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A large inlet from the ocean into the landmass

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Gulf

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Science and the Sea podcast
Setting a Baseline

Science and the Sea podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 2:15


Doctors sometimes run tests even when they know you're just fine. The tests tell them how your body works when it is fine, making it easier to figure out what's wrong when you're sick.Marine biologists sometimes do the same thing with fish. They run tests to see how the fish operate under current environmental conditions. That can help them figure out how the fish are faring in the future under different conditions.An example is some work done by scientists at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute. They studied the role of an enzyme in the blood that affects how a fish “breathes in the good air and breathes out the bad.”The enzyme is carbonic anhydrase. It was already known to help fish get rid of carbon dioxide in the blood. But some fish have a lot more of the enzyme than they need to take care of CO2.So the researchers checked whether carbonic anhydrase also effects how oxygen is transported in the blood. In the lab, they tested the blood of red drum, a popular sportfish in the Gulf of Mexico. When they cut the amount of the enzyme by half, the amount of oxygen passed from the blood to the tissues also was cut in half. And when they doubled the amount, the rate of oxygen delivery doubled as well.The researchers say that keeping an eye on the enzyme in fish in the wild could be one way to monitor their health -- and how they're adapting to the changing oceans.

Cheap Beer Fantasy Football League
Trade Deadline Chaos

Cheap Beer Fantasy Football League

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 67:24


While the Lord Commissioner and Captain of the SS Cheap Beer sails the high seas in the Gulf of Mexico, Sweatrag and Sweat Towelette sit down with three other managers and breakdown the chaos that occurred right before the trade deadline. Is trading draft picks a good idea? Are Nick and Mike going to run away with the league next year? What was Rochie on when he offered Mike that egregious trade? Open your earholes and find out!

That's What G Said
NFL Week 13 w/ Erik, Wrestling w/ Chad, Friday & Saturday Racing : Gulf, Oak, AQU

That's What G Said

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 235:49


On This Episode of That's What G Said presented by @btvbets 1:40 BetterThan.Vegas & Kurt Angle !!! 3:00 DRF.com/sports 4:50 NFL Week 13 Game Previews w/ Erik 1:30:00 StableDuel Weekend Schedule 1:32:30 Friday Gulfstream Best Bets 1:37:55 Friday Oaklawn Best Bets 1:41:55 Saturday Gulfstream Best Bets 1:49:08 Saturday Aqueduct races 7-10 1:54:22 Saturday Oaklawn Best Bets 1:58:20 This Week in Wrestling w/ Chad Cooper, AEW 2:43:20 Smackdown 3:01:00 Raw 3:26:45 WWE NXT War Games Preview sponsored by -Full Service Realtor Cindy Carava at CindyCarava.com. -BetterThan.Vegas has all the FREE handicapping content to help you become a better gambler. -All Natural Soy Wax Candles, CeraCandles.com, use promo code GINO for 10% off your purchase. -DRF.com for all of your Past Performances & Handicapping info, Check out the newly optimized DRF Mobile! -StableDuel, Daily horse racing contests, download the APP and #PLAYRACEWIN , if you have any questions visit Stableduel.com or please contact me! That same trusted source of incredible info for Horse Racing, is now in the sports world. For all the help you need with Sports Wagering, check out www.drf.com/sports Music by Joey Cleveland

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
Algeria-GCC Relations: Geopolitics, Energy, Security (Webinar)

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 68:58


This webinar was co-organised with the Society for Algerian Studies. Historically Algeria has had its ups and downs with the Gulf states. During the Arab Spring, Algeria was at odds with the assertive and proactive approach from GCC states, most notably in Libya, where Algeria opposed interventions and involvement from Qatar and the UAE. In line with its commitment to non-interventionism, the country also rejected involvement in the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen in 2015. More recently, Algiers remained neutral throughout the intra-GCC rift, an easier accomplishment due to the lack of economic engagement and personalised ties it has with the monarchies, when compared with its neighbours. During this webinar, speakers explored this historical background, and took stock of the geo-political and economic relations between Algeria and the countries of the GCC. Arslan Chikhaoui is Chairman of Nord Sud Ventures, a consultancy company established in Algeria in 1993. He is a member of the Defense and Security Forum Advisory Board, the World Economic Forum Expert Council and the UNSCR 1540 Civil Forum. Arslan is a visiting lecturer at both the Algerian Staff Academy and Algerian Civil Defense Academy. He is active in various Track II task forces such as the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), Security in the Mediterranean Region, the Maghreb and Sahel, WMD Free Zone in MENA, and Security Sector Reform (SSR) in North Africa. He has served as Senior Advisor to the Algerian Institute for Strategy Studies (1991-1994) and as Senior Coordinator of the Development Aid and Cooperation Programs for Algeria (1982-1990). He contributed to the report Algérie, Perspective 2005 (Algeria: Forecast 2005) carried out in 1991/92, and has been involved in the development of the Algerian non-hydrocarbon export policy and the restructuring and privatization policies of Algerian SOCs. Fatiha Dazi-Héni is a Middle East researcher specializing on the GCC monarchies at L'Institut de recherche stratégique de l'École militaire (IRSEM). Fatiha also lectures at Sciences Po Lille where she teaches history and socio-political developments in the Arabian Peninsula. Fatiha is author of L'Arabie saoudite en 100 questions (Tallandier, 2020). She is also a contributor to the Arab Reform Initative's e-book A Way Out of the Inferno? Rebuilding Security in Libya, Syria, Iraq and Yemen (2017) and to Yahyia Zubir's edited book The Politics of Algeria Domestic issues and International Relations (Routledge, 2019). She recently published, The New Saudi Leadership and its Impact on Regional Policy (The International Spectator, Italian Journal of International Affairs, Nov 2021). Sebastian Sons is a researcher at the Center for Applied Research in Partnership with the Orient (CARPO-Bonn). Previously, he served as an advisor for the Regional Programme “Cooperation with Arab Donors” (CAD) of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ). As a political analyst, he is consulted by German and international political institutions as well as by international journalists to provide expertise on Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states. Among many other articles and analyses on Saudi Arabia, he published the book Built on Sand: Saudi Arabia – A Problematic Ally (in German) in 2016. He also conducted a study with the title A new “Pivot to the Maghreb” or “more of the same”? The transformative shift of the Gulf engagement in North Africa in 2021. Sebastian holds a Ph.D. from the Humboldt University Berlin with a thesis on media discourses on labor migration from Pakistan to Saudi Arabia.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: African Politics and Security Issues

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Michelle Gavin, CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, leads a conversation on African politics and security issues.     FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR fall of 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record and the video and transcript will be available on our website, cfr.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Michelle Gavin with us today to talk about African politics and security issues. Ambassador Gavin is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies. Previously, she was managing director of the Africa Center, a multidisciplinary institution dedicated to increasing understanding of contemporary Africa. From 2011 to 2014, she served as the U.S. ambassador to Botswana and as the U.S. representative to the Southern African Development Community, and prior to that, she was a special assistant to President Obama and the senior director for Africa at the National Security Council. And before going into the Obama administration, she was an international affairs fellow and adjunct fellow for Africa at CFR. So we are so delighted to have her back in our fold. So, Michelle, thank you very much for being with us. We have just seen that U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken went on a trip to Africa. Maybe you could begin by talking about the strategic framework that he laid out on that trip, and then we have in just recent days—with a new variant of Omicron—seen the travel ban imposed on several African countries and what that means for the strategic vision that he laid out. GAVIN: Sure. Thank you. Well, thank you so much for inviting me to join you today. And I looked at the roster. There's so much amazing expertise and knowledge on this Zoom. I really look forward to the exchange and the questions. I know I'll be learning from all of you. But maybe just to start out to talk a little bit about Secretary Blinken's trip because I think that, in many ways, his efforts to sort of reframe U.S. engagement on the continent, trying to move away from this sort of binary major power rivalry lens that the Trump administration had been using is useful, but also exposes, really, a lot of the challenges that policymakers focused on Africa are dealing with right now. So he tried to reset the relationship in the context of a partnership, of purely acknowledging African priorities and African agency in determining what kind of development partners Africa is interested in, what kind of security partners. I think that's a very useful exercise. Then he kind of ticked through, as every official has to do in making these big framing statements as sort of broad areas of engagement and cooperation, and he talked about increasing trade, which, of course, is interesting right now with AGOA sunsetting soon, working together to combat pandemic diseases, particularly COVID, working together on climate change, where, of course, Africa has borne more consequences than many other regions of the world while contributing far less to the problem, working together on the democratic backsliding and authoritarian sort of surge that we've seen around the world and, finally, working together on peace and security. So this huge agenda, and I think what's interesting and what in many ways his trip made clear is that it's very hard to get to the first four points when the last one, the peace and security element, is in chaos. And, look, obviously, Africa's a big continent. All of us who ever engage in these conversations about Africa are always—are forever trying to provide the disclaimer, right, that there's never one African story. There's never one thing happening in this incredibly diverse continent. But it is the case that the peace and security outlook on the continent is really in bad shape, right. And so the secretary traveled to Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. The headlines from his trip, really, were dominated by the disorder in the Horn of Africa that we're seeing right now. So you have the civil conflict in Ethiopia, which has been incredibly costly to that country in terms of lives, in terms of their economic outlook, has been characterized by atrocities of war crimes. And, I think right now, most observers are very concerned about the integrity of the Ethiopian state, its capacity to persist. Regardless of today, tomorrow, or next week's military developments, it's very hard to see a lasting and sustainable military solution to this conflict and the parties do not appear, really, amenable to a serious political negotiation. But it's not just Ethiopia, of course. It's Sudan, where we saw the tenuous military-civilian transitional government kind of fully hijacked by the military side of that equation in a coup that has been, really, rejected by so many Sudanese citizens who are still on the streets even today trying to push back against the notion of military dominance in their transition and beyond, and they are being met with violence and intimidation. And the outlook there is quite worrying. You've got border clashes between Ethiopia and Sudan. You have electoral crisis in Somalia. So the Horn, you know, is looking like a very, very tough neighborhood. And, of course, everyone is concerned about the impact on Kenya and East Africa itself, given the insurgency in Mozambique, which has more than once affected neighboring Tanzania, these bombings in Uganda and the sense of instability there. The picture is one of multiple crises, none of which come with easy fixes or purely military solutions. And then you have this kind of metastasizing instability throughout the Sahel, right, and the concern that more and more states will fall victim to extremely worrisome instability and the very costly violence. So there's a huge security agenda and we're just—we're all aware of the basic facts that it's very hard to make progress on partnerships to support democratic governance in the midst of conflict. It's very hard to come together on climate change or to fight a pandemic in the midst of these kinds of circumstances. So I think it's a really challenging picture. And just to pull a couple of these threads, on this issue of democratic backsliding the Biden administration's desire to build more solidarity among kind of like-minded countries whose democracies may take different forms but who buy into a basic set of democratic values, it's undeniable that the trend lines in Africa have been worrisome for some time and we do see a lot of these kind of democratic authoritarian states, these states where you get some of the form, some of the theater, of democracy, particularly in the form of elections, but no real capacity for citizens to hold government accountable. It's not really a kind of a demand-driven democratic process, that the fix is often in on these elections, and there is polling, right, that suggests that this is turning people off of democratic governance in general, right. If what you understand democratic governance to be is a sham election, you know, at regular intervals while you continue to be governed by a set of individuals who are not really beholden to the electorate, right, and are protecting a very small set of interests, then it's not surprising to see some waning enthusiasm. It's not that other forms of government are necessarily looking great to African populations, but I think it is notable in some of that Afrobarometer polling in places where you wouldn't expect it, right, like South Africa, where people sacrificed so much for democracy, and you really do see a real decline in enthusiasm for that form of governance. So there's a lot of work to be done there. The last thing, just because you brought it up, on the latest news about this new variant, the Omicron variant—I may be saying that wrong. It may be Omicron. Perhaps someone will correct me. And the kind of quick policy choice to institute a travel ban on a number of southern African countries. So I do think that in the context of this pandemic, right, which has been economically devastating to the continent—where the global economic downturn that occurred for Africans, too, but you had governments with very little fiscal space in which to try to offset the pain for their populations. In addition, you have had the issues of vaccine inequity, right, where it's just taken far too long to get access to vaccines for many African populations—it's still not adequate in many places—and a sort of sense that the deal initially proposed in the form of COVAX wasn't really what happened—you know, a feeling of a bait and switch—that looks like—what it looks like is disregard for African lives. And while I am really sympathetic—I used to work in government and it's crystal clear when you do that your first responsibility is the safety of the American people—these travel bans sort of fit into a narrative, right, about scapegoating, about disregard for African life that, I think, is going to make it awfully hard for this new reframing of respect and partnership, right, to really resonate. And I would just note, as a former U.S. ambassador in Botswana, that the scientists in the lab in Gaborone and the scientists in South Africa who did the sequencing and helped to alert the world to this new variant, right, were doing us all a tremendous favor. It's not at all clear that this variant started in southern Africa, right. We know that it exists on every continent right now except Antarctica. We know that samples taken in Europe before these discoveries were made in southern Africa—just tested later—showed that the variant was already there. And so it is a bit hard to explain why specifically southern Africans are banned from travel. You know, I think it's unfortunate. There are other policies that could be pursued around testing, around quarantine requirements. So I'll leave that there. I'm not a public health expert. But I think it's—I'm glad you brought it up because I think these things do really resonate and they inform how the United States is understood on the continent. They inform how Africans understand global institutions and kind of global governance to reflect or not reflect their concerns and interests. And if what the Biden administration wants is partners in this notion of democratic solidarity and partners in trying to reconstruct kind of international institutions a sense of global order, a norms-based rules-based approach to multilateral challenges, it's going to be hard to get the African buy-in that is absolutely necessary to achieve those goals when these kinds of issues continue to give the impression that Africa is an afterthought. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much, Michelle. That was really a great overview for us. So now we want to go to all of you. You can raise your hand—click on the raised hand icon to ask a question—and when I recognize you please unmute yourself and state your affiliation. Otherwise, you can submit a written question in the Q&A box, and if you do write a question please say what institution you're with so that I can read it and identify you properly and—great. Our first hand raised is from Dr. Sherice Janaye Nelson. And let me just say, the “Zoom user,” can you please rename yourself so we know who you are? So, Dr. Nelson, over to you. Q: Good afternoon, everyone. Dr. Sherice Janaye Nelson from Southern University. I'm a political science professor in the department. And the question, I guess, I have is that we know that the African people have a history of nondemocratic governance, right? And when we look at a place like Tunisia, we know that one of the reasons in the Arab Spring that they were so successful—although often considered an Arab country, they are successful because there had been tenets of democracy that were already broiled in the society. The question I have is that to these places that do not have that institutional understanding or have even—maybe don't even have the values to align with democracy, are we foolhardy to continue to try to support democratic governance as the full-throated support versus trying to look at more of a hybrid of a sovereign situation that allows for, in many ways, a kingdom, a dictator, and et cetera, with then a democratic arm? Thank you so much. GAVIN: Thanks, Dr. Nelson. It's an interesting question, and I agree with you insofar as I think that it's really interesting to think about the kind of governance antecedents in a bunch of African countries, particularly in the pre-colonial era, right, and try to figure out how they find expression afterwards. There's no question that, you know, colonialism doesn't set the table well for democracy. There's no doubt about that. But I would say that, you know, despite the loss of faith in democratic governance that we've seen in some of the polling, you know, very consistently for a long time what you've seen is that African populations do seem to want democratic governance. They want to be able to hold their leaders accountable. They want everyone to have to abide by the law. They want basic protections for their rights. So, you know, I'm not sure that there's any society that's particularly ill-suited to that. But I do think that democracy comes in many forms and it's always particularly powerful when there is, you know, some historical resonance there. I also—you know, if we take a case like one of the world's last absolute monarchies in eSwatini right now what you see is a pretty persistent civic movement demanding more accountability and less power for the monarch, more protection for individual rights. And so, you know, I'm not—I think that people are feeling disillusioned and frustrated in many cases and you see this, too, in the enthusiasm with which several of the recent coups in West Africa have been met—you know, people pouring out into the streets to celebrate because they're frustrated with the status quo. They're interested in change. But very rarely do you see then persistent support for, say, military dictatorships or military-dominated government. So I'm not sure that the frustration means enthusiasm for some of these other governing models. People want democracy to work a lot better. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Lucy Dunderdale Cate. Q: Hi. Yes. I'm Lucy Dunderdale Cate. I'm with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I wanted to just ask you about kind of the African Union's role in this, you know, particularly and with the Biden administration, and thinking about, you know, the Horn of Africa security issues that you mentioned. Kind of where do you see that we're going and what do you see kind of for the future there? Thank you. GAVIN: Sure. Thanks for that question. I think the AU, for all of its flaws—and, you know, find me a multilateral organization that isn't flawed—is actually incredibly important. You know, for the Biden administration, which has kind of staked out this position that international institutions matter and multilateral institutions matter, they've got to work better, we can't address the threats we all face without these functioning and they may need to be modernized or updated but we need them, then the AU is a really important piece of that puzzle. And I think, you know, right now, for example, in Ethiopia that the—it's the AU's negotiator, former Nigerian President Obasanjo, who really is in the lead in trying to find some glimmer of space for a political solution, and this was a little bit late in the day in terms of AU activism on this issue and I think it's been a particularly difficult crisis for the AU to address in part because of being headquartered in Addis and sort of operating within a media and information environment in Ethiopia that is one that does not create a lot of space for divergence from the federal government's position. So I think that, in the end, right, the prospect of the collapse of a 110-million-strong country, a place that used to be an exporter of security, a major diplomatic player in the region, right, spurred AU action. But it's been a little bit—more than a little bit slow. But you have seen some pretty forward-leaning stance at the AU as well. Their response to the military coup in Sudan this fall was pretty robust and clear. Now this sort of new transitional arrangement that appears to be more palatable to much of the international community than to many Sudanese citizens is a—we're wading into murkier waters there. But I think the AU, you know, it's the only game in town. It's essential, and particularly in the Horn where the subregional organization EGAD is so incredibly weak that the AU, as a vehicle for an African expression of rules-based norms-based order, is—you know, actually its success is incredibly important to the success of this major U.S. foreign policy plank. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next written question from Rami Jackson. How much of the democratic backsliding is supported by outside powers? For example, there was a chance for a democratic movement in Chad but the French threw their weight behind Déby's son after he was shot. GAVIN: That's a great question. I think that it's, certainly, not the case that external partners or actors are always positive forces, right, for democratic governance on the continent. There's no doubt about that, and it can be France and Chad. It can be, you know, Russian machinations in Central African Republic. There's a lot. It can be some of the Gulf states in Sudan, right, who—or Egypt, who seem very comfortable with the idea of military dominance and maybe some civilian window dressing for this transition. So you're right that external actors are kind of an important piece of the puzzle. You know, I don't think that there are many situations where there is a single external actor who is capable of entirely influencing the direction of government. But there are, certainly, situations where one external actor is tremendously powerful. Chad is a great example, again. And it is something that, I think, you know, again, an administration that has staked so much of its credibility on the notion that this is something very important to them, you know, is going to have to deal with. And it's thorny, right. Foreign policy always is where you have competing priorities. You need to get important work done sometimes with actors who do not share your norms and values, and it's the messiness of trying to articulate and integrate values in a foreign policy portfolio that runs the gamut, right, from counterterrorism concerns to economic interests. But I think that those are tensions that the administration will continue to have to deal with probably a little more publicly than an administration who didn't spend much time talking about the importance of democratic governance. FASKIANOS: Great. And I just want to mention that Rami is a graduate student at Syracuse University. So I'm going to go next to a raised hand from Mojúbàolú Olufúnké Okome. I know you wrote your question, too. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you very much. Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: I wrote my question because I couldn't figure out how to name myself on the phone. You know, thank you for your presentation. When I look at democracy in Africa—I mean, this is not the first go-round—and the response by people, by citizens, to the backsliding by governments is not—it looks familiar to me because, you know, in the 1960s—from the 1960s, there were similar responses. People were dissatisfied. They welcomed authoritarian governments again and again because the government they voted for rigged elections, were also authoritarian, and they were kleptocratic. So what's different now and where's the continuity and what has changed, really, with democracy? The other thing is about this COVID—the management of the COVID situation. I also kind of see the—I think I agree with you. The way Africa is being treated looks very familiar—you know, with disdain, with disrespect, as if the lives of the people there don't matter as much. And what is it going to take, really, to change the—because, you know, if a pandemic that cannot be stopped by walls and borders is not instigating change what is it going to take to change the way in which world politics is—world politics and its governance is done? GAVIN: Fantastic questions and ones that, I think we could talk about for, you know, a week-long conference. But so I'll start from the beginning and just take a stab. I think you're absolutely right. There have been these interesting cycles when it comes to governance on the continent and I think—when I think about sort of what's different from what we were seeing in, say, toward the end of the '60s, I think it's a couple things. One is geopolitical context, right. So my hope is that what we're not doing is kind of doing a reprise of this bipolar world where we're subbing in China's authoritarian development model for a Soviet Communist model and sitting here on the other side and, you know, trying to manipulate other countries into one camp or another. I don't think we're quite there yet and I think the Biden administration is trying very hard not to wade into those waters. So I do think the geopolitical context is a bit different. I also think, you know, that where so many African states are is at—in terms of kind of the scope of their existence as independent entities is an important difference, right. So I think that in the immediate kind of post-colonial era, for an awful lot of governments the fundamental basis for their legitimacy was having—is not being a colonial administrator, not being a puppet of some external power and so the, you know, legitimacy came from liberation, from independence. In places that had terrible conflict sometimes legitimacy came from, you know, delivering some degree of security from a long-standing insecure situation. So, you know, you look at—I think that's where sort of President Museveni derived a lot of legitimacy in the late '80s and through the '90s. And I think that, you know, now, as you have these very significant young populations whose lived experience is not one of ever knowing a time pre-independence, you know, they're looking for service delivery, right. They're looking for opportunity. They're looking for job creation, and I think legitimacy is increasingly going to be derived from the ability to deliver on these priorities. And so I do think that that makes kind of the governance landscape a little bit different, too, sort of different ideas about where governing legitimacy comes from. And, you know, I think that can be manifest in really different ways. But if I had to try and, you know, grab onto that interesting idea about what's different, that's what comes to mind. In this, you know, incredibly important question about what's it going to take to recognize African states as equal players and African lives as—every bit as urgently valuable as any other, you know, I do think that as the world continues to grapple with this pandemic and with other issues that can only be resolved globally, like climate change, it will, over time, kind of force a reckoning and a rethink about what are the important states and what are not. You know, it's interesting to me, it's absolutely true that by not moving out robustly to ensure that the whole world has access to vaccines the richest countries have created opportunities for new mutations to emerge. I hesitate to say that, in some ways, in this context because it sounds like I'm positive that these emerged from Africa, and I'm not. But we do know, you know, as a basic matter of science, right, that we're not safe until everyone's safe. And so I do think that as these kinds of issues that military might and economic power cannot address alone, where it really does take global solidarity and an awful lot of multilateral cooperation, which is messy and cumbersome, right, and necessary, my hope is that that will start to change perceptions in framing. FASKIANOS: Thank you. So I'm going to go next to a written question from Abbey Reynolds, who's an undergraduate student at the University of Central Florida. What steps do you think that international and regional organizations can take to preempt future attempts to derail democratic governance in the region—coups, circumvention of constitutional term letter—limits, rigged elections, et cetera? GAVIN: OK. I'm sorry. What steps should who take? I'm sorry. FASKIANOS: Multilateral—international and regional organizations. GAVIN: OK. You know, I think that in a number of cases subregional organizations have been taking steps, right—ECOWAS, certainly, in rejecting coups and suspending memberships, et cetera. I think, you know, if you look at the sort of articulated and documented principles of a lot of these organizations they're pretty good. It's really about the gulf sometimes between stated principles and practice. So, you know, I think the Southern African Development Community is sometimes guilty of this where there are—you know, there's a clear commitment in static kind of principle documents and protocols around democratic governance but you also have an absolute monarchy that's a member state of SADC. You've had, you know, significant repression in a number of states—Zimbabwe leaps to mind—that SADC doesn't have, really, anything to say about. So you can have organizations that have kind of principles and procedures. At the end of the day, organizations are made up of member states, right, who have a set of interests, and I think that, you know, how governments understand their interest in standing up for certain norms, it's—I think it's specific in many ways to those governments in those states how they derive their own legitimacy, the degree to which they feel they may be living in a glass house, and, you know, frankly, relative power dynamics. So I'm not sure. Certainly, it's always—you know, I'm a believer in multilateralism. I think from an African point of—you know, if you imagine African states trying to assert themselves on the international stage, multilateralism is really important, right, to get if it's possible, where interests align, to have as many African states speaking with one voice. It's a much more powerful message than just a couple individual states. But there are always going to be intrinsic limits. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Gary Prevost with the College of St. Benedict. And if you can unmute yourself. Q: Speaking today, actually, as honorary professor and research associate from Mandela University in South Africa. I've had several students in recent years—doctoral and master's students—study U.S. and allied counterterrorism strategies both in the Middle East and in Africa, and they've come away with a general perspective that those strategies going back several administrations have been almost solely focused on military action and that it has led them in their recommendations sections of their theses to argue that other steps must be taken if these efforts in places like Nigeria or Somalia or Mozambique or even in the Middle East, Syria, and Iraq, are to be successful they must have a changed mindset about counter terror. What's your perspective on that? GAVIN: Well, thanks for that. I wholeheartedly agree, right, and I think, you know, you'll even get plenty of military officers, right, who will say there's no way we can address some—these problems, these, you know, kind of radical violent organizations aligned to global terrorist groups with a purely military approach. It's frustrating. I'm sure it's frustrating for your students, too, because it feels like everyone keeps coming to this conclusion, and, certainly, there have been efforts to, you know, counter violent extremism, provide opportunity for young people. But we're not very good at it, right. We haven't been very good at it yet. There's still a mismatch in terms of the resources we pour into these kind of relative—these different streams of effort, right. But I think also while it's very clear in a situation like Mozambique that if you want to weaken the insurgency you need to be providing more opportunity and building more trust in a community that's been disenfranchised and alienated from the center for a very, very long time. But the how to do that, how to do that effectively and how to do it in a climate of insecurity I actually think is an incredibly difficult challenge, and there are, you know, brilliant people working on this all the time. You know, some of the best work that I've seen suggests that some of this can be done but it's an incredibly long-term undertaking and that, you know, is sometimes, I think, a difficult thing to sustain support for, particularly in a system like the United States where, you know, our appropriations cycles tend to be very short term. So people are looking for, you know, quick impact, things you can put on a bar graph quickly and say that you've done. And I think that, you know, a lot of the kind of peace building research suggests that that's—that, you know, building community trust, which is a huge part of what needs to happen, operates on a very different kind of timeline. So it's a really thorny, thorny problem and how to get—you know, how to sustain political and budgetary support for those kinds of efforts. I don't know the answer yet. I'm sure somebody really smart on—maybe on the Zoom does. FASKIANOS: I'm going to go next to Pearl Robinson at Tufts University. Q: Hello, Ambassador Gavin. First of all, I'd like to congratulate you in your new position as Ralph Bunche Senior Fellow for Africa, and that's actually—as I've been sitting here listening to this, my thought was I'd like to know if you have thought about ways in which you can use your position at the Council to help actualize forms of partnerships about policy dialogues related to Africa. You began by articulating the U.S.'s new strategic vision for Africa. That was an American statement. I haven't really heard an African statement that would be engaging with that policy dialogue. These one-on-one trips of the secretary of state and other people going to individual African countries, based on our agenda, and having one-on-one dialogue discussions, in a way, does not get towards that real notion of African agency in policy and partnership. So I'm actually wondering whether you might envision the Council playing a role and creating some kinds of policy dialogue fora that would have American(s) and Africans participating in ways that would be visible to American publics as well as African publics. So I'm suggesting that you might, you know, be uniquely well suited to have the Council play a role in actually making visible and operationalizing this concept. I just thought about this sitting here listening because what I realized was everybody talking is talking from the American side and I'm wondering if—well, my dear colleague, Olufúnké, actually was an African voice. But I think what needs to happen is there needs to be a way for this taking place maybe with African institutions, academics, civil society actors. So I just throw that out for you to think about and I'd like to hear your first response to that idea. GAVIN: So I think it's exciting and I'd love, actually, to follow up with you. I'm delighted that you're here. I heard some wonderful things about your work. I think there's always the hard part of, right, who speaks for Africa, right, because there are so many diverse African perspectives. But I don't think you're suggesting there's necessarily a unitary voice. You're talking about sort of different actors, and I would agree with you that it's always incredibly rich to have conversations. You know, I recently did a panel with Professor Ed Vitz, who is working on some—working on a paper, I think, that will eventually be a book about sort of U.S.-Africa policy and particularly interested in the kind of frame of major power rivalry. But it was such a refreshing conversation to examine that and compare notes on what we thought the flaws of that frame might be to hear his perspective on where he thought there might be advantages to be seized from it. It was wonderful, and I agree with you that the more dialogue and the more opportunity not just to sort of talk amongst ourselves in a U.S. community that cares about Africa and about U.S. policy the better. You know, I will be honest with you, I often, in a situation like the one right now, I try hard to stick to—to at least keep circling back to U.S. policy because that's where my background is and I, you know, have no desire to posit myself as speaking on behalf of Africans. That's nuts and, you know, not my role. But I do—I have spent a lot of time thinking about how the U.S. engages with the continent. And so I think it's a really interesting notion. I'd love to follow up with you. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take the next written question from Krista Johnston, who's a professor at Howard University. The African Continental Free Trade Area will create the largest consumer market. What are the barriers U.S. businesses investing in Africa and positioning themselves to take advantage of this new trade area and what can the Biden administration do to incentivize this kind of engagement with China? And perhaps I can tack on another question to that because we have a lot of questions—(laughs)—both raised hands—is just to talk a little bit about China's footprint in Africa as well. GAVIN: Sure. Well, so I absolutely agree that the African Continental Free Trade Area is a really incredibly promising step forward for African economic integration and that is, you know, compelling in any number of ways. I think, for example, about the very hot topic of pharmaceutical production, right. And between the Free Trade Area, the standing up of the African Medicines Agency, right, which should help to harmonize regulatory standards for pharmaceuticals and medical equipment throughout the continent, investments seem a lot more attractive, right, when you're looking at much bigger markets than any one country, even than a giant like Nigeria, can provide. So I think that there's tremendous potential here. I will go back to what I said earlier, which is that even with these positive steps, right, it's going to be really important that the peace and security parts start trending in the right direction because it's very—you know, I would say this. U.S. investors are already quite bad at assessing risk in Africa and a backdrop of instability is not going to help that situation, right, and it is, in many cases, going to make a given investment opportunity or partnership opportunity too risky for many. So, you know, there's just no way to jettison those concerns. But wholeheartedly agree it's an exciting development. If the world hadn't gotten sort of hijacked by COVID, I think we'd be talking about it a lot more. On China, you know, the Chinese engagement on the continent is a fact of life that's existed for a very long time and is not going anywhere. It is economic, it is political, it is, increasingly, cultural, and I think, you know, for a state like China that aspires to be a major global power it's entirely predictable and understandable. Do I think that there are some ways in which Chinese investment and engagement are not always beneficial to African states? I do. I have concerns, certainly, about the way China sometimes uses its influence to secure African support for Chinese positions that appear antithetical to stated values in AU documents and other(s) and I have concerns about the transparency of some of the arrangements. I have concerns as well about some of the tech standards and just sort of play for technical dominance that maybe does not have the cybersecurity interests of Africans as its top priority. All that said, I think it's really important for the United States to, you know, understand that there's no—there's nothing to be gained by constantly vilifying China's engagement, some of which has been incredibly helpful for African states hungry, particularly, for financing on major infrastructure projects, and, you know, it's a fact of life we all have to learn to deal with. I do think, you know, there's some natural tension between the Biden administration's democracy focus, right, and the very explicit and intentional efforts of China to present a different model, and I don't think that the U.S. needs to shy away from that or pretend that those differences don't exist. But I do think it's incredibly unhelpful to frame up all of U.S. policy as if it's intended to counter China as opposed to intended to find those areas in the Venn diagram of, you know, those overlaps of African interests and U.S. interests and work together on them. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Anna Ndumbi, who is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Southern Mississippi. Please unmute yourself. Q: Thank you very much. I really appreciate the presentation. I have a quick question in regards to the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is center of Africa. About three years ago, there was a new president that stepped in by the name of Félix Tshisekedi, and he decided to pass a law saying that all the secondary education should be free because, obviously, in Africa schools aren't free. And I, personally, think that maybe it wasn't really—it was something they should have probably considered before passing the law. The result of that is that you have classrooms where there were maybe twenty students and now there's, like, there could be over a hundred students in one classroom, right. So we spoke about the pandemic. When COVID hit a lot of schools were shut down. They were shut down for a long period of time, and when you look at a lot of schools in Africa they don't have the ability of giving out maybe laptops or anything like that to assist students to continue school at home. So in result of that, you see a lot of children who are really below what they should be, below the average when it comes to education, and my question with that is where do we see the future going as far as maybe having international organization(s) or United States intervene because the future is not bright when we look at education with the children or the youth. How can United Nation(s) or maybe other international organization(s) assist, especially with what happened during COVID, going forward? What does the future look like for Africa? And I'm speaking more for the Democratic Republic of Congo. How can nonprofit organization(s) or United States intervene and assist in this matter? GAVIN: Well, thank you for that, and I have followed this a little bit because it was an interesting and kind of splashy promise and initiative on the part of President Tshisekedi and it's been disappointing, I think, to see that some of the, you know, government's budget that was intended to be allocated for that appears to have found its way into a handful of individuals' accounts. But I think that, you know, the fundamental point you're making, which is that in DRC but also throughout the African continent, right, there are these vast populations of young people. It is the youngest region of the world. And if you look at it historically at how other parts of the world have dealt with youth bulges, right, investing in that human capital so that they can be drivers of innovation and economic growth has been a really powerful kind of transformational tool—for example, in Asia. And so I definitely think that you're onto something really important right now about prioritizing investing in young people and their capacity, and you're absolutely right that the disruptions of the pandemic have, in many cases, fallen most heavily on children. You know, how to tackle that, I think, is sort of—you know, I can't design a program in this moment, I'll be honest with you. But I think that you're absolutely right, it's an incredibly important and too often easily overlooked priority. You know, there have been some interesting education innovations on the continent but they're too often kind of small, not scalable, and the need is so incredibly vast. But here, again, I will be a broken record. We do have to go back to this issue that peace and security matters, right. It's very, very hard for kids to get a sustained education that's going to provide them with opportunity in a context of insecurity, which, for a lot of children in eastern Congo, is still the case. FASKIANOS: OK. We have three minutes left. I am going to—and so many questions, and I apologize that we're not going to be able to get to all of you. So I'm going to give the final question to Caleb Sannar. Q: Hi. Yes. Thank you for joining us today, Ambassador Gavin. As they said, my name is Caleb Sanner. I'm a student from the University of Wisconsin in Whitewater. My question is with the Abraham Accords the Trump administration signed the agreement with Morocco to recognize Moroccan sovereignty over Western Sahara. Following that, there was some discrepancies in the southern territory controlled by the U.N., MINURSO, and the Polisario Front, the external Saharawi government, ended up declaring war again on Morocco, resuming the war from nineteen years previously. My question is what is the Biden administration's policy on that? GAVIN: Great question. Reporters have been asking that question, too, and with great message discipline the administration continues to say is that they're supporting U.N. efforts. And so whenever they ask, are you are you going to reconsider this decision regarding recognition of Moroccan sovereignty in Western Sahara, they respond not by answering that question but by saying they're supporting U.N. efforts. So that's the most I can report to you in—regarding that. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Well, we are at the end of our time. So, Ambassador Gavin, thank you very much for being with us and, again, to all of you for your fantastic questions, and I apologize for not being able to get to all of you. But we will have to continue doing webinars on this important topic and on digging in a little bit deeper. So we will be announcing the winter-spring academic lineup next month through our academic bulletin. This is the final webinar of this semester. Good luck with your finals—(laughs)—and grading and taking the exams and all of that. I know it's a very busy and stressful time with the pandemic layered on top of all of it. If you haven't already subscribed for the bulletin, please, you can do so by emailing us at cfracademic@cfr.org. You can follow us on Twitter at @CFR_Academic. And of course, please go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. You can see on CFR.org Michelle's latest post on Africa—blog posts, so you should follow her there as well. So, again, thank you. Thanks to all of you, and happy holidays, and we look forward to reconvening in 2022.

Full Out with Samantha Jo Harvey
How to build the life + business of your dreams with Nikki Cummings

Full Out with Samantha Jo Harvey

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 39:05


In this conversation, you'll hear about: -Nikki's journey in entrepreneurship -How career success fueled her fire -Nikki's love for women in business -The pressure of having to 'have it all' -The prices Nikki paid trying to live her life according to society's ideals of success -Comparison for moms + business owners -Building workplace culture -The biggest differences between men and women -Asking for permission v asking for forgiveness -Connection +clarity to desire -Superpowers of women -Being a woman in a man's world -Sam's audition story against the odds -'You can't buy grit, you have to earn it' -Writing your own story -Raising strong daughters   Guest bio: Nikki is a proud mama of three stoke-chasing kiddos. She is wife and business partner to her best friend, Buddy. As an entrepreneur, Nikki has built and sold multiple successful companies across divergent industries. Today, she is in Real Estate Development, in the process of launching a new business and serves as CEO and Cofounder of Cummings Camp Programs a coaching and consulting organization that serves and supports business owners, and their teams. Professionally, Nikki excels in developing operational efficiencies to support scale. She's skilled in finance, strategy, crisis management, the dynamics of family-run business, the vital importance of company culture and building unstoppable teams. She has an extensive history in community service and philanthropy.  She currently serves on a hospital board and is a mentor in residence for The Spring Entrepreneur Hub, an MIT-based mentoring program. Today, Nikki is living her dream come true on the Gulf of Mexico in Florida. She loves spending time on their ranch in California and chasing new adventures with her tribe. She is passionate about business and serving Renegades, Dreamers, Risk Takers and Doers. Her mission every day is the same: To help business owners build the business of their dreams, so they can live the life of their dreams. Connect with Nikki: IG: @MsNikkiCummings & @CummingsCamp FB: @MsNikkiCummings & @CummingsCamp LinkedIn:  Nikki Cummings YouTube: Cummings Camp   Connect with Sam: @samanthajoharvey   Get info about 1:1 coaching with Sam

Unreached of the Day
Pray for the Gulf-spoken Arab in Egypt

Unreached of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 1:01


People Group Details:  https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/10376 Listen to "A Third of Us" podcast with Greg Kelley, produced by the Alliance for the Unreached: https://alliancefortheunreached.org/podcast/ Watch "Stories of Courageous Christians" w/ Mark Kordic https://storiesofcourageouschristians.com/stories-of-courageous-christians

Noob Spearo Podcast | Spearfishing Talk with Shrek and Turbo
NSP:176 James Sakker | A+ Snapper Hunting Technique, Telemarketing & Getting Barnacled

Noob Spearo Podcast | Spearfishing Talk with Shrek and Turbo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 119:25


Interview with James Sakker Today's episode is with James Sakker, aka Sakker J - The best telemarketer you didn't know of! Absolutely mad about spearfishing, we chat about hunting Snapper, Dhufish, big Abalone, some interesting tips for using crayfish to call fish, hunting in cold dirty water and dealing with sharks! James is well travelled and has speared in many places all over the world, he recounts his time in the USA and in Mexico going from cold dirty Great White infested waters to warm, clear water with huge fish around. James has also submitted a bunch of recipes to 99 Spearo Recipes so keep an eye out for his recipes when it comes out! There is also a great discussion on dealing with sharks and his experiences with different species in different parts of the world. He also wears a tourniquet and has a great Youtube channel! You can support us and secure yourself a copy by supporting our campaign! Important times: 00:13 Intro 05:27 Welcome James! 06:15 There were some cool magazines out when I started spearfishing like ISFN and SDM 07:36 Shoutout to some real legends 10:22 99 Spearo Recipes 11:18 Where did your love for spearfishing start? 13:00 A freerange child 15:22 Political changes and people making laws on a computer 17:48 Stand out memories from when you started spearfishing 23:00 What is your fishery like? Dhue Fish life cycle 25:23 Lobsters: Eastern vs Southern 27:40 Best eating: East, west or south? 29:24 Fish and Cray mounts 30:17 Snapper is a special fish that I've put 100's of dives in to get a 10kg+ and the first Snapper I shot 34:42 People who don't spear or fish don't see these rare and amazing sights 35:55 Finding spots and hunting tips 38:25 Learning to hunt in the water and learning the seasons and times of day 42:56 Time spent in the water and hunting snapper tips 46:37 How did you learn to use lobster as bait? 50:58 Hot smoking Mackerel recipe 53:15 Spearo marine scientists 57:42 Tourniquets and TacMed - I got bitten by a shark 01:03:17 Big abalone in the USA 01:06:35 Ling Cod 01:08:03 What's Oregon like? 01:09:29 Mexico has some incredible diving and one of my best diving days 01:13:45 Gulf of Mexico vs the Sea of Cortez: Cold vs Warm water and prospecting wild islands 01:17:34 Palapas Ventana trip and going to the USA 01:20:11 What's the Gulf of Mexico like? 01:22:02 New Zealand and scary sharks 01:24:03 The only shark I've ever had to shoot 01:28:21 Bronze Whalers vs Dusky Whalers 01:29:42 Have you learned how to deal with sharks over your years? Charging Great Whites 01:34:04 Great Whites 01:35:02 Killer Whales / Orca's 01:36:05 Spearfishing puts you back into the food chain 01:38:16 Diving in big seas and slippery rocks 01:42:28 Loaded guns out of the water 01:43:58 Barracuda 01:48:19 What's in your dive bag? Immersion wetsuit, DiveR fins, Edge speargun, Ronstan float, Omer mask 01:53:40 Spearo Q&A Best piece of advice: slow down If you could start over: nothing would change What struggles do you have? Ears and sharks What's something unique that you do? Do lots of prospecting and navigating using landmarks Spearfishing experience in 1 sentence 01:56:59 Outro   Listen in and subscribe on iOS or Android   Important Links   Noob Spearo Partners and Discount Codes . Use the code NOOBSPEARO save $20 on every purchase over $200 at checkout – Flat shipping rate, especially in AUS! – Use the code NOOB10 to save 10% off anything store-wide. Free Shipping on USA orders over $99 + Free Shipping with promo code NOOBSPEARO at ! #ad #manscapedpod | Simple, Effective, Dependable Wooden Spearguns. Use the Code NOOB to save $30 on any speargun:) use the code SPEARO to get 20% off any course and the code NOOBSPEARO to get 40% off any and all courses! Use the code NOOBSPEARO to save $25 on the full Penetrator Spearfishing Fin Range . 28-day Freediving Transformation (CODE: NOOB28 for 15% off) | Equalization Masterclass – Roadmap to Frenzel | Free Courses | Freediving Safety Course | How to Take a 25-30% Bigger Breath! | The 5 minute Freediver | Break the 10 Meter Barrier – Use the code NOOBSPEARO to save $ | Wickedly tough and well thought out gear! Check out their | ‘Spearo Dad' | ‘Girls with Gills' | ‘Jobfish Tribute' | Fishing Trips () Subscribe to the best spearfishing magazine in the world. International subscription available! . Listen to 99 Tips to Get Better at Spearfishing

EWN - Engineering With Nature
Applying EWN strategies at National Parks and Refuges

EWN - Engineering With Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 27:30


Climate change and the imperative to take action now is top of mind following the COP26 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow. The effects of climate change – rising sea levels, changing temperature and precipitation patterns, wildfires  and many other changes impact vulnerable natural resources, including national parks and wildlife refuges. In this episode, host Sarah Thorne and Jeff King, Deputy Lead of the Engineering With Nature Program at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, are joined by Rebecca Beavers, Coastal Geology and Adaptation Coordinator for the National Park Service and Scott Covington, Senior Ecologist for Refuges within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Rebecca and Scott share a strong commitment to protecting our national parks and wildlife refuges by making them more resilient to the changing conditions exacerbated by climate change. Teddy Roosevelt established the National Wildlife Refuge System in 1903 at Pelican Island, Florida, originally a five-and-a-half-acre island dedicated to saving Brown Pelicans from being over-harvested for their feathers. Sea-level rise and erosion have reduced Pelican Island to about two acres. “Thanks to an Engineering With Nature solution put in place about 20 years ago, that trend has been reversed,” Scott says. Pelican Island now stands at about three acres.  Scott describes how climate change is affecting refuge management today: “Refuges are typically established with a specific purpose, like protecting waterfowl, but because of the impact of climate change, we may not have waterfowl there anymore. We really need to be shifting our mindset about how we are managing that specific refuge, looking from a broader context, thinking about things like biodiversity. We want to look at the shorebirds, the wading birds, or whatever species and habitats are in that particular area and plan for species that are probably going to be leaving the area and new species that will probably be coming because of the shifts in climate.” Rebecca sees similar threats in her work with the National Park Service: “Many of these parks are changing in tremendous ways. Drought in the west is often followed by wildfire and following wildfire we're seeing landscape changes from major debris flows–cascades of water and rocks that come down the hillsides. These can affect homes, infrastructure, along with the habitats of the plants and animals which are very much affected.” Rebecca adds that the effects on natural features can be significant, “A freshwater marsh may become brackish where it has some of the saltwater components, or it may become a fully saline marsh–what we call a saltmarsh.” These changing conditions add complexity to the challenge of protecting and preserving the parks, along with the many physical structures of historical significance. “We also have to look at some of the other stressors that we put on the landscape. In some of these places we built dams that are great for hydroelectric power, but it also has an impact of holding up sediment further up the watershed.” Rebecca and Scott share several examples of EWN approaches being used to protect parks and refuges and make them more resilient.  At Fort Pulaski National Monument, on the Savannah River in Georgia, and Fort Massachusetts, on the Gulf of Mexico coast of Mississippi, beneficial use (BU) of sediment reduces coastal erosion and returns beneficial sediment to the system. Thin layer placement (TLP) of dredged sediments builds up sinking wetlands at the Chafee Refuge in Rhode Island, and in turn, protects and preserves wildlife habitat. Scott says, “Sea level rise is starting to eat away at the marsh, and we're having some marsh die off, along with the plants. With TLP, we're taking some dredge materials and actually stacking it on top of the marsh to buy some time. We've added a little bit to the elevation, and that gives vegetation a shot in the arm.” Rebecca adds that TLP was used on the Big Egg Marsh Project in Jamacia Bay, Gateway National Recreation Area, New York in 2003.  The Marsh is currently being resurveyed to provide insight into the effectiveness of the project and natural adaptation.  Collaboration is a key theme throughout this episode.  The leading-edge work at the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and the adjacent Harriet Tubman Underground Railway Park in Maryland is a great example of NFS, NPS, USACE, and several other non-government organizations working together to protect the marsh and this important historical landmark.  According to Scott, “This is a really good demonstration project to show what you can do when you work together with what nature gives you.” In closing the show, Jeff notes, “I'm truly moved by the energy and the enthusiasm and the wonderful examples that have been shared. Thank you to the Wildlife Refuge System and the National Park Service for being wonderful partners throughout the years. Their work is really accelerating practice and will continue to do so.” In Episode 6, Rebecca, Scott, and Jeff return to talk about working together on adaptive management strategies for the parks and refuges, and what individuals can do to help protect and preserve these priceless resources.   Related Links EWN Website ERDC Website Jeff King at LinkedIn Jeff King at EWN Network of Engineering With Nature EWN Atlas Series Rebecca Beavers at LinkedIn National Park Service Coastal Adaptation Strategies Handbook Olympic National Park and the Elwha Valley Fort Pulaski National Monument Gulf Islands National Seashore Fort Massachusetts – Gulf Islands National Seashore Jamaica Bay National Wildlife Refuge Gateway National Recreation Area, Jamaica Bay Unit In the Field: Restoring Big Egg Marsh National Park Service Climate Change Response Program National Park Service Coastal Geology Program Scott Covington at LinkedIn Climate Adaptation Science Centers Climate Change Page at USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System National Wildlife Refuge System History Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge John H. Chafee National Wildlife Refuge Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Hurricane Hugo Hurricane Sandy EWN Podcast S3E4: Engineering With Nature for Safe and Livable Cities

Quillette Podcast
Batya Ungar-Sargon on the Growing Gulf Between Ordinary Americans and the Progressive Journalists Who Cover Them

Quillette Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 30:03


Quillette podcast host Jonathan Kay talks to Newsweek editor Batya Ungar-Sargon about her new book, "Bad News: How Woke Media Is Undermining Democracy"—and her political voyage from doctrinaire progressive to self-described "left-wing populist"

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Producer/Host: Sarah O’Malley This episode describes bryozoans, colonial marine invertebrates commonly seen growing on kelp (among other places). Key characteristics of bryozoans are their calcareous modular exoskeletal features and the lophophore, a tentacular feeding structure that rings the mouth of each individual zooid. About the host: Sarah O’Malley is an ecologist, naturalist and science communicator passionate about deepening her listeners’ experiences with the natural world. She teaches biology and sustainability at Maine Maritime Academy and is currently collaborating on a guide book to the intertidal zone in the Gulf of Maine. The post The Essential Rhythm 11/28/21: Bryozoans first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

This Date in Weather History
1973: Violent weather breaks out in Southern US

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 1:59


On November 28, 1973, warm, humid air moving northward from the Gulf of Mexico out ahead of a strong cold front fed violent weather in the lower Ohio Valley and all across the southern United States. Tornadoes and flash floods killed 3 people and injured more than 600 during the day. 9 twisters touched down in southern Louisiana, northern Alabama, and Tennessee. Hundreds of houses and trailer homes were destroyed as the cold front blasted into Georgia and the Carolinas. Huntsville, Alabama was hardest hit - winds were clocked at 94 mph before the weather instruments broke. Extensive flooding occurred in southern West Virginia. Warm air surged northward ahead of the storm system as temperature readings reached close to 70 as far north as Washington DC, Philadelphia and New York City. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Climate Change, Nation-States, and The Greatest National Security Threat w/ Anatol Lieven

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 69:54


On this edition of Parallax Views, we are hot off the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference aka COP25. Joining us in light of this is Prof. Anatol Lieven, a Senior Fellow at the Quincy Institute and a former academic at King's College in London. According to Lieven, in a new report he authored, climate change is our greatest national security threat. We discuss this and his book Climate Change and the Nation State: The Case for Nationalism (which, as you'll hear in the conversation in this episode I prefer the alternative British title of Climate Change and the Nation State: The Realist Case). In this conversation we discuss how Lieven became interested in climate change as someone who came out of security studies; civic nationalism and/or patriotism vs. ethno-nationalism, legitimate concerns over the concept and idea of nationalism, the need to reject ethno-nationalism, Lieven's critique of cultural individualism and Reagan/Thatcher-style politics, Lieven's criticism of power elites and especially Pentagon/military elites, Lieven's criticisms of how the Left approaches climate change and politics, unifying people in the fight against climate change, misconceptions about the Realist School of Foreign Policy in relation to issues like human rights and ethics, the potential of climate chaos to cause a refugee crisis, the need for international cooperation, the anarchic world system, migration and climate change, migration and radicalization of the right, the need to make individual sacrifices to combat climate crisis, why climate change is a bigger national security threat to the U.S. (and the world) than China, Teddy Roosevelt, the fossilization and atrophying of thought within the U.S. foreign policy "Blob" due to generational strangleholds, Lieven's support for the Green New Deal, mentioning the failings of the previous New Deal of FDR in terms of how it didn't necessarily help marginalized people in society enough, conservatism and environmentalism, why conservatives should be concerned about climate change and why it would fit within a broad definition of conservative thought and its intellectual tradition (also how supporting reform could fit into that tradition), the effect of climate change on the U.S. and Western nations already, how technological fixes are not enough in the near-term future, climate change as a threat multiplier, fights over water in places like Darfur, the capacity of climate change to cause food shortages (which in turn have historically caused revolutions, public unrest, and civil war), the need for a "new dispensation" as we saw under FDR, the need for social solidarity, the strains of American nationalism, at this current point only states can be pushed to introduce policies that will address climate change, the United Nations as a body of states, John Mearsheimer's The Great Tragedy of Power Politics, climate change may bring about the collapse of the nation state system, Lieven's belief that we cannot wait till the end of capitalism to deal with climate change, the need to reform capitalism at the very least, heatwaves and forest fires in the U.S., sea level rise and intensified storm and storm surged having the potential to causing damaging floods, comparing the U.S. national security elites of today to those of the Confucian elites in imperial China, the need to assess new threats rather than being unadopted to and blindsided by them, the problem of "residual elites" and their concern with "Great Power" threats, the worst offender in the world of climate change other than the Gulf states, the Glasgow summit and what it demonstrates, currently existing technological fixes for climate change aren't radical enough, the lessons of COP26 and the need for investments into new technologies, the need to invest in storage in relation to alternative energy, the need to research nuclear and fusion energy, carbon capture, tech is not a miracle cure, Biden's military spending and why Lieven views it as grotesque, America's radical individualism and the need for a renewal of civic duty, embittered cultural divisions and polarization being whipped up across the political spectrum, the U.S. neglect of Central America, Trump's hollowing out of the EPA and the threat of Trumpism to the American struggle against climate change, and much, much more. "Climate Change: The Greatest National Security Threat to the United States" by Anatol Lieven - Quincy Brief No. 18 10/25/21 "THE CLIMATE CRISIS IS OUR REAL CHALLENGE, NOT CHINA" by Anatol Lieven - InkStick 11/04/21 "Climate chaos: the global threat multiplier of our time" by Anatol Lieven - Responsible Statecraft 10/26/21 "Here's what world leaders agreed to — and what they didn't — at the U.N. climate summit" by Lauren Sommer - NPR 11/13/21 "Interview: Lawrence Wilkerson - A discussion of tensions in East Asia, and some possible solutions" by Emanuel Pastreich - The Diplomat 12/03/21 Anatol Lieven Discusses America Right or Wrong: An Anatomy of American Nationalism on C-Span "What do realists think about climate change?" by The Centre for Geopolitics & Security in Realism Studies (CGSRS) 11/13/21 "Abby Martin Confronts Nancy Pelosi Over Pentagon Spending at COP26" - Yoube 11/09/21 "We Can't Confront Climate Change While Lavishly Funding the Pentagon" by JP Sottile - Truthout 08/18/21 "The Realist Guide to Solving Climate Change" by Stephen M. Walt - The Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs 08/13/21

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Coastal Conversations 11/26/21: From the Sea Up #1

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 56:35


Producer/Host: Natalie Springuel Maine coastal and ocean issues: From the Sea Up #1 With the holiday season upon us, it is time to talk seafood. Fresh, sustainable, Maine seafood that is! For the next three episodes of Coastal Conversations, we are featuring a series of stories produced by The First Coast and the Island Institute. The series, called From the Sea Up, introduces the people and species that make Maine seafood so incredible, both for our taste buds and for our coastal economy. It's perfect listening to inspire your holiday feasts! First up today, we hear how Luke's Lobster and the Island Institute formed a creative partnership to build resilience in the seafood supply chain in the wake of the pandemic's early shut down of traditional seafood markets. Our second story today explores the freshness and flavor of Maine dayboat scallops that have been caught, sold, and eaten or frozen in less than 24 hours. These are inspiring stories about people in the Gulf of Maine who are finding ways to ensure the future of our oceans while diversifying our seafood economy. Both of our stories today on Coastal Conversations were produced by Galen Koch of The First Coast as part of an Island Institute podcast called “From the Sea Up.” And we are thrilled to announce that we'll be featuring more of these great stories in upcoming episodes of Coastal Conversations. I mentioned at the top of the hour that a lot of folks were involved in producing these stories and we wanted to make sure to thank them here. Ok, here goes. First, From the Sea Up is presented by the Island Institute and produced by Galen Koch of The First Coast. The stories are made possible by the Fund for Maine Islands and a partnership between the Island Institute, College of the Atlantic, Luke's Lobster, Maine Sea Grant, and The First Coast. For our first story today, thanks go to Rob Snyder, Luke Holden, Ben Conniff, Merritt Carey, and Sam Belknap. For the second story, thanks go to Togue Brawn, Dan Miller, Tad Miller, Merritt Carey, Raymie Upham, and Silas Miller. If you are interested in learning more about how to purchase local sustainable seafood for the holidays, you can check out the online markets LukesLobster.com and at DowneastDayboat.com that were talked about in today's stories. And finally, extra gratitude goes to Galen Koch, the producer of these stories, for helping us get them on the air on Coastal Conversations, here at WERU community radio. About the host: Natalie Springuel has hosted Coastal Conversation's since 2015, with support from the University of Maine Sea Grant where she has served as a marine extension associate for 20 years. In 2019, Springuel received an award for Public Affairs programming from the Maine Association of Broadcasters for the Coastal Conversations show called “Portland's Working Waterfront.” Springuel is passionate about translating science, sharing stories, and offering a platform for multiple voices to weigh in on complex coastal and ocean issues. She has recently enrolled in audio production training at Maine Media Workshop to dive deeper into making great community radio. The post Coastal Conversations 11/26/21: From the Sea Up #1 first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The Southern Fork
Adam Evans, Automatic Seafood & Oysters (Birmingham, AL)

The Southern Fork

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 41:01


After a week of thinking about cooking turkey and a day of eating it, you might want to consider something else, so come with me to the Gulf of Mexico, where the sand is white and the seafood is plenty. This is the source of inspiration and menu items for Adam Evans, chef and co-owner, along with his wife Suzanne, of Automatic Seafood & Oysters in Birmingham, AL. Housed in a former mid-century warehouse, a table here has been one of the hottest in town since the restaurant opened in 2019. Adam started his career in Fairhope at The Grand Hotel, spent time cooking in some of the best kitchens in New Orleans, has worked as the executive chef of private events for Tom Colicchio's team at Craft in NYC, and was the opening chef of The Optimist in Atlanta for Ford Fry in 2012. Automatic Seafood & Oysters was a James Beard Foundation finalist for Best New Restaurant in 2020, and here he brings his passion for seafood back to his home state of Alabama.

Poetry Unbound
Linda Hogan — Song for the Turtles of the Gulf

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 15:48


In a poem called a “Song,” Linda Hogan crafts a song for turtles and other creatures killed through oil spills in the gulf. At once a praise song for the beauty of the sea, the earth, and its animals, this song also functions as a lament: for the history erased by industrial practices; for the lack of respect and love for living breathing other-than-human lives; for plastic and the plastic containers used to hold the body of a dead sea turtle. The poem veers towards a prayer, too, begging forgiveness for being “thrown off true.”Linda Hogan is a Chickasaw novelist, essayist, and environmentalist. She earned an undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs and an MA in English and creative writing from the University of Colorado-Boulder. Her books of poetry include Dark. Sweet., The Book of Medicines, Seeing Through the Sun, and many more.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast
WFS 266 - The Boundary Waters in Minnesota with Riverhorse Nakadate

Wet Fly Swing Fly Fishing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 54:34


Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/266 The purpose of this episode is to raise your awareness of the Boundary Waters status and encourage you to help preserve the great wilderness area in the country. Riverhorse Nakadate shares some insight into what he's been up to lately with Patagonia helping save the Boundary Waters movement. Click here to help protect the Boundary Waters: https://www.savetheboundarywaters.org/ Boundary Waters Show Notes with Riverhorse Nakadate 03:10 - Riverhorse is working on a new Patagonia film with Tony Czech 07:17 - The Darkest Web - Protecting the Gulf of Mexico from illegal fishing 09:30 - Riverhorse talks Paddling in the back country - read more in detail here 24:01 - The Punch Project - is a project that celebrates food, culture, music, and art 25:45 - Riverhorse was on the Fretboard Journal Podcast 26:05 - Riverhorse's reading in The Bent - MeatEater's Podcast (at 47:50) 37:45 - Trout Unlimited is doing some great stuff throughout the country 40:14 - Patagonia Action Works is where you can learn how to help your local community 40:53 - Riverhorse's fishing love story - Love and Water  41:21 - Tom Skerritt the actor from 'River Runs Through It' movie has a foundation for wounded soldiers called The Red Badge Project 45:56 - Riverhorse is writing a book and plans to publish it a year from now 49:13 - We'll bring Riverhose back in for a bonus episode with one of his poetry readings in the coming WFS episodes You can find Riverhorse on Instagram @riverhorse_nakadate Boundary Waters Conclusion with Riverhorse Nakadate The country's greatest wilderness area - is threatened by human interference. Riverhorse explained on the podcast how we can help save it. How can you start making a difference within your local community? Let me know in the comments or send me a DM on Instagram. Show Notes: https://wetflyswing.com/266

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report
How To Master Recipes for Everything You Catch With Hank Shaw

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 70:33


In this special Thanksgiving episode, Joe Baya and Butch Thierry talk with author and James Beard Award-winning chef Hank Shaw. With experiences from around the world as a hunter, angler, gardener, forager, and even commercial fisherman, being a cook is the glue that has bound it all together for Hank Shaw. Hank shares his fish and seafood cooking skills and some crucial lessons on handling, preparing, and ultimately serving your best catch on the Gulf of Mexico and inland waters. Happy Thanksgiving, and enjoy this delicious show! Hook Line and Supper by Hank Shaw One great Christmas gift and quite possibly the only fish and seafood cookbook you'll ever need - BUY HERE This Report is Presented By: Angelo DePaola - The Coastal Connection - eXp Realty Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, just head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/asfr, and we'll send you the new show each week. Check Out The Best Regional Fishing Tournaments on Fishing Chaos Check Out The NEWEST WAY To Get Your Fishing Reports: TEXT "fishing" to 314-665-1767 Keep Whackin'em! This has been a special presentation of the Great Outdoors Podcast Network. Edited and produced by Johnny Gwin and Deep Fried Studios ////////////   Sponsors: Buck's Island Marina MB Ranch King Blinds Test Calibration Photonis SunSouth Dixie Supply & Baker Metal Works CCA Alabama Angelo Depaola EXP Realty "The Coastal Connection" KillerDock Fishbites National Land Realty- Gulf Coast Office Hilton's Offshore Charts Great Days Outdoors Foster Contracting

Alabama Freshwater Fishing Report
How To Master Recipes for Everything You Catch With Hank Shaw

Alabama Freshwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 73:55


In this special Thanksgiving episode, Brian hands over this week's show to Great Days Outdoors Podcast Network's Joe Baya and Butch Thierry as they talk with author and James Beard Award-winning chef Hank Shaw. With experiences from around the world as a hunter, angler, gardener, forager, and even commercial fisherman, being a cook is the glue that has bound it all together for Hank Shaw. Hank shares his fish and seafood cooking skills and some crucial lessons on handling, preparing, and ultimately serving your best catch on the Gulf of Mexico and inland waters. Happy Thanksgiving, and enjoy this delicious show! Hook Line and Supper by Hank Shaw One great Christmas gift and quite possibly the only fish and seafood cookbook you'll ever need - BUY HERE Check Out The Best Regional Fishing Tournaments on Fishing Chaos Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/affr, and we'll send you the new show each week.   This has been a special presentation of the Great Outdoors Podcast Network. Edited and produced by Johnny Gwin and Deep Fried Studios Sponsors: Mustad Fishing BnM Pole Company Photonis Intercoastal Safaris Buck's Island Marina SunSouth Southeastern Pond Management YUDU National Land Realty Great Days Outdoors Fishbites Killerdock

Northwest Florida Fishing Report
How To Master Recipes for Everything You Catch With Hank Shaw

Northwest Florida Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 70:56


In this special Thanksgiving episode, Joe Baya and Butch Thierry talk with author and James Beard Award-winning chef Hank Shaw. With experiences from around the world as a hunter, angler, gardener, forager, and even commercial fisherman, being a cook is the glue that has bound it all together for Hank Shaw. Hank shares his fish and seafood cooking skills and some crucial lessons on handling, preparing, and ultimately serving your best catch on the Gulf of Mexico and inland waters. Happy Thanksgiving, and enjoy this delicious show! Hook Line and Supper by Hank ShawOne great Christmas gift and quite possibly the only fish and seafood cookbook you'll ever need - BUY HERE This Report is Presented By: Angelo DePaola - The Coastal Connection - eXp Realty Check Out The Best Regional Fishing Tournaments on Fishing Chaos   This has been a special presentation of the Great Outdoors Podcast Network. Edited and produced by Johnny Gwin and Deep Fried Studios Sponsors: Boaters List Photonis MB Ranch King Blinds Hunting Exchange Fishing Chaos Buck's Island Hilton's Real-Time Navigator Test Calibration Dixie Supply / Baker Metal Works SunSouth Fishbites Great Days Outdoors Killerdock National Land Realty

Heat Death of the Universe
118 - Implanted Advertisements in Our Dreams

Heat Death of the Universe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 72:26


The farmer's protests in India are going well and Modi's seemingly on the ropes. Biden sells off the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas interests less than a week after talking about leading the world in climate emergency mitigation at the COP26 summit.  Some scientists and marketing demons are researching ways to implant specific images and then efforts into you dreams. Texas once again wants to secede from the country. NASA will fly a satellite into a pair of asteroids as preparation for an Armageddon-like event. Japan is turning shitty adult diapers into a new fuel source. Support: patreon.com/heatdeathpodGeneral RecommendationsJD's Recommendation: Hell BoundJNM's Recommendation: Urban HikingFurther Reading, Viewing, ListeningIn Rare Show of Weakness, Modi Bows to India's FarmersIndian farmers hold mass rally, keep pressure on Modi despite climbdownUS auctions off oil and gas drilling leases in Gulf of Mexico after climate talksInside your dreamscape: Dream-hacking techniques can help us create, heal and have fun. They could also become tools of commercial manipulationGravitas: Texit after Brexit? Why some Texans want to leave the USNasa to slam spacecraft into asteroid in mission to avoid future ArmaggedonA New Source of Fuel in an Aging Japan: Adult IncontinenceLocationless Locationsheatdeathpod.comEvery show-related link is corralled and available here.Twitter: @heatdeathpodPlease send all Letters of Derision, Indifference, Inquiry, Mild Elation, et cetera to: heatdeathoftheuniversepodcast@gmail.comAlso, check out our newly updated YouTube channel for the hell of it

Democracy Paradox
Zoltan Barany on the Ineffectiveness of the Gulf Militaries

Democracy Paradox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 51:33


The last time, and luckily this hasn't really happened since 1990, there was minimal resistance from the Kuwaiti and the Saudi forces. So, this obviously is 30 years ago, but there is little reason to believe that in spite of the hundreds of billions of dollars that is spent on armaments, this state of affairs has changed. Let me just put it this way. Nobody in Tehran is losing any sleep over the prowess of any of the Gulf militaries.Zoltan BaranyA full transcript is available at www.democracyparadox.com or a short review of Armies of Arabia: Military Politics and Effectiveness in the Gulf here.Zoltan Barany is the Frank C. Erwin, Jr. Centennial Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of Armies of Arabia: Military Politics and Effectiveness in the Gulf. Key HighlightsWhat should be expected of the militaries of the Gulf countries?Would the Gulf countries be threatened without the American security guarantee?What types of military investments do the Gulf countries make?What has the Yemeni War taught us about armies of Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries?How does the leadership of MBS differ from MBZ?Key LinksArmies of Arabia: Military Politics and Effectiveness in the Gulf by Zoltan BaranyRobert Strauss Center For International Security and LawCenter for Strategic & International StudiesDemocracy Paradox PodcastDaniel Brinks on the Politics of Institutional WeaknessElizabeth Nugent on Polarization, Democratization and the Arab SpringMore Episodes from the PodcastMore InformationDemocracy GroupApes of the State created all MusicEmail the show at jkempf@democracyparadox.comFollow on Twitter @DemParadoxFollow on Instagram @democracyparadoxpodcast100 Books on Democracy

H2ORadio
This Week in Water for November 21, 2021

H2ORadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:41


How Cryptocurrencies Harm the Planet. That story and more on H2O Radio's weekly news report about water. Headlines: There's growing backlash around the world about the environmental effects of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. The Biden administration was criticized last week for auctioning off large tracts in the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas companies, just after COP26. It must feel like weather whiplash to live in Washington state or British Columbia. Creatures whose name translates to “little armored one” typically live in southern states, but global warming might change that.

Unresolved
The San Fernando Massacres (Part One)

Unresolved

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 47:34


"Now there is fear for everything you do. The fear of going out, to drive, to get out of the car, to go to a party. We no longer trust anyone."In 2010, 18-year-old Luis Freddy Lala Pomavilla began heading north from his native Ecuador, towards the United States. There, he hoped to reunite with his parents living in New Jersey, and made a deal with a notorious coyote to take him across several borders.Sadly, though, the bus that Luis Freddy was on - along with at least 72 other undocumented migrants - began crossing through Tamaulipas in August of 2010. At the time, this Mexican state had become ground zero for an escalating conflict between the prominent Gulf Cartel and their vicious adversaries, the Los Zetas...Episode hosted, produced, and research/writing by Micheal WhelanOriginal music created by Micheal Whelan through Amper MusicOutro music: "Informed and Prudent" by Yi NantiroLearn more about this podcast at http://unresolved.meIf you would like to support this podcast and others, consider heading to https://www.patreon.com/unresolvedpod to become a Patron or Producer

Synapsen. Ein Wissenschaftspodcast von NDR Info

Bakterien nehmen wir oft vor allem als Krankheitserreger wahr. Dabei schützen sie uns auch. Streng genommen sind wir auch im Haushalt von natürlicher Artenvielfalt umgeben - schätzungsweise sind aber nur 20-50 von 200.000 Bakterienarten pathogen. Deshalb ist aggressives Putzen oft kontraproduktiv. Wissenschaftsjournalist Marko Pauli hat mit einem Biologen gesprochen, der sich als Mikroben-Fan zu erkennen gibt, und er hat ein Hamburger Labor besucht, in dem mit plastikzersetzenden Bakterien gearbeitet wird. Marko erklärt im Gespräch mit Host Maja Bahtijarević, wie Kleinstlebewesen unser Grundwasser sauber halten, unter welchen Bedingungen sie eine Ölpest im Meer bekämpfen können und warum Milben im Gesicht kein Grund zur Sorge sind. Außerdem: wie das nun mit dem Händewaschen und Desinfektionsmittel in der Coronakrise ist. • Mikroskopische Aufnahmen und darauf basierende 3D-Modelle Fluoreszenz-markierter Bakterien in einem gebrauchten Küchenschwamm | MDR, Bildmaterial der Hochschule Furtwangen https://www.mdr.de/wissen/mensch-alltag/keime-im-kuechenschwamm-102.html • Das Rob Dunn-Lab lädt Wissenschaftler aller Couleur ein, die mikrobielle Artenvielfalt zu erforschen | The Public Science Lab - Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity of Humans and Food https://robdunnlab.com • Plattform für Citizen Science-Projekte in Deutschland, ein Projekt von Wissenschaft im Dialog (gGmbH) und dem Museum für Naturkunde Berlin | Bürger schaffen Wissen https://www.buergerschaffenwissen.de • Buch von Rob Dunn: "Eine Naturgeschichte der Wildnis in unseren Häusern, von den Mikroben in unseren Duschen bis zu den Grillen in unseren Kellern" | Rob Dunn: "Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live" https://robdunnlab.com/science-portfolio/never-home-alone/ • Studie zum Rückgang der Gesamtbiomasse der Insekten um mehr als 75 Prozent in 27 Jahren | Caspar A. Hallmann et al.: More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas, Oktober 2017 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0185809 • Eine Studie der Ruhruniversität kommt zu dem Schluss, dass sowohl Seife als auch Desinfektionsmittel zuverlässig Corona-Viren und deren Mutanten töten | Toni Luise Meister et al.: Comparable Environmental Stability and Disinfection Profiles of the Currently Circulating SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern B.1.1.7 and B.1.351, The Journal of Infectious Diseases, August 2021 https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/224/3/420/6276396 • Hände anstelle von häufigem Händewaschen mit Seifen desinfizieren | Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft: Handekzeme nehmen zu - Handhygiene-Strategie in Pandemiezeiten ändern, Informationsdienst Wissenschaft e. V. https://idw-online.de/de/news765848 • Das US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) zum Händewaschen: Handdesinfektionsmittel könnten schädliche Chemikalien wie Pestizide und Schwermetalle nicht von den Händen entfernen, außerdem seien Handdesinfektionsmittel auf Alkoholbasis ein mögliches Einfallstor für Bakterien, die Resistenzen entwickeln oder entwickelt haben | New Straits Times: Overuse of hand sanitisers poses health problems, Oktober 2021 https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters/2021/10/734242/overuse-hand-sanitisers-poses-health-problems • Studie zum Wandel der biologischen Vielfalt in marinen und terrestrischen Lebensgemeinschaften | Shane A. Blowes et al.: The geography of biodiversity change in marine and terrestrial assemblages, Science, Oktober 2019 https://www.science.org/doi/full/10.1126/science.aaw1620 • Milben im Gesichtstalg | Erika Engelhaupt: Mini-Mitbewohner - In unseren Gesichtsporen leben Milben https://www.nationalgeographic.de/tiere/2020/06/mini-mitbewohner-in-unseren-gesichtsporen-leben-milben • Analyse vom Grundwasser Hannovers | Bernd Haase: Überraschende Artenvielfalt - diese Tiere tummeln sich in Hannovers Grundwasser, Hannoversche Allgemeine Zeitung https://www.haz.de/Hannover/Aus-der-Stadt/Uebersicht/Hannover-Im-Grundwasser-tummeln-sich-unerwartet-viele-Lebewesen • Ein Appell aus der Mikrobiologie von Antje Boetius und anderen Wissenschaftlern, die Mikroben und ihr Wirken nicht zu übersehen | "Wer über den Klimawandel redet, muss auch über Mikroben reden", Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Juni 2019 https://www.mpg.de/13561429/0613-mbio-064278-wer-ueber-den-klimawandel-redet-muss-auch-ueber-mikroben-reden • Das Potential von Bakterien im Kampf gegen den Plastikmüll | Fünf Fragen an den Mikrobiologen Wolfgang Streit: "Für eine PET-Flaschen brauchen Bakterien mindestens 500 Jahre", Universität Hamburg, April 2020 https://www.uni-hamburg.de/newsroom/19neunzehn/2020/0414-5-fragen-an-mikrobiologen.html • Forscher haben eine Methode entwickelt, ölabbauende Bakterien auf Plättchen aus biologisch abbaubaren Holzfasern aufzubringen und im Meer auszusetzen, um damit Erdöl aus dem Wasser aufzunehmen | TU Dresden: Mit Holz statt Chemie gegen die Ölpest https://www.wissenschaft.de/umwelt-natur/mit-holz-statt-chemie-gegen-die-oelpest/ • Die Exxon Valdez Ölkatastrophe von 1989 - Studie zum Verbleib, den Auswirkungen und den Sanierungsbewertungen | Yuqiang Xia, Michel C Boufadel: Lessons from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill disaster in Alaska, Oktober 2010 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/259392296_Lessons_from_the_Exxon_Valdez_Oil_Spill_disaster_in_Alaska • Ölkatastrophe im Golf von Mexiko von 2010, der größten Ölpest in der Geschichte der Meere | Richard Pallardy: Deepwater Horizon oil spill environmental disaster, Gulf of Mexico https://www.britannica.com/event/Deepwater-Horizon-oil-spill

This Date in Weather History
Arctic cold outbreak leads to record temperatures in East US

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 1:44


An early-season arctic cold outbreak on November 19, 2008, led to records being broken, both for overnight lows and daytime highs all across the eastern part of the United States. Worcester, MA had a high of only 29 degrees. Even as far south as Saint Simons Island, GA there was a record cold day, with a high of only 50 degrees. Killing frost and freezes were felt in the deep South and with a strong wind accompanying the cold many marginal plants and vegetation didn't stand a chance putting an abrupt end to the growing season all the way to the Gulf coast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Crypto lovers go all in on the Constitution

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 16:41


Crypto enthusiasts came through. They’ve raised $40 million to buy a rare copy of the U.S. Constitution that’s up for auction to put it back in “the hands of the people.” We’ll explain how this all ties into what’s happening in the crypto space. Plus, why inflation is hitting some parts of the United States harder than others and the problem with Biden’s plan to open ports 24/7. Oh, and smiling quokkas! Here’s everything we talked about today: “A group of crypto investors is trying to buy a copy of the Constitution — for $40 million” from CNN “Truckers Steer Clear of 24-Hour Operations at Southern California Ports” from The Wall Street Journal “Where Inflation Is Highest in US” also from The Wall Street Journal “US auctions off oil and gas drilling leases in Gulf of Mexico after climate talks” from The Guardian “Furor Over Peng Shuai’s #Metoo Accusation Challenges China” from The New York Times Smiling quokka’s  Video: “Top Gun,” Ohio State vs. Purdue halftime Read the transcript here. Join us on YouTube Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for our live happy hour episode! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don't miss it.

Marketplace All-in-One
Crypto lovers go all in on the Constitution

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 16:41


Crypto enthusiasts came through. They’ve raised $40 million to buy a rare copy of the U.S. Constitution that’s up for auction to put it back in “the hands of the people.” We’ll explain how this all ties into what’s happening in the crypto space. Plus, why inflation is hitting some parts of the United States harder than others and the problem with Biden’s plan to open ports 24/7. Oh, and smiling quokkas! Here’s everything we talked about today: “A group of crypto investors is trying to buy a copy of the Constitution — for $40 million” from CNN “Truckers Steer Clear of 24-Hour Operations at Southern California Ports” from The Wall Street Journal “Where Inflation Is Highest in US” also from The Wall Street Journal “US auctions off oil and gas drilling leases in Gulf of Mexico after climate talks” from The Guardian “Furor Over Peng Shuai’s #Metoo Accusation Challenges China” from The New York Times Smiling quokka’s  Video: “Top Gun,” Ohio State vs. Purdue halftime Read the transcript here. Join us on YouTube Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for our live happy hour episode! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don't miss it.

Progressive Voices
Green News Report

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 6:00


Pacific Northwest careens from deadly extreme heat to deadly extreme floods; Interior Department holds controversial oil and gas lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico; Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether Big Oil is illegally inflating gas prices; PLUS: President Biden promotes infrastructure deal and American-made electric vehicles... All that and more in today's Green News Report!

Trumpet Daily Radio Show
#1644: The DOJ's War Against Ordinary Americans

Trumpet Daily Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 54:33


[00:30] Biden's Lowest Approval Poll Yet (10 minutes) Descending to an all-time low of 36 percent, Joe Biden's approval rating is like a sinkhole. How much lower can it get? [10:20] Qatar Representing the U.S. in Afghanistan (5 minutes) After its humiliating surrender to the Taliban in August, the United States is now reduced to seeking help from the tiny Gulf state of Qatar to get stranded Americans out of Afghanistan. [15:30] Turning the DOJ Against America (25 minutes) In this segment, we explain the step-by-step process the Joebama administration has taken to politicize and weaponize the Department of Justice against ordinary Americans. [40:40] Bible Study: The Greatest Story Ever (15 minutes) "The true gospel," Herbert W. Armstrong wrote, "is greater than any story of man ever written before." When we have that perspective, everything else shrinks in comparison!

Liberty Lighthouse
20211118 - Liberty Minute

Liberty Lighthouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 1:13


News headlines in a Liberty Minute for Thursday, day 613 of 15 days to flatten the curve. The Biden administration wants the Federal Trade Commission to investigate if price gouging is causing increased gas prices. Seriously? Joe, you caused the gas prices. You put in so many new regulations you are in the way of production. You are the problem. Was yesterday's sale of the last of the oil drilling leases in the Gulf of Mexico your way of admitting that? Disney Cruise Line is demanding that everyone 5 years old and up to be vaccinated, while the governor of New Mexico now says that you are not vaccinated unless you've had all the boosters too. Meanwhile, the OSHA vaccine mandate is on hold but Senate Republicans are attempting to use the Congressional Review Act to make it go away. The Senate Republicans need just one Democrat to vote for the Review. Everyone, just shut up and get vaccinated. Watch the Liberty Lighthouse live stream tonight at 7 pm Eastern with Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidate Jason Monn. Until tomorrow, protect your liberties. Once they're gone there's no getting them back. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/libertylighthouse/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/libertylighthouse/support

The Philip DeFranco Show
PDS 11.17 EXPOSED! Hasan Piker, Pokimane, & More Denounce Streamlabs As Scandal Goes Viral

The Philip DeFranco Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 17:18


Go to https://noom.com/phil and take your free 30-second quiz! Thank you #noom for sponsoring today's video! More PDS: https://youtu.be/0A36tKIHm64 TEXT ME! +1 (813) 213-4423 Get More Phil: https://linktr.ee/PhilipDeFranco -- 00:00 - Streamlabs Accused of Copying Lightstream, OBS, and Elgato 06:35 - WSJ Alleges Activision CEO Bobby Kotick Knew of Company Issues, Threatened Employee 09:17 - Sponsor 10:11 - Chrissy Teigen, MrBeast Spark Backlash & Conversation with Squid Game Recreations 13:17 - Apple Will Sell Parts for Home Repairs 14:43 - Biden Administration Reopens Oil and Gas Leasing in Gulf of Mexico Days After Climate Pledge -- ✩ TODAY'S STORIES ✩ Streamlabs Accused of Copying Lightstream, OBS, and Elgato: https://roguerocket.com/2021/11/17/twitch-streamlabs/ WSJ Alleges Activision CEO Bobby Kotick Knew of Company Issues, Threatened Employee: https://twitter.com/WSJ/status/1460740863978614795?s=20 Chrissy Teigen, MrBeast Spark Backlash & Conversation with Squid Game Recreations: https://roguerocket.com/2021/11/17/chrissy-teigen-backlash-squid-game-party/ Apple Will Sell Parts for Home Repairs: https://www.theverge.com/2021/11/17/22787144/apple-home-repair-iphone-mac-parts-tools-instructions Biden Administration Reopens Oil and Gas Leasing in Gulf of Mexico Days After Climate Pledge: https://roguerocket.com/2021/11/17/biden-oil-and-gas-climate-pledge/ ​​✩ STORIES NOT IN TODAY'S SHOW ✩ Staples Center Will Become Crypto.com Arena After $700 Million Naming Deal: https://roguerocket.com/2021/11/17/staples-center-crypto-com-arena/ —————————— Executive Producer: Amanda Morones Edited by: James Girardier, Julie Goldberg, Maxwell Enright Art Department: Brian Borst, William Crespo Writing/Research: Philip DeFranco, Cory Ray, Brian Espinoza, Maddie Crichton, Lili Stenn, Neena Pesqueda Production Team: Zack Taylor, Emma Leid ———————————— #DeFranco #Streamlabs #Pokimane ————————————

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
Midday Mobile - Congressman Jerry Carl talks Washington DC and an oil lease auction in the Gulf - November 17 2021

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 20:17


Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
November 17th, 2021 6am Alice Celebrity Trash

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 17:05


Britney Spears blames mom over conservatorship, Carole Baskins says her husband probably crashed in the Gulf of Mexico, and the official trailer for Tiger King Season 2 is out. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
Conflicts of Interest #189: The Pentagon Manufactures Crises It Cannot Control

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 71:54


On COI #189, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman – writer at the Libertarian Institute – talk about increasing tensions in Eastern Europe and the Persian Gulf. Kyle covers the refugee crisis on the border shared by Poland and Belarus. Washington and their European allies have accused Minsk of “orchestrating” the dire humanitarian situation. But the refugees are attempting to reach Europe, fleeing countries such as Yemen, Iraq, and Syria which have been largely destroyed by America's post 9/11 wars. Kyle breaks down the news on the refugees' mistreatment. He also reports on the European Union preparing new sanctions on Belarus. Poland is buying more American arms as well, including 300 used MRAPs and 250 Abrams tanks. Connor details the hawks' plans for regime change in Minsk, including the National Endowment for Democracy's involvement in Belarus. Kyle further reports on escalations in the Black Sea region. The U.S. has accused Moscow of a massive troop buildup in western Russia aimed at Ukraine. Moscow denies the accusations, pointing to the increasing U.S./NATO presence in the region as the source of instability. NATO is hyping the alleged Russian threat, saying they “stand” with Ukraine. A German regulator has temporarily suspended the license for Nord Stream 2 and Kiev is pushing for more U.S. sanctions to block the pipeline Connor then covers the latest news on the soon to resume JCPOA talks, including the Iranians' potential economic benefits that could result from significant sanctions relief. Connor argues U.S., Israel, and their allied Gulf dictatorships are fomenting instability, including openly preparing for war. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Conflicts of Interest
The Pentagon Manufactures Crises It Cannot Control

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 71:55


On COI #189, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman – writer at the Libertarian Institute – talk about increasing tensions in Eastern Europe and the Persian Gulf. Kyle covers the refugee crisis on the border shared by Poland and Belarus. Washington and their European allies have accused Minsk of “orchestrating” the dire humanitarian situation. But the refugees are attempting to reach Europe, fleeing countries such as Yemen, Iraq, and Syria which have been largely destroyed by America's post 9/11 wars. Kyle breaks down the news on the refugees' mistreatment. He also reports on the European Union preparing new sanctions on Belarus. Poland is buying more American arms as well, including 300 used MRAPs and 250 Abrams tanks. Connor details the hawks' plans for regime change in Minsk, including the National Endowment for Democracy's involvement in Belarus. Kyle further reports on escalations in the Black Sea region. The U.S. has accused Moscow of a massive troop buildup in western Russia aimed at Ukraine. Moscow denies the accusations, pointing to the increasing U.S./NATO presence in the region as the source of instability. NATO is hyping the alleged Russian threat, saying they “stand” with Ukraine. A German regulator has temporarily suspended the license for Nord Stream 2 and Kiev is pushing for more U.S. sanctions to block the pipeline Connor then covers the latest news on the soon to resume JCPOA talks, including the Iranians' potential economic benefits that could result from significant sanctions relief. Connor argues U.S., Israel, and their allied Gulf dictatorships are fomenting instability, including openly preparing for war. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

The Long View
Robin Wigglesworth: The Rise of Index Investing and the 'Renegades' Who Ushered It In

The Long View

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 54:58


Our guest this week is Robin Wigglesworth. Robin is the Financial Times' global finance correspondent based in Oslo, Norway. He covers investing in markets with a focus on technological disruption and quantitative investing. He joined the FT as a Gulf correspondent in June 2008. Before that, he was a Nordic economics and politics correspondent for Bloomberg News. Robin is a graduate of City, University of London and received his master's in history of international relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Robin is here to discuss his new book, Trillions: How a Band of Wall Street Renegades Invented the Index Fund and Changed Finance Forever.BackgroundBioTrillions: How a Band of Wall Street Renegades Invented the Index Fund and Changed Finance ForeverHistory of Indexing“Louis Bachelier: An Underappreciated Revolutionary,” historyofdatascience.com, June 3, 2021.Paul SamuelsonEfficient Market HypothesisRex SinquefieldDean LeBaronMac McQuownJack BogleJohn BrennanDimensional Fund Advisors Dan WheelerLarry FinkEugene FamaHarry MarkowitzBill SharpeBaby BellsTechnologyCowles Foundation for Research in Economics“Can Stock Market Forecasters Forecast?” by Alfred Cowles, yale.edu, 1933.The Beginning of ETFs“Passive Attack: The Story of a Wall Street Revolution,” by Robin Wigglesworth, FT.com, Dec. 19, 2018.“All That Drama About Fixed-Income ETFs Was Overplayed,” by Robin Wigglesworth, FT.com, April 21, 2020.Nate Most

The Kim Monson Show
Biden Preparing to Auction 80 Million Acres of the Gulf of Mexico to Oil and Gas Companies

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:09


Thank you to Laramie Energy and Caerus Oil and Gas for their sponsorship of this show! Kim remarks on President Brandon's Build Back Better Plan that “eligible,” media organizations receive a $25,000 income tax credit per journalist the first year and then a $15,000 income tax credit per journalist for each of the next four years.  This can be claimed for the first 1,500 journalists.  Once again, PBIs (Politicians, Bureaucrats and Interested Parties) picking winners and losers with the added benefit of thanking slanted and corrupt mainstream media for their inaccurate reporting.  Biden and Polis continue the drumbeat against fossil fuel energy. Yvonne, a grassroots leader in Larimer County, is pleased to report that the Larimer County Health Department has cancelled their proposed vaccine passport program.  The mask orders are still in effect.  Yvonne and other activists prove that “We the People” can stop tyrannical dictates and expose PBI's (Politicians, Bureaucrats and Interest Parties) for what they are, tyrannical rulers.  We have won this battle now we must liberate our children from mandated masks.  Tommy Pigott, Director of Rapid Response for the Republican National Committee, reports on inflation rising 11%, and the impact on lower income families.  These families are being hurt the most economically.  Food banks, as the holiday season approaches, are close to empty.  The Biden administration's policies are complicit in what is happening as gas prices increase.  Natural gas prices are expected to go up 130% and heating costs are expected to increase by 54% this winter.  Democrats are picking winners and losers.  We can draw parallels with Solyndra (which went out of business) and other renewable energy companies that Obama gave preferential treatment to.  The Secretary of Energy, Jennifer Granholm, is one example of conflict of interests due to her financial ties to a battery manufacturing firm for electric vehicles.  John Kerry, Biden's envoy for climate, flying around the world in his multiple private jets is another.  The elites enrich themselves at the expense of the “little guy.” Kimberlee Bell, owner of Kunjani Coffee, invites listeners to visit Kunjani for coffee, conversation, community and compassion.  They are in need of two part-time baritas so if you are interested stop by to fill out an application or email kim@kunjanicoffee.com.  For the holiday season Kimberlee has brewed up a few new coffee drinks.  Tuesday's special is a coffee flight offered from 12pm to 6pm.  Come try some new flavors. Guest Daniel Turner, founder and Executive Director of Power the Future, remarks on reports that Biden is preparing to auction 80 million acres of the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling companies.  Smoke and Mirrors.  In reality, the probability of a company making a bid is slim as the companies know that once purchased, they will have the EPA, Department of Interior, eco-radical groups, and others, breathing down their backs, using expensive rules and regulations to thwart drilling.  11,000 jobs vanished with the closure of the Keystone XL Pipeline.  Biden is considering closing a pipeline in Michigan and a pipeline in Minnesota.  Winter time is typically quite cold in both those states.  Communities were thriving where the pipeline was being constructed.  They've been decimated with Biden's policies.  The current administration does not support affordable, reliable, efficient and abundant energy for Americans.  However, Biden supports the construction of an oil pipeline by Russia.  Should our pipeline workers move to Russia to be employed?  Democrats only want to be judged by their intentions, not the consequences of their actions.  The climate conference in Glasgow was for the rich and famous to enjoy on the taxpayer's dime.  Attendees numbered 39,000.  Let's have an honest conversation about energy.  Get involved at your local level where many of the policies, detrim

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.15.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:42


Grape consumption benefits gut microbiome and cholesterol metabolism University of California at Los Angeles, November 11, 2021 A new clinical study published in the scientific journal Nutrients found that consuming grapes significantly increased the diversity of bacteria in the gut which is considered essential to good health overall.  Additionally, consuming grapes significantly decreased cholesterol levels, as well as bile acids which play an integral role in cholesterol metabolism.  The findings suggest a promising new role for grapes in gut health and reinforce the benefits of grapes on heart health. In the intervention study], healthy subjects consumed the equivalent of 1.5 cups of grapes[2] per day – for four weeks. The subjects consumed a low fiber/low polyphenol diet throughout the study.  After four weeks of grape consumption there was an increase in microbial diversity as measured by the Shannon index, a commonly used tool for measuring diversity of species.   Among the beneficial bacteria that increased was Akkermansia, a bacteria of keen interest for its beneficial effect on glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as on the integrity of the intestinal lining.  Additionally, a decrease in blood cholesterols was observed including total cholesterol by 6.1% and LDL cholesterol by 5.9%.  Bile acids, which are linked to cholesterol metabolism, were decreased by 40.9%.     Vitamin D supplementation associated with lower risk of heart attack or death during follow-up Kansas City VA Medical Center, November 8 2021.  The October 2021 issue of the Journal of the Endocrine Society published findings from a retrospective study of US veterans that uncovered an association between supplementing with vitamin D and a lower risk of heart attack and mortality from any cause during up to 14 years of follow-up. The study included men and women treated at the Kansas City VA Medical Center from 1999-2018 who had low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 20 ng/mL or less. Among 11,119 patients who were not treated with vitamin D supplements, follow-up vitamin D levels remained at 20 ng/mL or lower. For those who received the vitamin, levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL among 5,623 patients and to at least 30 ng/mL among 3,277 patients at follow-up.  Men and women whose vitamin D levels improved to at least 30 ng/mL had a risk of heart attack that was 35% lower than patients whose levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL and 27% lower than the untreated group. The difference in risk between untreated individuals and those whose levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL was not determined to be significant. Patients whose vitamin D levels improved the most also experienced significantly greater heart attack-free survival during follow-up than the remainder of the patients. When mortality from any cause during follow-up was examined, men and women whose vitamin D levels improved to 21-29 ng/mL had a 41% lower risk, and those whose levels improved to 30 ng/mL or more had a 39% lower risk than the untreated group.  “These results suggest that targeting 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL might improve prognosis in the primary prevention setting among individuals with vitamin D deficiency,” authors Prakash Acharya of the University of Kansas Medical Center and colleagues wrote.     Meditative practice and spiritual wellbeing may preserve cognitive function in aging       Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation and Thomas Jefferson University, November 12, 2021 It is projected that up to 152 million people worldwide will be living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) by 2050. To date there are no drugs that have a substantial positive impact on either the prevention or reversal of cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence finds that targeting lifestyle and vascular risk factors have a beneficial effect on overall cognitive performance. A new review in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, published by IOS Press, examines research that finds spiritual fitness, a new concept in medicine that centers on psychological and spiritual wellbeing may reduce multiple risk factors for AD. Research reveals that religious and spiritual involvement can preserve cognitive function as we age. Significantly, individuals who have a high score on a "purpose in life" (PIL) measure, a component of psychological wellbeing, were 2.4 times more likely to remain free of AD than individuals with low PIL. In another study, participants who reported higher levels of PIL exhibited better cognitive function, and further, PIL protected those with already existing pathological conditions, thus slowing their decline.   Radiotherapy may explain why childhood cancer survivors often develop metabolic disease Rockefeller University, November 9, 2021 Decades after battling childhood cancer, survivors often face a new challenge: cardiometabolic disease. A spectrum of conditions that includes coronary heart disease and diabetes, cardiometabolic disease typically impacts people who are obese, elderly, or insulin resistant. For reasons yet unknown, young, seemingly healthy adults who survived childhood cancer are also at risk. Radiation therapy may be to blame. A new study finds that childhood cancer patients who were treated with abdominal or total body irradiation grow up to display abnormalities in their adipose (fat) tissue, similar to those found in obese individuals with cardiometabolic disease. "When physicians are planning radiation therapy, they are very conscious of toxicity to major organs. But fat is often not considered," says Rockefeller's Paul Cohen. "Our results imply that the early exposure of fat cells to radiation may cause long-term dysfunction in the adipose tissue that puts childhood cancer survivors at higher risk of cardiometabolic disease."   Researchers discover link between dietary fat (palm oil) and the spread of cancer   Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (Spain), November 10, 2021 The study, published in the journal Nature and part-funded by the UK charity Worldwide Cancer Research, uncovers how palmitic acid alters the cancer genome, increasing the likelihood the cancer will spread. The researchers have started developing therapies that interrupt this process and say a clinical trial could start in the next couple of years. Newly published findings reveal that one such fatty acid commonly found in palm oil, called palmitic acid, promotes metastasis in oral carcinomas and melanoma skin cancer in mice. Other fatty acids called oleic acid and linoleic acid—omega-9 and omega-6 fats found in foods such as olive oil and flaxseeds—did not show the same effect. Neither of the fatty acids tested increased the risk of developing cancer in the first place. The research found that when palmitic acid was supplemented into the diet of mice, it not only contributed to metastasis, but also exerts long-term effects on the genome. Cancer cells that had only been exposed to palmitic acid in the diet for a short period of time remained highly metastatic even when the palmitic acid had been removed from the diet. The researchers discovered that this "memory" is caused by epigenetic changes—changes to how our genes function. The epigenetic changes alter the function of metastatic cancer cells and allow them to form a neural network around the tumor to communicate with cells in their immediate environment and to spread more easily. By understanding the nature of this communication, the researchers uncovered a way to block it and are now in the process of planning a clinical trial to stop metastasis in different types of cancer.   Study finds consuming nuts strengthens brainwave function Loma Linda University, November 15, 2021 A new study has found that eating nuts on a regular basis strengthens brainwave frequencies associated with cognition, healing, learning, memory and other key brain functions.  In the study titled "Nuts and brain: Effects of eating nuts on changing electroencephalograph brainwaves," researchers found that some nuts stimulated some brain frequencies more than others. Pistachios, for instance, produced the greatest gamma wave response, which is critical for enhancing cognitive processing, information retention, learning, perception and rapid eye movement during sleep. Peanuts, which are actually legumes, but were still part of the study, produced the highest delta response, which is associated with healthy immunity, natural healing, and deep sleep. The study's principal investigator, Lee Berk, DrPH, MPH, associate dean for research at the LLU School of Allied Health Professions, said that while researchers found variances between the six nut varieties tested (almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans, pistachios and walnuts), all of them were high in beneficial antioxidants, with walnuts containing the highest antioxidant concentrations of all.     Why Nitrates And Nitrites In Processed Meats Are Harmful – But Those In Vegetables Aren't University of Hertfordshire (UK), November 11, 2021 While there are many reasons processed meats aren't great for our health, one reason is because they contain chemicals called nitrates and nitrites.  But processed meats aren't the only foods that contain these chemicals. In fact, many vegetables also contain high amounts – mainly nitrates. And yet research suggests that eating vegetables lowers – not raises – cancer risk. So how can nitrates and nitrites be harmful when added to meat but healthy in vegetables? The answer lies in how nitrates and nitrites in food get converted into other molecules. Nitrates and nitrites occur attached to sodium or potassium, and belong to a family of chemically related molecules that also includes the gas nitric oxide. Vegetables such as beetroot, spinach and cabbages are particularly good sources of nitrates. When we eat something containing nitrates or nitrites, they may convert into a related molecular form. For example, nitrate in vegetables and in the pharmaceutical form nitroglycerine (which is used to treat angina), can convert in the body into nitric oxide. Nitric oxide dilates blood vessels, which can reduce blood pressure. It's actually sodium nitrite – not nitrate – that's linked to cancer. But if consuming nitrites alone directly caused cancer, then even eating vegetables would be harmful to us. Given this isn't the case, it shows us that cancer risk likely comes from when the sodium nitrites react with other molecules in the body. So it isn't necessarily the nitrates and nitrites themselves that cause health issues – including cancer. Rather, it's what form they are converted into that can increase risk – and what these converted molecules interact with in our bodies. The main concern is when sodium nitrite reacts with degraded bits of amino acids – protein fragments our body produces during the digestion of proteins – forming molecules called N-nitroso compounds (NOCs). These NOCs have been shown to cause cancer.     Obama Climate & Environment Record   Seasoned environmentalists were very skeptical of obama from the very start n the 2008 campaign -- notably his coal to liquid technology he advocated and his great enthusiasm for ethanol   Sold off 2.2 billion tons of coal from public land (Greenpeace report). The sales to private interests generated $2.3 billon but CO2 damage estimated between $52-530 billion   His Clean Power Plan -- which Trump administration later trashed -- really had little to do with the plan's name -- had nothing to do with eradicating hazardous pollutants from power generation; it was primarily all based on a cap and trade system to regulate carbon dioxide   Ran on campaign that by 2025, 25% of US energy would be renewable  Was never anywhere close on being on track for that goal   Promoted fracking as a move away from coal to natural gas -- this was a midst promises to have highest standards for fracking on federal land -- never happened   Lowered natural gas export restrictions in order to sell more US natural gas to foeign customers   Made efforts to weaken rules.on methane leaks from oil and gas operations -- leaks account or 3 percent of US gas emissions   Also instrumental in pushing on behalf of pipeline companies and terminals to have major coastal terminals for gas exports (most notable example was Cove Point terminal in Maryland that Obama touted   Flint Water crisis    Sued the EPA over a dozen ties against the agency's effort to increase environmental regulations on corporations   Opened more federal and land (18% increase between 2009-2014) for oil and gas drilling -- including "off limits" regions in the mid Atlantic coast, along Alaska's Arctic coast and Gulf of mexico,    Completely failed on setting rules or clean disposal of coal ash byproduct -- US produces about 100 million tons of this crap annually and just dumps into holes in the ground   Went soft on ozone pollution and smog rules -- did lower Bush's ozone threshold from 75ppb to 70 ppb, but his EPA was recommending 60-65 ppb   Very insensitive to wood pellet development under the disguise as a renewable -- part of his clean power plan

Offshore Sailing and Cruising with Paul Trammell
A Family on a Tartan 41, John, Jennifer, and Wilson Stark

Offshore Sailing and Cruising with Paul Trammell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 67:41


John, Jennifer, and their son Wilson Stark live on a Tartan 41. I interviewed them in Bocas del Toro, Panama. We talk about their boat, safety, sailing through a 2-day gale in the Gulf of Mexico, sailing from Jacksonville, Florida, to Panama, whales, swimming offshore, Panamanian residency, working while living aboard, homeschooling, boat kids, mooring screws, and much more.

This Date in Weather History
2006: Tornado outbreak in the Gulf Coast

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 2:08


As autumn approaches winter the severe weather season usually grinds to a halt. Hot and humid weather is pushed south into Mexico and the Gulf and the dynamics to spawn severe thunderstorms and tornados is quickly on the wane. Temperature contrasts from the Earth's surface to the upper atmosphere take on a winter time aspect. But still, severe weather outbreaks occasionally happen and often times just as people are letting down their guard. On November 15, 2006 there was such a Tornado Outbreak. A tornado with a total path length of just over 6 miles long and 250 yards wide, damaged several buildings in Montgomery, Alabama. Six people were reported injured in East Montgomery. Several other tornados were reported across southeast Alabama into southwest Georgia. Moderate damage occurred in Fort Benning, Georgia along a path 1.5 miles long and 150 yards wide; six people injured. A tornado in Riegelwood, North Carolina demolished several homes with eight fatalities reported. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Congressional Dish
CD242 The Offshore Drilling Police

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:22


On October 1, 2021 an oil pipeline that was likely struck by a cargo ship's anchor leaked tens of thousands of gallons of oil into the ocean and onto the beaches of Orange County, CA. In this episode, examine how the oil spill happened by listening to testimony provided to both the U.S. Congress and the California State Senate, and learn about the disturbing lack of policing that is taking place under the sea. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Articles and Documents Nicole Charky. April 7, 2021. “LA City Council Urges Newsom To Close Playa Del Rey Oil Storage.” Patch. Nicole Charky. March 23, 2021. “Is It Time To Shut Down The Playa Del Rey Oil Storage Facility?” Patch. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Offshore Oil and Gas: Updated Regulations Needed to Improve Pipeline Oversight and Decommissioning. GAO-21-293. Jen's Highlighted PDF Heal the Bay. June 24, 2015 . “Confirmed: L.A. Tar Balls Linked to Santa Barbara Spill.” planetexperts.com Heal the Bay. August 20, 2012. “What Are Those Black Clumps on the Beach?” Sarah S. Elkind. June 1, 2012. “Oil in the City: The Fall and Rise of Oil Drilling in Los Angeles.” The Journal of American History, Volume 99, Issue 1. Tom Fowler. February 21, 2012. “U.S., Mexico Sign Deal on Oil Drilling in Gulf.“ The Wall Street Journal. APPEL News Staff. May 10, 2011. “Academy Case Study: The Deepwater Horizon Accident Lessons for NASA.” APPEL News, Volume 4, Issue 1. Offshore Technology. “Projects: Macondo Prospect, Gulf of Mexico.” Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. November 23, 1970. Treaty to Resolve Pending Boundary Differences and Maintain the Rio Grande and Colorado River as the International Boundary. Open Secrets Profiles Rep. Yvette Herrell - New Mexico District 02 Rep. Paul Gosar - Arizona District 04 Rep. Bruce Westerman - Arkansas District 04 Rep. Katie Porter - California District 45 Rep. Pete Stauber - Minnesota District 08 Images Playa del Ray in the 1920s 2021 Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 1. CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. 2021Huntington Bay Oil Spill Image 2 CA State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Informational Hearing Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions. Mileage of Decommissioned Pipelines Removed Relative to Those Left in Place. GAO Analysis of Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Data, GAO-21-293. Potential Effects of Currents on Pipeline Leak Identification. GAO-21-293. Hearings Southern California Oil Spill: Preparation response, ongoing risks, and potential solutions California State Senate: Natural Resources and Water Committee Thursday, October 28, 2021 Witnesses: Chuck Bonham Head of California Department of Fishing and Wildlife Tom Cullen Administrator of OSPR (Offshore Spill Prevention and Response) Kim Carr Mayor Pro Tem, City of Huntington Beach Brian Nowicki California Climate Policy Director at the Center for Biological Diversity Pete Stauffer Environmental Director for the Surfrider Foundation Jennifer Lucchesi State Lands Commission Clips 3:44 Senator Henry Stern: But the pipeline that runs to Amplify and Beta Offshore's platform is the source of the oil production that runs through the pipeline in question. That pipeline is in federal jurisdiction but it brings that produced oil onshore into the state waters and eventually on state lands. 21:05 Chuck Bonham: What we now know is about four and a half miles offshore, so in federal waters, there's a pipeline that runs from one platform, which is a collection of three platforms operated by a company called Beta Offshore, owned by a company called Amplify Energy. That last platform, Ellie, has a pipeline which delivers the product 17.7 miles inland, where the pipe comes on shore just below the Queen Mary more or less, to land based infrastructure. That pipe had a rupture in it. And we now know based on visual and diver and other evidentiary efforts, that about 4000 feet of that pipeline was moved about 105 feet off of center. And in that stretch is about a 13 inch horizontal, almost like a hairline fracture. If you could imagine a bone break in a pipe, which is, I think, about 13 inches in diameter, concrete on the outside and metal on the inside. That's the likely source of the leak. 22:25 Chuck Bonham: From the very beginning moments, all of us involved assumed a worse case. At that moment in time we had a planning number of a spill of about 3,134 Barrels which is 131,000 gallons rounding as a maximum worst case. 30:59 Chuck Bonham: A month later we now think the likely spill number is 24,696 gallons 41:13 Chuck Bonham: Fortunately given the size of the spill, there were not as many wildlife casualties as could have occurred during a higher migration cycle. 1:25:47 Mayor Kim Carr: So starting off on Saturday, October 2, it's been brought up that yes, we did have a very large air show happening that day. About 1.5 million people were on the beach that day to see the Pacific Air Show. And around nine o'clock that morning, there were city personnel that heard an announcement on VHF channel 16 by the Coast Guard of a possible oil spill in the area, but nothing very specific. At that time, no major details, it wasn't anything to really worry about. By 10:30 in the morning, the Coast Guard had advised us that the spill was larger than originally thought. However, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the location of the spill was nor of the scope of the situation. By 11 o'clock that same day, the Coast Guard had announced that it was now going to be a major spill, and that the incident management team was being activated. 1:28:00 Mayor Kim Carr: At two o'clock, the Coast Guard had advised us that the oil spill would not be reaching the shores of Huntington Beach until Monday, October 4. And again, we didn't have a whole lot of information as to where the spill was. We knew it was off our coast, but we didn't know exactly where or exactly how large the spill was. But then interestingly enough, just a half hour later, we started to receive messages that there were boats that were experiencing oil damage just outside of the air show flight box. And so that became a concern for our city. So then we activated our fire crews, our hazmat team, or the oil spill response trailer and started to do the mitigation efforts. Then this is where it gets to be very, very interesting. At 2:45 the city was notified by the Newport Beach rescue vessel that there were private contractors conducting oil spill cleanups outside of the air show flight box. 1:32:42 Mayor Kim Carr: What we could have done better, what would have been an opportunity was perhaps if the Coast Guard had some sort of awareness, the night before or when that nine o'clock notification came through, we could have been even more proactive because as I said before, every hour during these crises matters. 1:34:00 Mayor Kim Carr: The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve was spared. The Talbert Marsh does have oil damage and again looking back, if we could have had maybe a few more hours notice, we probably could have mitigated that damage even more than what we did. 1:43:17 Brian Nowicki: Like all of you, we at the Center for Biological Diversity are heartbroken by every oil and seabird and are alarmed at the miles of marshes and coastline that will be poisoned for years by this bill. We're angry that yet again, the oil industry has proven its inability to contain its toxic pollution. The structure of pipeline funding to beach proves yet again, that every piece of fossil fuel infrastructure is yet another disaster waiting to happen. And there is a lot of that infrastructure in California. It's increasingly old, outdated in disrepair and poorly located, like the 40 year old pipeline that gave us this most recent spill, all of which makes it increasingly dangerous. Looking beyond the nine oil platforms and islands in state water, there are 23 platforms in federal waters off California. But the fact that those 23 platforms are a little farther from shore should not give us much comfort. First, because oil spills from those operations still end up in our water, our beaches and our wildlife. But also as we've heard today, further from shore also means longer stretches of aging and dangerously vulnerable infrastructure, like the 17 mile long pipeline we're discussing today are clean, reliable federal regulations to protect us from oil spills in federal waters. Federal regulators continue to prove that they are perfectly willing to allow those platforms to continue operating to the last drop of oil despite the mounting dangers of decaying infrastructure well beyond its intended lifespan, outdated drilling plans, numerous violations and insufficient bonds to pay for decommissioning. 1:45:15 Brian Nowicki: But I want to be clear that this is not a problem unique to offshore platforms. At the exact same time that 10s of thousands of gallons of oil were rolling up onto beaches and marshes in Orange County, there was an oil spill in Kern County that is now approaching 5 million gallons of fluid, a mixture of crude oil, toxic wastewater, that includes 600,000 gallons of crude. In fact, in just the last few years, there have been many oil spills in California greater than the spill off Huntington Beach. In the Cymric field alone there were three huge spills in 2019 at 550,000 gallons, 836,000 and 1.2 million gallons respectively. 159,000 in Midway in 2019, 250,000 at McKittrick in 2020. There is another ongoing spill at a separator plant in Cymric that has been leaking since 2003 and has reportedly released as much as 84 million gallons of fluid to date. Now these numbers reflect total combined volumes of crude and produced water and mud, which constitute a toxic mix. As state agencies have testified before this legislature in the past, these dangerous onshore oil operations have contaminated groundwater, land, and wildlife. 1:46:32 Brian Nowicki: After more than 150 years of the oil industry drilling at will in California, the oil is gone and the bottom of the barrel that's left is harder and more dangerous to extract. There's also some of the most carbon polluting crude in the world. With the easy stuff taken, the oil industry is in decline in California, with production down 68% since 1985. The only question is how much more damage will this dying industry do on its way out? 1:49:10 Pete Stauffer: Now with the oil deposit seen as far south as the Mexico border, there are concerns that San Diego wetlands are also being impacted. Moreover, while birds, fish and marine mammals have been the most visibly impacted, the full scale of the ecological damage will take some time to become clear. In the week since the spill event, the oil slick has transformed into an incalculable number of tar balls in the ocean, while tar balls typically float, they can also find their way into underwater sediment or near shore habitats where their impacts on ecological health and wildlife may persist for years or even decades. 1:52:51 Pete Stauffer: According to the federal government there have been at least 44 oil spills since 1969 that have each released more than 10,000 barrels of oil into US waters 2:02:36 Mayor Kim Carr: Just to give you an idea of how much TOT we do receive in Huntington Beach, we receive about $16 million a year. We don't receive anything from those offshore platforms, nothing. And as far as the drilling that we currently have here in Huntington Beach, it's less than $700,000 a year. 2:05:54 Brian Nowicki: What I can't say though, for sure is that it's going to take longer than one season to see what the full impacts are to the local wildlife. And of course, it is wetlands and marshes that often are the most difficult and take the longest to recover from the sorts of impacts. 2:21:11 Jennifer Lucchesi: In 1921, the legislature created the first tidelands oil and gas leasing program. The existing offshore leases the commission is responsible for managing today were issued over a 30 year period between 1938 and 1968. Importantly, I want to highlight a specific act in 1995. The Cunningham shell Act, which serves as a foundational law for the existing legacy oil and gas leases the commission currently manages. Importantly, this Act required the commission to issue oil and gas leases for term not based on years, but for so long as oil and gas is produced in paying quantities. Essentially, this means that Alessi can produce oil and gas pursuant to their state lease indefinitely as long as it is economic for them to do so. 2:58:13 Jennifer Lucchesi: For pipelines that are solely within state waters and under lease with the State Lands Commission, we require the pipelines to be externally and internally inspected annually. And we have engineers on staff that review those inspections and consult with the fire marshal as well with our federal partners on any type of remedial action that needs to happen based on the results of those inspections. For those pipelines that cross both federal and state waters our authority is more limited because the federal government's regulatory authority takes precedence. And PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) is the primary federal agency that regulates those interstate pipelines. They require inspections externally and internally every two years. And that's what this pipeline at issue was subjected to, the platform Elly pipeline. 03:01:20 Senator Dave Min: Let's say you have a pipe and the lease term ends. What powers do you have? What are the considerations you have to follow either statutory or contractually to renew those permits, issue a new permit? Or alternatively, do you have any leeway contractually, statutorily to end those permits prematurely and say, you know, we don't think that, you know, the upkeep is appropriate, you're violating certain provisions, we're just gonna take away your permit prematurely. Do you have any leeway like that? So I'm just trying to get a sense of your flexibility, both in issuing new right of way permits, but also yanking away existing permits. Jennifer Lucchesi: Certainly. So I can give an example of our lease compliance and enforcement actions most recently, with a pipeline that served platforms Hogan and Houchin in the Santa Barbara Channel. Those are two federal platforms in federal waters, that pipeline that served those platforms did cross into state waters and connected on shore. That pipeline lessee of ours was not compliant with our lease terms and the commission took action to terminate those leases based on non compliance and default in breach of the lease terms. And essentially, that did terminate production on those two federal platforms. And they are part of the eight federal platforms that BOEM just announced they were going to be looking at as part of a programmatic EIS for decommissioning. The Commission does not have the authority to unilaterally terminate an existing valid lease absent any evidence of a breach or non compliance SOUTHERN CA OIL LEAK: INVESTIGATING THE IMMEDIATE EFFECTS ON COMMUNITIES, BUSINESSES, AND ENVIRONMENT House Committee On Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations and the Subcommittee October 18, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi Director, Oiled Wildlife Care Network Executive Director, One Health Institute, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis Scott Breneman Commercial Fishing, Retail Market, and Restaurant Owner Newport Beach, CA Vipe Desai Founding Member, Business Alliance for Protecting the Pacific Coast Dr. David L. Valentine Norris Presidential Chair, Earth Science Professor of Marine Science, UC Santa Barbara Clips 15:44 Rep. Katie Porter: As of October 10, workers had recovered 250,000 pounds of oily debris and 14 barrels full of tar balls from the Orange County shorelines. That is a small fraction, though, of the oil that was released, most of which is being distributed in the ocean, making its way into the food chain or falling to the ocean floor. Some of that oil is now heading south. And we will not learn the long term consequences on the environment for many years to come. 17:39 Rep. Katie Porter: The witnesses here with us today will reveal a different kind of subsidy for oil and gas companies, an involuntary subsidy that occurs when the community bears the costs of oil drilling's pollution. When a locally owned business like Mr Brennaman that has been in the family for four generations loses tens of thousands of dollars because of the leak. That's his subsidies to oil and gas. When a hotel loses its bookings overnight. That's its subsidy for oil and gas. When the fragile decades-long effort to recover a species under the Endangered Species Act is finally showing progress, but an oil spill puts it all at risk. That's a cost of oil and gas to these subsidies and so many others are the reasons that oil wells like the ones behind this leak are still active. Getting rid of the subsidies is the first step to get rid of the problem. 27:52 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): We know that the spill was not reported by the responsible oil company until the next day, despite the company's knowledge. We also know that Orange County residents recognize that there was a problem in part due to the smell caused by this bill and actually reported it before the oil company did so, clearly something wrong with that. 28:35 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): In my congressional district, which is just the south of here, the spill shutdown businesses and beaches in Dana Point in San Clemente. Tarballs that are likely caused by the spill have also been found as far south in my district as Oceanside, Carlsbad, Encinitas and Del Mar in San Diego County. 29:03 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): It'll come as no surprise that more than $2 billion in wages and $4 billion in gross domestic product are generated by Orange County's ocean and marine economy, including tourism. So we have a lot to lose every time there's a spill, not just to our beaches but to our economy. 39:30 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: In Birds, the primary issue we are concerned mostly about are the acute effects due to hypothermia. If you think of feathers almost as a dry suit in animals, if oil gets on that dry suit, it creates a hole that allows cold water to seep next to the skin. Birds can get very cold in the environment and start to waste away, they have to come ashore to stay warm, but they can no longer eat. So these birds actually can waste away in a matter of days unless proactive capture occurs. There can also be chronic effects in animals as well due to printing of oil off of the feathers or ingestion in their food items. Those chronic effects can include, in essence, effects on every organ system in an animal's body from reproductive effects liver, kidney, respiratory tracts, depending on the dose and the exposure and the toxin itself. 42:50 Scott Breneman: We were fishing on Friday, October 1, and we were coming in the harbor and I detected a distinct odor of oil and it was about midnight we're heading in. Kind of search around the boat. I thought maybe it was a spill on the boat or a hose broke. I went in the engine room, searched all the hatches where I keep all my extra fluids and everything, didn't find anything. Come the next day the press released that there was an actual oil spill, and my fish sales and my fish market, once that was released, they dropped drastically down, 90% this past few weeks since it was released. I've seen the same effect -- my family's been fishing for four generations and in the 90s my dad went through the oil spill that was off Seal Beach, in our fish market, the same exact response from the public scared, worried the products contaminated. A huge ripple effect all the way up to the wholesalers I deal with outside of Orange County there. They had concerns from their customers, their restaurants. And to rebuild that business when it happened in the 90s, I watched my dad struggle for months to get back to back to where it was and it's...I'm seeing the same exact thing happen here. A couple of days after the oil spill they had closed Newport Harbor. And so my boat was actually trapped inside of the harbor so I wasn't even able to go service my accounts. And it's just been, to tell you the truth, a very difficult couple of weeks and I'm not sure how long this is going to last. I'm not sure how the public's going to respond to it long term if there's still going to have some fear that the fish is contaminated. 46:20 Vipe Desai: In fact between 2007 and 2018 there were over 7000 oil spills in federal waters, an average of about two every day. 46:50 Vipe Desai: The first impact came from the much anticipated Pacific Air Show. As oil began to wash ashore, beaches were deemed unsafe for activity. On Saturday October 2nd, 1.5 million visitors saw the show from Huntington Beach, but the show's triumphant conclusion on Sunday was cancelled with little fanfare. Cancellations hit hotels and resorts almost immediately and their surrounding retail and restaurants suffered. Wing Lam, co-founder of Wahoo's Fish tacos, informed me that the Saturday before the oil spill felt like a busy summer day. But the following day, once word got out about the spill, it was a ghost town. In addition, as the spill moved south, their locations in Laguna Beach and San Clemente started to feel the impacts. Bobby Abdel, owner of Jack's Surfboards, had a similarly bleak weekend. He told me that once the oil spill was announced customer traffic plummeted. Their stores are facing a stockpile of unsold inventory from the US Open of Surfing and the Pacific Air Show. All nine of Jack's Surfboards locations were impacted in some form or another because of the spill. Later in the week, I received a call from a colleague, Wendy Marshall, a full time hard working mother of two who shared with me that her upcoming Airbnb reservations, a form of income to help her offset college tuition costs for her children, had mostly been cancelled. From Dana Point though dolphin and whale capital of the world and the first whale Heritage Site in the Americas. Giselle Anderson from local business Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari shared losses from trips and bookings into November could be down as much as 74% because of the oil spill. 52:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: I want to invoke my privilege as a university professor to start with a little bit of a history lesson. Many people think that the largest spill in US history occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. This is not correct. The largest spill in US history occurred in California. It was not the October 2021 spill that we're here to talk about today. Nor was it the 2015 refugio beach pipeline rupture on the gaviota coast. It was not the 2007 Cosco, Busan spill and San Francisco Bay. And it was not the 1997 platform Irene pipeline rupture of Annenberg Air Force Base. It was not the 1990 American traders spill off the coast of Huntington Beach. It was not the 1969 platform, an oil spill off of Santa Barbara, the one that helped spawn the environmental movement. Nor was it the sinking of the SS Montebello, an oil freighter that was hit by a Japanese torpedo off the coast of Cambria and World War Two. It was called the Lakeview Gusher. It occurred in Kern County, and it's estimated to have released around 380 million gallons of oil over an 18 month period starting in 1910. And I tell you this bit of California history because it punctuates five important points. First, oil production carries inherent risk. Second, California has suffered more than its fair share of spills. Third, the size of a spill is only one factor in determining its impact. Fourth, responsiveness and context matter. And fifth, every spill is different and that includes the impacts. 54:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: For the current spill, I have honed in on three key modes of exposure that concern me most: floating oil slicks that can impact organisms living at or near the sea surface, coastline areas such as wetlands where oil can accumulate and persist, and the sea floor, where oil can easily hide from view but may still pose longer term risks. Among these three, the fate of impacts of submerged oil is especially relevant to California, is the least well understood, and requires additional research effort. 59:40 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): So recently I asked the Department of Interior about the specific kinds of subsidies that Beta Operating received. Beta is a subsidiary of Amplify Energy, and that's the company that owns the platforms and the pipelines that leaked off our coast. It turns out that they got nearly $20 million from the federal government, specifically because the oil wells are at the end of their lives and are not producing much oil, which makes them less profitable. So taxpayers are being asked to pay to encourage oil production in the Pacific Ocean by giving oil companies millions of dollars to do it. 1:00:39 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Beta operating is in line to get another $11 million to drill for new wells off the coast because that $11 million is needed, in their words, “to make production economic.” So taxpayers are being asked to pay Beta to drill new wells. That means wells that would otherwise not be drilled without our taxpayer subsidy. 01:02:52 Dr. Michael H. Ziccardi: What we have found, during and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is that dolphins can be significantly impacted by oil, primarily through inhalation of the fumes at the surface and ingestion of the oil substances themselves. What we found is that it affects their immune system, it affects their reproductive tract, and it affects their gastrointestinal tract, so very significant changes. And that's information that is just now starting to come out in the publications from the Deepwater Horizon incident. 1:06:51 Vipe Desai: Had this oil spill moved north, it would have impacted two of the busiest ports in the nation, which account for billions of dollars of goods flowing in and out of both ports of LA and Long Beach. And that would have had an even larger impact to other communities across the US. 1:08:21 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): The annual oil production off the coast of California is about 1/3 of what our nation produces in a single day. So it really is a drop in the bucket when you consider the overwhelming potential for economic damage for environmental damage, the risks simply aren't worth it. 1:09:34 Vipe Desai: California's ocean economy generates $54.3 billion in revenue and supports 654,000 jobs. 1:25:15 Dr. David L. Valentine: In Orange County, the areas that I would look at most closely as being especially vulnerable on the environmental side would be the wetland environments. Places like Talbert Marsh where oil can surge in with the tide. And it can get trapped in those environments and it can get stuck and it won't come back out when the tide recedes. Those are especially vulnerable because they're these rich, diverse ecosystems. They provide a whole host of different services, whether it's flyways, or fisheries, or in keeping the nutrient levels moderated in coastal waters. And that oil can stick there and it can have a long term impact. And furthermore, cleanup in those cases can be very difficult because getting into a marsh and trying to clean it up manually can cause as much damage as oil can cause. 1:26:24 Dr. David L. Valentine: And then the other environment that I worry a lot about is the environment we can't see, that is what's going on under the surface of the ocean. And in that case, we can have oil that comes ashore and then gets pulled back offshore but is now denser because it's accumulated sand and other mineral matter. And that can be sticking around in the coastal ocean. We don't really understand how much of that there is or exactly where it goes. And that concerns me. 1:29:18 Rep. Mike Levin (D-CA): But Dr. Valentine, how concerned Do you think California should be that companies that own the offshore platforms, wells and pipelines might go bankrupt and pass decommissioning costs on to taxpayers? Dr. David L. Valentine: I think that we need to be very concerned. And this is not just a hypothetical, this is already happening. There are two instances that I can tell you about that I've been involved with personally. The first stems from the pipeline 901 rupture, also known as the Refugio, a big oil spill that happened in 2015. When that pipeline ruptured, it prevented oil from being further produced from platform Holley, off the coast of Santa Barbara just a few miles from my home. That platform when it was completely shut in, all 30 wells, was unable to produce any oil and the company, a small operator, went bankrupt. And then shortly thereafter, they went bankrupt again. And this time, they just gave up and they did something called quit claiming their lease back to the state of California. Meaning that the plugin abandonment and property commissioning fell into the lap of the State of California in that case, and that is an ongoing, ongoing saga. The second example I would give you is in Summerland. In 1896, the first offshore oil wells in this country were drilled from piers in Summerland. Those have been leaking over the years. And as recently as last year, there were three leaky oil wells coming up in Summerland. The state of California has found money to try alternative plug in abandonment strategies because anything traditional is not going to work on something that is 125 some odd years old. So that would be the second example where this is now falling into the taxpayers lap yet again. IMPACTS OF ABANDONED OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE NEED FOR STRONGER FEDERAL OVERSIGHT House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. October 14, 2021 Witnesses: Dr. Donald Boesch Professor and President Emeritus, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Dr. Greg Stunz Endowed Chair for Fisheries and Ocean Health, and Professor of Marine Biology Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies Texas A&M University Robert Schuwerk Executive Director, North America Office Carbon Tracker Initiative Ms. Jacqueline Savitz Chief Policy Officer, Oceana Clips 10:34 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I can certainly provide a summary of things that will help keep energy prices down: issue onshore and offshore lease sales; reinstate the Presidential permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline; renew our commitment to exporting American energy, instead of importing foreign energy; reform a broken permitting process; and stop burdening domestic producers. 16:08 Dr. Donald Boesch: Oil and gas production from wells in less than 1000 feet of water declined as fuels discovered in the 80s and even earlier were depleted. Crude oil production in these relatively shallow waters declined by over 90% both in the Gulf and and in Southern California. Natural gas production in the OCS, which mainly came from the shallow water wells, declined by 80%. Offshore fossil energy production is now dominated in the deep water off the Gulf of Mexico, up to 7500 feet deep. Deepwater production grew by 38% just over the last 10 years since the Deepwater Horizon disaster. 17:05 Dr. Donald Boesch: Since the lifting of the crude oil export ban in 2016, last year there was 78% more crude oil exported from Gulf terminals, exported overseas, than actually produced in the US OCS and three times as much natural gas exported, than produced offshore. 18:06 Dr. Donald Boesch: So, the depletion of shallow water gas has left this legacy of old wells and declining resources and the infrastructure requires decommissioning and removal. Much of this infrastructure is not operated by the original leaseholders, but by smaller companies with lesser assets and technical and operational capacity. 18:40 Dr. Donald Boesch: Off Southern California there are 23 platforms in federal waters, eight of which are soon facing decommissioning. In the Gulf, on the other hand, there are 18,162 platforms and about 1000 of them will probably be decommissioned within this decade. 19:46 Dr. Donald Boesch: According to the GAO, as you pointed out, there are 600 miles of active pipelines in federal waters of the Gulf, and 18,000 miles of abandoned plant pipelines. The GAO found the Department of the Interior lacks a robust process for addressing the environmental and safety risk and ensuring clean up and burial standards are met. And also monitoring the long term fate of these, these pipelines. 20:54 Dr. Donald Boesch: At recent rates of production of oil and gas, the Gulf's crude oil oil reserves will be exhausted in only six or seven years. That is the proven reserves. Even with the undiscovered and economically recoverable oil that BOEM (Bureau of Ocean Energy Management) estimates in the central and western Gulf, we would run out of oil about mid century. So unless some miracle allows us to capture all of the greenhouse gases that would be released, we really can't do that and achieve net zero emissions, whether it be by resource depletion, governmental or corporate policy, or investor and stockholder decisions. Offshore oil and gas production is likely to see it see a steep decline. So the greenhouse gas emissions pathway that we follow and how we deal with the legacy and remaining infrastructure will both play out over the next decade or two. 25:16 Dr. Greg Stuntz: In fact, these decades old structures hold tremendous amounts of fish biomass and our major economic drivers. A central question is, how do these structures perform in relation to mother nature or natural habitat and I'm pleased to report that in every parameter we use to measure that success. These artificial reefs produce at least as well are often better than the natural habitat. We observe higher densities of fish, faster growth and even similar output. Thus, by all measures, these data show artificial reefs are functioning at least equivalent on a per capita basis to enhance our marine resources. 28:54 Rob Schuwerk: When a company installs a platform and drills well, it creates an ARO, an obligation to reclaim that infrastructure when production ends. This costs money. But companies aren't required to get financial assurance for the full estimated costs today. Money to plug in active wells today comes from cash flows from oil and gas production. But what happens when that stops? The International Energy Agency sees peak oil and gas demand as early as 2025. This will make it harder to pay for decommissioning from future cash flows. Decommissioning is costly. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) data indicate that offshore AROs could range from $35 to over $50 billion while financial assurance requirements are about $3.47 billion. That is less than 10% of expected liability. The GAO believes these figures may actually underestimate the true costs of retiring the remaining deepwater infrastructure. 30:05 Rob Schuwerk: Only about a third of the unplug wells in the Gulf of Mexico have shown any production in the last 12 months. Why haven't the other two thirds already been retired? Because of uncertainty as to when to close and poor incentives. Infrastructure should be decommissioned when it's no longer useful. But the regulator has difficulty making that determination. This uncertainty explains why BSEE waits five years after a well becomes inactive to deem it no longer useful for operations with years more allowed for decommissioning. These delays increase the risk that operators will become unable to pay or simply disappear. We've seen this already with a variety of companies including Amplify Energy's predecessor Beta Dinoco off California and Fieldwood recently with Mexico. 30:55 Rob Schuwerk: There's also a problem of misaligned economic incentives. As it is virtually costless to keep wells unplugged, companies have no incentive to timely plug them. AROs are like an unsecured, interest free balloon loan from the government with no date of maturity. There's little incentive to save for repayment because operators bear no carrying cost and no risk in the case of default. If the ARO loan carried interest payments commensurate with the underlying non performance risk, producers would be incentivized to decommission non economic assets. The solution is simple, require financial assurance equivalent to the full cost of carrying out all decommissioning obligations. This could take the form of a surety bond, a sinking fund or some other form of restricted cash equivalent. If wells are still economic to operate, considering the carrying cost of financial assurance, the operator will continue production, if not they'll plug. In either case, the public is protected from these costs. 32:11 Rob Schuwerk: A key risk here is operator bankruptcy that causes liabilities to be passed on to others. And we could see this in the recent Fieldwood bankruptcy. Fieldwood was formed in 2012 and in 2013 acquired shallow water properties from Apache Corporation. It went through chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018, and then undeterred, acquired additional deepwater platforms from Noble Energy. Fieldwood returned to bankruptcy in 2020. It characterized the decommissioning costs it shared with Apache as among the company's most significant liabilities. The bankruptcy plan created new companies to receive and decommission certain idle offshore assets. If they failed, prior operators and lessors would have to pay. Several large oil and gas companies objected to this proposal. They were concerned that if Fieldwood couldn't pay they would. Ultimately the plan was proved. The case illustrates a few key dynamics. First, if bankrupt companies cannot pay, others, including taxpayers, will. How much of the possibly $50 billion in offshore decommissioning liability is held by companies that are only a dragged anchor, a hurricane a leaking pipeline or oil price shock away from default? And second, as detailed in my written testimony, private companies who face liability risks understand them better than the government does. When they transfer wells, they demand financial protections that are in fact greater than what the government requires today. 36:02 Jacqueline Savitz: Supplemental bonds are necessary to protect taxpayers from the risk of spills but BOEM is overusing the waiver provisions that allow a financial strength test to waive requirements for supplemental bonds. BOEM regulations require that lessees furnish a relatively small general bond and while BOEM has discretion to acquire supplemental bonds, it generally waives those. General bonds that lessees are required to furnish don't come close to covering the cost of decommissioning and haven't been updated since 1993. Since that year, the cost of decommissioning has gone up in part because development has moved into deeper waters, only about 10% of offshore oil production in the Gulf was in deepwater in 1993. But by 2014, that figure rose to 80%. Regulations need to be updated to ensure the federal government and taxpayers are not left picking up the tab on decommissioning. According to GAO, only 8% of decommissioning liabilities in the Gulf of Mexico were covered by bonds or other financial assurance mechanisms, with the other 92% waived or simply unaccounted for. 38:06 Jacqueline Savitz: BSEE does not conduct oversight over decommissioning activities underway and it does not inspect decommissioned pipelines so the Bureau can't ensure that the industry has complied with required environmental mitigation. 38:17 Jacqueline Savitz: Leak detection technologies that the oil and gas industry touts as safer have not been proven to prevent major leaks. All pipelines in the Pacific region are reportedly equipped with advanced leak detection equipment. Though two weeks ago we saw exactly what can happen even with the so-called “Best Technology.” 42:00 Dr. Donald Boesch: In Hurricane Ida, all of a sudden appeared an oil slick, and it lasted for several days. And apparently it was traced to an abandoned pipeline that had not been fully cleared of all the residual oil in it so that all that oil leaked out during that incident. 47:59 Dr. Donald Boesch: One of the challenges though, is that this older infrastructure is not operating in the same standards and with the same capacity of those of the major oil companies that have to do that. So for example, when I noted that they detected this methane being leaked, they didn't detect it from the new offshore deepwater platforms which have all the right technology. It's in the older infrastructure that they're seeing. 54:14 Rob Schuwerk: There's actually one thing that exists offshore, joint and several liability, that only exists in certain jurisdictions onshore. So in some ways the situation onshore is worse. Because in some states like California you can go after prior operators if the current operator cannot pay, but in many jurisdictions you cannot. And our research has found that there is about $280 billion in onshore liability, and somewhere around 1% of that is covered by financial assurance bonds so, there is definitely an issue onshore rather than offshore. 55:04 Rob Schuwerk: The issue is just really giving them a financial incentive to be able to decommission. And that means they have to confront the cost of decommissioning and internalize that into their decision on whether continuing to produce from a well is economic or not. And so that means they need to have some kind of financial insurance in place that represents the actual cost. That could be a surety bond where they go to an insurer that acts as a guarantor for that amount. It could be a sinking fund, like we have in the context of nuclear where they go start putting money aside at the beginning, and it grows over time to be sufficient to plug the well at the end of its useful life. And there could be other forms of restricted cash that they maintain on the balance sheet for the benefit of these liabilities. 1:15:38 Jacqueline Savitz: Remember, there is no shortage of offshore oil and gas opportunity for the oil industry. The oil industry is sitting on so many, nearly 8.5 million acres of unused or non producing leases, 75% of the total lease acreage in public waters. They're sitting on it and not using it. So even if we ended all new leasing, it would not end offshore production. 1:22:35 Rob Schuwerk: Typically what we'll see as well to do companies will transfer these assets into other entities that have less financial means and wherewithal to actually conduct the cleanup. Rep. Katie Porter: So they're moving once they've taken the money, they've made the profit, then they're giving away they're basically transferring away the unprofitable, difficult, expensive part of this, which is the decommissioning portion. And they're transferring that. Are they transferring that to big healthy companies? Rob Schuwerk: No, often they're transferring it to companies that didn't exist even just prior to the transfer. Rep. Katie Porter: You mean a shell company? Rob Schuwerk: Yes. Rep. Katie Porter: Like an entity created just for the purpose of pushing off the cost of doing business so that you don't have to pay it even though you've got all the upside. Are you saying that this is what oil and gas companies do? Rob Schuwerk: We've seen this, yes. Rep. Katie Porter: And how does the law facilitate this? Rob Schuwerk: Well, I suppose on a couple of levels. On the one hand, there's very little oversight of the transfer. And so there's very little restriction from a regulatory standpoint, this is true, offshore and also onshore. So we see this behavior in both places. And then secondary to that there are actions that companies can take in bankruptcy that can effectively pass these liabilities on to taxpayers eventually and so some of it is to be able to use that event, the new company goes bankrupt. 1:25:01 Rob Schuwerk: Certainly no private actor would do what the federal government does, which is not have a security for these risks. MISUSE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND CORPORATE WELFARE IN THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY House Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 19, 2021 Witnesses: Laura Zachary Co-Director, Apogee Economics & Policy Tim Stretton Policy Analyst, Project on Government Oversight (POGO) Clips 27:10 Laura Zachary: There have long been calls for fiscal reforms to the federal oil and gas program. Compared to how states managed oil and gas leasing, the federal government forgoes at least a third of the revenue that could have been captured for taxpayers 27:25 Laura Zachary: On January 27 of this year, the Biden administration signed Executive Order 14008 that pauses issuing new federal oil and gas leases. And importantly, the language implies a temporary pause, only on issuing new leases, not on issuing drilling permits. This is a critical distinction for what the impacts of a pause could be. Very importantly, federal permitting data confirms that to date, there has been no pause on issuing drilling permits for both onshore and offshore. And in fact, since the pause began, Department of Interior has approved drilling permits at rates in line with past administrations. 37:08 Tim Stretton: Because taxpayers own resources such as oil and gas that are extracted from public lands, the government is legally required to collect royalties for the resources produced from leases on these lands. Project on Government Oversight's investigations into the federal government's oversight of the oil, gas and mining industries have uncovered widespread corruption that allows industry to cheat U.S. taxpayers out of billions of dollars worth of potential income. Given the amount of money at stake and the oil and gas industry's history of deliberately concealing the value of the resources they've extracted with the intent of underpaying royalties, the government should be particularly vigilant in ensuring companies pay their fair share for the resources they extract. 46:28 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): We are here today for the majority's attempt, which I believe is more of a publicity stunt to criticize the oil and gas industry than to talk about real facts and data. The playbook is a simple one: recycled talking points to vilify the industry and to paint a distorted picture of so-called good versus evil. I'm sure that we'll hear more about corporate subsidies that aren't. We'll hear about unfair royalty rates that aren't and we'll hear many other meme worthy talking points that fail the logic test. 47:35_ Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): What we're -really talking about today is an industry that provides reliable and affordable energy to our nation. This isan industry that contributes to almost 10 million jobs and plays a vital role in our daily lives. In fact, we cannot conduct virtual hearings like this without the fossil fuel industry. And of course, when myself and my colleagues travel to Washington, DC, we rely on this industry to fly or to drive here. 49:33 Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-AR): But they ignore the real world consequences of demonizing this industry. The results are devastating job loss and the loss of public education funding to name just a few. 54:05 Rep. Pete Stauber (R-MN): I also had a roundtable discussion and learned how New Mexico schools received nearly $1.4 billion in funding from oil and gas just last year. 55:08 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Mr. Stretton, how long has your organization been conducting oversight of oil and gas production on federal lands? Tim Stretton: For decades, I mean, we started doing this work in the early 90s. And actually, some of our earliest work in the space was uncovering in excess of a billion dollars in unpaid royalties to your home state of California. Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): And you mentioned, what are some of the patterns? You've been doing this for decades? What are some of the patterns that you observe over time? Tim Stretton: The oil and gas industry working with each other to really undervalue the resources they were selling, fraudulently telling the government the value of those resources, which left billions of dollars in unpaid revenue going to the federal government. 1:01:09 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): There are some people who have made environmentalism a religion. Rather than focus on solutions that can make lives better for people, some would prefer to vilify an industry that provides immeasurable benefits to people's livelihood in the function of modern day society. 1:04:21 Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): The other side looks at globalism, you know this environmental movement globally. So it makes more sense to me at least and folks I come from that we produce it cleaner more efficiently than anybody else in the world. And so that geopolitical application, if you're an environmentalist, you would want more American clean oil and gas out there versus Russian dirty or Chinese dirty gas. 02:37:23 Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT): In January state education superintendents in Wyoming, Miami, North Dakota, Alaska, and Utah submitted a letter to President Biden outlining their concerns with the administration's oil and gas ban which has reduced funding used to educate our rising generation. 02:43:35 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): I'm glad to be able to highlight the true success story of the oil and gas industry in my home state of New Mexico. To put it simply, the oil and gas industry is the economic backbone of New Mexico and has been for decades. The industry employs 134,000 People statewide and provides over a billion dollars each year to fund our public education. 02:44:30 Rep. Yvette Herrell (R-NM): Many of my Democratic colleagues have stated that green energy jobs can replace the loss of traditional energy jobs, like the 134,000 Oil and Gas jobs in my state. Many also say that we need to be transitioning to a completely carbon free energy grid. Can you tell me and the committee why both of those ideas are completely fantasy? Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

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PBS NewsHour - Science
Barely a cloud in the sky and Portland, Maine, is flooding

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 6:22


The Gulf of Maine is one of the fastest-warming bodies of saltwater on the planet. In Portland, Maine, sea levels are expected to rise 10 to 17 inches by 2030 from the levels in 2000. Christopher Booker reports on how the city is trying to adapt to climate change as flooding from sea level rise increases. The story is part of our ongoing initiative, Peril & Promise: The Challenge of Climate Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Barely a cloud in the sky and Portland, Maine is flooding

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 6:22


The Gulf of Maine is one of the fastest-warming bodies of saltwater on the planet. In Portland, Maine, sea levels are expected to rise 10 to 17 inches by 2030 from the levels in 2000. Christopher Booker reports on how the city is trying to adapt to climate change as flooding from sea level rise increases. The story is part of our ongoing initiative, Peril & Promise: The Challenge of Climate Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Time to Shine Podcast : Public speaking | Communication skills | Storytelling
183. Steve Donofrio: Crafting Extraordinary Stories From Ordinary Life

Time to Shine Podcast : Public speaking | Communication skills | Storytelling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 31:44


Steve Donofrio is a former Non Commissioned officer (NCO) in the US Army with deployments to Iraq and Kuwait for the first Gulf war as well as other real-world missions.   As an international motivational speaker and leadership trainer, Steve utilizes his 20 years of speaking and training to help leaders move things to done through […]

Real Estate Marketing Dude
How To Build A Never Ending Pipeline With Sherri Johnson

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 36:53


Quite often on the show, what you'll hear me say is stuff along the lines of "Hey, you are just a salesperson chasing another check if you are only counting the commission as the real value of closing a transaction instead of leveraging your transactions. When I was selling real estate, the goal of the listing was not to sell the damn house, the goal was to leverage the house for additional buyer leads brand building, and certainly to solidify the relationship with the person that we represented. It's never a matter of just selling a house. So today, Sherry Johnson is going to walk us through exactly what she calls sort of the gold mine pipeline. She's a coach nationally. She's been doing this for years, and she's got a wealth of knowledge. She sold for almost 10 years, then went into leadership and management with a huge company, Howard Hanna Real Estate. There, she grew the sales volume of 750 agents from 600 million to 1.7 billion in four years. Today, she provides solutions for agents, individual agents, teams, large teams, mega teams, and also provides management and brokerage executive level coaching for companies.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeWhy you should be running a business and not being a salesperson chasing a checkWhat the goldmine pipeline system isHow to grow your sales volumeResourcesSherri Johnson CoachingReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business, you constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike way ambassador, real estate marketing. This podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them. Let's get startedWhat's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast, another Friday here, and actually, this show is gonna go live tomorrow. So this is like real time, like, I'm low on shows, and I'm loading up. But it's a good one. I was just on her podcast. And I know the last few weeks, I've been doing a lot more like training and whatnot. But I wanted to bring on a coach. And she's got a really cool system. Quite often on the show, what you'll hear me say is stuff along the lines of like, Hey, you are just a salesperson chasing another check. If you count the real value of closing a transaction that only commission you have on that deal specifically, and not leveraging your transactions, the next one. So when I was selling real estate, the goal of the listing was not to sell the damn house and it was gonna sell fucking house. The goal, the goal was to leverage the house for additional buyer leads brand building, and certainly to solidify the relationship with the person that we represented. Because it's never a matter of selling a house. Like my goal is to sell everyone for houses and under referred into for more relationships that I can read, rinse and repeat the same damn thing. So we're talking about running a business and not being a salesperson chasing a check. So our guest today is Sherry Johnson is going to walk us through exactly what she calls sort of the gold mine pipeline. She's a coach nationally. She's been doing this for years, and she's got a wealth of knowledge. So without further ado, let's go ahead and welcome Miss Sherry Johnson to the show. Sherry, how are you and thank you for joining us.Hey, Mike, thanks for having me. I'm excited to be on your awesome podcast and talk about this. Yeah, it's gonna be to be hopefully one of your best episodes I have, I think.Let's go in. I want you to tell everyone, just brief background, who the hell are you? Where do you come from how you been doing this, and then we'll get into it.Awesome. So I am in Cleveland, Ohio, born and raised, and I've been a real estate broker for 25 years, I'm going to 26 I was a top agent at a company we had two huge independent companies here in Cleveland. So I sold for almost 10 years, I then went into leadership and management with a huge company, Howard Hanna real estate. They're huge. We had, I think I had 750 agents in my territory after managing a couple of offices. Through the goldmine pipeline system that I created, when I was an agent, grew the sales volume of those 750 agents from 600 million to 1.7 billion in four years. And that was done through aggressively coaching and helping agents through the go my pipeline, but also, you know, going after being a listing agent, and as you said, selling three to five houses off of every listing and also, you know, getting clients for life and building a 90% referral base. So four years ago, or maybe now almost four and a half years ago, I started sharing Johnson coaching, which was a life goal of mine since I was 27 years old to have my own national speaking coaching and consulting company. We provide solutions for agents, individual agents, teams, large teams, mega teams, and then we also provide management and brokerage executive level coaching for companies and we are our preferred coaching company for some of the large brands. But at the end of the day, it's all about giving and adding value to agents to help them compete and win at higher level and grow really amazing businesses while working smarter, not harder. And, you know, not getting distracted by a lot of things out there. lead sources can come we're gonna talk about that, where can you go deep and one of those is with your database, or client base, also known as and I think we you know, there's there's lots of ways to do this business. I think agents just need to focus and have a system and a strategy and that's what I'm gonna deliver today for you with the goldmine pipeline. I have two kids by the way, I didn't mention that.Manage that you managed to finally get a couple kids in there through all this.I love my daughter Tori and 14 year old son Matthew, they're like little awesome individual. Many people they're just amazing. And they inspire me every day and I'm a big runner. I run half marathons and I love to run and I love I love real estate. I'm just like so stoked to be here. So thanks. Cuz you're amazing. And you were amazing on my podcast, by the way, sothank you. Yeah, well, um, let's get into it because you're exactly right. When you say there's a system, they're running this business. And I think we're the why so many agents like fail from the beginning is because they don't approach it like a business or have a system to it, they approach it, like you're working in for a sales position, and you're working for someone that hires you to go out and sell stuff each and every month. And you can't run a business that way. It just won't work. It just, it doesn't work. I mean, statistically, and I hate saying that cliche, but 87% of agents fail after five years. And that's because for reasons that's four out of five people don't make it. And I think a lot of it has to do with what they're being taught at the very beginning. Cold calling door knocking and you're burning people out, you're so you're taking like a bunch of sales, people who aren't even really sales, people are trying to mold them into salespeople, and then it just turns into an ugly mess. So let's get into this gold mined pipeline and start from square one, I want you to walk me through sort of give me what are we going to focus on first, and let's go through sequential order, so everyone could sort of follow it,I send out so you are the CEO of your business, you're gonna call yourself CEO, but you have to run out like a business, as Mike just said. And, you know, it's, it's not just gonna happen, like people, I think, get the get their license, and they mistakenly think that everyone in their sphere is gonna use them, which happens at some point, it will happen. But you have to have a plan. And we can't hope that people are just going to use, you can't hope you're going to do this business, you have to actually have a plan and make it happen, and be intentional and on purpose and what the goldmine pipeline is going to do for you. And what's so great about this pipeline, Mike is that it works, no matter what someone's current production is, okay, so if someone's already doing eight or 10, or 15 million or 20 million, they can use it to do 10, or, you know, to grow their business double or triple it, I have agents that are doing 100 million that use this system, everyone on their team is on it. So it doesn't matter what your current production is brand new, or you've been licensed for a long time. So it doesn't matter your years of experience, it doesn't matter your current production, this will create what I love the most which every agent, the reason 87% fail, is they don't ever develop consistent or predictable monthly income and they sell a house one month, don't sell a house the next month. And it's this ugly roller coaster issue. So perfectly stated. It's like, they just don't have enough people. And the biggest thing I've seen over these 26 years of leading and developing agents is that they have like two to three people that they focus their time and attention to over a 30 to 40 Hour Work Week, you've seen this movie, doing research for those three to five people. And they just don't have enough people that are having have conversations with enough people. And so while agents discount the ones who say, I'm not going to do anything for six to 12 months, they don't put them on a list, they never follow up with them. And what I say is opportunities are not lost. We didn't lose those opportunities. Those people went and bought a house eventually and listed their home with somebody else. So opportunities are lost, they go to someone else go my pipeline system will help alleviate that and not have that happen anymore. When you lose that listing. You know, agents will say to me Why didn't believe these people because they said they weren't going to do anything for a couple of months. And two weeks later the house is you know, frickin listed. And there's a sign in the yard or they see an MLS and they're like whiplash thinking How did this happen? And I'm like, Well, you didn't maximize the opportunity. And you didn't overcome their objection to listen, somebody else did. The what the goal my pipeline system will do is create consistent and predictable monthly income, which I love. So you're starting out and you want five grand a month or eight grand a month or 10 or 12,000 a month or more. You can create consistent and predictable monthly income by having more people on the list and taking everybody I mean, do we really care when I meet somebody at an open house and they don't know they started looking, you know, my line is hey, I work with you at your pace and your speed. Whether this takes two weeks, two months or two years I'm not going anywhere. Right and we take out that like Parana pneus of like I only want to work with you if you're ready now and and so when people like that they like that I'm not going to show houses for two years for God's sakes that's another problem people do but I'm saying is keep them on your list because even the two year person is going to sell in less than two years Okay, they just haven't wrapped their head around that yet. So what happens is they agents are spending all their time and attention on these two to three people they consider a buyers and if those things don't pan out Mike what do we have? We have like a big fat wellthis is what happens when you do I mean it's why the peaks and valleys everyone spends time on the two to three you close them you're like shit, I need two to three more. Then you spend two to three months trying to find those two, three more than you rinse and repeat the same fucking thing over and over again. And that's why the average agent only sells six to nine houses. I could trip over six to nine sales a year. But I want to point out something that you said, it's really good. You're right, you have to, it's like, you meet someone in an open house, you have a good conversation, you know that if they were ready now that they would probably work with you, you just either get that feeling or you don't. And same thing, if it comes off a lead online, you're like, hey, you have a good rapport with somebody, Okay, I gotta, this guy's gonna buy a house. But the problem is, he's not gonna move here till about nine months. So How the hell am I gonna stay in touch with them? Listen, folks, if you just like continuously, every time you communicate with them, for the first time that you meet them to the time they're ready, if it's always about work, you're fucking slick salesman, at least in their eyes. And there's a way to humanize and nurture that relationship through other ways that you're not always having to talk about work, like trust me, once you meet someone first, and you establish the point that your agent, like, great, I got your an agent, okay, but doesn't mean that every time you talk to him in the future, you're gonna be like, written by anybody where he saw you already. So think about that salesperson that did that to you. Usually, it's in the form of a financial planner. And every time they come up to you, they just keep coming after you, you're like, your ego ready to go, we're gonna go dinner, like, I know, you're trying to sell me something, and then we get turned off. So I'm really interested to see how you're going to position this Go right ahead, keep going.So the goldmine pipeline will actually cast a wider, bigger net, so that you're having more conversations with more people at varying stages of their home buying or selling process. And so some of those people are going to be a, but that might look like a right now, some are going to be be some are gonna be C and then in the pipeline, where we define a, b, and c is like, A, it's going to be 70. In the next 60 days, they're given Lister or bi, B would be up to six months, and C would be over six months, right? And what happens is we actually take your list instead of Mike, everyone has a list of leads, and we take the list, and you actually monetize the sales value of each of those people. So if you're in an average $400,000 market, and you have 10 leads, that would potentially be listing prospects, even if you haven't even spoken to them yet, you just know they might be a possible listing. And even when you know you're getting 10 of those leads for 100,000 apiece, we're at 4 million already right now, just intend. Now you say okay, Sherry, I've got 20 potential sellers, at varying stages of ready to sell. Now I met 20 times 400, a pop or $8 million. And I haven't even talked to you about your buyer side, potential client relationships yet. So think about this. So now go to page two on the form, and the strategy and we're gonna look at all buyers, okay, same thing, identify what timeframe they're in roughly A, B, or C ranking, and then put a value for them. And when we add that up, and it's 10, we've got another 4 million if it's 20, we have another 8 million. And so if you have 20, buyer leads and 20. Let's do it. So it's many of you do, you're sitting on what I call unrealized business, when you look at it in terms of monetized value, not because we look at people as $1 sign sale, but because if you saw what's on your pipeline right now, and it was $16 million, I think you'd feel like the Rockstar agent that you are or could be, right? So coaching is not making people great. It's actually bringing out your potential of what you have. And you just don't realize youhave given potential.When agents come to me and they say, oh my god, here's a here the two bad examples everybody resonates with. They come to me and they say I have these three things that are happening. And I'm going out of town for you know, four days. I said, okay, can any of them happen before you get them any signed before you leave now? Okay, great. Let me know if you need anything. Well, two of them got listed. When was one was an expiring listing for 350 that got listed by you know, it's sold, actually. The other one got listed. It was 215. And it was that lifted by another agent in the office. She lost that so both those deals are gone. Before the four days are up. She comes into my office. My name is Jane, God bless her and she says you're not going to believe this. And I said why? She said my buyer that was going to write for 450 bought a for sale by owner. And I said, well, obviously you have other people in the pipeline. She said no. And this is what we hear. I was counting on those three things. She's crying, she was counting on a commission. I'm gonna sucks people. This is not how you This is why you are failing. And so to be totally blunt, it's like, oh my god, okay. So now as you said, we have to start over 90 days, two months it takes to cultivate, so then conversely with a better story, so you cannot just have three eggs and The basket people, it just it's not the way to do this business and you'll hate it. It is an up and down financial roller coaster. And again, any one of those blows would have been would have sucked just one of them all three, she didn't have if she had 25 or 30 more people to go talk to you, okay, she could have absorbed those hits. And then and and failures, you know, as out of her control a little bit. But like she could have gone to those other 25 to 30 leads, she didn't have anything in the backlog. So on the on the opposite spectrum. I had an agent come to me, one of the office and she came in and she said, You know, I feel like a loser 15 year veteran. Okay, she said, I feel like a loser. I said, Well, you're not a loser. She said, But I only have four buyers. And I said, Okay, handle the forum, I said, how many people you're talking to about listing their house? And she's like, well, I have a lot of those I said, are touch that have a ton of them. They said, Well, what's a ton? And like she said, I have 25 of those at least. And I said, if 25 listing leads, and you're telling me you're a loser, right? She said, Yeah. And I said, How many of those people are moving out of state? And she said, none of them and I said, Okay, so you have 54 pieces of business right here. Go fill this out, write down the numbers, fill in the blanks write down that value of each one of those potential sale, she came back 12 and a half million dollars. Okay, she's hugging me. She's feels like 10 She feels like 10 million 12 million. And And the truth was she about a 225 average sale price. And what I what she said to me, Mike is this, and this is where we fail again, she said to me, Well, none of these people are asking me to list their house. And I said they're not going to like we know what to do when a lead says Hey, Mike, I'm ready to sell my house. Hey, Cherie, like, I'm ready to go, I already bought a house and moving my leases up, I've already sold my house, I need to do this. Now. We know what to do when people call us. And when they do. What happens for these agents is it shows up in a blue frickin Tiffany box with a white bow on it, it's a gift. It happens once in a while. And it doesn't certainly doesn't happen often enough for people to make 150 or $350,000 a year. So if you want to be an agent that's making more money, you have to go make this happen. And so I said to her, they're not going to you have to add value and get yourself appointments of these people and get them excited about moving and go see their house. And so once you fill this pipeline up, she had, again, 54 pieces of the business 24 or 25, listing leads, and 29 buyer sides. And I said to her, you don't have any dialogue scripts, or talk tracks or strategies to get an appointment. So you need to come to life coaching each come i training and Thursday, whatever it was, and I'll teach you how to get appointments. So we fail, and we suck miserably as an industry at adding value to convert leads into clients and then getting appointments. So if you you could actually work a smaller number of people and just be more effective with a better strategy and get more business than trying to throw you know, whatever.I mean, these are these are conversations. All right. These are. So these are so in would you say within the last three to six months? What's what's timeframe, like how often? What should we call these as like conversations that you guys have had, whether you're buying or selling with consumers, over a periodof what? Well, whatever it takes. So people stay on this list really until they buy or die or tell you to stop calling and most people are not going to tell you to stop calling unless they have bought something. So I followed up with it with a lead from an open house Mike for 11 months, I didn't show houses for 11 months, I followed up with a 45 second voicemail that I left people that said, hey, Sherry Johnson, with XYZ company, I sent you some less days I'd love to show you these houses when you're ready like no this day or this day. They didn't call me they didn't call me. And there are many coaches out there that say after someone goes shoo, you know, dump them after the third time. That's not my strategy at all. If they're just not calling me back, that's okay. I actually would call and laugh and say, Hey, tell me if you want me to stop calling and I will. But I probably won't. I'm gonna I'm gonna call you again next month. I'm going to call you again next month. And what happened is these folks were like, in the 11th month, which coincidentally happened to me November, they said to me, Sherry Johnson, you are the only person that stayed in touch with us. We'd like to listen and sell our house. Can you come over this week now? I was like, yeah, and then I and then here's what's crazy. They listed and bought with me and then less than two years in less than two years they did it again. And that time the house I sold them was for it was a 450 list and they bought for 650 and this is a repeatable and the fortune is in the follow up people it is how long did it take me to make those two calls a month, right? It did. I made two calls. Add value, I stayed in touch. And really those people had I not stayed in touch with them 11 months. So here's what's cool. The Goldmine pipeline is like the Alaskan pipeline, it goes on forever. And you're sitting on a goldmine if you build a big enough backlog of people, like I used to sell 75 houses. And I had about 125 good leads on my list at all times. And so you can very mathematically with my formula, figure out exactly how many people have to be on the pipeline that you're going to convert over, you know, the next 636 12 months, you need business six months from now. So when somebody says they're not ready, that's okay. That's awesome. I actually need business eight months from now, because I don't know where that sales gonna come from. And this is funny, Mike, this actually came from me sitting around as an agent, saying, where's my next deal coming from? I did about three and a half million my first year in 1996, when we still had books, and we weren't online, really MLS books. And, and I was like, where am I getting my next sale? So I would write down everybody, because I'm even remotely talking to you. And then I would write down everybody about buying. And I would add it up. And I would I would be like, Look, I could do 8 million look, I could do you know, it'sfunny, I used to run around the notepad. That's how I kept track, as I said, but the white notepad and I remember having like 10 pages of people, I would just go through those names every day. And I would write my last notes. There's no system of follow up, and it's okay, follow up on this one, or I'd add it to my paper calendar. And follow up on it. So let's get into the communication part. Sure. How are we staying in touch? What's the conversation? Like? Are you reaching out on phone? Are you hitting any given them through email? So let's just take the average person that you have a conversation with, but I think where people get stuck is like, alright, they're not ready. But what the fuck do I say to them during this time? So like, let's get through the nurturing content? And how are we nurturing these people until they're ready, because you can't, you have value but you can't always be like, by you got it, it's there's a thin line, right? There's a you can always just be like, you can't be that slick salesman, but you can also be that non aggressor either, because that also says something. So what is the communicationyou're doing? Once somebody comes into your fold into your environment, they go on everything, right, you get their email, and you add them to your, your, your Facebook group, that's a private group that only your clients and past clients and family friends referral sources are in, you start to build a relationship with them. And, you know, if you identify at the beginning, you say here, I have an exclusive homebuyer guide that has everything I need to know about buying a home, I tell agents to take the explicit homebuyer guide, we give them one, but if you don't, if you already have one, and break that into like 15 emails, if they're gonna buy with you and list with you, you use that campaign and you say, it's never too soon to have me over to look at your house, I'm not coming to list it. I mean, I am coming to list it. But I want to come there first and see the house. Because I add value to the process before you go to Home Depot or hire a contractor. I can tell you, I could save you time and money and tell you exactly what to do with that slight floor in the back hall that you're thinking needs to go because you haven't sold a house in 15 years. And you don't know that today's buyers love slate. So you can add value early on. And then what happens is those people are like, You know what, we met you and now we're excited and the interest rates and this and that, we're gonna move it up, and now we're going to buy and move sooner. So I would put them on a very good email campaign doesn't have to be complicated. You don't have to spend a ton of money on a CRM, you can if you have a CRM, these come with those, you could just develop 16 emails that go out over time, with different points where you would say, you know, I'm still here, I'm if you're looking, if you're ready, still thinking of making a move? You know, for your SI people, I think your follow up, you know, a lot of times people make the mistake of thinking a C person is a C person six months after they put them on the list. And it's like, they could have changed, and you just, you're remembering that you made them a C, but that was six months ago or three months ago, they might see people turn into eight people very quickly. And you want to be the one that maximize that opportunity. So I would I would call them I would put them on an exclusive buyer program. Like everyone says, Well what's so exclusive? Well, it's yours number one and you are different than every other agent. So if you don't know that sit down over the weekend or this tonight and say what am I doing that's different than everybody else. My homebuyer guide was my listing tool like I used it as a prop and it got me more listing appointments because I would talk about the buying side but then I would quickly sort of identify you know, I want to come into your house that helps me to see your house while I'm out looking for a house for you. I can see your room sizes, your furniture, colors, things you love about your house and you You heard about your house. And they're like, Oh, no one's ever done that. That makes sense. And I just say, that's how I do things. I want to come see your house, what's in their house. Now we're talking about listing it. Now we're talking about a time frame. It shortens the sale process. And if you all would listen for like a second, here you are salespeople, like we said at the beginning, and your job is to get appointments, like nothing happens. You're not going to write an offer, not going to write a listing contract. If you don't have appointments in your in your schedule this week, it's not going to happen again. And I don't want that to happen is you have bills to pay and your whole family thing. Sure, you know, outworking and I want you to be in that 13% That's actually making money. So go my pipeline, over time should be carried around with you. And when you get lower, you start to see that you sold everything, if Bill your calendar by going back to that thing and saying okay, well to a bar.Like seriously, just go out to a family party. Okay, get together, like, oh, yeah, you have Thanksgiving, like this time that Thanksgiving, Christmas, Halloween, all the parents that were just trick or treating around the neighborhood's 10 to 15% of the people that you're walking around are moving this year, and all of them have referral for you. But here's what we're talking about is talking about building your audience building your list over time and building the wider net. She mentioned something that was important. The Facebook group, not all communication always has to be about real estate, that drip campaign should references just one touch through emails. But if they're also the Facebook group, or friends on Facebook, she's probably also talking about the news restaurant in the community. Right, right. She's also talking about a picture with her fabulous kids. She mentioned earlier, I'm sure it's mixed and matched somewhere in there. And it all starts by that little homebuyers guide you have what's the hook? That was the what gave you the excuse? So like, do you guys have any tools? Or do you guys have any content you own, you guys have any original content that will position you as an expert, like you have to have the basic tools and know your brokerages site is not good enough, because that's their tool, not yours. And you need your own brand. I mean, that's what people are hiring. Soyeah, it could be it could be educational, you could do a video series on your homebuyer guide, put on your YouTube channel and say, Look, if you're interested this is this is available for a minute already. In the meantime, I'm not going anywhere I work at your pace, your speed if we need to, if we need to move that up quicker, I will. But in the meantime, I'm going to put you into our system. And I'm going to share with you we do stuff on you know community involvement, we do a lot for the community, it's just other stuff outside of buying and selling and you're gonna love it because it's all great information. And it's part of the community, we all live work and play, I think that say, I love having conversations that have nothing to do with real estate, because you're at the center of those. So if you haven't done a networking event where you put four or five or eight women together that could all help each other, you know, do that. You're the, you're the center of those things. And when eventually the someone's gonna say, Hey, how's the real estate market share, and you're gonna start talking about the real estate market, everywhere you go. And like you said, this, you know, I made $18,000 at the carwash because I said real estate and I and I was available. And I I capitalized on talking to someone, which is again, what you're supposed to be doing, you know, if you don't like the word prospecting, I say talk real estate to everyone you meet, everywhere you go, you're gonna bump into people, Kid event, sports event, a work event, holiday event, birthday, whatever, you can make money in this business so easily, if you would just think about serving with, you know, value add a value driven strategy, the goal mind pipeline, what's so cool about this is that on the very last page of the pipeline, we separate the A's from the A, B, and C. And when we look at all A, B, and C, it's a pretty big number 16 20 million, whatever. When you just look at the A's, you're able to now forecast like a business owner, what your sales and listings will look like over the next two months. And ultimately what your cash flow will look like which again, we never see that we agents or make money, make no money, right? You don't have to be in that feast and famine, you can actually look at and say I'm I should, over the next two months, make this and this and now you're saying predictability, predictability, I now am in control of my business and you can make whatever you want. You want to double your business, double the amount of appointments should go on, put more people on the pipeline. And by the way, I almost forgot to say like if someone says they have a referral for you like this one guy friend of mine, Josh said I have a referral and my neighbor wants to sell and we're like in a park There's no way I'm getting that information right then. And I said, great, cool that his neighbor, they live in a 650 plus neighborhood. So I'm going to write on the goldmine pipeline under listing lead Josh's neighbors 650. Why cuz I want to remind myself to call the lead referral source, right? Otherwise, that's going to go through the cracks, I'm going to see that house listed and be like, Oh, my God, I talk to somebody and be pissed at myself. Now, you won't be because you put Josh's neighbor 650 on the go my pipeline sheet as a reminder, as a placeholder until you get the clients actual information. So this system is like simple, but it's brilliant, if I may say so. And I've helped 1000s of people like that we're gonna quit the business, say, You know what, I did this. And now I've already sold 3 million. I mean, we take people from a million and a half to 6 million in one year, we take people from six to 60, and so on. So you know, if you want a copy of this, I'm happy to you know, go to just email me, man, you rock at Sherry Johnson comm. We'll put that in, in your podcast if you want. But I'll give you the system, the form and the ways to maximize it. It is a simple system we have provided also in an Excel spreadsheet for people who like it, most agents don't like Excel. But the bottom line is talking to more people. And using this as this is your list to follow up with every week. And if you can't follow up, because your scripts soccer you feel like you just can't you're dead ending everywhere, then, you know, hire somebody hire coach, though, listen to some free content that is out there.So easy, though. Like, it's so easy, like you can't, if you can't follow up? No, I'm just gonna tell them I quit the business like you're not, it's not gonna work like this is really simple. And I don't want to be the negative Nancy over here. But you'll just be honest, like if this is really simple, so I want to, it's so similar to how I used to run my business back home. So here's what I walk you guys through this. And we'll wrap this up and get Sherry's info. So you guys can get a copy of this thing, you definitely get it. But I used to carry a yellow pad in my back pocket. It's how I got started. At four o'clock in the morning in the nightclubs during bottle service, I'd be getting everyone's drunk email addresses and phone numbers. And when conversations for me to get them to start talking about a house was always asking them what they do first, and they always have to ask you what you do next. And it always opened up the conversation for real estate. So like if I knew that 10 to 15% of the market moves every every night, or every night, every year and every night when I go out. I know that I'm just looking for 10 to 15 people to talk to I don't know yet. What I ended up doing was building an email list and a direct mail lists, just friends and family some conversations with real estate or not. But I would always add them to my direct mail list, which meant they got my next touch each and every month. I always add them to my email list, which meant they got my next touch and I wasn't ever talking about real estate. I was just building an audience and it still worked. I was I was I was wishing people happy St. Patty's Day in town where the bar specials were. I was wishing people happy Valentine's Day. My direct mail pieces were just like toilet humor. Fun facts have nothing to do with real estate. But what I realized is that if you have brand associated on communication, whether it's a shirt, you're wearing a hat, you're wearing the sign and Sherry's video right here behind her I know she has Sheri Johnson coaching, she's not doing that on accident. She's doing that on purpose, because you might not be listening to the audio of this. You might be watching the video and um, she's branding, branding, branding, but that consistent communication, because you're right 80% of those people that you have conversations with, end up hiring the first person they meet with when they're seriously ready. So just because you have that one conversation up front, like it's your job to continuously follow up and you don't always have to follow up in a way that involves them, like hogtied them and sending them into a house and getting them pre approved. Like you could just be in relationship with people but it starts by consistent communication to the same audience over time, not only build your brand, but get those people that you're talking to once to actually come back. Well put Jerry, I love it. Why don't you go ahead and give them your website again, so they can know we'll get this all wrapped up?Absolutely. So you can find us at Sherry Johnson calm and that is Sh e r i Johnson. No t so Sherry Johnson sh t ri johnson.com. If you're listening to this, and in there is a on demand webinar on the go mind pipeline that you can download in a minute and just put in fillable form it'll email the the download of this very strategy as a web. It's on our it's on demand, an on demand webinar. The other thing you can do is send an email to you rock at Sherry johnson.com and ask for the goldmine pipeline and mentioned this podcast if you want or just say I want a copy of the Gulf, my pipeline, we'll send it out to you right away. And we have you know, my podcast is you Rock cherry Johnson, are you rock to share Johnson podcast, which is really fun. You can listen to our exclusive interview with Mike because it was fantastic and it was awesome. And yeah, that's how you can find us love to love to share anything with any of you whether you want coaching or you just want some really good free content, I have a tendency to give out a lot of just helpful staff to help you and if you do want coaching, we're happy to help any of you. You could also see all of the coaching programs on my website.Love it. Thank you Sherry class, give her a call. Look her up guys and thank you guys for listening another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. I appreciate you guys each and every month. Why don't you guys go ahead and follow us on social if you'd like to contact us seeing subscribe to the show, follow us on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, subscribe to that channel. And you know if you need more real estate marketing help, we'll script that and distribute all your video content for you without making you look like a total loser on camera will make you look really really really cool. And I think you're gonna be happy with the results. So why don't you give us a shot? Visit us at real estate marketing do.com real estate marketing dude.com We appreciate you guys listen another episode. See you next week. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing do.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule a time to speak with a dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk #409 - 11.10.2021  KLAUS' CAGE: Fishy Pfizer Meme, WEF to NWO, Deep Fake Future - CCNT 409 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel Podcast (Basil's other podcast) Facelikethesun Resurrection (Gonz' new YouTube channel) Truther Dating experiment   INTRO Fact Check: Astroworld was not a satanic ritual (Politifact) YouTube to hide “dislike” button (Verge)   FLIPPY Japanese steal Flippy    SHILLZILLA Ted Cruise finds waccine enemy, BIG BIRD! (CNN)   COVID19/I AM WACCINE Clip: Rochelle dodges question about CDC employee inoculations  Tweet: Pfizer hashtag “Science Will Win”…meme Mind jab trap, 5 rules that don't make sense (Telegraph) Moderna and NIH at odds, grapple for power (NY Times) [CBS report on Kizzie from 1/2021] Note: Syringe shortage in 2022? (Reuters) Brothel Vaccine Rewards   Party Pitch BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   NEW WORLD ORDER/GREAT RESET Klaus Schwab congratulates UAE, Expo ceremony (Gulf News) Evergrande officially defaults (Express CO UK) NY Times saying Evergrande did not default (NY Times) (

Science Friday Videos
How Puffins On The Gulf Of Maine Act As ‘Sentinels Of Climate Change’

Science Friday Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


Learn how conservationists live on an isolated island to study Maine's puffin population, and how the birds are dealing with warming seas.

Wine for Normal People
Ep 399: Basilicata, Italy and the Wines of Aglianico del Vulture

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 48:02


Basilicata is a tiny region that represents the arch of the Italy's boot -the small area that borders Calabria in the west, Puglia in the east, Campania in the north and the Gulf of Taranto in the south. In this, Italy's 3rd least populous region, wine has been made for thousands of years but today, what remains is just 2,006 ha/5,000 acres of vineyards, which is 0.15% of Italy's total wine production. Of the 2% that is DOC wine, there is a shining star – a wine that can rival the best of the best in all of Italy – Aglianico del Vulture (ahl-LYAh-nee-koh del VOOL-too-ray). In this show we discuss the background of this southern Italian region and discuss the jewel in its crown.     Here are the show notes… We first discuss the location and land of Basilicata In the southern Apennines, Basilicata is the most mountainous region in the south of Italy. 47% is covered by mountains, 45% is hilly, and only 8% is plains. The west is the hillier area, the east runs into flatter land into Puglia. There is a small stretch of coastline between Campania and Calabria and a longer one along the Gulf of Taranto, between Puglia and Calabria. Photo: Getty Images We do a good look at the history of Basilicata, but the highlights are: People (or really ancestors of modern people) have inhabited the area since Paleolithic times. Matera is considered one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world. Its Sassi district, which has now become a UNESCO World Heritage Site, has caves on a rocky hillside that were inhabited by people as far back as the Paleolithic times. Greeks settled in Basilicata from at least the 8th c BCE and likely brought Aglianico with them. Basilicata has been conquered by nearly everyone who paraded through southern Italy over the centuries. In the 1970s and 80s there was a renaissance in wine in Basilicata but it didn't last. Today, there is renewed hope and investments, as a new generation of winemakers takes over their family domaines, establishes new properties and combines traditional and modern winemaking to make excellent wines.   We mention several DOCs of Basilicata: Photo of Matera: Getty Images Matera DOC was granted in 2005 It is 50 ha / 124 acres, and produces about 11,200 cases per year REDS: Matera Primitivo (90%+ Primitivo/Zinfandel grape), Matera Rosso (at least 60% Sangiovese and 30% Primitivo), and Matera Moro, (a minimum of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Primitivo and 10% Merlot). There are basic and Riserva levels Whites: Matera Greco (85%+ Greco), Matera Bianco (minimum of 85% Malvasia Bianca di Basilicata) There is also spumante (sparkling) made in the Champagne method   Grottino di Roccanova DOC was granted in 2009 8 ha / 20 acres, and producers about 3,000 cases per year White/Bianco (Minimum of 80% Malvasia Bianca di Basilicata) Red/Rosso: Sangiovese with Cabernet Sauvignino, Malvasia Nera di Basilicata, Montepulciano   Terre dell'Alta Val d'Agri DOC was granted in 2003. At 11 ha / 27 acres, the area makes a mere 3,840 cases a year. Vineyards can be no higher than 800 m/ 2,625 ft Red/Rosato: Rosso (Minimum 50% Merlot; minimum 30% Cabernet Sauvignon; maximum 20% other red grapes). Riserva and regular versions Photo: Getty Images, Val d'Agri   We spend the rest of the show discussing  Aglianico del Vulture DOC/DOCG, which is 25% of Basilicata's total production Vulture's land… Vulture is an extinct volcano that was last active about 130,000 years ago. It is 56 km/35 miles north of Potenza at an altitude of 1,326m/4,350 ft, close to borders with Puglia and Campania. Woods surround the area and the top of the slope has more volcanic soils and lower lying vineyards have more mixed, colluvial, and clay soils. The elevations are specified by the DOC – too low or too high and you won't get great flavor development or quality wine, so the range is 200-700 m/660 -2300 ft. The variety of soils, elevations and exposures mean that there are different styles of Aglianico del Vulture. Photo: Getty Images Vulture's climate… Vulture is continental in climate and it has lower average daily temperatures than Sicily or Tuscany. There are cool breezes that sweep in from the Adriatic, cooling the area and preventing humidity. Elevation also keeps things cooler, especially at night, which means the grapes experience a long growing season, building flavor in the hot sun during the day, and cooling at night to hoard acidity.  The rain shadow of Mount Vulture also keeps the weather cool and dry.  That said, in some years the drought is fierce, grapes can get sunburned, the tannins can be tough, and the wine can be overly alcoholic.     Characteristics of Aglianico del Vulture Aglianico is a thick-skinned grape that needs mineral-rich soils with clay and limestone (like what is on Vulture). It can be overcropped, so careful tending to the grapes leads to better results (this is kind of a dumb thing to say, since that's the case with all grapes, but I'm putting it out there anyway!).   Flavors range in Aglianico del Vulture. Younger wines are high in tannins and acidity, with black cherry, chocolate, flowers, minerals, dark-fruit, and shrubby, forest notes. With a few years (5 or more), you may get nuances of Earl gray tea, black tea, licorice, earth, tar, spice, and violets. The tannins calm with age, but the acidity remains – with age (7-10 years) these wines are pretty impressive. We discuss the fact that there are some lighter styles and some savory, complex ones, but most are minerally with tannin in some form. Photo of Aglianico: Getty Images  Aglianico del Vulture was made a DOC in 1971 It is 520/1,284 acres, and it's average production is 235,000 cases The wine is red or spumante – all is 100% Aglianico (the sparkling must be made in the Champagne method). Reds are required to be aged for 9-10 months in a vessel of the producer's choice before release (oak isn't required). Spumante must rest for 9 months on the lees. Photo: Monte Vulture, Getty Images Aglianico del Vulture Superiore DOCG/ Riserva Superiore DOCG was created in 2010. It is within the Aglianico del Vulture DOC but is only 89 ha/220 acres Production is much smaller, at 6,670 cases. The wine is 100% Aglianico. Superiore is required to spend 12 months in oak, 12 months in a bottle, cannot be sold until at least three years after harvest. Superiore Riserva spends 24 months in oak, 12 in bottle, and cannot be released until at least 5 years after harvest. Both categories must reach a minimum of 13.5% ABV (basically a guarantee that the grapes are ripe!)     In the show we discuss the food of Basilicata and mention a few specialties: M.C. Ice was surprised that in this area, bread crumbs were a cheese substitute, sprinkled over pasta, meat, and vegetables. Horseradish is common here, along with Italian hot peppers, beans, pork sausage, and the famed bread of Matera, which is a Protected Georgraphical Indication and uses wheat grown locally and a yeast infused with fruit.     Producers are vital to getting a quality wine. This is my list… D'Angelo (Split into D'Angelo and Donato D'Angelo recently, and each is good) Paternoster (recently sold to Veneto's Tommasi family) Cantine del Notaio Elena Fucci Terre degli Svevi /Re Manfredi Grifalco Eubea and Basilisco (both small-production bottlings) Bisceglia (we were drinking the 2018 Terre di Vulcano, which was about $18) DOC wines are around US$20/GBP£15, DOCG wines are more like US$45/GBP£43.   __________________________ Thanks for our sponsors this week: Wine Access: Access to the best wines for the best prices! For 15% off your next order, go to www.wineaccess.com/normal   If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes _____________________________ Some interesting sources I used for this show: Italian Wine Central (Great for data on DOCs/DOCGs) "The Wines of Basilicata Paradise Lost and Found" 4/17, Vinous, by Ian d'Agata  NY Times Article on Aglianico

The John Batchelor Show
1815: IAF and Gulf-state warplanes escort a US B-1 bomber over the region. Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 16:17


Photo:  Israeli Air Force 69 Squadron F-15I Ra'ams at Red Flag 04-3 IAF and Gulf-state warplanes escort a US B-1 bomber over the region.  Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 @ThadMcCotter @theamgreatness https://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/american-1b-bomber-flies-mideast-amid-iran-@CharlesOrtel tensions-80885081