covers why it's important, and breaks down the various proposals for the plan. Finally, they end the show discussing the State Rep. Position 1 race in Seattle's 46th LD and how it reflects current debates we're having across the state.  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Doug Trumm, at @dmtrumm. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “Outpacing Suburbs, Seattle Grows 20,100 in One Year in Latest Population Estimate” by Doug Trumm from The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2022/06/30/outpacing-suburbs-seattle-grows-20100-in-one-year/  “Initiative for higher minimum wage in Tukwila qualifies for November ballot” by Daniel Beekman from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/initiative-for-higher-minimum-wage-in-tukwila-qualifies-for-november-ballot/    Raise the Wage Tukwila: ​​https://www.raisethewagetukwila.org/   “Seattle Might Soon Defund a Promising Police Alternative” by Will Casey from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/06/23/75477450/seattle-might-soon-defund-a-promising-police-alternative    “When Will Seattle Get Police Alternatives?” by Will Casey from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/06/28/75720496/when-will-seattle-get-police-alternatives   “Seattle Reveals Rezoning Concepts and Invites Scoping Comments for Big 2024 Update” by Doug Trumm from The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2022/06/23/seattle-reveals-rezoning-concepts-and-invites-scoping-comments-for-big-2024-update/    “Far-Right Freaks Could Force Washington to Act Fast to Protect Abortion” by Will Casey from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/06/30/75818300/far-right-freaks-could-force-washington-to-act-fast-to-protect-abortion    Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in our State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced on the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome back to the program today's co-host, Executive Director of The Urbanist, Doug Trumm. [00:00:49] Doug Trumm: Hi Crystal. Thanks for having me - I'm really excited - there's so much happening right now to talk about. [00:00:53] Crystal Fincher: I know - we've got a full slate of things to talk about. Starting from the top is news that you covered in The Urbanist this week - in that Seattle's growing a lot faster than its suburbs once again. What's going on here? [00:01:10] Doug Trumm: Yeah, the Office of Financial Management at the State released their April estimates and Seattle was up a little over 20,000 residents, which was by far and away the biggest gain across the state. All of King County was up about 30,000. So Seattle is again back to taking the lion's share of the county's growth and was also growing faster than Pierce and Snohomish County, so it just dispels that notion that Seattle is in decline, or is dying, or that the suburbs are certainly the place to be. [00:01:47] Crystal Fincher: That's always so interesting - we've talked about that narrative a lot on this program and candidates who've run talking about "Seattle is Dying" - that whole thing - have never caught on. They've usually topped out at about 15% of the vote in Seattle elections, but there's been a lot of effort put into that narrative and one of the things about a narrative - if someone can walk outside and see that that's not the case, it doesn't quite gain the traction that people would hope. So people in Seattle basically have mocked that the entire time. However, that narrative has caught hold in the suburbs for people who actually don't live in Seattle, visit Seattle, know many people in Seattle - they just take that on faith - it's what they see, have seen on TV, or have heard people mention, or as they're browsing Facebook with all the other stuff on there. They see that and - oh, it's a chaos city, it's burning to the ground, my goodness. And couldn't be further from the truth. Obviously people there keep saying that, and the numbers of people attracted to the City continue to steadily grow. It's just one of those really interesting things where there is a very intentional political narrative that's laughable inside the City, but because it's just been so pervasive and the people have been persistent talking about it, it takes hold outside of it. [00:03:21] Doug Trumm: Yeah, and sometimes the narrative can be destiny, but that doesn't seem to be the case here, where you'd think this produced narrative of Seattle just being chaotic would eventually lead to people moving to the suburbs. But that's not in the numbers - Bellevue posted like 1,300 population gain compared to Seattle's 20,000. And there are a couple standouts, like Shoreline and Redmond are growing at a relatively fast rate, but most of the suburbs are just growing very slowly. So all this talk of people wanting to ride out the pandemic out in bucolic setting or in a suburb is maybe starting to reverse, and I think some of the numbers obviously is also reflecting the fact that students are back on campus. So places like Bellingham saw a big jump as well. [00:04:11] Crystal Fincher: Also another - exciting news this week - the initiative for a higher minimum wage in Tukwila, Raise the Wage Tukwila, qualified for the November ballot. This is really exciting. Have you been following this? [00:04:25] Doug Trumm: Yeah, this has been really cool - Southcenter being in Tukwila - that's a lot of jobs, it's huge job center for south King County - and they qualified with a really healthy cushion. So it looks pretty certain that that's going on the ballot and, I think, in our state, once something like that is on the ballot, usually it passes. So hopeful sign, hopefully good - will be a solid raise for workers if it passes and with the mall being the driving employment center in the area, there are a lot low-wage workers. [00:05:01] Crystal Fincher: Lot of retail, lots of service - yeah, definitely a lot of lower wage workers. And one of the issues there is surrounding cities have raised their wage - starting with SeaTac, which was the first in the country to go for a $15 minimum wage. And other surrounding cities have also raised the minimum wage. And one of the biggest, as you talk about, job centers in that entire area has been left behind. So even though Tukwila has to adhere to the state's minimum wage, which is currently $14.49/hour, they're comparing with minimum wage at $17.54/hour in SeaTac, Seattle is $17.27/hour for most workers. So just the geography is the differentiation here, and especially with the higher percentage of those low-wage workers, this is really meaningful. These initiatives have won, but they've won with a lot of work in the campaign and door-knocking and calls with neighbors. So this is one where it's absolutely winnable, but it's gonna take people getting involved, volunteering - this has largely been a volunteer effort - the Transit Riders Union has been a big part of this and in conjunction with people, business owners, community leaders from within Tukwila. So very exciting, but definitely a point to get engaged in this issue - if this is something that's interesting to you, we are linking the information in our episode notes. This was also covered this week by Daniel Beekman in The Times - just always exciting to see a community-led effort successfully gather enough signatures to get on the ballot. So very, very good - congratulations for the qualification and looking forward to seeing how that initiative proceeds throughout this campaign. [00:07:02] Doug Trumm: Yeah, great work to Transit Riders Union - I'm a member over there, but the leadership team there is just really great - Katie Wilson and all the organizers over there. [00:07:10] Crystal Fincher: Really, really great. In less great news, I would say, Will Casey from The Stranger, who's been writing some great articles for The Stranger, wrote this week that Seattle might - the defund and movement in Seattle is going along just fine, except it's not the one that everybody keeps trying to complain about. It looks like the City might actually be defunding a really promising alternative response to armed police. What's the deal here? [00:07:43] Doug Trumm: Yeah, this one's a head scratcher to me - just having tried to cover police as well for the past few years - whenever you're talking about police alternatives, everyone brings up JustCARE - it's almost like a rule. So you would think with everyone name-dropping JustCARE, that they would be ready to fund JustCARE. But it doesn't really seem like that's necessarily the case. And then, the successful program that JustCARE has helped stand up - that offers a police alternative so that when some of these motels and hotels that have been converted to serve homeless folks if there's an incident - canceling this program would just force more calls to the police, more emergency room visits, more things that are really expensive. If we're looking at brass tacks to the City - so if you do a broader accounting, and a lot of folks who do this kind of work say, you really should be looking holistically at this - you're gonna save this $10 million maybe initially, but you're going to end up paying for it through other ways. So it just seems like someone's - we just have to figure out a way to keep these police alternatives going because $10 million for this program could really go a long way - and the budget is very large for the City and Seattle Police Department's spending far more than that. So if we're serious about funding public safety, I think this is one place to really invest. [00:09:12] Crystal Fincher: Completely agree. And if we're serious about public safety, we start by acknowledging that public safety is bigger than policing. With - crime has increased - there are things that are happening in our community that are scary, that are worrisome - the rates of gun violence. Just the things that we're hearing about gun violence, assault and there are some crazy things going on. And if we are actually serious about solving that problem and reducing crime, we can't just focus on the responses after crimes have been committed, the response after people have been victimized. The most powerful way to keep people safe is to keep them from being victimized in the first place - certainly I've talked about this before, we've talked about - lots of people have talked about this before. And we talk about alternatives to policing or really just - hey, we're working on preventing problems and victimization and intervening in things before it gets to the point where it's hurting anyone else. So JustCARE and a local public safety firm called We Deliver Care has been protecting outreach workers who serve people experiencing homelessness - so as they're doing outreach, they're also involved in that. They've been providing de-escalation services for people in crisis, and they've been doing it without the involvement of a uniformed cop. And this is what so many people are talking about - hey, police don't have the tools to, and were never intended to be people who respond to someone in crisis - mental health crisis - and are actually able to do something about that crisis and get that person into a situation where they need help. JustCARE and We Deliver Care are doing that. And we had a conversation with Senior Deputy Mayor Monisha Harrell on this program where they talked about - hey, we're doing a review and analysis of our partner organizations who are doing alternative responses. And we just wanna make sure that they're effective, we wanna make sure that we're getting the results of the money that we're investing. I did make the comment that - I would love to use that kind of analysis across the board, including with the police department and all of our public safety stuff. But the University of Washington actually conducted a study of JustCARE that included findings about the work that We Deliver Care does - their analysis showed a 39% reduction in 911 calls in the neighborhoods where they operate, a 12% reduction in 911 calls from the hotels where the programs provide shelter. The police department would be celebrating and calling a press conference, I'm sure Mayor Harrell would be celebrating and praising these numbers. So one, this is absolutely a success. If there was a small pilot program - that where they are operating, they're getting these kinds of concerns - a nearly 40% reduction in 911 calls where they are, meaningful reductions in crime and people being victimized and people being worried and anxious and concerned, and unsafe being able to handle crisis situations. This is what we need. This is keeping people safe. We have data showing this is keeping people safe, and this is gonna wind up on the chopping block, while we're increasing funding in other areas that certainly are not getting these kinds of results. It's just, it's really confusing. And it just seems if you're making this move, are you actually serious about keeping people safe, or are you invested in a particular method of, or a strategy - that maybe there's investment or a payoff in continuing that strategy, but it's not anything related to actual public safety. Just really confusing. [00:13:14] Doug Trumm: Yeah, and are we only going to put our data on public safety through the prism of SPD? Because it doesn't seem like they're really, truly open to looking at these alternatives. [00:13:26] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I know they're talking about establishing a Department of Public Safety - certainly did seem like some of the defunding effort of these community prevention and intervention programs may - that funding may disappear in order to stand up this Department of Public Safety. But whether internally or externally, it seems like the point is - do what it takes to keep people safe, do what it takes to make people safer, do what it takes to reduce the calls we - they keep talking about cops are overloaded and not able to respond to 911 calls - well, what would a 40% reduction in them do? This is what this program is accomplishing - seems like that might right-size things according to their calculations and help balance things, so maybe they could stop ignoring sexual assaults and actually start investigating them again. Just it is - this seems to fly in the face of everything that the public is demanding, everything that they say that they are standing for, and it's just not coming. How do you stop a program that's getting those kinds of results, and then move the money to somewhere that is not? Either we care about keeping people safe or we don't. People are scared and anxious and they want solutions - hiring more police officers is not even something that will - those police officers won't land on the ground until later this year, or next year - that's not a plan for keeping people safe today, and people are demanding a plan to make their streets safer right now. I just don't understand what they're doing. [00:15:02] Doug Trumm: Yeah, and one thing I'll say really quickly is - as a policy nerd, one really cool thing about the program design is the fact that We Deliver Care is hiring largely from folks who are formerly incarcerated or formerly homeless - you're creating a virtuous cycle there where people get meaningful and gainful employment and it interrupts that cycle of poverty. So it just seems like a really, just a really solid program that we shouldn't be pulling the plug on so abruptly. [00:15:30] Crystal Fincher: That's a really good point - and really those are subject matter experts. Few people are better poised to be able to understand, connect with, and really help - with appropriate and meaningful help, and not something that people who've never been in that situation feel is best for that community or that group of people - but people who have been through it, who understand a lot of the challenges and ways that other folks don't. And so they can be more effective a lot of times in identifying and connecting people to help. I hope we see an increase and a further investment in that program and not a decreased one. And if you feel the same, it would certainly be very, very good to talk to your City Council people and to let, most of all, Mayor Harrell and his office know that we want to be investing in things that work and not defunding them. Also this week, scoping for the Comp Plan update is underway - you've been covering this in The Urbanist - what's going on? [00:16:38] Doug Trumm: Oh, so much - a lot of different advocates and organizations are really spinning their wheels right now trying to get geared up for this, because it's a month long - currently announced as a month-long - scoping period to determine what are the options, what's on the menu for our big Comprehensive Plan update in 2024, which is - [00:17:02] Crystal Fincher: I'm gonna jump in and pause right here, just to ask you - a lot of people are not familiar with - okay, Comprehensive Plan? What's its purpose? Why does comprehensive planning happen and what does it accomplish? [00:17:14] Doug Trumm: Yeah, the Comprehensive Plan - it's both kind of opaque and esoteric, but also it's sort of like the Super Bowl of planning. And you certainly can do things between the major Comp Plan updates, but this is when the big zoning changes, the big land use changes, and also the big changes in the related plans - like the Transportation plans and even Parks plans, everything - they try to line everything and get everything, hopefully in harmony, more or less. And there's a lot of debate about - that's really the case - but this happens. Now with the recent reform at the state level, every 10 years - you have to do a major update to your Comp Plan. And every 5 years, there's a minor update. Now if you really get a fire under someone, you can do major zoning changes in between them - and sometimes it's like a station area plan - if you're getting a new bus rapid transit or a new light rail station. So you can do stuff in between, but it's rare and you have to have the staff time to dedicate to it. So really there's a lot of pressure on this 2024 Comp Plan update to be ambitious, to really try to do as much as we can because worst case scenario, we're not gonna get another opportunity to do something really big until the next major update, which is a full decade later. And this has really gotten the attention of climate advocates, which we would include us at The Urbanist as those, that - okay, well, the IPCC, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is saying, okay, we need to do a lot of concerted climate action now because if you don't do anything by 2030, our options just get considerably less. If we're not lowering emissions immediately, our pathways just get worse and worse. So land use is the forgotten aspect of climate change for many policy makers, 'cause it's a hard thing to deal with, but it really is crucial to actually decarbonizing our economy and our society. So not to put a ton of pressure on this, but it is a huge moment and a good chance to do climate action through land use, and also through - to connect the Transportation Plan. [00:19:42] Crystal Fincher: So as they're talking about this plan, they're looking at some different - conceptual alternatives. They've laid out some - and some look more promising than others - what's on the lineup? [00:19:55] Doug Trumm: So, there's five alternatives currently. And one of them by default is no change alternative - they use as a baseline. So that's Alternative 1. Then there's also an alternative, that is called the focus alternative. I think that's alternative to - apologies if I get this order a little bit off - and the focus alternative uses the concept of urban nodes, so it's sort of like urban villages, but they'd be adding these nodes in between urban villages and other business districts, or existing grandfathered-in areas of multi-family and some commercial. And they'd be adding these sort of urban village-esque aspects - and urban village is just the City's term of art for - it's an urban neighborhood, but because it's Seattle, we have to throw in village to make it feel a little neighborhoody and quaint. But it's basically continued the urban village idea and then, I guess, the implication then is we wouldn't be doing a lot outside of those nodes. So it'd sort of be a truce on single-family zoning outside of those. [00:21:03] Crystal Fincher: So basically any growth will be happening in these concentrated areas, any absorption of density, increase of density is limited to these new nodes. But most areas outside of that are still going to be high-cost detached homes. [00:21:20] Doug Trumm: Exactly, and I think you would basically be going along roughly the same in the existing urban villages, potentially with some expansions, which would be nice in some areas where some of the urban villages are very skinny and gerrymandered. And then there's Alternative 3, which is sort of the opposite approach - which is taking these Neighborhood Residentials, which the city's calling single-family zones now - it's taking these Neighborhood Residential zones and it's adding some missing middle types. And so far the types that OPCD, the Office of Planning and Community Development - it's the City agency tasked with this plan - so far, the types that they're listing are triplexes and fourplexes and that type of - it's on the low end. And so one thing advocates can do, who are looking for more than that - in the State bill, they contemplate sixplexes - is asking for sixplexes, maybe rowhouses, stack flats - more of those denser but still missing middle types that fit it very well into single-family neighborhoods or Neighborhood Residential, if you will. And so that's Alternative 3 - it's looking primarily outside of the urban villages, not necessarily only focus - it would be broad sections of single-family zoning, or you could just redefine single-family zoning to be that fourplex or sixplex zoning, or something like that. Because this is a scoping phase, none of that's really decided - it's just setting the menu, like how much would OPCD actually study - because what they actually put into the draft is what we then can actually order. You can't order something that hasn't had some of that underlying work, like the environmental impact analysis, because then you get sued and you'll lose. And you will get sued probably anyways. But we can move on to Alternative 4 now, which is called - I think a corridor approach, or transit corridors, I forget their shorthand name - but it would do more just along transit corridors and they didn't exactly say how wide of a band. So that would be one thing to give feedback on is - if we were to only focus on transit corridors and there's some arguments against that, which we could get into later, but that would be where you focus zoning change. Are we going a quarter mile from the stops, are we going a half mile, are we going only less than that? And if you're going only in a very narrow band, that's when those criticisms really creep in - because many of our transit quarters in this City are along busy, polluted, congested arterials, where you're not really gonna want your kid to be playing outside, you're not really gonna necessarily be breathing that air if you face out into that street. So, I think one concept that advocates are really bringing into this study is we need to be putting housing where people wanna live and it can't only be in the space leftover that single-family homeowners don't want. It also has to be places that are livable. [00:24:49] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, it has to be everywhere - otherwise we're just redlining by another name, really. It's really interesting - and this is, this is wonky, totally wonky - but as a former planning commissioner myself, it really is the skeleton of a community. This is the thing that the determines the composition of how the community can grow, can evolve, can look, who's going to be there, who's not going to be there, who we're gonna include, how we can be responsive and resilient against climate change. It's - everything about how a city develops is really dictated by this footprint that's established that says - this is what is allowed here, this is what can go here, this is what we wanna encourage in these areas and what we don't, this is what is included and straight up outlawed. This is how we're going to enable this community to become walkable - that this can build that 15-minute city where everything is within walking distance - everyone's basic needs. So this is basically determining what Seattle's gonna look like in - 20 years from now - is based on the decisions that we make today. And if you think about what Seattle - I'm old, so I remember what Seattle was like 20 years ago - maybe people listening here may have moved here, maybe a lot younger, but it looks a lot different now than it did 20 years ago. And the planning process is what basically started the ball rolling on all of this. So if we think about the conversations that we're having today and what we're looking at in the City right now and saying - this is what we like and this is what we don't like, and this is what we wanna see, or don't see - then engage in this process because this is what will determine Seattle in 2042, and the Seattle that our kids and grandkids live in, or not able to live in - the decisions now determine that. [00:27:06] Doug Trumm: And it has a big impact on affordability and what housing options and prices are out there. And we did save the best of the bunch proposed so far for last - the concept, Alternative 5 is the combined approach. So basically it sounds like you would stack those three approaches, just described, on top of each other - which makes sense, because like you said, some of these Neighborhood Residential zones - they're attractive places to live, but good luck if you don't have a million dollars sitting around. So it would add more housing options there, which helps folks age in place, while also still doing that stuff around the nodes and around the transit corridors - to focus even more potentially multi-family development or just more options in those areas where they're well served by services and transit. So, of the ones proposed, 5 looks promising, it looks like it would be a huge upgrade. And there's also some talk of there being an Alternative 6 that advocates are - do we need an alternative that sort of even goes beyond the concepts proposed so far? And I haven't seen exactly what Alternative 6 would be, but obviously if it's something even better, then that's definitely something worthy of discussion. [00:28:28] Crystal Fincher: Well, we will keep an eye on that - certainly we hope you will keep an eye on that and engage, and at least conceptually make your voice known that - I think my perspective, a lot of people's perspective is - yeah, we don't want to constrain where people have the choice to live. People should be able to live in desirable, healthy, attractive, enticing neighborhoods. And we shouldn't reserve that for the most wealthy residents who can buy into them - those should be accessible to all of us. Another thing this week, I guess leading into that, it is lots of conversations about the City we wanna see - as we were just talking about - and a race in Seattle for the Legislature that really is talking a lot about the kind of Seattle we wanna see. And that's the one between Gerry Pollet and Hadeel Jeanne in the 46th legislative district. What have you seen in this race? [00:29:29] Doug Trumm: Yeah, this has been a really interesting race - so far this year, there haven't - well, and the deadlines passed, so we see what the field is - there haven't been a lot of progressive challenges of incumbents, like we saw two years ago with a lot of incumbents having to defend the record, which is I think a healthy thing for democracy rather than people just going unopposed for decades at a time. But the exception to this is this Gerry Pollet race where he's been there a good amount of time - he's also has a very important chair, which he's Chair of the House Government Committee - Local Government Committee - which is where many of these zoning bills have to go through. And he disputes this sometimes, but I think the record speaks for itself - we just haven't been able to get a zoning bill through his committee and he always has massive changes to bills, it seems like - rewriting bills like he did to Jessica Bateman's bill which was the big missing middle reform that we've covered in previous shows, I'm sure, and on The Urbanist. That was going to have that fourplex zoning, potentially sixplex zoning in an earlier draft, before - relatedly - Gerry Pollet voted to amend that. So in other words, he's been an obstacle to that kind of reform. And he represents, now, North Seattle - he used to have Lake Forest Park and kinda more in farther north. But now it's just North Seattle and Northeast Seattle. And I think he's a bit outta step with his district because these are places where people are really concerned about housing affordability, where the idea of a fourplex isn't that scary necessarily - and it's something that he hasn't furthered in his time as a legislator. So he's getting a challenge from someone who's specifically saying - this is a reason why I'm running. We got a chance to interview Hadeel and she's clearly passionate about this issue, she clearly knows a lot about this issue, she's clearly approaching this race from a - much more of a sense of urgency around both climate and housing affordability, and not just doing the things the way we've always done 'em. The Urbanist's Election Committee is still yet to vote and issue its endorsements, but I would say that it's looking promising for Hadeel and that's just a testament to someone having the bravery and the gumption to run against a long-time incumbent with sort of this institutional backing. [00:32:12] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, it really is gonna be interesting to continue to follow these races. I am working in a 46th legislative district race with Melissa Taylor - that's the only candidate race I'm working on, but that does make it really interesting to watch what's happening in these other seats in Seattle and beyond. And housing affordability, which this conversation is directly tied to, is a huge concern in the district. The stories that I hear from the doors from Melissa, who's out there every day, are harrowing. So many people are struggling in so many different ways - even people who - you drive down to see - North Seattle street, right? You see the homes now - the average home price, it's pretty high in Seattle - and people may look comfortable from the outside, but a lot of them are struggling. A lot of people have had to bring in roommates and extra people to live in their homes. Some of them can't fit any more people in and are at the point where if rent goes any higher, if mortgages go any higher, if costs go any higher, they're not going to be able to stay in their home and stay in Seattle. There's so many people dealing with this - even in single-family neighborhoods - where they're saying something has got to give, we're being squeezed to the point where we have nothing left to give - and it's really displacing people from neighborhoods. This is a conversation about who do we want to be able to live in neighborhoods - do we want these neighborhoods to be exclusive places where no one ever is able to move in again, unless you are effectively making half a million dollars a year or more? Or places where young families starting out, people graduating from college, the kids of the people in these homes - are they going to be able to move into this neighborhood and build the kind of life that other people have seen, or not? So it's just really interesting to see the different levels of urgency, as you just talked about, 'cause some people are - we're at this point with a number of things - you talked about with climate, the IPCC report saying - look, we get this right and we start making meaningful, tangible progress by 2030, or we're in for a world of pain and consequences. And we get this housing thing right, and this comprehensive planning process right now, or we're in for a Seattle that just does not reflect anything that we've seen before and that's really a playground for the rich, a very exclusive place. The only accessible places are ones that come with harm attached - with pollution and a lot of the consequences of poorly managed growth. And it's just - this is a time where the urgency is now - we need people to act and not continue to kick the can down the road. [00:35:15] Doug Trumm: Yeah, exactly. And it really speaks to - there's so many legislators who are homeowners and who - many of them are wealthy, and there are not many tenants. And Hadeel would be someone who's bringing a younger tenant perspective to the Legislature at a time when it's really needed. And you would think that legislators who have had that luck - to have bought into the housing market, now have a home that's worth over a million dollars, like Representative Pollet - you would think they would have some sort of empathy or sympathy for folks who are not buying in at the opportune time, who are buying in when the prices of admission is a million dollars. You'd think that they would policy make to try to correct that problem, but it doesn't appear there's that sense of duty or urgency there. [00:36:10] Crystal Fincher: Yeah - different experiences, different things - and when you look at polling, it's really interesting. And one of the things a lot of people have talked about - yeah, young people are feeling different, and younger people are - they have different voting patterns. But "young" is doing really heavy lifting in that sentence because when you look, the dividing line is 45 or 50 years old. This is not young as in college. This is young as in not senior. Everybody is being squeezed and that line keeps on moving up and up and up, which is why we are seeing different people being elected, different challengers gaining strength and momentum, different kinds of policies that weren't in mainstream conversation even five years ago now moving with urgency. 'Cause when you talk about just the community under 50 - that's parents, that's grandparents, that's a whole big swath of people who are feeling this pain and who understand that we can't continue the way we're going, that we're going to have to substantially change something if we want these results that we're seeing to change. Another thing I wanted to talk about this week was another article from Will Casey. And it was about - hey, given these continuing Supreme Court decisions - first and foremost, the Dobbs decision overturning the right to abortion from Roe vs Wade - hey, is anyone gonna call for a special session in Washington to address this? What's in this article? [00:38:02] Doug Trumm: Yeah, that - Will Casey made a really good point there. We've had special sessions for a lot less. The most recent example is, that comes to mind, is the 2013 special session to make a special tax break for Boeing - that was hoping to keep, entice them to keep their jobs in Washington State. And they ended up still moving their corporate campus to Chicago and they've moved also some of their production to the South and other locations in the country. So, we did it for that. But we're not doing it for fundamental rights that speak to the - both the physical and economic security of our population and people who really are scared right now because the Supreme Court really upended what we thought was sort of settled. And obviously we saw this coming for many years, and even if Democratic establishment sort of buried their head in the sand about this. But yeah, it seems like we could call a special session about this. There's a ton of Supreme Court mischief right now of overturning precedents and there are laws that we could pass to lessen the risk there. And really just - it's also important to remind people that maybe if not the federal level of government, but the state and local levels of government can still work how they should. It's a lot harder without the federal government, but I think at a certain point, you also just have to restore faith in our system. [00:39:43] Crystal Fincher: That's such a great point and it's absolutely true. Lots of people are, myself included, frustrated by federal government, which is why I have a podcast talking about state and local government 'cause I do think we need to talk about that more and so much is possible, still, at these levels. But it's such a challenge when talking about this - so there is - Democratic leadership is all saying that we do need to pass legislation. And they're saying we need to carefully craft this legislation, we're working on it, we'll have it ready for when the January session starts. The risk to that is we have an election before the January session and people are working hard, but it's possible that Democrats lose seats this Legislative Session - to the point where it's possible to lose a chamber in our State Legislature. There are many competitive races here in our state in battleground districts, so it is not a given that we walk into 2023 with the same composition in our Legislature that - and given the current composition, they should be able to pass legislation that does codify abortion protections. I should note we should absolutely be going beyond that because we know that they're going to be attacking contraception, marriage equality, basic privacy rights - we know that's on deck, so we shouldn't wait for that either and that should be ready. But it's possible that we lose the seats necessary to pass this before that time. Hopefully that doesn't happen, but there's a chance of it. And the one thing that we should never do with basic human rights is leave them up to chance. As you said, we called a special session for Boeing. We've called special sessions for transportation packages. We can do that with such basic, fundamental, necessary protections for Roe - protections for abortion access and the others, as we should say. I will tell you - so what is not talked about upfront - the problem is when you call a special session, it basically forces people to stop campaigning. We cannot campaign while a session, or fundraise, while a session is happening. So leading up to a session, during the session - you basically have to suspend campaigning activity, you have to suspend fundraising - which unfortunately is a necessary part of winning campaigns in our existing political system - would love to change that, but that's part of the existing system. And so, I'm sure there's calculations going - my goodness, we've got these more competitive races than we've seen in quite some time. We do have - we're fighting to defend seats on the Democratic and progressive side, with vigorous challenges by Republicans in several of them. The last thing that people wanna do is to take some time off the campaign trail to do this. We can do it in January. And my response to that would be - one, it's the right thing to do and you don't leave rights up to chance. So one - morally, ethically, logically, it's the right thing to do. We can do it now, you do it now. You might not be able to do it later, so you do it now. On top of that, there's an opportunity to, as you said, show the State that one, government can work as it's intended. The majority of people in this state, as we've covered in polling and talked about over and over again - want, believe in, are passionate about these protections. You have the opportunity to have all eyes on you as you take action and deliver the protections that people in this state are currently protesting in the streets for. You have the opportunity to have a ton of earned media show that you're responding to the needs of the state. And only one party is willing to do that - you have the media shining a light on who truly is pro-woman, pro-family - pro-life in terms of being able to live, have opportunity, have rights and not be subjugated or treated like a second-class citizen. That's the opportunity ahead of us. And then you can roll after talking about - yeah, we just did take extra steps and take the action necessary to make sure you are protected. You can run on that. People will see that, people believe in that, they're asking for that. This is a humongous opportunity for the Democratic party to demonstrate, in the most clear and present way, that they are serving and protecting the interests of the residents in the state right now. So I think there's absolutely a case for doing it - I understand that it's not the best thing, but I truly believe that if they were to do that - coming off the other end, they would have a lot of thankful, happy people who are ready to roll in to 2022, to continue to defend the threats that are being brought about by this extremist, far-right Supreme Court, the extremist Republican Party that's looking to gain seats in our federal legislature. The pressing need to defend against Republicans is not going away, so let's not leave any rights at risk and let's put ourselves in the best position to be able to continue defending and then moving forward to pass policies that we know people in the state want. [00:45:24] Doug Trumm: Yeah, I couldn't agree with you more. And it goes to that fundamental critique of our politics, especially as the Democratic establishment party politics, where - issue polling, you can't be scared of your own shadow. You have to design the situation that you want to see, both as a policymaker and as a campaigner. If they're looking at polling and saying - oh no, maybe this won't be that popular in this swing seat or something like that. At a certain point, I think you have to just - A) take a moral stand, like you were saying. But also, have a little faith that people can change their mind, that you can campaign on something and change people's minds, that maybe this poll isn't really reflecting what would be salient in a race or that we'll see - oh, the Democrats took concerted action and that will have, and passed something and did something brave - that might have a bigger impact than whatever they fear for blowback by not apparently calling this sooner and just go charging ahead with this. Because I think people really need a shot in the arm - just this, I think people are a little dejected right now, and they have a right to be, because we've seen this organized, concerted campaign from conservatives for decades to take over the court system and undo all this legislative work. And in the meantime, we didn't even codify it at the federal level. And now we have a chance to codify at the state level - and eventually, you have to treat this like it truly is - which is an all problem, and conservatives are coming for many of these basic rights. And they're coming for the climate, as we saw with the recent decision announced, I think yesterday, with the Clean Power law. This Supreme Court is on the march, it's corrupt, it has no regard for precedent and they make up their own. And if we're not all hands on deck right now, when are we going to be? [00:47:39] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely - that's a question a number of people are asking. This is not a drill, we are here and it's time to act. We have to, we may not get this chance to act later on in the future, so now is the time. With that, thank you for listening to Hacks & Wonks this Friday, July 1st, 2022. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistant producer Shannon Cheng, with assistance from Bryce Cannatelli. And our wonderful co-host today was Executive Director of The Urbanist, Doug Trumm. You can find Doug on Twitter @dmtrumm, that's two M's at the end. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - we'll talk to you soon.

    Rising
    SCOTUS Drops NEW Major Rulings On Climate, Immigration: Ryan, Emily, & Rafael Bernal Discuss, And More: Rising Fridays 7.1.22

    Rising

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 89:17


    Today on Rising, SCOTUS drops new major rulings on climate, immigration: Ryan, Emily, & Rafael Bernal discuss (00:00)Abortion hurts, not helps, women's fight for EQUALITY: Emily Jashinsky (23:05)Why haven't Democrats EVEN TRIED to codify Roe?: Ryan Grim (34:14)Virologist who tried to DISCREDIT LAB LEAK was a ‘partner' to EcoHealth Alliance: Emily Kopp (46:48)Flint water scandal: Charges against Rick Snyder DROPPED, media SILENT on current contamination (57:35)NEW: National STRIKE in Ecuador ends, agreement reached on gas prices & food shortages (1:08:20)Biden: SUCK IT UP on gas prices ‘as long as it takes' to beat Russia, it's PUTIN'S fault  (1:18:10)Where to tune in and follow: https://linktr.ee/risingthehillMore about Rising:Rising is a weekday morning show hosted by Ryan Grim, Kim Iversen, and Robby Soave. It breaks the mold of morning TV by taking viewers inside the halls of Washington power like never before, providing outside-of-the-beltway perspectives. The show leans into the day's political cycle with cutting edge analysis from DC insiders and outsiders alike to provide coverage not provided on cable news. It also sets the day's political agenda by breaking exclusive news with a team of scoop-driven reporters and demanding answers during interviews with the country's most important political newsmakers.

    Pat Miller Program
    Steve Shine and the celebration of the Mural on Side of Republican Party Headquarters

    Pat Miller Program

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 10:48


    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    A recent poll shows that a majority of Americans think that American democracy will eventually cease to exist. Are they right? Or do we have more to hope for than we think? Boyd spoke with Former Senator Joe Lieberman about what he thinks about the future of the country.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Be Ready Utah - Creating a Community Disaster Plan

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 7:36


    When disaster strikes, does your local community have a plan to help you and your neighbors survive? The Red Cross' Michael Smauldon joins Inside Sources to talk about how to put together a community disaster plan and what you need to think about before disaster happens. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Interest Rates, the National Debt, and Non-Trumpian Republican Wins

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 8:52


    Interest rates are rising, which means the federal government's $30 trillion debt is becoming even more expensive. How will this impact taxpayers and DC spending? And with Trump-backed Republicans losing big in the primaries, could the right's economic agenda shift to the center to attract more voters this fall? The Washington Post's Henry Olsen breaks down the economic and political realities. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Senator Joe Lieberman on the Integrity of Compromise

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 10:34


    Congress' very existence is based on a compromise our founders came to over 200 years ago. But since then, this great legislative body has lost the ability to find middle ground and pass bills. Whether we're talking about voting rights, crime, or healthcare, how do we restore compromise to the House and the Senate? Former Senator Joe Liberman gave his thoughts on the problem and the way forward during an interview with Boyd this week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Tabernacle Choir's First Public Concert Since 2020 Focuses on Loving Your Neighbor

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 10:01


    These are challenging times at home and abroad, from Russia's invasion of Ukraine to political division in America. In that light, the Tabernacle Choir is putting on a special concert to inspire more kindness called "Love Thy Neighbor". It's their first performance open to the general public since 2020. Tabernacle Choir President Mike Leavitt stops by to give details. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Clean The Air Challenge

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 7:36


    The summer can be a terrible time for air quality in the Salt Lake area. That's why businesses and community groups are joining the 13th annual Clear the Air Challenge. Salt Lake Chamber CEO Derek Miller talks about the program and how people can participate. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Secretary Buttigieg's Transportation Equity Plan Actually Looks Good

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 6:04


    Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg unveiled a "racial equity" infrastructure plan this week. But if you look past the headlines and the buzz words, there's a lot in the pilot program that's forward-thinking, community connecting, and could give all Americans more choices when it comes to transportation.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
    Clean Energy Scores a Win at The Supreme Court

    Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 10:56


    Activists and politicians are calling this week's Supreme Court ruling in West Virginia vs. EPA a loss for the planet. But could it actually speed up our transition to green energy? Phil Rossetti from The R Street Institute breaks down what the ruling means, how Congress can address environmental problems, and how business has been leading on clean energy. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.