Podcasts about United Arab Emirates

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  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST
United Arab Emirates

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Best podcasts about United Arab Emirates

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Latest podcast episodes about United Arab Emirates

UN News
News in Brief 18 January 2022

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 2:44


Peaceful protesters killed or injured almost every day in Sudan  Conflict escalates in Yemen with more civilians dead Earthquake in Afghanistan kills at least 26

Marketplace Morning Report
Global oil prices hit their highest level in more than seven years

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:53


From the BBC World Service: The crude oil price spike is tied to rising geopolitical risks, with concerns over a Russian invasion of Ukraine and supply disruptions in the United Arab Emirates after a deadly drone attack. Plus, at the virtual Davos summit, Chinese President Xi Xinping defended his common prosperity strategy. And, concerns over China’s influence at Sri Lanka’s new port city development.

PRI's The World
The UAE has the world's highest COVID-19 vaccination rate

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 46:40


Pandemic trivia: Which country has the highest COVID-19 vaccination rate in the world? The answer is the United Arab Emirates. The UAE boasts a vaccination rate higher than 90%. We look into what's driven the country's massive success. Also, in the Arctic, the ground is literally disappearing. Roads, bridges and infrastructure are built on permafrost. But with climate change, that's starting to thaw. Plus, tensions are on the rise in Bosnia. Experts are calling this its worst crisis in more than 25 year as Bosnian Serbs seem poised to pull out of the government that they share with Bosnian Croats and Muslims.

The Equestrian Podcast
[EP 202] International Photography with Raphael Macek

The Equestrian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 29:47


Raphael Macek is a renowned photographer who specializes in a wide range of equine photographs. In 2007 Raphael graduated with a Masters of Fine Art degree in New York City. In the years that followed, he published his work in countries such as Germany, Belgium, Spain, Brazil, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States of America. In 2009 he photographed on safaris in Africa, particularly in Tanzania and Kenya. Over the course of his career, Macek has become known for his unique ability to capture the beauty of his animal subjects along with their emotions and the essence of their nature. Horses of different breeds from around the world have served as Macek's top models. The artistic view expressed in his work has been recognized worldwide in important art exhibitions, private showings, and publications. When he's not busy running a photoshoot, Raphael is teaching photography workshops around the world sharing his skills and knowledge to those willing to learn. To learn more visit: raphaelmacekworkshops.com

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts
Global Solutions, Episode 29: Remote Work and Telework Rules in EMEA

Ogletree Deakins Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:11


In this episode of our Global Solutions series, Chris Andersen and Andre Appel address laws regarding remote work in Europe, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates that were implemented as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The speakers focus on four issues that might arise in workplaces that have implemented remote work arrangements: (1) how employers and employees agree on teleworking arrangements; (2) whether employers must pay to implement a remote work arrangement, including payment for the necessary equipment to facilitate work from home; (3) employers' workplace safety obligations with regard to employees who work from home; and (4) employee morale issues that might result from teleworking arrangements.

The Greek Current
Turkey's efforts to mend relations with rivals in the East Med and Gulf

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 14:35


In 2021 we saw Turkey slowly work to reduce tensions with a number of its regional rivals, including Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. While Turkey seems eager to move from active confrontation toward greater stability, its rivals have not all embraced rapprochement with the same zeal as Ankara. The question now remains how far regional dynamics will shift given that many underlying fault lines remain. Expert Nicholas Danforth joins The Greek Current to talk about his latest policy brief for ELIAMEP, the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, which explores Turkey's efforts over the past year to mend relations with its rivals in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Gulf, and share his thoughts on  what we should expect moving forward. Nicholas Danforth is a Non-Resident Senior Research Fellow at the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, ELIAMEP, and the author of the newly published “The Remaking of Republican Turkey: Memory and Modernity.”Read Nicholas Danforth's policy brief for ELIAMEP here: New Dynamics, Old Problems: Turkey's Rapprochement Overtures in the Eastern MediterraneanYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Greece says Turkey distorting historyErdogan says Turkey committed to EU membership, calls for ‘direct' dialogue with GreecePlans for 86,000 new jobs within 2022Greek inflation soars to 5.1% in December

World Business Report
US inflation hits 7%

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 26:28


The US annual inflation rate rose to 7% in December, a figure not seen since 1982. Jayne Schaber lives in New York state and tells us about her experiences when out shopping, and we get a historical perspective on the latest figures from Professor Peter Morici of the Robert H Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. Also in the programme, Kenya and the United Arab Emirates are embroiled in a row that has seen air links between the two countries suspended. Victor Amadala of The Star in Nairobi explains the background. The BBC's Clare Williamson reports on a fierce political row that has broken out in the European Union over how to define what is green or sustainable in new guidelines for finance and investment. Plus, a new report from the app monitoring firm App Annie indicates that smartphone users are spending an average of 4 hours and 48 minutes each day on their devices. The BBC's Jane Wakefield discusses the findings.

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2022.01.12

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022


Korea24 – 2022.01.12. (Wednesday) News Briefing: North Korea has reported that Tuesday’s missile launch was of another hypersonic missile. The test was also said to have been overseen by leader Kim Jong-un, unlike the previous two reported launches of hypersonic missiles. (Eunice Kim) In-Depth News Analysis: President Moon Jae-in will embark on an 8-day tour of the Middle East from Saturday, taking him to the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Egypt. The presidential office said the visit will serve to solidify cooperative ties in areas of energy, construction and infrastructure, as well as promising future sectors, such as public health, science, hydrogen and climate. To look at the significance of the trip, as well as assess the Moon administration’s diplomacy in the Middle East over the past five years, Professor Park Hyon-do (박현도) from the Euro-MENA (Middle East & North Africa) Institute at Sogang (서강) University joins us on the line. Korea Trending with Walter Lee: 1. All projects by HDC Hyundai Development Company have been suspended in Gwangju after a second building under construction collapsed in less than a year. (광주시, 현대산업개발 모든 건축 · 건설 현장 공사 중지 명령) 2. A group of Samsung Electronics employees who had tested positive for COVID-19 after attending the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) last week have returned home on chartered flights. (CES 출장서 코로나 확진된 삼성전자 임직원 전세기로 귀국) 3. Lee Jun-ho, the actor and member of K-Pop group 2pm, is set to hold an in-person fan meeting for the first time in over three years next week. (이준호, 단독 팬미팅 양일 전석 매진) Korea Book Club: Literary critic Barry Welsh introduces ‘River of Fire’ (불의 강) by O Chonghui (Oh Jung-hee / 오정희), a short story collection by one of Korea’s most influential female writers of the post-war generation. Translated by Bruce and Ju-chan Fulton, this collection brings together works from across four decades of her career, including her first published story, 'The Toy Shop Woman (완구점 여인)' from 1968. Morning Edition Preview with Mark Wilson-Choi: - In tomorrow’s Korea Times, Ko Dong-hwan writes about the Korea Forest Service(KFS) offering the ‘forest healing program’ to help those suffering mental stress amid the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly front-line medical staff. - In tomorrow’s Korea Herald, Kim Hae-yeon has a piece on “Pyeongsaengdo(평생도)” an 8-panel folding screen painting from the late 19th to early 20th century, which has been digitally restored.

The John Batchelor Show
Jonathan Schanzer #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview, DECEMBER 6, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 39:28


Photo:  Gazan ruins @Batchelorshow Jonathan Schanzer #Unbound: the complete, forty-minute interview, DECEMBER 6, 2021. Gaza Conflict 2021, by  Jonathan Schanzer  (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09JMFWWDV/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 The May 2021 conflict between Israel and the terrorist group Hamas generated headlines around the world. However, much of the reporting ignored the history, funding, political dynamics, and other key components of the story. Hamas initiates conflict every few years, but the reporting rarely improves. Social media has only further clouded the picture. Hamas is rarely held responsible for its use of "human shields," blindly firing rockets at civilian areas in Israel, or diverting aid that should benefit the people of Gaza. The Islamic Republic of Iran, a state sponsor of terrorism, has been the primary patron of Hamas since the group's inception in the late 1980s. Hamas has received additional assistance over the years from Qatar, Turkey and Malaysia. These countries are fomenting conflict, while others, such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, have tried to minimize it. Gaza is therefore ground zero in a struggle for the future stability of the Middle East. The Biden administration has important choices to make. Its intent to re-enter the Iran nuclear deal could have significant consequences, given that sanctions relief to Iran will likely yield a financial boon for Hamas, along with other Iranian proxies. The Biden administration must also come to terms with "The Squad," a small but loud faction of the Democratic Party that seeks to undermine the US-Israel relationship. Jonathan Schanzer @JSchanzer @FDD, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.  

Today's Focus of Attention
United Arab Emirates bans foreign travel without booster jab

Today's Focus of Attention

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 1:12


From the 10th of January, the United Arab Emirates will ban citizens who haven't had three doses of an anti-Covid vaccine from travelling abroad. The UAE is the latest country to announce new curbs amid a rise in infections. More than 90% of the population are fully vaccinated against Covid there, with 34% boosted as of 24 of December, according to Our World in Data. Recent studies have shown that a booster shot offers better protection against the heavily mutated variant Omicron, which has been spreading rapidly round the world in the latest weeks. 

America's Roundtable
Fred Zeidman | The State of US-Israel Relations | America's Energy Independence Abandoned | The Abraham Accords | Iran Nuclear Threat

America's Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 43:42


Fred Zeidman, a prominent Houston based business and civic leader, joins America's Roundtable co-hosts Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy in addressing the importance of America securing its energy independence amid the adverse economic impact on American families and businesses, the state of US-Israel relations, the challenges in the Middle East and the accomplishments of the historic Abraham Accords and how it impacts of the United States' policy in the region and beyond. The conversation will also bring to the forefront the rise of anti-Semitism and the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement (BDS) targeting Israel. Fred Zeidman presents a principled approach on how America's stakeholders and leaders can best address this growing concern. Fred Zeidman is the Co-Chair and Director of Council for a Secure America. He served as Chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council and was appointed by President George W. Bush in March 2002, serving in that position from 2002-2010. Mr. Zeidman also is Chairman Emeritus of the University of Texas Health Science System Houston, interim Chief Financial Officer of the Texas Heart Institute and serves on the Board of the Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR). He further serves on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of the University of Saint Thomas and Houston Community College. Mr. Zeidman currently serves as Chairman of the Board of Petroflow Energy, and as a Director of Petro River Oil, Hyperdynamics Corp., Straight Path Communications, Inc. and Prosperity Bank in Houston. He was formerly Chairman of The Gordian Group, Chairman of the Board of SulphCo Inc., Chief Restructuring Officer of Transmeridian Exploration, Inc. and Bankruptcy Trustee of AremisSoft Corp. He has previously served as Chairman of the Board of Seitel Inc. and Unibar, Inc. Fred Zeidman serves on the board of the Republican Jewish Coalition and the Development Corporation of Israel (Israel Bonds), and served on the Board of the National World War II Museum. https://ileaderssummit.org/services/americas-roundtable-radio/ https://ileaderssummit.org/ | https://jerusalemleaderssummit.com/ America's Roundtable on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/americas-roundtable/id1518878472 Twitter: @ileaderssummit @NatashaSrdoc @JoelAnandUSA America's Roundtable is co-hosted by Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy, co-founders of International Leaders Summit and the Jerusalem Leaders Summit. America's Roundtable from Washington D.C. informs, educates, empowers and challenges the listening audience about the importance to restore, strengthen, and protect our freedoms, the rule of law, and free markets. America's Roundtable advances the ideas of freedom, the significance of freedom of speech, limited government, and the application of free market principles to solve problems. America's Roundtable presents in-depth analysis of current events and public policy issues while applying America's founding principles. America's Roundtable radio program - a strategic initiative of International Leaders Summit, focuses on America's economy, healthcare reform, rule of law, security and trade, and its strategic partnership with rule of law nations around the world. The radio program features high-ranking US administration officials, cabinet members, members of Congress, state government officials, distinguished diplomats, business and media leaders and influential thinkers from around the world. America's Roundtable is aired by Lanser Broadcasting Corporation on 96.5 FM and 98.9 FM, covering Michigan's major market and the upper Midwest, SuperTalk Mississippi Media's 12 radio stations and 50 affiliates reaching every county in Mississippi and also heard in parts of the neighboring states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Tennessee, and through podcast on Apple Podcasts and other key online platforms.

The John Batchelor Show
#ClassicAnatolLieven: Not yet Global Boris Johnson. and AUKUS Anatol Lieven @QuincyInst

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 8:05


Photo:  Booris Johnson — Foreign Ministers of the US, the UK, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, before a working dinner focused on Yemen, 19 July 2016 #ClassicAnatolLieven: Not yet Global Boris Johnson. and AUKUS Anatol Lieven @QuincyInst https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/09/15/joint-leaders-statement-on-aukus/

Euphomet
Our Holographic Reality | NITE DRIFT with Jim Perry

Euphomet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 56:05


Host JIM PERRY in conversation with mystic Tim Rothschild on the holographic nature of reality and then numerologist Kathy Bernstein shares what the numbers say 2022 may have in store for us. Founder of The Third Thing Network and Co-Founder of The Divine Movement, Tim Rothschild is an explorer, dedicating his life to healing and awakening work. His focus remains within the realm of conflict resolution, map-making, as well as truth and reconciliation with what it means to be Human. As a Nondual Kabbalistic Healer, philosopher, numerologist, broadcaster and writer, Tim has ventured through the paranormal, conspiratorial, and mystical realms only to begin to understand what it means to awaken to our true nature, and live it within the Great Mystery. The core of his healing work revolves around integration of a Nondual approach to the Kabbalistic Tree Of Life as well as the Kabbalistic Universes of Consciousness, allowing the individual to come into relationship with reality as it is. The integration of this particular healing and awakening work opens the door for more possibility and potential to unfold holographically, that is, everywhere and in everything. He is a graduate of A Society of Souls, and continues this work through Advanced Studies Groups, Teacher Training programs, as well as a nondual approach to intimacy. He is also a practitioner of the MAGI process, Impersonal Movement 1 and 2 and the Work of Return. Tim is an apprentice in the 4 year ASOS class in the United Arab Emirates. He is co-host of The Divine Movement Podcast, as well as various other programs. His websites are thethirdthingnetwork.com and thedivinemovement.com. •••••• Kathy Bernstein has studied, taught, and written about numerology for forty years. She integrates her understanding of the Kabbalah, and the Kabbalah's Tree of Life, into her numerology readings. In her Life Readings, she transposes one's numerology chart onto the Tree of Life, giving a depth to the readings that can often be profoundly revealing. Kathy is a graduate of A Society of Souls, a four year course of study in Nondual Healing and in-depth study of the Kabbalah's Tree of Life. She has completed eight years of advanced study at A Society of Souls. Kathy is a graduate of the Nondual Teachers in the Marketplace four-year training of A Society of Souls, the international school for non dual healing and awakening taught by Jason Shulman and Brenda Carter Blessings. She continues to offer classes based on that work. She is also a graduate of the Barbara Brennan School of Healing , a four year study of energy healing. Kathy has a private numerology and healing practice in Rhode Island: reach her at kathy@numerologypro.com **** Bumper music on the show (Art Bell appreciation night): • Loreena McKennitt - The Mummers' Dance • Ian Gomm - Hold On • Blue Oyster Cult - (Don't Fear) The Reaper • Enigma - Age Of Loneliness You can listen to NITE DRIFT with Jim Perry LIVE on Sunday nights at 5pm pst ( 8pm est) on KKNW 1150 AM Seattle or at Euphomet.com Join the Euphomet Patreon and gain access to our archive of the Original Series and be a part of LIVE interactive shows JOIN HERE JIM PERRY | @ItsJimPerry on Twitter | Host, Executive Producer, Founder Produced by ODY ORTIZ at KKNW 1150 AM Seattle Privacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands

Echoes From The Void
EFTV - 170: Girls Robbing Boys

Echoes From The Void

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 107:11


Although the creator is Korean, and the show did gangbusters on Netflix, North Korea still has issues. So much so, that they are set to execute a man, for smuggling in copies of the series. And distributing them to school children. Delusional Tory MP, Nick Fletcher, tried to claim that boys no longer have good role models, during a Westminster debate. He used the Female Doctor Who as part of his ramblings. Which mainly highlights Fletcher's fragile grasp on reality! It's not really that shocking (though people are acting that way), that the Taliban have put in place new crazy rules affecting women. Like, they can no longer appear on TV! Interpol have really reinforced the notion that they are a worth group of dullards. Because they recently elected the United Arab Emirates's Interior Minister, Ahmed Nasser AL RAISI, as their new President. In a move that seems more to garner interest than actually meet a demand. The Brit Awards have merged their 'male' and 'female' categories for 'Best Artist Award'. So in 2022, it will just be 'Best British Artist'. All this and more, on this week's #EFTV PLUS, we head over to Netflix for their live-action adaptation anime classic 'Cowboy Bebop'. Which, is not a western and is set in space! AND, our Audible book of the week, is the tenth instalment of Mark Greaney's 'Gray Man' series. We catch-up with Court Gentry trying to solve a missing agent situation, in 'Relentless'. This week: - North Korea to execute man for importing Squid Games - Female Doctor Who damaging young boys - Taliban ban women from TV - Interpol President Accessed Of Torture - Brit Awards create single category for best artist award REVIEWS & RECOMMENDATIONS - TV: Cowboy Bebop - S1 - thoughts AUDIBLE - Relentless by Mark Greaney *(Music) ‘Zen' (feat. Re-Up) by The Clipse - 2008 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/eftv/message

Strait Talk
Turkiye and the Arab World Move Towards Mending Ties

Strait Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 25:35


This past year, Turkiye and its former Gulf rivals have gradually moved towards improving relations. The first such step was witnessed during a visit by the United Arab Emirates' de-facto ruler, Crown Prince Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, to Ankara last month. But there have also been significant efforts to normalise ties between Turkiye and other regional powers, including Saudi Arabia and Egypt. So, what brought about this change of heart? And how might it impact the region? Guests: Ali Bakir Assistant Professor at Qatar University Sara Bazoobandi Fellow at the German Institute for Global and Area Studies Tahir Kilavuz Associate Professor at Marmara University

Trumpet Hour
#655: Week in Review: Russia Issues Bold Threat Against NATO

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 55:04


Russia just released a set of demands of NATO that, if agreed to, would effectively destroy the trans-Atlantic alliance. It appears this is the endgame that Vladimir Putin has been preparing for many months, positioning troops in Ukraine and completing the Nord Stream 2 pipeline. Chinese Supreme Leader Xi Jinping said the relationship between Russia and China is better than an alliance. The two Asian giants are pulling ever closer together in response to pushback from other nations. A cluster of devastating tornadoes tore through six American states, adding misery to a number of curses many Americans are already suffering. We also talk about what we're learning from the criminal trial of Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister making his first visit to the United Arab Emirates, skyrocketing inflation in America, and Britain's government being battered by scandals. Links [00:37] Russia vs. NATO (13 minutes) KEY OF DAVID: “Germany Going Underground” “The Crimean Crisis Is Reshaping Europe” “Demise of the INF Puts Europe in the Nuclear Crosshairs” [14:04] Tornadoes Hit U.S. (6 minutes) “You Can Know Why 'Natural' Disasters” “Plague of Tornadoes Devastates America's Heartland” [20:08] Netanyahu Trial (7 minutes) “Are the Unlawful Roots of the Netanyahu Witch Hunt About to Be Exposed?” [27:45] Russia and China Draw Closer (6 minutes) TRENDS: “Why the Trumpet Watches Russia Allying With China” [33:33] Israel PM Visits U.A.E. (6 minutes) “Peace With the Arabs: Can It Happen?” [39:03] U.S. Inflation (8 minutes) “Inflation Hits Highest Level in 39 Years” [47:20] Britain's Government Scandals (7 minutes) “Why Your World Is Changing So Suddenly”

And Another Thing with Dave
(Ep 201) Religion, Spirituality, and Psychedelics Part 5 of 5

And Another Thing with Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 42:48


In this episode: In this talk with Ben Jenkins from the Stereo App we go deep on a number of topics. We are mostly posing questions about the following topics reincarnation astral projection consciousness and what is it quantum physics extraterrestrial inbreeding psychedelics and soup kitchens We also discuss the good wolf bad wolf story I read somewhere online. In this native american tale, a child is asking his father what is good? What is evil? The father took a moment to think, then told his son. Each man has two wolves within him son. One of the wolves is good and one of the wolves are evil, and they are constantly at odds. The child says father father which wolf wins. The father responds, the wolf you feed the most Find my Cohost and myself on Stereo @benjenk126 @andanotherthing LINK TO SOURCES BELOW I am VERY excited to have listeners from over 49 countries !!! Thank you ..... Researchers are giving religious leaders psychedelic drugs in the interest of science https://qz.com/879285/psilocybin-drug-trials-psychedelics-such-as-acid-lsd-might-not-only-make-us-more-spiritual-and-religious-they-make-us-healthier-too/ Psychedelics Fueling A Mental Health Revolution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJNpKaZmidU Revealing The Mind: The Promise of Psychedelics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fi66wFfOC-4&t=570s I am VERY excited to have listeners from 49 countries!!! Thank you ..... SHOUT OUT TO MY LISTENERS ABROAD !!! India - 8% of my listeners The UK 6% Canada 6% Romania 3% Check Republic 1% Australia 1% Ireland 1% Germany1% Netherlands 1% Thailand 1% Sweden 1% Russia 1% and just under 1% from the following countries (but I have faith in you...LOL), Pakistan, Indonesia, New Zealand, Norway Denmark Bangladesh, Denmark, Nigeria, Austria, Japan, Iran, Croatia, Nepal, Portugal, Brazil, Austria, Bahrein, France, Greece, Mexico, Nigeria, Finland, Spain, Israel, South Africa, Lebanon, Italy, Ghana, Belgium, Poland, Singapore, Cayman Islands, Hungary, Sri Lanka, Somalia, Chile, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, and the Philippines. Thank you all so much. Please share If you would like to communicate via social media about one of my podcasts, or about an issue you would like to see me cover you can reach out to me via Instagram @andanotherthingwithdave https://www.instagram.com/andanotherthingwithdave/ You can also follow and tune into my live shows on Stereo here - www.stereo.com/andanotherthing ....... thanks for listening Dave --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/andanotherthingwithdave/message

PRI's The World
Missionaries in Haiti freed after 2 months

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 46:33


Haitian police say kidnappers have released all the remaining missionaries they held from an Ohio-based missionary group Christian Aid Ministries. The notorious Haitian gang 400 Mawozo had seized 17 members of the group exactly two months ago. And Amazon has officially launched its smart speaker, Alexa, in Arabic. The service is now available in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. But creating smart speakers that can understand Arabic has its own set of challenges. Plus, how are international students dealing with COVID-19 shutdowns at US universities? New York University, which has the largest population of international students in the country, just canceled almost all in-person gatherings and events and have mandated booster shots for all students. There is still time to support The World before our fundraising drive ends on Dec. 31. Your gift ensures that all our coverage on the air, on the web, and via the podcast remains free and accessible to everyone. With a donation of $130 (or $11/month), host Marco Werman will personally thank you on the podcast! Learn more and make your gift today.

Stratfor Podcast
Essential Geopolitics: Is the UAE-US F-35 Deal Off?

Stratfor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 6:04


In this episode of RANE's Essential Geopolitics podcast from Stratfor, Emily Donahue speaks to Tyan Bohl, Stratfor Middle East and North Africa analyst at RANE.Back in 2020, the United States inked a deal with the United Arab Emirates for $23-billion worth of F-35 fighter jets, drones, and munitions. But this December, the UAE announced it would suspend discussions on the deal. Bohl explains how the deal came about and why it may disintegrate. Stay ahead of the news with the latest geopolitical events and analysis of the Middle East. Subscribe to Worldview today! Right now we're offering a special price for subscriptions.

Agtech - So What?
What's the role of government in agtech ecosystems? Salvatore Lavallo, Abu Dhabi Investment Office

Agtech - So What?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 44:15


It's fair to say most entrepreneurs (and farmers!) aren't big fans of government rules and regulations for fear of being slowed down by red tape and bureaucracy. However, the political environment in which a startup develops can have a big impact on its ability to find investment and support, especially in agtech, where ecosystems are still very new for most countries.The United Arab Emirates is investing heavily in agtech, seeking to make Abu Dhabi the global center for innovation in agriculture. Their focus is on vertical farming, aquaculture, and hydroponics. And they're working to be strategic in attracting investment and solving for food security, while also developing a knowledge economy.Salvatore Lavallo is the Head of Foreign Direct Investment at the Abu Dhabi Investment Office. He's had a unique, and perhaps unlikely journey, to this position. Growing up in Indiana, his interest in economic development led him to become, at the age of 27, one of the youngest people to travel to every country in the world. Along the way, he became a farm owner in Tanzania, and later, a consultant with McKinsey in Africa and the Middle East.In this episode, Salvatore discusses:Challenging conventional economic indicators to understand what actually benefits local communitiesAbu Dhabi's bold plan to create Food Tech Valley, a hub for agtech innovation in desert environments.The tension between too much government regulation and too littleFor more information and resources from this episode, visit our website

Lady Curious
Wait, Are We Recording?!

Lady Curious

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 86:31


In this week's episode, we are joined by our friend Elena, to discuss two different humanitarian issues. Annaig gives updates on the Irish family law system, the Indian farmers' protests and the devastating tornado system that hit the United States. Henna discusses the completion of the Apartheid Wall surrounding the Gaza strip, detailing the security measures and media details told by Israel. Annaig then discusses the civil war in Tigray, Ethiopia. She provides details of the powers and countries involved, the prevention of humanitarian aid to the Tigray region and the funding of weaponry involved.If you, or anyone you know, is affected by the topics discussed in this episode or the current government restrictions, please visit Crisis helplines - https://www.3ts.ie/need-help/crisis-helplines/Substance abuse helpines - https://spunout.ie/help/service/drugs-alcohol-helplineDomestic/sexual/other abuse - https://spunout.ie/help/categories/abuse-support-servicesSources -https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/family-courts-in-camera-rule-paradise-for-abusers-1.4752296 https://www.google.ie/amp/s/news.sky.com/story/amp/india-farmers-celebrate-victory-as-prime-minister-modi-repeals-controversial-laws-12493092 https://news.sky.com/story/us-tornadoes-at-least-50-people-likely-to-have-been-killed-in-kentucky-12492503 https://www.oryxspioenkop.com/2021/12/the-uae-joins-tigray-war-emirati-wing.html?m=1 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tigray_War Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/LadyCurious)

The News Diet
$380M Settlement From Larry Nassar Case, Widespread Software Vulnerability, Danish Immigration Minister Sentenced to Prison, and Meeting Between Israel and UAE

The News Diet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:54


The $380 million settlement from the Larry Nassar case, the software issue that's probably affecting most of our devices, the sentencing of an Danish immigration official, and the first ever meeting between the Israeli Prime Minister and United Emirates Crown Prince. Let's be informed so we can get on with our day.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/thenewsdiet)

Axios Today
Donald Trump, Benjamin Netanayhu and the historic Abraham Accords

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 11:29


Yesterday was a historic day in the Middle East. The Israeli prime minister, Naftali Bennett, met the de facto leader of the United Arab Emirates, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed during the first ever official visit to the UAE from Israel. This took place 15 months after the Abraham Accords, the biggest breakthrough in Middle East Peace in a quarter century, normalized diplomatic relations between Israel, the UAE and three other Arab countries. And, the creator economy boomed in 2021. Plus, federal student loans are coming back. Guests: Axios' Barak Ravid and Sara Fischer. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Julia Redpath, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Alex Sugiura, Sabeena Singhani, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Jayk Cherry, and David Toledo. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Political Misfits
Operation Whistle Pig; Back Channels and War Fever In Ukraine; Israel & The UAE

Political Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 112:28


John Kiriakou, co-host of The Backstory on Radio Sputnik, joins us to talk about the curious case of Operation Whistle Pig, where a reporter was contacted by a potential source, only to be revealed later that this “source” was actually planting information and had mined data on the reporter in order to vet her. We talk about how the FBI eventually got involved and eventually revealed a wide web of surveillance that goes beyond this particular case, and how this story up-ends perceptions about whistleblowing, the objectives of certain leakers, and how government agencies deal with cases like these. Dan Kovalik, author and human rights and labor lawyer, joins us to talk about the annoying tensions between the U.S., Russia, Ukraine, the EU and NATO, and how we sometimes need to look beyond the bluster portrayed in the media, which has been inflating the risks over a war in the region. We talk about how despite the media bombast which has portrayed Biden and NATO standing fast in their demands in the region, there has been a recognition of grievances by Russia and the rebel regions despite Ukraine requesting more Western involvement. We also talk about the school shooting in Oxford, Michigan, and the legal fallout so far, and the labor struggle at Kellogg's, where workers are continuing their strike after failed negotiations with management.Mitchell Plitnick, political analyst, writer and president of ReThinking Foreign Policy, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about the ongoing negotiations over the nuclear deal with Iran taking place in Vienna, the ups and downs that have seen them almost fall apart, but that now seem to be taking a more positive note. We also talk about the visit of Israeli PM Naftali Bennett to the United Arab Emirates, as the two countries seek to deepen ties following the Abraham Accords and will likely discuss Iran's nuclear program, as well as the Israeli government labeling six Palestinian NGOs as terrorist groups and how this is yet another effort to destroy Palestinian civil society.

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Evening Edition: Israel's Prime Minister Makes Historic Trip To The United Arab Emirates

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 11:48


Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett is meeting with the Crown Prince of the United Arab Emirates to discuss Iran in a first-ever visit to the country by an Israeli Prime Minister. Also, the leaders of the G7 are warning Russia there will be consequences if they invade Ukraine. Senior FOX Field Producer Yonat Friling, joins Trey to discuss these stories and others developing around the world. 

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Israel's Prime Minister Makes Historic Trip To The United Arab Emirates

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 11:48


Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett is meeting with the Crown Prince of the United Arab Emirates to discuss Iran in a first-ever visit to the country by an Israeli Prime Minister. Also, the leaders of the G7 are warning Russia there will be consequences if they invade Ukraine. Senior FOX Field Producer Yonat Friling, joins Trey to discuss these stories and others developing around the world. 

How It Happened
Trump's Big Deal Part II: From Secret Alliance to the Abraham Accords

How It Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 26:43


After Donald Trump's peace plan between Israel and the Palestinians failed, there was a desperate attempt by the U.S. and the United Arab Emirates to stop Israel from annexing part of the occupied West Bank. That effort led to the most significant Middle East peace agreement in a generation. With exclusive reporting, Axios Middle East correspondent Barak Ravid tells national political correspondent Jonathan Swan what led to Trump's success and its effects.  Note: This episode contains some explicit language. Credits: The senior producer is Ariana Gharib Lee. The senior editor is Ted Robbins. Dan Bobkoff is the executive producer. Sara Kehaulani Goo is the editor-in-chief. Our managing editors include Alison Snyder and Margaret Talev. Dave Lawler is the world editor. Sound design and mixing by Jeanne Montalvo and Alex Sugiura. Our series theme music is by Michael Hanf. Fact checking by Jacob Knutson.

World Business Report
Israeli PM in landmark visit to UAE

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 22:56


Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett is in the United Arab Emirates, on a landmark first visit by an Israeli head of government to the country. Hussein Ibish, senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington DC, tells us about the potential for economic cooperation between the two states, who normalised relations last year. Plus, as South Korean president Moon Jae-in travels to Australia to talk trade, honorary senior research fellow in Modern Korea at Leeds University Aidan Foster-Carter tells us what he'll be discussing with counterpart Scott Morrison. Last week's announcement that inflation in the United States has reached its highest level in almost four decades came ahead of a scheduled Federal Reserve meeting this week. Economic commentator Laurie Laird tells us what she thinks will be on the agenda. Plus, the jihadist Allied Democratic Forces militant group, based in the Democratic Republic of Congo, has been blamed for several recent suicide bombings in Uganda's capital Kampala. Ugandan journalist Nebert Rugadya and Judith Tyson from the Overseas Development Institute tell us more about the group, and how rising insecurity is affecting the economies of both countries.

Science Friday
Vocal Fry, Indigenous Tribes And The Colorado River, Year In Space. December 10, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 47:07


The Why Of Vocal Fry For decades, vocal fry lived a relatively quiet existence. A creaky or breathy sound that occurs when your voice drops to its lowest register, this phenomenon was long known to linguists, speech pathologists, and voice coaches—but everyday people didn't pay much attention to it. Then in 2011, people started noticing it everywhere. So, what happened? What's going on in our vocal chords when we fry? And why does it bother so many people so very much? “Science Diction” host Johanna Mayer explains the history of vocal fry, and looks at languages where fry is a feature, not a bug.   Tribal Concerns Grow As Water Levels Drop In The Colorado River Basin Lorenzo Pena pulls off the highway and into a drive-through water distribution center on the Southern Ute Indian Tribe reservation in southwest Colorado. He parks his truck and connects the empty tank it's hauling to a large hose and thousands of gallons of water quickly rush in. Pena, who works for the Southern Ute Indian Tribe's hauled water program, has made this trip countless times to deliver water to tribal members who don't have clean water piped to their homes from the local utility. “It's pretty dry around here,” Pena said. “So if people have wells, they're real slow or the wells aren't really producing much water.” If a family on the reservation doesn't use well water or lives outside of town, they have to haul water to fill their cistern to flow through their home.   The Colorado River is the lifeblood for the Southern Ute and dozens of federally recognized tribes who have relied on it for drinking water, farming, and supporting hunting and fishing habitats for thousands of years. The river also holds spiritual and cultural significance. Today, 15 percent of Southern Utes living on the reservation in southwest Colorado don't have running water in their homes at all. That rate is higher for other tribes that rely on the Colorado River, including 40 percent of the Navajo Nation. Native American households are 19 times more likely to lack piped water services than white households, according to a report from the Water & Tribes Initiative. The data also show Native American households are more likely to lack piped water services than any other racial group. Leaders of tribes who depend on the Colorado River say the century-old agreement on managing a resource vital to 40 million people across the West is a major factor fueling these and other water inequalities. State water managers and the federal government say they will include tribes in upcoming Colorado River policymaking negotiations for the first time. Read more at sciencefriday.com.   Space Tourists, Asteroids, And Anti-Satellite Tests, Oh My! Space has been a busy place this year. In February, NASA's Perseverance rover landed on Mars and embarked on its mission to collect samples, alongside the first ever helicopter to fly on the Red Planet. July and September saw the launches of billionaires, space tourists, and civilian astronauts to various elevations above the Earth. Human beings are arriving to the International Space Station via Cape Canaveral for the first time since the discontinuation of the shuttle program in 2011. In November, NASA launched a mission to test our ability to deflect dangerous asteroids. And China, the United Arab Emirates, and Russia have all continued to make their way through the solar system as well. But what about the continued concerns astronomers have about the steep rise and future plans for fleets of private telecommunications satellites in low Earth orbit, like SpaceX's StarLink? Will the increasing footprint of private industry in space exploration have potential drawbacks for science? And what about that Russian anti-satellite test, which disrupted operations at the International Space Station for several days after? Ira and a trio of star space reporters—WFME's Brendan Byrne, Axios' Miriam Kramer, and The Verge's Loren Grush—round up 2021's out-of-this-world headlines.

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
Life After Guantánamo: “It Doesn't Leave You”

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 24:05


On Tuesday, with 39 men remaining at Guantánamo Bay, the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on closing the infamous military prison. This week on Intercepted: Intercept photo editor Elise Swain breaks down the horrifying story of one Yemeni man after being released from Guantánamo. After 20 years in arbitrary detention, former Guantánamo detainee Abdulqadir al Madhfari was released from a United Arab Emirates prison to his family's care in Yemen. His freedom lasted less than a week. Suffering the mental impact of long-term detention and torture, al Madhfari fled from his own family and was captured and detained by Houthi rebels in Yemen. Swain discusses the consequences of life after Guantanamo with Mansoor Adayfi, a former detainee and author of the memoir “Don't Forget Us Here.” Mansoor calls for accountability and reparations to the men detained and tortured, describing how his life and those of others now resemble "Guantánamo 2.0." join.theintercept.com/donate/now See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Middle East Focus
The UAE at 50

Middle East Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 27:54


Gerald Feierstein, Afshin Molavi, and Courtney Freer discuss the state of the United Arab Emirates as the country celebrates its 50th anniversary, including its history, economic development, and domestic and regional policy objectives.

Newshour
Ukraine invasion fears ahead of Biden-Putin meeting

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 49:56


President Biden is expected to warn Vladimir Putin that Russia will be hit with severe sanctions if it invades Ukraine, in a video call later today. Russian troop movement on the border with Ukraine has led to fears and concerns that Moscow is planning on an invasion. Latvia's foreign minister, Edgars Rinkēvičs, warns this programme of "huge bloodshed" if the situation escalates. Also in the programme: A whistleblower says the British operation to evacuate people from Afghanistan was dysfunctional and chaotic; we speak to one of those left behind in Kabul. Mel Brooks reflects on decades in showbusiness and we find out why the United Arab Emirates is moving its weekend. (Picture shows a Ukrainian serviceman on the front line in Donetsk. Credit EPA)

A Bit of Optimism
Hope with Shamma Al Mazrui

A Bit of Optimism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 33:24


So many politicians say our children are our future, so why do so few nations have a cabinet level position to represent their youth? As the Minister of State for Youth Affairs for the United Arab Emirates, Shamma Al Mazrui is revolutionizing the dynamic between youth and government. At the age of 22, she became the youngest government minister in the world. Now, five years later, she has powerful insights to share about fostering a nation's youth, the power of listening, and how hope empowers.    This is... A Bit of Optimism.     If you want to know more about Shamma and the Ministry for Youth Affairs, check out:  https://youth.gov.ae/en  https://uaecabinet.ae/en/details/cabinet-members/her-excellency-shamma-bint-suhail-faris-al-mazrui https://u.ae/en/about-the-uae/the-uae-government/government-of-future/youth

The John Batchelor Show
4/4 Gaza Conflict 2021, by Jonathan Schanzer (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 8:40


Photo:  Anglo-Egyptian Sudan — camel soldier of the native forces of the British army.   4/4  Gaza Conflict 2021, by  Jonathan Schanzer  (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09JMFWWDV/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 The May 2021 conflict between Israel and the terrorist group Hamas generated headlines around the world. However, much of the reporting ignored the history, funding, political dynamics, and other key components of the story. Hamas initiates conflict every few years, but the reporting rarely improves. Social media has only further clouded the picture. Hamas is rarely held responsible for its use of "human shields," blindly firing rockets at civilian areas in Israel, or diverting aid that should benefit the people of Gaza. The Islamic Republic of Iran, a state sponsor of terrorism, has been the primary patron of Hamas since the group's inception in the late 1980s. Hamas has received additional assistance over the years from Qatar, Turkey and Malaysia. These countries are fomenting conflict, while others, such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, have tried to minimize it. Gaza is therefore ground zero in a struggle for the future stability of the Middle East. The Biden administration has important choices to make. Its intent to re-enter the Iran nuclear deal could have significant consequences, given that sanctions relief to Iran will likely yield a financial boon for Hamas, along with other Iranian proxies. The Biden administration must also come to terms with "The Squad," a small but loud faction of the Democratic Party that seeks to undermine the US-Israel relationship. Jonathan Schanzer @JSchanzer @FDD, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.   . 

The John Batchelor Show
3/4 Gaza Conflict 2021, by Jonathan Schanzer (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 12:00


Photo:   NZ Vickers Gun Section under fire during Second Battle of Gaza 3/4  Gaza Conflict 2021, by  Jonathan Schanzer  (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09JMFWWDV/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 The May 2021 conflict between Israel and the terrorist group Hamas generated headlines around the world. However, much of the reporting ignored the history, funding, political dynamics, and other key components of the story. Hamas initiates conflict every few years, but the reporting rarely improves. Social media has only further clouded the picture. Hamas is rarely held responsible for its use of "human shields," blindly firing rockets at civilian areas in Israel, or diverting aid that should benefit the people of Gaza. The Islamic Republic of Iran, a state sponsor of terrorism, has been the primary patron of Hamas since the group's inception in the late 1980s. Hamas has received additional assistance over the years from Qatar, Turkey and Malaysia. These countries are fomenting conflict, while others, such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, have tried to minimize it. Gaza is therefore ground zero in a struggle for the future stability of the Middle East. The Biden administration has important choices to make. Its intent to re-enter the Iran nuclear deal could have significant consequences, given that sanctions relief to Iran will likely yield a financial boon for Hamas, along with other Iranian proxies. The Biden administration must also come to terms with "The Squad," a small but loud faction of the Democratic Party that seeks to undermine the US-Israel relationship. Jonathan Schanzer @JSchanzer @FDD, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.   . 

The John Batchelor Show
2/4 Gaza Conflict 2021, by Jonathan Schanzer (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 10:25


Photo:   Scenes with the expeditionary force in the Egyptian area Advanced field ambulance dressing station on the Gaza 2/4   Gaza Conflict 2021, by  Jonathan Schanzer  (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09JMFWWDV/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 The May 2021 conflict between Israel and the terrorist group Hamas generated headlines around the world. However, much of the reporting ignored the history, funding, political dynamics, and other key components of the story. Hamas initiates conflict every few years, but the reporting rarely improves. Social media has only further clouded the picture. Hamas is rarely held responsible for its use of "human shields," blindly firing rockets at civilian areas in Israel, or diverting aid that should benefit the people of Gaza. The Islamic Republic of Iran, a state sponsor of terrorism, has been the primary patron of Hamas since the group's inception in the late 1980s. Hamas has received additional assistance over the years from Qatar, Turkey and Malaysia. These countries are fomenting conflict, while others, such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, have tried to minimize it. Gaza is therefore ground zero in a struggle for the future stability of the Middle East. The Biden administration has important choices to make. Its intent to re-enter the Iran nuclear deal could have significant consequences, given that sanctions relief to Iran will likely yield a financial boon for Hamas, along with other Iranian proxies. The Biden administration must also come to terms with "The Squad," a small but loud faction of the Democratic Party that seeks to undermine the US-Israel relationship. Jonathan Schanzer @JSchanzer @FDD, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.   . 

The John Batchelor Show
1/4 Gaza Conflict 2021, by Jonathan Schanzer (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 8:25


Photo: Gaza 1/4  Gaza Conflict 2021, by  Jonathan Schanzer  (Kindle Edition) @JSchanzer @FDD https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09JMFWWDV/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0 The May 2021 conflict between Israel and the terrorist group Hamas generated headlines around the world. However, much of the reporting ignored the history, funding, political dynamics, and other key components of the story. Hamas initiates conflict every few years, but the reporting rarely improves. Social media has only further clouded the picture. Hamas is rarely held responsible for its use of "human shields," blindly firing rockets at civilian areas in Israel, or diverting aid that should benefit the people of Gaza. The Islamic Republic of Iran, a state sponsor of terrorism, has been the primary patron of Hamas since the group's inception in the late 1980s. Hamas has received additional assistance over the years from Qatar, Turkey and Malaysia. These countries are fomenting conflict, while others, such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, have tried to minimize it. Gaza is therefore ground zero in a struggle for the future stability of the Middle East. The Biden administration has important choices to make. Its intent to re-enter the Iran nuclear deal could have significant consequences, given that sanctions relief to Iran will likely yield a financial boon for Hamas, along with other Iranian proxies. The Biden administration must also come to terms with "The Squad," a small but loud faction of the Democratic Party that seeks to undermine the US-Israel relationship. Jonathan Schanzer @JSchanzer @FDD, Foundation for Defense of Democracies.   . 

Energy Week
181 - Will the oil industry stand up for itself?

Energy Week

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 43:58


Biden Official Heckled by Oil Group After Urging Shale Boosthttps://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-12-06/biden-official-heckled-after-urging-shale-to-boost-oil-supplies- was it really a heckle? or just a little pushback?European Power Prices Climbs in Freezing Cold Weather This Weekhttps://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/european-power-prices-climbs-in-freezing-cold-weather-this-week-1.1691679- US temps are up which is has brought natural gas prices down in the US- But in Europe, price increase of 69%Saudis Raise Oil Prices for Asia, U.S. Despite Omicron's Spreadhttps://finance.yahoo.com/news/saudi-arabia-raises-oil-prices-122146298.html- Aramco prices January Arab Light to Asia at $3.30 above benchmark- Amin Nasser says omicron not a threat to demand and market has over-reacted- OPEC+ message to the market that it believes the global economy will continue to be strongJP Morgan sees oil prices hitting $125 in 2022, $150/bbl in 2023https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/jp-morgan-sees-oil-prices-hitting-125-2022-150bbl-2023-2021-12-02/- Why? JP Morgan thinks that OPEC+ will slow down production increases because the prices won't be high enough- This seems to be a ridiculous assumption to me. - The bank forecast global oil demand to reach 99.8-101.5 million barrels per day in 2022-23. China Seeks First Military Base on Africa's Atlantic Coast, U.S. Intelligence Findshttps://www.wsj.com/articles/china-seeks-first-military-base-on-africas-atlantic-coast-u-s-intelligence-finds-11638726327- Is China's military prowess really as significant as say, Nazi Germany?- Ryan's read - trying to do whatever they can to keep the top down economy afloat. Investment in Africa is also to create jobs for Chinese- Is China heading out of Africa? - Will China invest in African oil and gas production? Especially when western countries are not as interested in investing in oil and gas production in developing countries.- protecting mineral rights?OPEC's power was waning. Soon it may have more sway than everhttps://www.cnn.com/2021/12/02/energy/opec-market-power/index.html- "The only producers that have put in the investment that's needed [to sustain long-term production] are Saudi Aramco and Adnoc," said Ellen Wald, author of the book "Saudi, Inc.," referring to state oil firms in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. "That shifts the balance over to OPEC."- If shale producers don't return to exponential growth they may never be able to challenge OPEC in the same way again?Global oil CEOs stress need for fossil fuels despite push for cleaner energyhttps://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/houston-oil-conference-speakers-pull-out-over-omicron-worries-2021-12-06/- Will oil and gas make its case for why fossil fuels are still necessary?

Amos 3:7  A Love of The Truth
What is The Great Narrative Initiative [Prophecy Update]

Amos 3:7 A Love of The Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 74:35


Recently, the World Economic Forum and the Government of the United Arab Emirates hosted the Great Narrative in Dubai back on November 11-12th. The Great Narrative meeting brought the so-called together Davos globalist types of leaders (professing themselves wise but are fools) from a variety of all over the globe and varied sectors of society such as – futurists, geneticists, philosophers, world leaders, and others. The WEF wants to implement a Global narrative (i.e. path, blueprint, a map) towards a more resilient, prosperous, inclusive, eco-friendly, and sustainable vision for our collective future. (i.e., a great reset agenda) these Davos elites are now attempting to legitimize their great reset agenda. These globalists, who think they are little gods want to decide what our future will be. We are nothing but slaves to them too stupid. They will decide what is best for us. In establishing this narrative or blueprint with all the countries around the world, They want to control the narrative for our future, imagine it, design it and implement it. It's purely authoritarian. it's their version of how humanity rises to the next evolutionary process in their words. In essence, it's how they achieve a global world unity, governance, economics, religions using technology by resetting all of the global society and the global economy.Globalist's Call for the Need for The Great NarrativeSee two Prophecy Update Videos with Video & News Clips to further explain how the WEF & the Elite want to bring in a New World Order and how that relates to events outlined in the Bible:  Article and Videos Here Amos37Amos37 on GettrAmos37 on GabAmos37 on ParlerAmos37 on RumbleAmos37 on InstagramAmos37 on PinterestAmos37 on Facebook

PRI's The World
How far will the US go in its relationship with Vietnam's military?

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 47:18


The US Navy has become a steady presence in Vietnam. It's part of a strategy to help Vietnamese forces stand up to China, which is beefing up its military presence in the area. But just how far will the US go in its relationship with Vietnam's military? Also, in the past few weeks, we've been hearing a lot about the migration crisis in Europe. At the center of the storm are Iraqi Kurds fleeing the semi-autonomous region in northern Iraq. Now, many are being flown back to northern Iraq and having to restart their lives with very little. Plus, the new director of Interpol is the former minister of the interior from the United Arab Emirates. Critics want him removed for his spotty record policing his own country with allegations of abuse, even torture. Every day, our incredible team brings you powerful human stories from diverse perspectives you can't hear anywhere else. Without your support, none of it would be possible. Help us unlock a matching gift of $67,000 by being one of 515 supporters giving $130, or $11 per month. Thank you for being a part of our fall drive, and making our work possible. 

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Dark Money Network Pushing Pro-Saudi/UAE Policies w/ Eli Clifton

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 57:20


On this edition of Parallax Views, a group launched over the summer called the Turkish Democracy Project appears to be pushing pro-Saudi/UAE policies with the potential backing of a dark money netowork say Eli Clifton and Murtaza Hussain in Responsible Statecraft and The Intercept. Interestingly, the Turkish Democracy Project has no Turkish people sans two figures who were removed from the site's advisory board membership shortly after launch. A number of notoriously hawkish foreign policy figure including Sen. Joe Lieberman, Frances Townsend, and John Bolton are involved with the project. But the figures of interest of most interest to Clifton and Hussain are Mark Wallace,  a former George W. Bush administration ambassador to the United Nations, and Wallace's close associate the billionaire investor Thomas Kaplan, the latter of whom has boasted of his business ties to the United Arab Emirates. In this conversation, Eli and I discuss the connections between Kaplan, Wallace, Electrum Group, United Against a Nuclear Iran, and the Counter Extremism Project. The story doesn't end their though as a lawsuit was launched attempting to ascertain whether CEP was obtaining foreign funding. Then the government "an unusual invocation of state secrets as a third-party intervenor in a civil suit" claiming "that permitting the case to move forward would jeopardize U.S. national security". Clifton lays all this out as well as discussing Kaplan's over $800,000 to the UANI, a "treasure trove" of fascinating leaked emails including figures like the aforementioned Frances Townsend and UAE Ambassador to the U.S. Yousef al Otaiba, whether the Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA) pertains to this case, the relationship between Iran and Saudi Arabia, the relationship between Saudi Arabia and Israel, Sen. Norm Coleman (now a Saudi lobbyist), foreign lobbying and influence efforts, lack of transparency around funding rather the lobbying itself being the biggest concern for many, Qatar, the relationship between Turkey and the Gulf States, Turkish anger over the Turkish Democracy Project's launch, geopolitics, the "Blob" and the foreign policy establishment, The Arab Lobby, AIPAC, the foreign policy establishment's protesting that its critics are just populist Know-Nothings, and much, much more!

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, Omicron and Delta variants, and vaccine updates for 12-02-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 5:02


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest on Omicron and other COVID variants and new hotspots for December 2nd, 2021. The UN Secretary-General has called the travel restrictions being placed by countries like the United States on one region like South Africa not only ineffective, but travel apartheid. The Omicron variant is already in 24 countries around the world, and as it turns out, it appears it didn't originate in South Africa anyway. The Netherlands had cases a week before two flights arrived from South Africa carrying the virus. Nine cases were linked to a private event in Scotland, days before South Africa announced the existence of the variant. And Nigeria detected its first case in a sample collected weeks before South Africa alerted the world about Omicron. Tracking the Omicron variant's spread, it's in the United States now. A fully vaccinated person in the San Francisco area came back from South Africa Nov. 22 and tested positive seven days later. South Korea confirmed the variant in five people linked to international arrivals. And Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates confirmed the first infections in the Persian Gulf region. So far, all symptoms reported have been mild. A reprieve for healthcare workers in ten states who don't want to take the vaccine. A federal judge blocked the vaccine requirement, saying the agency that issued the rule likely exceeded its authority. That stops the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services from enforcing its healthcare worker mandate until the court can hear legal challenges brought by Missouri, Nebraska, Arkansas, Kansas, Iowa, Wyoming, Alaska, South Dakota, North Dakota and New Hampshire. Well people who don't like mandates sure aren't going to like this. The chief of the European Union's executive arm said member nations should consider making vaccinations mandatory, period. The EU-wide vaccination rate stands at 66%. Germany's new Chancellor, for one, said he'd back a proposal like that. With reporting affected by the Thanksgiving holiday, in the United States cases were down 2%, deaths are down 16%, and hospitalizations are up 15% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending down since November 23. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Wyoming, Montana, West Virginia, Michigan, and Kentucky. There are 9,449,555 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Rhode Island 51%, Indiana 47%, Massachusetts 43%, New Hampshire 41%, and Michigan 40%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Koochiching, MO. Nodaway, MO. Shiawassee, MI. Colfax, NM. Sullivan, NH. Jackson, IA. Clay, IL. Neosho, KS. Dunn, WI. And Pope, MN. There have been at least 782,104 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont unchanged at 72.9%, Rhode Island at 72.6%, and Maine at 72.3%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41.5%, Wyoming at 45.6%, and Alabama at 46.2%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 59.4%. Globally, cases were up 10% and deaths were down 4% over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 20,471,414 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 120,441. Germany 71,887. France 49,610. The U.K. 48,374. And Russia 32,837. There have been at least 5,223,657 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Power Play
Jeff Sanders - Taking LEGO's To A New Level

The Power Play

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:25


On today's episode I am joined by the founder of Brick Bending, Jeff Sanders. Jeff's work sits at the nexus of art, engineering, mathematics, ancient traditions, and popular culture--exploring the patterns inherent in LEGO® bricks, and pushing the limits of what can be created with the ubiquitous construction toy. ​Jeff has shipped original artworks internationally, has been exhibited around the Pacific Northwest, and most recently was commissioned to create the 10 square meter mega-build 'Ten Point Geometry in Brick' for the 2019 Sharjah Islamic Arts Festival in the United Arab Emirates. Drop Jeff a follow on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/brickbending/ Go ahead and buy some Bricks - https://www.mochub.com/user/52423 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thepowerplay/support

Speed and Power Podcast
Ep 73: Matt McInnes Watson- Reactive Strength Ratio, Horizontal-based Momentum, Performing Plyos on Hills, The Optimal Range of Dorsiflexion For Power

Speed and Power Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 59:47


Presented by: www.exxentric.com/speedandpower Matt McInnes Watson is a performance coach and specialist in track and field, speed, power and plyometrics. He has a master's degree in athletic development and is currently studying for a Ph.D. in plyometrics. Watson is the owner of Plus Plyos, a coaching business that provides plyometric programs through video format. He is currently teaching in the United Arab Emirates, and he coaches multiple athletes from the U.K. and U.S.   https://www.instagram.com/mcinneswatson/  https://www.instagram.com/PLUSPLYOS/ 

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Morocco and Israel tighten relations with Gantz visit

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 18:05


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Judah Ari Gross and environmental reporter Sue Surkes appear on today's podcast with host Jessica Steinberg. Gross discusses his visit to Morocco last week with defense minister Benny Gantz, on a trip that focused on the warming relationship between Israel and Morocco, particularly between the two armies.  The trip was of particular interest to members of Gantz's entourage, some of whom are of Moroccan heritage, and most of whom had never visited the country previously. Surkes describes ongoing issues in the Knesset internal affairs and environment committee with the state company that signed a contentious deal with the United Arab Emirates to transport its oil from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean. She also looks at plans for building six new marinas around Israel, as environmental groups counter the plan, pointing out that it will interfere with marine life and can be avoided. Discussed articles include: Israel looking to deepen ties with Morocco, with plans for arms sales, joint drills Hearing the cantor sing the prayer for IDF soldiers… in Morocco Firm behind disputed UAE-Eilat oil pipeline: Ministries don't have right to see deal Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: The first Israel Defense Forces officers to ever visit Morocco in uniform, from left, Col. Noam Arbeli, Brig. Gen. Yaki Dolf, and Lt. Col. Netanel Kula in front of the Tomb of Moroccan King Muhammad V in Rabat on November 24, 2021. (Defense Ministry) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast
207 – Fly (United Arab) Emirates

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 54:03


As a child, did you ever wonder why Garfield wanted to send Nermal to Abu Dhabi [and actually, where the heck is that place anyway]?! On this episode, Julia flies you to the United Arab Emirates to discuss the history, culture, geography, and [of course] the tourist attractions of the U.A.E. Later, take a quiz called “A Brainteaser Tedium”! . . . [Music: 1) PeriTune, “Folk Arabian,” 2016; 2) Frau Holle, “Ascending Souls,” 2017. Courtesy of Frau Holle, CC BY-NC 3.0 license.]

Takeline
Lincoln Riley, Frank Vogel, Knicks Revenge + A Chess Grandmaster

Takeline

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 66:05


This week on Takeline, Jason and Renee talk to ESPN's Paolo Uggetti about Lincoln Riley taking the USC football coaching job, the Knicks revenge win against the Hawks, and Frank Vogel's status as the Lakers coach. Plus, chess Grandmaster Maurice Ashley joins to talk about his journey in the world of chess and the latest from the World Chess Championship in the United Arab Emirates. Don't forget to smash the subscribe button at http://youtube.com/takelineshow for exclusive video clips and to watch ALL CAPS NBA. New episodes every Friday! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.29.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:46


Yoga improves quality of life in men with new diagnosis of prostate cancer University of Texas at San Antonio, November 23, 2021 An estimated 1.4 million men were diagnosed with prostate cancer worldwide in 2020, according to the American Cancer Society and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. With a new diagnosis of prostate cancer, these men have approximately a 30% incidence of depression and anxiety, a fourfold higher risk of heart attack and a twofold higher risk of committing suicide. Yoga, a set of specific body postures combined with breathing techniques and mindfulness, may be an easy-to-implement answer in this stressful situation, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases. A pilot randomized clinical trial by urology researchers at the Mays Cancer Center, home to UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, enrolled 29 men who were awaiting prostatectomy. Fourteen were randomized to participate in yoga and 15 were assigned to the standard of care, which was just waiting for surgery. “We gave the active intervention group six weeks of yoga, at least twice a week, for 60 to 75 minutes,” said lead author Dharam Kaushik, MD, associate professor of urology in UT Health San Antonio's Joe R. and Teresa Lozano School of Medicine and cancer surgeon with the Mays Cancer Center. Via questionnaires, the team documented the men's perceived quality of life at the start of yoga, at the time of surgery and after surgery. Men who did not do yoga completed the same questionnaires at study enrollment and at the other two junctures. The team drew blood samples before the men began yoga and after all sessions were completed. Samples were also taken from men who did not do yoga. Sense of well-being  “What we found was very interesting,” Dr. Kaushik said. “Yoga improved quality of life in men compared to the standard of care, specifically on the fatigue scale, meaning they were less tired; on sexual function; and on their functional, physical and social well-being.” A more robust immune response and lower levels of inflammation were observed in the yoga group, he added. “This is positive data and further large-scale studies are needed, for which this pilot study can be a model,” Dr. Kaushik said. Biomarkers and yoga The primary study outcome was self-reported quality of life assessed by the questionnaires. Changes in immune cell status and inflammatory markers with yoga were secondary outcomes. The yoga group showed increased numbers of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are important contributors to immune health. Among other markers, the yoga group also exhibited a reduction in inflammatory markers called cytokines. The median age of participants was 56 years in the yoga group and 60 years in the standard of care group. Yoga has been studied in breast cancer, but not at the level of detail of this study, matching self-reported quality of life data with markers of immune response and inflammation, Dr. Kaushik said. “If we are able to encourage patients to do a small, inexpensive and easy-to-implement intervention that can have a big impact, then why not?” he said.     Researchers Discover How Antibiotic Power of Garlic Fights Chronic Infections Washington State University, November 28, 2021   Garlic is probably nature's most potent food. It is one of the reasons people who eat the Mediterranean diet live such long healthy lives. An active sulphurous compound found in garlic can be used to fight robust bacteria in patients with chronic infections, a new study from the University of Copenhagen indicates.   A previous finding from Washington State University showed that garlic is 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics at fighting disease causing bacteria commonly responsible for foodborne illness.  Here the researchers show that the garlic compound is able to destroy important components in the bacteria's communication systems, which involve regulatory RNA molecules. 'We really believe this method can lead to treatment of patients, who otherwise have poor prospects. Because chronic infections like cystic fibrosis can be very robust. But now we, together with a private company, have enough knowledge to further develop the garlic drug and test it on patients', says Assistant Professor Tim Holm Jakobsen from the Costerton Biofilm Center at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology. The study is the latest addition from a research group headed by Professor Michael Givskov, which since 2005 has focussed on garlic's effect on bacteria. At the time they learned that garlic extract is able to inhibit bacteria, and in 2012 they showed that the sulphurous compound ajoene found in garlic is responsible for the effect. The new study, which has been published in the scientific journal Scientific Reports, takes an even closer look and documents ajoene's ability to inhibit small regulatory RNA molecules in two types of bacteria. 'The two types of bacteria we have studied are very important. They are called Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They actually belong to two very different bacteria families and are normally fought using different methods. But the garlic compound is able to fight both at once and therefore may prove an effective drug when used together with antibiotics', says Tim Holm Jakobsen. Previous studies have shown that garlic appears to offer the most powerful, naturally occurring resistance to bacteria. In addition to inhibiting the bacteria's RNA molecules, the active garlic compound also damages the protective slimy matrix surrounding the bacteria, the so-called biofilm. When the biofilm is destroyed or weakened, both antibiotics and the body's own immune system are able to attack the bacteria more directly and thus remove the infection. In 2012 the researchers took out a patent on the use of ajoene to fight bacterial infections. Similar patents have been taken out for compounds in allicin -- which gives garlic its aroma and flavour -- and is known as one of the world's most powerful antioxidants.     Calorie restriction cycles could help cancer patients Fondazione Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (Italy), November 22 2021.  Findings from a trial reported on November 17, 2021 in Cancer Discovery revealed that five days of a diet that mimics fasting is safe for people with cancer and could improve factors that affect prognosis. The trial included 101 patients with different cancers treated with standard therapies. Participants were assigned to a five-day low protein, low carbohydrate, plant-based diet that provided up to 600 calories on the first day and up to 300 calories per day during the remaining days. The regimen was repeated every three or four weeks for up to eight cycles. Each period of calorie restriction was followed by a period in which patients were instructed to adhere to healthy diet and lifestyle guidelines. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of each calorie restricted period. Severe adverse events related to the diet were reported by 12.9% of the participants, which was significantly lower than the 20% figure hypothesized by the researchers prior to the study. Median plasma glucose, serum insulin and serum IGF-1 were decreased by 18.6%, 50.7% and 30.3% after each cycle. In an evaluation conducted among a subgroup of participants after the first calorie restricted cycle, a reduction in peripheral blood immunosuppressive cells and an increase of immune cells known as activated CD8+ T cells was observed. To explore the effects of the diet on immunity within cancer patients' tumors, the researchers performed an analysis of findings from an ongoing trial that administered the fasting-mimicking diet prior to tumor removal in breast cancer patients. Tumor microenvironments revealed enhanced tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and additional favorable immune factors when compared to biopsy samples obtained before the diet was initiated.  “Cyclic fasting-mimicking diet is a safe, feasible and inexpensive dietary intervention that modulates systemic metabolism and boosts antitumor immunity in cancer patients,” the authors concluded.     Morning exposure to deep red light improves declining eyesight University College London, November 24, 2021       Just three minutes of exposure to deep red light once a week, when delivered in the morning, can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a pioneering new study by UCL researchers. Published in Scientific Reports, the study builds on the team's previous work*, which showed daily three-minute exposure to longwave deep red light ‘switched on' energy producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.   For this latest study, scientists wanted to establish what effect a single three-minute exposure would have, while also using much lower energy levels than their previous studies. Furthermore, building on separate UCL research in flies** that found mitochondria display ‘shifting workloads' depending on the time of day, the team compared morning exposure to afternoon exposure. In summary, researchers found there was, on average, a 17% improvement in participants' colour contrast vision when exposed to three minutes of 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light in the morning and the effects of this single exposure lasted for at least a week. However, when the same test was conducted in the afternoon, no improvement was seen. Scientists say the benefits of deep red light, highlighted by the findings, mark a breakthrough for eye health and should lead to affordable home-based eye therapies, helping the millions of people globally with naturally declining vision. Lead author, Professor Glen Jeffery (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology), said: “We demonstrate that one single exposure to long wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. “This simple intervention applied at the population level would significantly impact on quality of life as people age and would likely result in reduced social costs that arise from problems associated with reduced vision.” Naturally declining vision and mitochondria In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. Mitochondrial density is greatest in the retina's photoreceptor cells, which have high energy demands. As a result, the retina ages faster than other organs, with a 70% ATP reduction over life, causing a significant decline in photoreceptor function as they lack the energy to perform their normal role. In studying the effects of deep red light in humans, researchers built on their previous findings in mice, bumblebees and fruit flies, which all found significant improvements in the function of the retina's photoreceptors when their eyes were exposed to 670 nanometre (long wavelength) deep red light. “Mitochondria have specific sensitivities to long wavelength light influencing their performance: longer wavelengths spanning 650 to 900nm improve mitochondrial performance to increase energy production,” said Professor Jeffery. Morning and afternoon studies The retina's photoreceptor population is formed of cones, which mediate colour vision, and rods, which adapt vision in low/dim light. This study focused on cones*** and observed colour contrast sensitivity, along the protan axis (measuring red-green contrast) and the tritan axis (blue-yellow). All the participants were aged between 34 and 70, had no ocular disease, completed a questionnaire regarding eye health prior to testing, and had normal colour vision (cone function). This was assessed using a ‘Chroma Test': identifying coloured letters that had very low contrast and appeared increasingly blurred, a process called colour contrast.    Using a provided LED device all 20 participants (13 female and 7 male) were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8am and 9am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post exposure and 10 of the participants were also tested one week post exposure.  On average there was a ‘significant' 17% improvement in colour vision, which lasted a week in tested participants; in some older participants there was a 20% improvement, also lasting a week. A few months on from the first test (ensuring any positive effects of the deep red light had been ‘washed out') six (three female, three male) of the 20 participants, carried out the same test in the afternoon, between 12pm to 1pm.  When participants then had their colour vision tested again, it showed zero improvement. Professor Jeffery said: “Using a simple LED device once a week, recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery. “And morning exposure is absolutely key to achieving improvements in declining vision: as we have previously seen in flies, mitochondria have shifting work patterns and do not respond in the same way to light in the afternoon – this study confirms this.” For this study the light energy emitted by the LED torch was just 8mW/cm2, rather than 40mW/cm2, which they had previously used. This has the effect of dimming the light but does not affect the wavelength. While both energy levels are perfectly safe for the human eye, reducing the energy further is an additional benefit. Home-based affordable eye therapies With a paucity of affordable deep red-light eye-therapies available, Professor Jeffery has been working for no commercial gain with Planet Lighting UK, a small company in Wales and others, with the aim of producing 670nm infra-red eye ware at an affordable cost, in contrast to some other LED devices designed to improve vision available in the US for over $20,000. “The technology is simple and very safe; the energy delivered by 670nm long wave light is not that much greater than that found in natural environmental light,” Professor Jeffery said. “Given its simplicity, I am confident an easy-to-use device can be made available at an affordable cost to the general public. “In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a podcast, and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.” Study limitations Despite the clarity of the results, researchers say some of the data are “noisy”. While positive effects are clear for individuals following 670nm exposure, the magnitude of improvements can vary markedly between those of similar ages. Therefore, some caution is needed in interpretating the data. It is possible that there are other variables between individuals that influence the degree of improvement that the researchers have not identified so far and would require a larger sample size. This research was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and Sight Research UK.   Global rise in red/processed meat trade linked to sharp increase in diet-related illness Michigan State University & University of California at Merced, November 22, 2021   The global rise in the red and processed meat trade over the past 30 years is linked to a sharp increase in diet related ill health, with the impact greatest in Northern and Eastern Europe and the island nations of the Caribbean and Oceania, finds an analysis published in the open access journal BMJ Global Health. Health policies should be integrated with agricultural and trade policies among importing and exporting nations as a matter of urgency, to stave off further personal and societal costs, say the researchers. Among continuous urbanisation and income growth, the global red and processed meat trade has risen exponentially to meet demand. This trend has implications for the environment because of the impact it has on land use and biodiversity loss.  And high red and processed meat consumption is linked to a heightened risk of non-communicable diseases, particularly bowel cancer, diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease. The researchers wanted to find out what impact the red and processed meat trade might be having on diet-related non-communicable disease trends and which countries might be particularly vulnerable.  They drew on data on meat production and trade from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) from 1993 to 2018 for 154 countries, focusing on 14 red meat items derived from beef, pork, lamb and goat, and six processed primarily beef and pork items, preserved by smoking, salting, curing, or chemicals. They then calculated the proportions of deaths and years of life lived with disability (DALYs) attributable to diet as a result of bowel cancer, type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery heart disease among those aged 25 and over in each country. The global red and processed meat trade increased by more than 148% from 10 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 25 metric tonnes in 2016–18. While the number of net exporting countries fell from 33 in 1993–5 to 26 in 2016–18, net importing countries rose from 121 to 128.  Developed countries in Europe accounted for half of total red and processed meat exports in 1993–95 and 2016–18.  But developing countries in South America, such as Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay made up nearly 10% in 2016–18, up from around 5% in 1993–5.  Developing countries also increased their meat imports by 342.5% from 2 metric tonnes in 1993–5 to nearly 9 metric tonnes in 2016–18; developed countries doubled theirs from 8 metric tonnes to 16. Diet related attributable death and DALY rates associated with the global meat trade rose in three quarters of the 154 countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18. Worldwide, the researchers calculated that increases in red and processed meat consumption, aligned to increases in trade, accounted for 10,898 attributable deaths in 2016–18, an increase of nearly 75% on the figures for 1993-5.  The global meat trade contributed to increases of 55% and 71%, respectively, in attributable deaths and DALYs in developed countries between 1993-5 and 2016-18.  The equivalent figures in developing countries were significantly higher: 137% and 140%, respectively, largely as a result of increased demand for meat, prompted by rapid urbanisation and income growth, suggest the researchers. Between 1993– 2018, island nations in the Caribbean and Oceania and  countries in Northern and Eastern Europe became particularly vulnerable to diet-related disease and deaths associated with large meat imports.  The island nations have limited land for meat production, so depend heavily on meat imports, while many of the European countries, such as Slovakia, Lithuania and Latvia, benefited from regional trade agreements and tariff exemptions after joining the European Union in 2003-4, which accelerated meat imports, explain the researchers. In 1993–5, the top 10 countries with the highest proportion of deaths attributable to red meat consumption included Tonga, United Arab Emirates, Barbados, Fiji, Gabon, Bahamas, Greece, Malta, Brunei and Saint Lucia.  In 2016–2018, the top 10 included The Netherlands, Bahamas, Tonga, Denmark, Antigua and Barbuda, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, Croatia and Greece. The meat trade in these countries accounted for more than 7% of all deaths attributable to diets high in both red and processed meat in 2016-18. The trends in attributable DALYs more or less mirrored those for attributable deaths. Attributable death and DALY rates associated with global meat trade fell in 34 countries between 1993–5 and 2016–18. But this was partly due to population growth exceeding increases in meat imports in 24 countries, while domestic meat production increased in 19.  In more than a half of these countries (20) the absolute number of diet-related deaths and DALYs rose in tandem with increased meat consumption between 1993-5 and 2016-18. And some countries, including Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina and Germany increasingly acted as net meat exporters, changing their land use, with consequent biodiversity loss. This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers acknowledge that many countries import and process red meat items for export, which may have skewed their findings. Nevertheless, they conclude: “This study shows that global increases in red and processed meat trade contribute to the abrupt increase of diet-related [non-communicable diseases]... Future interventions need to urgently integrate health policies with agricultural and trade policies by cooperating between responsible exporting and importing countries.”     Glyphosate levels sharply increase by 1,208% within the human body University of California San Diego The environmental dangers of glyphosate in Roundup and other weed killer products have been well documented. Now new research, from a team led by Paul Mills of the University of California San Diego, has found it could be negatively affecting human health – especially in lower-income communities, as illustrated by the 1,208 percent increase in human glyphosate levels. The study tracked people in southern California over age 50 from the years 1993 to 1996 as well as from 2014 to 2016. Urine samples were collected from these persons (periodically) during that time. Number of persons testing positive for glyphosate in their urine went up by 500 percent within 20 years The researchers determined the percentage of persons testing positive for glyphosate went up an alarming 500 percent during that time period.  And, for some, glyphosate levels surged by a frightening 1,208 percent. A past UK trial of rats fed low doses of glyphosate – over their lifetimes – were found to have a higher risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Research out of King's College in London found this toxic herbicide ingredient can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats at just 4 nanograms/kg. By the way, this amount is 437,000 times below levels that are allowed in the United States. In more recent research, the levels of glyphosate in the humans studied were proportionately 100-fold higher. Further research regarding the connection between glyphosate and liver disease are being planned.  But, what we already know has been published in JAMA. Important to note: people who live in rural areas near farms that use Roundup are at the highest risk for exposure.  Yet, traces of this herbicide ingredient – left on fruits and vegetables – can easily make its way into the bloodstream of anyone who consumes these foods. Glyphosate weed killer in Roundup considered “probable carcinogen” by World Health Organization While Roundup was developed to kill weeds, many weed types have actually become resistant to the herbicide. This is causing some farmers to use even more Roundup. Glyphosate has been listed as a “probable human carcinogen” by WHO (the World Health Organization). It has also been linked with birth defects, ADHD and autism. Studies on humans have shown Roundup causes liver damage even when found in “permissible amounts” in tap water. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease currently affects 90 million Americans and is on the verge of becoming a global epidemic. Associated disorders such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are also soaring. Glyphosate in Roundup weed killer INCREASES the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease While the known causes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease include overeating, sugary foods and a sedentary lifestyle, some health professionals are beginning to wonder if glyphosate exposure is exacerbating this trend. NAFLD symptoms include chronic fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain and/or swelling, weight loss, jaundice, itching, confusion and swelling of the legs. Untreated, NAFLD can lead to liver cancer and liver failure. Unfortunately, glyphosate residue has been showing up in increasing amounts in our food supply. It has even been detected in wine, table salt and vaccines. So, it really isn't a wonder how glyphosate levels in the human bloodstream have increased by 1,208 percent. If you're outraged by this, take the time to voice your opinion to your state representatives. And, at the very least, eat organic fruits and vegetables – as often as possible to avoid this cancer-causing substance.   Study finds psychedelic microdosing improves mental health University of British Columbia, November 23, 2021 An international study led by UBC Okanagan researchers suggests repeated use of small doses of psychedelics such as psilocybin or LSD can be a valuable tool for those struggling with anxiety and depression. The study, recently published in Nature: Scientific Reports, demonstrated fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and greater feelings of wellbeing among individuals who reported consuming psychedelics in small quantities, or microdosing, compared to those who did not. Microdosing involves regular self-administration of psychedelic substances in amounts small enough to not impair normal cognitive functioning. Considering this is the largest psychedelic microdosing study published to date, the results are encouraging, says UBCO doctoral student and lead author Joseph Rootman. "In total, we followed more than 8,500 people from 75 countries using an anonymous self-reporting system—about half were following a microdosing regimen and half were not," Rootman explains. "In comparing microdosers and non-microdosers, there was a clear association between microdosing and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress—which is important given the high prevalence of these conditions and the substantial suffering they cause." The study is also the first to systematically examine the practice of stacking, or combining microdoses of psychedelics with other substances like niacin, lions mane mushrooms and cacao, which some believe work in conjunction to maximize benefit. Rootman works with Dr. Zach Walsh, a psychology professor in UBCO's Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dr. Walsh says it's an exciting time for research in this area. "These findings highlight adults who are microdosing to treat their mental health conditions and enhance their wellbeing—rather than simply to get high," says Dr. Walsh. "We have an epidemic of mental health problems, with existing treatments that don't work for everyone. We need to follow the lead of patients who are taking these initiatives to improve their wellbeing and reduce suffering." Study co-author Kalin Harvey is the chief technology officer of Quantified Citizen, a mobile health research platform. He says this study highlights the potential of citizen science. "The use of citizen science allows us to examine the effects of behaviors that are difficult to study in the lab due to regulatory challenges and stigma associated with the now discredited 'war on drugs.'" According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, one in five Canadians personally experience a mental health problem or illness each year. This is one of the many reasons Dr. Walsh says conducting innovative psychological research is imperative. "These cross-sectional findings are promising and highlight the need for further investigation to better determine the impacts of factors like dosage and stacking," explains Dr. Walsh. "While the data is growing to support the use of psychedelics like psilocybin in large doses to treat depression and addiction—our data also helps to expand our understanding of how psychedelics may also help in smaller doses."

National Day Calendar
November 26, 2021 - National Cake Day | Black Friday

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 3:30


Welcome to November 26, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate expensive cakes and being in the black  Yesterday on Thanksgiving, pie got its time in the spotlight. But most people prefer cake. Like the man from the United Arab Emirates who purchased a custom-made cake for his daughter's birthday. And it was expensive. Very expensive. The cake cost—you may want to sit down for this one—$75 million. Debbie Wingham, a British designer, created a replica of a fashion show, complete with a runway, models, and audience. The cake was about 2 meters long and took 1,100 hours to complete. Premium ingredients, gemstones, and handmade outfits for the tiny figures drove the price into the stratosphere. On National Cake Day, celebrate with a cheaper version that lets you have your cake and eat it too! Brace yourself for the start of the Christmas shopping season. Here comes Black Friday! Shopping today is hectic, but certainly not awful, so why does it have such a bleak name? Turns out that the phrase Black Friday was first used in 1869, when plummeting gold prices crashed the market. It was also used by traffic police in the 1950s to describe the surge in traffic jams caused by post holiday shoppers. The silver lining explanation goes something like this. Through most of the year, retailers are losing money, which is known as “being in the red.” When Christmas shopping starts, sales go way up, and they're “in the black.” No matter how you see it, Black Friday is a great day to find amazing deals on gifts for friends and family. I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cleared Hot
Episode 207 - Eric Oehlerich and Mick Mulroy

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 164:29


Olly is a retired 20+ year Navy SEAL Officer, ending his career while serving as the Commanding Officer (CO) of Naval Special Warfare Development Group- Squadron 2, from July of 2017-2019. At the pinnacle of a career as CO of this elite unit, he was responsible for the research and development of technology and tactics for SEALs to use against the nation's hardest problems. The geographic scope of responsibility spanned the Pacific, Africa and the Middle East. By galvanizing over 1,100 personnel combined with collection technology he provided a security blanket against extremism for the International Community. Olly is also a member of the Board of Directors for Grassroots Reconciliation Group, a nonprofit to help rehabilitate child soldiers. Olly graduated from the Naval Academy in 1999 and went straight to Basic Underwater Demolition (BUD) Seal training, a grueling program that pushes young service members to their limits. Out of 144 students who entered his training class, he was one of only 10 who finished. Michael "Mick" Patrick Mulroy is a former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (DASD) for the Middle East (Nov. 2017-Dec. 2019). As DASD for the Middle East, he was responsible for U.S. Department of Defense policy for Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates and Yemen. He is a retired Central Intelligence Agency Paramilitary Operations Officer and United States Marine. In addition, he is a member of the Board of Directors for Grassroots Reconciliation Group, a nonprofit to help rehabilitate child soldiers. He is also the co-founder of Lobo Institute, a private firm consulting, advising and teaching on current and future conflicts. https://athleticgreens.com/clearedhot https://magicspoon.com/clearedhot https://superbeets.com/clearedhot https://tenthousand.cc