Podcasts about Gulf

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

A large inlet from the ocean into the landmass

  • 3,236PODCASTS
  • 6,677EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 1, 2022LATEST
Gulf

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Gulf

Show all podcasts related to gulf

Latest podcast episodes about Gulf

Sailing - The Ocean Cruisers Podcast
Lauren & Kirk, Sailing Soulianis - Sailing - The Ocean Cruisers Podcast - Chat 37

Sailing - The Ocean Cruisers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 54:04


This week on The Ocean Cruisers podcast we are speaking with Lauren and Kirk from the Youtube Sailing Channel, Sailing Soulianis.Lauren and Kirk started their live aboard life 5 years ago when they began to hunt for their first cruising boat. They picked a Tartan 37, one of the most respected American made Bluewater cruisers.Their journey started in Racine Milwaukee before navigating the Great Lakes and the inland waterway systems to pop out in the Gulf of Mexico.They have spent seasons cruising the Bahamas and meticulously caring for their boat, Soulianis, and are now about to go boat hunting to start their next adventureIf you want to follow their journey, check out their YouTube channel, Sailing Soulianis.https://www.youtube.com/c/SailingSoulianisYou can support the Podcast on Patreon and follow us on Instagram, Facebook, watch the interviews on Youtube and download the audio on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.You can follow our social media pages and interact with us by checking out the link below:https://linktr.ee/OceanCruisersPodcastEnergetic Rock | Hiking Free Music by Efficsounds & Alex-Productions | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCx0_...https://www.efficsounds.co.ukMusic promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.comCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/...Resident AlienThis is a podcast about my journey as a resident alien in the united states. will be...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify The 90-10 RuleHe said, SHE said. Relationship talk show from the experts--REAL MEN & WOMEN.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Starting Over Stronger | Divorce Survival & RecoveryStarting Over Stronger Divorce Survival & Recovery saves you time, money and stress...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Around The Empire
Ep 262 Yemen Ceasefire and Reasons Behind It feat Isa Blumi

Around The Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 59:07


Guest: Isa Blumi. We talk about the ceasefire in Yemen, the circumstances and the reasons why it happened. We also talk about energy development, the Hodeidah blockade, the situation in Aden, the ousting of Hadi and creation of a new Presidential Council and we continue our discussion from previous episodes about the war within wars in Yemen and the Gulf states. In a bonus segment we talk about Sweden and Finland changing their neutral status and joining NATO. When we recorded this, Turkey was still holding up the approval but yesterday at the NATO summit that block was cleared and it was announced that they would be joining NATO.  Dr. Isa Blumi is an historian, an author and Professor of Global History, Islamic World, Ottoman Empire, Yemen, Albania. His most recent book Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us about the World tells the story of the wars in Yemen but also “ultimately tells an even larger story of today's political economy of global capitalism, development, and the war on terror as disparate actors intersect in Arabia.”  He also authored the book Ottoman Refugees, 1878-1939: Migration in a Post-Imperial World. FOLLOW Isa Blumi @IsaBlumi and find his work at Google Scholar and his latest book at UCPress.edu.  Around the Empire aroundtheempire.com is listener supported, independent media. SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW on Rokfin rokfin.com/aroundtheempire, Patreon patreon.com/aroundtheempire, Paypal paypal.me/aroundtheempirepod, YouTube youtube.com/aroundtheempire, Spotify, iTunes, iHeart, Google Podcasts FOLLOW @aroundtheempire and @joanneleon.  Join us on TELEGRAM https://t.me/AroundtheEmpire Find everything on http://aroundtheempire.com  and linktr.ee/aroundtheempire Recorded on June 10, 2022. Music by Fluorescent Grey.

Up2Me Radio
Keepin It Real with Host Jimbo and Special Guest Randy Flukinger

Up2Me Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 52:00


Welcome to the Keepin It Real Podcast with Host Jimbo and Special Guest Randy Flukinger Topic:  Let's Talk About Fishing Spending time in beautiful outdoor places, the calming sound of the waves lapping against a shoreline, the feelings of accomplishment when you reel in a personal best catch -- there are probably more reasons to go fishing than you ever realized.  Fishing newcomers and experienced fisherman alike need to check out this episode of Keepin It Real with Jimbo. We hope you enjoy Jimmy's conversation with fishing guide, Randy Flukinger from Safefloor based in Florida, as they talk about some of the best reasons to get out on the water and wet a line. Randy's Outdoors is run by Captain Randy Flukinger, a licensed USCG Captain Master with over 30 years of fishing experience based in Galveston, Texas. He has commercial fished the Gulf of Mexico, and fished both local and regional fishing tournaments. He now calls the Tampa Florida area home.  He offers inshore and nearshore charters for up to four guests, fishing either the Tampa Bay area or Gulf waters. No matter your skill level, Capt. Randy looks forward to creating a memorable fishing trip for both novice and experienced anglers.  Enjoying the conversation,leave me a comment and subscribe to the show at www.up2meradio.com/keepin-it-real-with-host-jimbo/  LIke and follow us on Facebook at Up2Me Radio, Instagram at Up2Me.radio and on Twitter at Up2Me Radio Thank you for tuning in!  

Deep Roots
Day 11 - “Finally the Gulf Stream”

Deep Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 16:19


Strange Sensations on the Gulf Stream as Damo and Gussy finally make in to the Gulf. And with the brings life and distance around the boat. Make sure to subscribe, so not miss an episode. Watch and follow Damian as it happens on his instagram @auld_stock and @deep_roots_podcast Track Damian and Fergus live on their row here > https://www.projectempower.ie/ THE ROW IN THE SUMMER OF 2022 LIFELONG GALWAY FRIENDS DAMIAN BROWNE AND FERGUS FARRELL WILL COMPLETE AN UNSUPPORTED ROW ACROSS THE ATLANTIC FROM NEW YORK CITY TO GALWAY. IN THE PROCESS DAMIAN WILL BECOME THE FIRST MAN IN HISTORY TO ROW THE ATLANTIC ONE WAY, CLIMB MOUNT EVEREST AND ROW THE ATLANTIC THE OTHER WAY. THIS ROW WILL BE A HISTORY-FORMING GLOBALLY RECOGNISED WORLD RECORD ATTEMPT. THROUGH CLEVER USE OF TECHNOLOGY, IT WILL FOCUS THE WORLD'S ATTENTION ON AN AMAZING ADVENTURE THAT WILL CULMINATE IN GALWAY ON THE WEST COAST OF IRELAND. https://www.baloremedia.co.uk/

The Tortoise Podcast
A coup at Claridge's: Qatar's quiet move on London

The Tortoise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 39:00


A tiny Gulf state has bought up some of Britain's prized assets. But at what cost? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inside The Epicenter With Joel Rosenberg
What Gulf Country Is Home To 700 Churches, and Why #58

Inside The Epicenter With Joel Rosenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 33:11


The UAE is a beautiful, advanced and hi-tech nation. It's the first Arab country to send a spaceship to the moon and, more importantly, the first to initiate peace with Israel in this century through the Abraham Accords. Joel C. Rosenberg and co-host Dr. Carl Moeller have a fascinating conversation in Jerusalem about the UAE, discussing its history and how its moderate Muslim leaders have re-branded the nation into what Joel refers to as the “Island of Arab Progress.” Learn more about The Joshua Fund: JoshuaFund.com Make a tax-deductible donation: Donate | The Joshua Fund Stock Media provided by DimmySad / Pond5

Selling Through Partnering Skills
Anirvan Sen - Selling in the Gulf: Respect Relationships

Selling Through Partnering Skills

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 19:56


This is a special series tailored for people working and selling in the region to discuss some of the unique challenges it presents. We talk about what is different about selling in the area and what the best companies and salespeople do to adapt. Anirvan talks about why many Western companies fail when even when great opportunities present themselves. He underlines the importance of relationships and how the region not having a singular culture makes this more complex. Patience is a virtue and this is particularly important when conducting business where personal and professional are so closely entwined. 'Slow down to speed up' is good advice in this area. Learn more at https://linktr.ee/fredcopestake

Beyond Zero - Community
Port Augusta, Whyalla - Green Steel and Smart Energy

Beyond Zero - Community

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022


Climate Action ShowJune 27th 2022Produced by Vivien Langford PORT AUGUSTA, WHYALLA - GREEN STEEL AND SMART ENERGY Guests:Kurt Johnson -  Journalist with Renew Economy https://reneweconomy.com.au/green-dreams-managing-the-transition-from-rust-to-renewables/ John Grimes - CEO The Smart Energy Council At the Smart Energy Conference in May, soon to be PM and Environment Minister Albanese and Bowen were fascinated by a new Solar Company. On display were 5B Mavericks. Mr Albanese was enthusiastic because they were very close to his electorate, employed many people and had expanded to USA, India and Chile. We asked them what 5B stood for and it turned out to be for the Five Billion Years of sun power ahead of us. The Mavericks are solar arrays the size of a roof. they can be folded up and deployed elsewhere and their inventors are Chris Mc Grath and Eden Tehan. Since the election many are expecting a great acceleration of clean energy and John Grimes says that the targets taken to the election could be more than doubled by 2030.Then we go to Port Augusta  and Whyalla with Kurt Johnson who found there was such a boom for workers there he could hardly find a room for the night. There is a Renewable Energy Park there with wind , solar, ocean and energy storage.https://www.dpenergy.com/projects/port-augusta-renewable-energy-park/It's not a simple story however, and locals are somewhat resigned to big promises, booms and setbacks.  One problem may be the difficulty of finding skilled workers and here is Kurt's article investigating that : https://reneweconomy.com.au/could-a-skills-shortage-stall-the-renewable-energy-revolution/He talks about the Sundrop  Farm which uses solar power to desalinate the sea water from St Vincent's Gulf and grow acres of tomatoes.https://reneweconomy.com.au/good-taste-and-food-security-how-sundrop-rewrote-rules-of-tomato-crops/ - https://www.sundropfarms.com/our-facilities/TRAININGThe Smart  Energy Council already has certificate courses: https://smartenergy.org.au/training/https://nswliberal.org.au/Shared-Content/News/2021/New-Training-For-Renewable-Jobs-Revolutionhttps://www.premier.vic.gov.au/ensuring-women-are-part-clean-energy-revolutionWe have our ears out to report on other training opportunities to turbo charge this energy transition, so please let us know by calling 3CR -   (03) 94198377 - In France they do not have a Minister for Climate Change but a Minister for Energy Transition which sounds much more determined, and we hope to interview her soon. https://www.euractiv.com/section/energy/news/three-women-to-steer-frances-new-super-green-ministry/ 

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
The Essential Rhythm 6/26/22: Attack of the clones

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 0:35


Producer/Host: Sarah O’Malley This episode describes the complex phenomenon of self/non-self recognition in otherwise simple asexually reproducing animals, the anemones. Certain anemones are able to differentiate between their own clones and unrelated individuals in order to defend their territory. This research is featured in Adam Nicolson’s Life Between the Tides. About the host: Sarah O’Malley is an ecologist, naturalist and science communicator passionate about deepening her listeners’ experiences with the natural world. She teaches biology and sustainability at Maine Maritime Academy and is currently collaborating on a guide book to the intertidal zone in the Gulf of Maine. The post The Essential Rhythm 6/26/22: Attack of the clones first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Reporters Without Orders
Reporters Without Orders Ep 225: Nupur Sharma's downfall, POCSO trial against anchors

Reporters Without Orders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 36:46


In this episode, host Nidhi Suresh is joined by Newslaundry's Shivnarayan Rajpurohit. They discuss two reports by Shiv, including a profile of former BJP spokesperson Nupur Sharma and how her remarks against prophet Muhammad on a Times Now debate triggered her downfall. “You have freedom of speech but it isn't absolute so you can't say anything and get away with it,” Shiv says, adding that Nupur has seen a “sudden rise and fall in a very short time”. He speaks about her academic record and political career.The second report was on a viral video showing prominent TV news anchors walking out of a POCSO court. The case is linked to a 2013 broadcast containing inappropriate visuals of a minor. They talk about the updates in the case as the trial goes on.This and a lot more as they talk about what made news, what didn't, and what shouldn't have.Tune in.Contribute to our NL Sena projects – bulldozing a new image in MP and the yogi who has it all.Timecodes00:00:00 - Introduction00:00:40 - Nupur Sharma 00:17:30 - Journalists at POSCO court00:32:00 - RecommendationsRecommendationsShivnarayanTrailer Park BoysOpen Secrets: India's Intelligence UnveiledNidhiWhy the Gulf matters for IndiaThe Broken News Sacrifices Engagement At The Altar of Lurid EntertainmentProduced and recorded by Tehreem Roshan, edited by Umrav Singh. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

That's What G Said
Sat & Sun Racing, Gulf, LAD, TDN, CD, This Week in Wrestling w/ Chad Cooper, AEW, WWE, NXT

That's What G Said

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 145:56


On This Episode of That's What G Said presented by @btvbets 2:40 BetterThan.Vegas 3:40 NBA Draft recap 10:38 StableDuel weekend info #PlayRaceWin 11:48 Saturday 6-25 Gulfstream Best Bets 13:30 Saturday 6-25 Thistledown Best Bets 16:20 Saturday 6-25 Churchill Downs Best Bets 19:00 Saturday 6-25 Louisiana Downs Full Card 29:05 Sunday 6-26 Louisiana Downs Full Card 38:30 This Week in Wrestling w/ Chad Cooper, AEW & Forbidden Door 1:24:35 WWE Smackdown 1:38:10 WWE RAW 2:02:00 WWE NXT sponsored by -Full Service Realtor Cindy Carava at CindyCarava.com. -BetterThan.Vegas has all the FREE handicapping content to help you become a better gambler. -All Natural Soy Wax Candles, CeraCandles.com, use promo code GINO for 10% off your purchase. -DRF.com for all of your Past Performances & Handicapping info, Check out the newly optimized DRF Mobile! -StableDuel, Daily horse racing contests, download the APP and #PLAYRACEWIN , if you have any questions visit Stableduel.com or please contact me! That same trusted source of incredible info for Horse Racing, is now in the sports world. For all the help you need with Sports Wagering, check out www.drf.com/sports

las vegas wrestling app racing nba draft aew gulf gino horse racing wwe nxt handicapping aew wwe week in wrestling sports wagering drf chad cooper full service realtor cindy carava cindycarava ceracandles all natural soy wax candles drf mobile playracewin
WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Coastal Conversations 6/24/22: Pogies (Atlantic menhaden)

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 57:31


Producer/Host: Natalie Springuel Coastal Conversations: Conversations with people who live, work, and play on the Maine coast, hosted by the University of Maine Sea Grant Program. This episode: Most fishermen will tell you that the presence of Atlantic menhaden on the coast of Maine is cyclical. In the last few years, menhaden, or pogies as the small schooling fish are known locally, have returned in high enough numbers to trigger a commercial fishery that holds promise for many fishermen. Their presence is fortuitous. Pogies have filled a lobster bait void left behind by declining Atlantic herring stocks. Many lobstermen, scrambling for bait to feed their lobster traps, have settled on pogies. There are many others in the Gulf of Maine who are happy to see the pogies return in great numbers – chief among them: the predators like tuna, striped bass, bald eagles and even humpback whales. On our show today, we explore the world of pogies, the fishermen who harvest them and the species like tuna who eat them. We talk with two fishermen who describe how the fish are caught and why the fishery is increasingly important to Maine fishermen. And we’ll hear from a scientist about how his research on Atlantic Blue-fin tuna also reveals the increasing presence of pogies in Maine waters. -Return of Pogies (AKA Menhaden) to Maine -Fishermen's stories about rigging up to purse seining for pogies. -Pogies as lobster bait -Pogies role in the Gulf of Maine food web Guests: Devyn Campbell, Boothbay Harbor fisherman (fishes for groundfish and in recent years pogies) Dave Horner, Southwest Harbor fisherman (has fished for lobster, scallop, shrimp, groundfish and in recent years pogies) Walt Golet, Assistant Professor at the University of Maine’s School of Marine Sciences and lead of the Pelagic Fisheries lab at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. About the host: Natalie Springuel has hosted Coastal Conversation's since 2015, with support from the University of Maine Sea Grant where she has served as a marine extension associate for 20 years. In 2019, Springuel received an award for Public Affairs programming from the Maine Association of Broadcasters for the Coastal Conversations show called “Portland's Working Waterfront.” Springuel is passionate about translating science, sharing stories, and offering a platform for multiple voices to weigh in on complex coastal and ocean issues. She has recently enrolled in audio production training at Maine Media Workshop to dive deeper into making great community radio. The post Coastal Conversations 6/24/22: Pogies (Atlantic menhaden) first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Jerusalem Studio
Washington's Mideast Efforts and Aspirations - Jerusalem Studio 698

Jerusalem Studio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 27:28


US President Joe Biden is scheduled to visit the Middle East next month for the first time in his term in office, although he has of course been to the region many times in the past, dating back to 1973. During his 4-day tour in Israel, the Palestinian Authority and Saudi Arabia, the US leader will meet with a dozen regional leaders in an attempt to convince the world that he is balancing realpolitik with human rights, managing crises with Iran- and in Yemen; and only renewing the American posture in the Levant and the Gulf as opposed to "folding up the Stars and Stripes in the area." How successful can the Biden visit be? Panel: - Erin Viner, Host. - Amir Oren, Editor at Large, Host of Watchmen Talk and Powers in Play. - Amb. Danny Ayalon, Co-Host TV7 Middle East Review, a Panelist on TV7 Powers-in-Play, former Israeli Ambassador to the United States and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as well as a lecturer at NYU. - Mr. Robert Silverman, A Lecturer at Shalem College and Former President of the American Foreign Service Association. Articles on the topic: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/gantz-urges-us-to-lead-mideast-arms-race-against-iran/ https://www.tv7israelnews.com/idf-5th-fleet-begin-intrinsic-defender-drill/ https://www.tv7israelnews.com/saudi-prince-calls-israel-potential-ally/ You are welcome to join our audience and watch all of our programs - free of charge! TV7 Israel News: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/563/ Jerusalem Studio: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/18738/ TV7 Israel News Editor's Note: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76269/ TV7 Israel: Watchmen Talk: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/76256/ Jerusalem Prays: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/135790/ TV7's Times Observer: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/97531/ TV7's Middle East Review: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/997755/ My Brother's Keeper: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/53719/ This week in 60 seconds: https://www.tv7israelnews.com/vod/series/123456/ Those who wish can send prayer requests to TV7 Israel News in the following ways: Facebook Messenger: https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Email: israelnews@tv7.fi Please be sure to mention your first name and country of residence. Any attached videos should not exceed 20 seconds in duration. #IsraelNews #tv7israelnews #newsupdates Rally behind our vision - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/donate/ To purchase TV7 Israel News merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/tv7-israel-news-store Live view of Jerusalem - https://www.tv7israelnews.com/jerusalem-live-feed/ Visit our website - http://www.tv7israelnews.com/ Subscribe to our YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/tv7israelnews Like TV7 Israel News on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/tv7israelnews Follow TV7 Israel News on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tv7israelnews/ Follow TV7 Israel News on Twitter - https://twitter.com/tv7israelnews

Deep Roots
Day 6 - Father's Day is different this year

Deep Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 23:42


It's Father's Day on board the boat, talk of the Gulf stream raises again and old lessons need reminding. Make sure to subscribe, so not miss an episode. Watch and follow Damian as it happens on his instagram @auld_stock and @deep_roots_podcast Track Damian and Fergus live on their row here > https://www.projectempower.ie/ THE ROW IN THE SUMMER OF 2022 LIFELONG GALWAY FRIENDS DAMIAN BROWNE AND FERGUS FARRELL WILL COMPLETE AN UNSUPPORTED ROW ACROSS THE ATLANTIC FROM NEW YORK CITY TO GALWAY. IN THE PROCESS DAMIAN WILL BECOME THE FIRST MAN IN HISTORY TO ROW THE ATLANTIC ONE WAY, CLIMB MOUNT EVEREST AND ROW THE ATLANTIC THE OTHER WAY. THIS ROW WILL BE A HISTORY-FORMING GLOBALLY RECOGNISED WORLD RECORD ATTEMPT. THROUGH CLEVER USE OF TECHNOLOGY, IT WILL FOCUS THE WORLD'S ATTENTION ON AN AMAZING ADVENTURE THAT WILL CULMINATE IN GALWAY ON THE WEST COAST OF IRELAND. https://www.baloremedia.co.uk/

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast
'Right moment' for steps toward Israel-Saudi normalization, says Daniel Shapiro

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 40:17


Daniel Shapiro, former US Ambassador to Israel and Distinguished Fellow at the Atlantic Council, discusses what to expect from US President Joe Biden's trip next month to Israel, the West Bank, and Saudi Arabia; whether the US and Israel are in sync on the Iran nuclear deal; the prospects for Israel-Saudi normalization and Israel-Palestinian peace talks; and scenarios for Israel's fall elections, including the possible return of Benjamin Netanyahu as prime minister.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The afikra Podcast
SHAHD ALSHAMMARI | Disability Studies | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 52:24


Shahd Alshammari talked about her work as a writer, academic, and researcher in the field of Gulf literature and disability studies.Dr Shahd Alshammari is a Kuwaiti-Palestinian author and academic. She is the author of Head Above Water (Neem Tree Press, 2022). Alshammari teaches literature and has written numerous stories and creative nonfiction. Her research areas include illness narratives and disability studies. She is Assistant Professor of English at the Gulf University for Science and Technology, Kuwait. She has authored an academic monograph, Literary Madness in British, Postcolonial, and Bedouin Women's Writing (2016). Her collection of short stories Notes on the Flesh (2017) is a biomythography that deals with gender, race and disability in Kuwait. In 2019, she was nominated for the British Council Alumni Awards – Social Impact. In 2021 she won Outstanding Monograph of the Year from the National Communication Association's (NAC).Created and hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Viewsroom
Gulf pot of gold, China's unemployment problem

Viewsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 18:28


Investment banks like HSBC and Citigroup are beefing up teams in the Middle East to rake in juicy IPO and M&A fees. In this Viewsroom podcast, Breakingviews columnists discuss why early investment is paying off. Also, the People's Republic's jobs crisis is likely to worsen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast
Calicut with Ajay Kamalakaran

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 57:30


This week, The Musafir Stories speaks to Ajay Kamalakaran, a writer and traveller as we explore the beautiful town of Calicut or Kozhikode, in the Malabar region of Kerala!!!Today's destination: Calicut or Kozhikode, KeralaNearest Airport: Calicut International Airport (CCJ)Nearest Railway Station: Kozhikode Railway Station (CLT)Prerequisites - N/APacking - Pack lightTime of the year - October to FebruaryLength of the itinerary: 2-3 daysItinerary Highlights: Ajay sets off on our virtual trip to Calicut by speaking about the historical significance of the place, the influence of the Zamorins or Samoothris as well as the conquest of the colonial powers starting with the arrival of Vasco da Gama on the shores of Calicut. Some of the first pit stops in the city include the famous Kuttichira, a heritage locality popular for some wonderful monuments like the Miskhal mosque and the Tali temple. Ajay discusses the history of the place, architecture, cultural influences of the Chinese as well as Arab merchants which forms a part of the popular culture. We also discuss the popular eateries in Calicut, including the influence of the Arab and Gulf cuisine. We talk about the busy SM Street and its specialities including Halwa and Banana chips. Ajay then takes us to some of the prominent beaches including the Calicut beach and Kappad beach, where Vasco Da Gama first landed in India. Ajay also shares the experience of walking about in SM Street area as well as watching a movie in an old single screen theatre - Radha talkies. Ajay speaks of the popular personalities of Calicut including the former Defense Minister, VK Krishna Menon, PT Usha and author Vaikom Basheer as well as his hometown of Beypore and its shipbuilding industry. We discuss short day trips that cna be done from Calicut - Kannur, Ponnani, Thalassery and other places nearby including Mahe. Finally Ajay shares his experience interacting with the locals from different communities - including the oldest woman freedom fighter, Parsi community Links:Ajay Kamalakaran's newsletter - https://ajaykamalakaran.substack.comAjay's Twitter - https://twitter.com/AjayKamalakaran Ajay's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ajaykamalakaran/Ajay's episode on Sakhlin islands: https://themusafirstories.com/podcasts/explore-sakhalin-island-with-ajay-kamalakaran/Image Credit - Photo by Arun Geetha Viswanathan on Unsplash Battle music: Sota War (https://freesound.org/people/YleArkisto/sounds/258207/ ) by YleArkisto (https://freesound.org/people/YleArkisto/ ) is licensed under CC by 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ )Follow the Musafir stories on:Twitter : https://twitter.com/musafirstories?lang=enFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/themusafirstories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/musafirstoriespodcast/?hl=enwebsite: www.themusafirstories.comemail: themusafirstories@gmail.comYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at http://www.ivmpodcasts.com/

Today in the Word Devotional

I’m told there is a house in the Midwest, where rain droplets that fall on one side of the roof flow through a downspout into a river that eventually runs to the Atlantic Ocean. Droplets that fall on the other side of the roof eventually flow into a river that leads to the Gulf of Mexico. A small gust of wind can change the destination of a single raindrop. Similarly, a single decision a person makes today can change his or her final destination. In our text today, the woman is not given a name but is only described as one who regularly sins (vv. 37, 39). She was most likely known throughout the community by her bad reputation. But when she heard that Jesus was in town, she had to see Him (v. 37). With great boldness and courage she busted into the house where Jesus was eating. Kneeling behind Him, she was moved emotionally. Her passionate tears began to fall on Jesus’ feet, and she began to wipe them with her hair and pour the expensive perfume. What did she know about Jesus that the Pharisee has failed to see? She recognized that there was something different about Jesus. Unlike other men that most likely had taken advantage of her, Jesus was the only one offering genuine peace and true rest (Matt. 11:28–30). The Pharisees were blind to the forgiveness Jesus offered. Jesus told them a parable emphasizing God’s forgiveness and the implications for a forgiven sinner (vv. 41-47). Her decision to see Jesus that night and put her emotions on the line, changed her life forever. It is a tragedy that those who think they are the most religious are often the ones likely to miss the significance of forgiven sin. >> Jesus extends grace to everyone, including you. No matter what sins you have committed in life, He will never stop forgiving you. Your decision to trust in Him today will change your eternal destination.

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch

Whatever you believe is the cause of our changing climate, we seem to be living through an era of historically more storms, and more severe storms. Even if you only moved here recently, most of us in Louisiana have now lived through a major hurricane, or had one narrowly miss us. You're no doubt all too familiar with the hurricane season ritual ahead of a storm heading in our direction. It starts about 5 Days out, with casually checking the weather forecast, and builds to obsessively watching storm predictions on TV, checking incessantly online, and asking family, friends, and neighbors, “Are you staying or evacuating?” So, here's a crazy question. What if you didn't have to do any of that? What if there was a website or an app that you could open, punch in your address, and get an individualized, accurate, wind and flood forecast? Not for the city, but for your own specific street address. If that sounds ridiculous and impossible, well, it's neither. It's actually real. It's a tool that's at your fingertips right now, called QRisq. It's the result of years of development by a company headquartered at the Stennis Space Center, called QRisq Analytics. Initially QRisq's customers have been municipalities but starting with the 2022 hurricane season, Q Risq is available to the general public. Elizabeth Valenti is the Lead Engineer who created, designed and, along with a staff of 7, built this piece of technology. There's a good side and a bad side to everything. Even high winds. Almost everybody in the energy production business believes that wind power is going to provide a significant amount of our future electricity supply. Here in Louisiana, we don't exactly have winds whistling across wide open plains. But we do have wind out at sea, in the Gulf. Harnessing that off-shore wind to generate electricity is now a priority, for both our State and Federal governments. As plans progress to build wind farms out in the Gulf, one of the essential items is the giant windmill blades that spin around to produce the energy. Each wind turbine blade is 400 feet long. And made of aerodynamically sculpted steel. Wind turbine blades are reportedly the largest serially produced item manufactured on earth. And the exact spot on the planet that some of the most advanced blades are being designed is at the Avondale Shipyards, just out of New Orleans, by a company called Gulf Wind Technology. Its CEO is James Martin. I'm sure you've heard the expression, “It's an ill wind that blows nobody any good.” It's meant to suggest that even something that is bad for most people has got to be good for somebody. There are very few instances where you can employ that expression literally. So, to that extent we may have made history with this podcast!  Elizabeth Valenti's QRisq technology might be the closest we've come to getting an advantage over hurricanes, or at least predicting our chances of survival. And increasing our chances of getting an insurance settlement on the other side. And whereas “trying to catch the wind” was once a poetic way of describing a hopeless cause, today, catching the wind is becoming a potentially planet-saving industry. And James Martin's turbine blade technology is at the cutting edge of the revolution.    Elizabeth and James are both doing ground-breaking work that would be significant whatever city they were in, anywhere in the world. It's amazing that they're both here in New Orleans. Out to Lunch is recorded live over lunch at NOLA Pizza in the NOLA Brewing Taproom. You can find photos from this by Jill Lafleur at itsneworleans.com. And  you can also check out more lunchtime conversation about New Orleans surprising role in advancing wind-power technology See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast
Are you stressed at work?

Bitesize Business Breakfast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 35:01


More than two thirds of Gulf employees say they've experienced increased stress levels at work in the past year - while nearly half say their workload has significantly increased. David Jones, Founder and CEO of The Talent Enterprise joined us to discuss the findings of their survey. Plus, Dubai has its own Michelin guide. We speak to a number of experts, and Issam Kazim, CEO of Dubai Economy and Tourism about what this means for businesses and Dubai's tourism industry. Plus, how do we define AI? We ask Dr. Scott Nowson Director, Artificial Intelligence Lead at PwC See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Green Gab Podcast – Green Homes, Green Living and Green Companies
Wicked Problems - Changing Weather and How It's Affecting Our Lives with Tony Pratte

Green Gab Podcast – Green Homes, Green Living and Green Companies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 31:53


  Global challenges are abounding, and working in the world of sustainability, health, and wellness has brought many wicked problems to light.  We can describe some of the most challenging social issues we face today as wicked problems. With those problems, we have to re-frame our notion of success. Although they will never get entirely solved, success with wicked problems is about impacting or improving outcomes and mitigating risks.  I am Marla, the Green Home Coach! I am excited to be back in the studio today with my co-host, Tony Pratte, who is joining me to talk about the wicked problem of changing weather.  Stay tuned for more! Crazy weather There has been some crazy weather in St. Louis for the last couple of months! It has been raining a lot, and the driving downpours have caused many problems for land developers.  Lots of rain  Over the last decade or so, we have seen an increase in rainfall in the Oklahoma area. There has been unusual rainfall between March and November- and sometimes even December!  Changing weather patterns Weather patterns appear to be changing everywhere. Even though some of it could be cycles, the changing weather over the last few years has been partially due to the increasing drought in the western part of the United States.  What is rain? When the moisture in the air reacts with water in the ground, it rains. Currently, the ground out west lacks water, so rain is not getting triggered in that area. The moisture that should be causing rain in the west (in California, Arizona, and Nevada) is moving eastwards. Extreme weather patterns Lately, the extreme global weather patterns have become more extreme! You cannot compare Oklahoma with St. Louis You cannot compare Oklahoma with St. Louis because St. Louis is a meteorological anomaly. Most cities have two weather patterns. They are either affected by the Arctic or the Gulf of Mexico. St. Louis gets affected by both, so it has three weather patterns. For weather forecasting, two mathematical equations get combined. In St. Louis, there is a third equation that throws everything off. A river effect St. Louis is at the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, the second-largest freshwater flow in North America. So the state is surrounded by water. That causes a river effect, much like the lake effect at the Great Lakes, which amplifies many weather patterns. That matters because it helps us gauge the changes we see in the weather patterns. Climate shift Things that do not usually occur in certain parts of the country are happening a lot more, and strong weather patterns have been reported in the news. Scientific data shows that the weather is changing, and people are starting to accept it.  Water usage Many large cities are in the desert. Air conditioning makes the heat bearable, but where does the water come from? A limited amount of fresh water exists on the planet that constantly gets recycled through the water cycle. A billion people have problems accessing clean water every day. Yet we keep building big cities in areas with no water (like Las Vegas), and more and more people keep moving to those locations.  Subsidized water The water pumped to the desert cities gets subsidized, so people aren't aware of the real cost. If it was not subsidized, fewer people and businesses might move to those cities. That could relieve some of the strain on the natural resources of those locations and help stabilize the weather patterns. Water rights In the west and in California Central Valley, where a lot of food is grown, water prices are soaring. As the drought in that area worsens, people are buying up water rights. That has created a challenge for small farmers who are unable to compete with the huge conglomerates that own the water rights. Is water an inalienable right? The corporations that own the big farms can use their resources, create hedging strategies, and buy options on commodities like water. So people are talking about whether water is an inalienable right, and if it should be commoditized and purchased.  A perpetual cycle Changing weather affects water patterns, and water patterns affect the weather. It is a perpetual cycle, so it is hard to know where to start if we want to change things. Natural patterns The natural patterns that exist will continue. If there is mismanagement, however, things get thrown out of whack, and problems tend to get amplified.  A wicked problem The water issue is a wicked problem because it requires many different solutions. If we want to continue as a society, we need to figure out how to deal with the effects of the weather changes. Change Change is here, and it is unavoidable. No matter what, we will have to adapt, mitigate, and suffer.  The real cost of water Mitigating and adapting will not solve this problem. If people were charged the actual cost of water in desert cities rather than subsidizing, it could prevent some future suffering.  Thinking differently We have to start thinking differently about water and the changing weather patterns. Some people recognize that, so they use water wisely and consider ways to conserve it when building. Figuring out how to obtain water  Although the agricultural community has probably adapted better than most by coming up with more efficient irrigation systems and using technology tools, we still have to figure out how to capture water and recharge the aquifers. Because thousands of acres of farmland and millions of people are affected by the weather changes.  Wasted water The water from the heavy rains in Oklahoma City over the past weeks has been running through the storm-water systems and into the Gulf of Mexico. That water gets wasted because it mixes with salt water. It would be a much better idea to figure out a way to keep that water fresh and re-introduce it to the water cycle.  Using strategies to overcome the feast or famine effect We can all do something for ourselves to overcome the feast or famine effect resulting from changing weather patterns. Small steps add up.  Gutters in Oklahoma Gutters are not automatically fitted on houses in Oklahoma City because there is usually not enough rain to make them worthwhile. With the climate becoming wetter, more people are putting gutters onto their houses and installing rain barrels and rain gardens to capture the water. No simple answers There is no simple answer to the wicked problem of obtaining enough water for everyone with changing weather patterns. We need to have open and realistic discussions about what is changing weather and the water patterns. It does not matter who caused the problem. What does matter is that we have to fix it. Some simple tips for becoming part of the solution: Use rain barrels (if they are legal in your state) Install a rain garden Buy local produce  Use native plants for landscaping Stand up and speak out about the need for change Have a great green day!   Links and resources: What Makes a Green Home Green Audio Program:  Green Home Coach Study.com video: wicked problems definitions EPA.gov climate indicators Scienceline on how weather affects the way we live EPA.gov Weather.com - weather changes National Geographic - climate change CDC Climate Effects on Health Psychiatry.org

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
The Old Right and the Antiwar Movement w/ Brandan P. Buck

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 64:04


On this edition of Parallax Views, a previously unpublished conversation from April 2022 with Brandan P. Buck, a Ph.D. candidate in history and Digital History Fellow at George Mason University. Brandan has been researching the topic of a early-mid 20th century conservative formation known as the "Old Right". Epitomized by figures such as Senator Robert A. Taft and journalists like John T. Flynn and Garet Garrett, the Old Right was a force that opposed President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Some of this was in opposition to FDR's New Deal, but the Old Right was also known for its antiwar stance often leading to it being accused of isolationism or antisemitic, fascist/Nazi sympathies. Brandan and I discuss all of this as well as the history of the Old Right and specifically its connection to antiwar thought. This conversation came about after reading Brandan's piece at Responsible Statecraft entitled "No ‘Putin apologia' and certainly not new: the Old American Right on war". Said piece details the history of the Old Right including the figure of Republican politician Eugen Siler's 1968 Senate run as an explicitly antiwar candidate during the Vietnam War. Prior to his Senate run Siler was a Congressman where he was the sole member of the House of Representatives to oppose the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution (a resolution that led to greater U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War). Among the topics discussed in this conversation: - The connection between the Old Right's opposition to FDR-era progressive economic policies and the Old Right's non-interventionism and opposition to mass conscription - Understanding the Old Right and its origins within the GOP - Anti-interventionist and antiwar sentiments in the aftermath of WWI and the U.S. soldiers who were casualties of that war. - The question of antisemitism; the America First Committee; Charles Lindbergh's September 11th, 1941 speech - The book Merchants of Death about war-profiteering in WWI and left/right anti-war coalition - The Cold War, the Ronald Reagan era, Pat Buchanan, William F. Buckley and the National Review, and the decline of the Old Right - The differences between the antiwar left and the antiwar right - The Old Right's view that war and militarism were destructive to either individual liberty and/or family units - The influence of both Jeffersonianism and particularism on the Old Right - And much, much more!

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA
Synchronization is INCREASING! Global cataclysms are engulfing the planet: France, Japan, USA, Cuba

Climate Breaking News ALLATRA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 14:28


Tropical Storm Alex was the first of this year's hurricane season. The storm formed in the Gulf of Mexico and Cuba was the first to experience its fury. June 3-4, 2022 CUBA. Severe storms and heavy rains hit the western and central regions of the country. June 4. The USA. Storm Alex caused flooding in much of South Florida, USA. May 29, 2022. SRI LANKA. Strong winds, lightning and heavy rains have hit parts of the country. About this and much more in this episode of Breaking News.

Chesapeake Uncharted
Season 2 Trailer: Tropical Storm Agnes at 50

Chesapeake Uncharted

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 3:53


Fifty years ago, “America's Estuary” was beginning to show signs of ecological collapse. But outside of a handful of environmentalists and academics, few people took much note. When a seemingly harmless tropical storm charged up from the Gulf of Mexico, few people took much note of that either. But within a few wild and tragic days in June of 1972, Tropical Storm Agnes changed the way people thought about the Chesapeake Bay and the power of storms in the Mid-Atlantic. This is the story of how Agnes ushered in a dark new era for the Bay -- an era we're still living in.

World Business Report
Biggest rail strikes in the UK for 30 years

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 26:26


Only 20% of trains across England, Scotland and Wales are running as the RMT union strike for three days over job cuts, pay and pensions. The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson has said commuters must "stay the course" and urged rail bosses and unions to agree a deal. The BBC's Rowan Bridge gives us an update from Manchester Piccadilly station in the north west of England. And it's not just the UK. Yesterday, public sector health workers and teachers walked out over pay in Zimbabwe. There was also a nation-wide strike by trade unions in Belgium. Emeritus professor of economics at Ottowa University, Mario Seccareccia, explains. The Hungarian government is subsidising fuel to around $1.25 a litre. But the policy triggered a wave of fuel tourism, as drivers from neighbouring countries crossed the border to fill up their cars more cheaply. The government has said cheaper fuel would only be available to Hungarian-registered cars, something the EU says is discriminatory and could land Hungary in court. Gabor Egri, President of the Independent Petrol Station Association of Hungary, tells us how petrol station owners are reacting. India has been firefighting a diplomatic row with Arab countries because of derogatory remarks made by the spokesperson of the ruling Hindu nationalist party, the BJP, about the Prophet Muhammad. Following strong objections and protests in these countries the spokesperson has now been suspended. The BBC's Devina Gupta tells us how much this has impacted India's relations with the Gulf countries, where it does trade worth billions of dollars. A gigantic cruise ship being built in Germany could be sold for scrap metal before it ever sets sail. We find out more from Captain Ken Caine of shipbrokers QPS Marine Ships in Florida. A new book called "The No Club" explains how doing the jobs which keep managers happy day-to-day, can actually hold you back in your career. The BBC's Leanna Byrne spoke to the book's four authors: Professors Linda Babcock, Lise Vesterlund, Brenda Peyser and Laurie Weingart.

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan
Ep. 72: Nupur Sharma, neo-feudalism and the geopolitical squeeze on India

Shadow Warrior by Rajeev Srinivasan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 12:51


A version of this essay was published by firstpost.com at Nupur Sharma, neo-feudalism and the geopolitical squeeze on IndiaThe commentariat has rightly focused on the specifics of the Nupur Sharma incident, such as the alleged blasphemy, the apparent provocation, the possibly pro-forma outrage and the street-veto (cheered on by certain politicians who spoke ominously about tinder and spark). I couldn’t possibly improve on their perspectives. For instance Utpal Kumar wrote an excellent piece excoriating the cringe-inducing and thunderous ‘liberal’ response https://www.firstpost.com/opinion/nupur-sharma-has-erred-no-doubt-but-why-are-liberals-mutedly-supporting-islamist-challenge-to-her-right-to-life-10767521.html; and I would add that ‘feminists’ were also notable by their absence. The blood-curdling death threats being hurled at Nupur, the fact that she has been hanged in effigy, and the related riots that appear to be astroturfed, are all deplorable.  I would like to look at the whole thing from the point of view of geopolitics. India is in the process of being squeezed badly.Thanks for reading Shadow Warrior! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.Soft StateThere are a couple of perspectives of interest. One is a throwback to the dark days of 1989-90, when the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban induced the most recent genocide of Kashmiri Hindus, because the terrorists Pakistan had assigned to their Afghan battle were (as they are now) available; and this time, thanks to Biden’s largesse, they have billions worth of weapons. A related historical incident is the hijack of Indian Airlines 814 in 1999, and what, in hindsight, was a strategic blunder committed by India, with Jaswant Singh personally escorting the freed terrorists to Kandahar, who then proceeded to wreak general havoc.  In both cases, the Pakistani takeaways were predicated on triumphalism. They could see the dictum in their Brigadier General SK Malik’s The Qoranic Concept of War being put in place. “Terror struck into the hearts of the enemies is not only a means, it is the end itself.” They could with good reason argue that they were on a trajectory towards a final victory, and urge a final thrust that would bring the house of cards down.The result was the Parliament attack, 2001. Operation Parakram. Godhra, 2002. And eventually 26/11 Mumbai in 2008.Pakistan and its friends in India have been nothing if not lucid: they openly declare their intent to wreak havoc on India, balkanize it, massacre people, do gazwa-e-hind. There is every reason to believe that they mean what they say. To pretend otherwise is to repeat the US folly vis-a-vis China: China kept saying what they intended to do, and the US kept pretending not to hear; and we know where that got Obama and Biden. The point is that every capitulation, every demand conceded, is viewed as a sign of weakness, and invites the next, ever more outrageous demand. India today may be going down this slippery slope, again. As it did repeatedly in the 20th century. The deep freeze on CAA was a capitulation. The withdrawal of the Farm Bills was a capitulation. And now the silencing of Nupur Sharma is a capitulation. If the State blinks on Agnipeeth, that would be another capitulation. There may well be good reasons for all of them, but the fact is that they perpetuate the notion that India is a Soft State.Thank you for reading Shadow Warrior. This post is public so feel free to share it.Neo-Feudalism and the Serf StateThe second perspective of interest is global. Sociologist and demographer Joel Kotkin writes in his latest book The Coming of Neo-Feudalism that we are slipping into a period where there is a stark contrast between the ruling elites, in particular the tech billionaires, and the ruled proletariat. In other words, a return to the European era of feudalism, where a ruling class lorded it over the serfs, who basically had no rights. On Singularity Radio, leftist and former finance minister of Greece, Yanis Varoufakis, echoes the same sentiment and argues it is ‘techno-feudalism’. He goes one step further to state that Capitalism is dead, whereas Kotkin only goes so far as to argue that a zaibatsu-ization of the US economy is happening, and the economic systems of the US and China are converging.In a Hoover Institution podcast based on his Foreign Affairs article, geo-strategist John Mearsheimer suggests a convergence from a political angle too. He argues that the difference between a democracy and an autocracy are limited so far as great-power rivalries go, and that the US made an extraordinarily foolish move to enable China to rise. Says he: Engagement may have been the worst strategic blunder any country has made in recent history: there is no comparable example of a great power actively fostering the rise of a peer competitor. And it is now too late to do much about it.Put these two arguments together, and you get an interesting picture. On the one hand, feudalism requires an upper class and a lower class. It could be argued that feudalism never in fact went away in Europe, or even the supposedly class-less US. Social mobility there is far less than one has been led to believe, according to research by Raj Chetty, then at Stanford. There indeed are traditional elites in the US: the East-Coast Wall Street types, for instance. Their kids all go to prep school like Philipps Andover or Exeter, then on to Ivy League colleges, and then on to Goldman Sachs or Morgan Stanley, and eventually maybe to government. This is, for all intents and purposes, an upper caste, which is also largely endogamous. Just try breaking into it: it is well-nigh impossible. Then there are the lower-caste serfs, the plebeian yahoos who are subjected to ‘manufacturing consent’ on a daily basis. They were earlier manipulated via the big newspapers, but now the tech platforms do an even better job. If you don’t believe me, see how the Overton window has shifted sharply in favor of woke tropes over the last few years. Or, for a more tactical shift, note how the topic of heated discussion has gone from Roe v Wade to school shootings to Jan 6 within days. I am reminded of a line from Pink Floyd, Welcome to the Machine: “What did you dream? It’s alright, we told you what to dream”.In contrast to Kotkin, I would argue that there is no neo-Feudalism, it is the same lovely practice that never went away. Kotkin also said, in passing, “Silicon valley is full of indentured servants from Asia”. He meant India. He is right, and that is the role of India in the game: producing raw materials, including serfs, for the consumption of the upper caste feudal lords.Feudalism applies also to nations. Whites have for a few centuries been the feudal lords, and their colonies, especially India, have been the untermenschen serfs. That is their pre-ordained role. As Mearsheimer candidly admits, the US blundered in allowing China to escape from serfdom. And it is too late. But of course it is not too late to contain India! They have no intention of blundering again, or allowing India to rise to be a great power as well. China has become an honorary upper caste country by bulking up its economy and especially its military. But applications are now firmly closed for membership in this club. Even rich Japan has only a tenuous membership. It is in the interests of the feudal lord countries to keep the serf countries as they are.In this, the US and China are as one: there is no way India can be allowed to gain power. This may explain the fury with which US and European commentators (eg Bruno Macaes) greeted India’s stance in the Ukraine war, of keeping aloof from it. That’s not how a serf state is supposed to act: it should do the Gunga Din tango.This mindset is why the US has continually armed and financed Pakistan, propping up a failed state that should have been dismantled long ago: it is meant to contain India. This is also why you have the likes of Thenmozhi Soundararajan running rampant in the US shouting about caste. This is why a propagandist like Audrey Truschke is not ejected from polite company. This is why USCIRF, an evangelist propaganda body, gets free rein to pontificate about India. This is why India is marginalized in the Quad, and the upper caste countries (Anglosphere is by definition upper caste) close ranks to form AUKUS. India must be put in its place, and that’s why a million mutinies are funded by the Ford Foundation and George Soros, and Xinhua and other CCP arms. There are plenty of sleeper cells armed and ready to riot on command. Add to this mix the oil states of West Asia. Qatar has its giant natural gas reserves, and India is increasingly addicted to LNG including for its newly-minted rural women consumers of cooking gas. Furthermore, Biden is genuflecting at the feet of Saudi Arabia, as Glenn Greenwald writes in a stinging comment on substack. Having successfully prevented India from buying cheap Iranian oil, and pushing hard to prevent it from buying cheap Russian oil, the Americans are forcing India to be ever-more dependent on West Asian states. Never mind that India has buyer power: of course the sellers have to sell the stuff to somebody to keep their economies ticking over.Also never mind the fallacy of the argument that India must kowtow to these Gulf states, in case they send back the Indians working there. Well, that is not charity, either. If the Indians were ejected (let us recall what happened to Uganda in Idi Amin’s time), the serfs running everything would be gone, and the feudal lords would actually have to get their hands dirty doing something other than being rich and idle. The fact that India has not asserted itself forcefully means that the pressure tactics are working: the malign forces have drawn first blood. Chances are that worse is yet to come. 1600 words, Jun 15, 2022 updated Jun 19, 2022 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit rajeevsrinivasan.substack.com

Not Today
Episode 87: Ocean Marathon

Not Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 54:03


Jim Holly and Jens Lundy wanted to get closer to both of their fathers, and decided to plan a joint fishing trip to Mexico.  However, instead of taking a commercial flight, Jim would fly all of them down in his own plane. The flight went well until they got over the Gulf of Mexico, where there was an unexpected storm system. Jim decided to fly through it, thinking it was small enough to power through., but the storm never let up. Jim pulled the plane up to get above the storm, and just a few moments after breaking free, the plane's engine failed. Jim and Jens were about to have a bonding experience with their fathers in a way they never expected.Classic Conversations: Pop Culture InterviewsPop culture influencers, TV stars, film actors, comedians, and musicians share...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Empowered Within with Jennifer PilatesEmpowered Within is Your Soul Quenching Podcast that will Set Your Soul on Fire!...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Bring Receipts PodcastTwo friends debate their unpopular opinions about pop culture.Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Inside The Epicenter With Joel Rosenberg
What Arab King Built the Region's Largest Church, and Why? #57

Inside The Epicenter With Joel Rosenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 36:25


Joel C. Rosenberg and co-host Dr. Carl Moeller reveal details from their recent trip to Bahrain, and why Joel considers it the “Hidden Pearl of the Gulf.” They summarize the history and impact of the Abraham Accords, Bahrain's decision to make peace with Israel, and the enormous threat Iran is to the island nation. Listeners also get an inside look at the King of Bahrain's efforts to promote religious freedom among his people through the Bahrain Declaration a bold assertion for an Arab nation. Learn more about The Joshua Fund: JoshuaFund.com Make a tax-deductible donation: Donate | The Joshua Fund Stock Media provided by DimmySad / Pond5  

This Day in Maine
June 20, 2022: COVID vaccines for young children coming to Maine; Phytoplankton growth is slowing in the Gulf of Maine

This Day in Maine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 6:07


WPKN Community Radio
GaiaGram #107 Environmental Headlines from around a planet in crisis.

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 4:36


-Yellowstone national Park floods and closes -The U.S. West is drying out due to climate-driven changes -Dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico is growing -Three oil companies cancel leases in Alaska's Arctic Wildlife Refuge - Weather Floods Miami Streets -Indonesia will start moving its capital city due to sea rise Electric aircraft flies 1,219 nm. In a test run

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast
Saudi Arabia banking oil windfall to keep focus on fiscal discipline, diversification, says Stephen Kalin

On the Middle East with Andrew Parasiliti, an Al-Monitor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 24:13


Stephen Kalin, Wall Street Journal Middle East Correspondent based in Riyadh and Dubai, breaks down the issues around US President Joe Biden's upcoming visit to Saudi Arabia and the region, including Iran, Yemen, Israel normalization, and global energy security….and how Saudi Arabia is managing the windfall from higher oil prices.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beyond the Headlines
How rising prices in the Middle East are pushing people into poverty

Beyond the Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 14:19


When you hear of Arab cuisine, what imagery does it conjure up? Hummus, bulgur wheat, meat, chicken and spices like sumac, cumin and cinnamon. Lavish dinner parties with popular dishes like Egyptian koshary, Jordanian mansaf and Iraqi tashreeb. The bigger the dish, the more generous the host. That is a deeply rooted belief in Arab culture. Despite the Gulf countries being insulated from the rising costs of living, people in many places in the Middle East - and around the world - are struggling to regularly buy quality raw food ingredients as prices skyrocket. In this episode of Beyond the Headlines, host Ahmed Maher speaks to people from across the Middle East to see how rising prices are pushing some of them into food poverty.

Richard and Judy Book Club Podcast - exclusive to WHSmith

Former Tornado navigator John Nichol has written a new book, Tornado: In The Eye of The Storm. He joins Richard and Judy to talk about the different types of fear he felt when he was shot down and tortured during the first Gulf war, and how the treatment of military personnel who are suffering mentally has changed over the last century. Tell Me Your Lies is this week's Book Club novel. Written by Kate Ruby, it tells the story of a mother who – determined to portray a picture perfect image of her family – sends her alcoholic daughter, Rachel, to therapy. However, Rachel and her renowned therapist develop a troubling relationship. Continuing the theme of mental health, Richard, Judy, John, and Kate all share their own thoughts about, and experiences of, therapy and psychological traumas. Simply head online to whsmith.co.uk to browse the Early Summer Book Club collection, and use the code APRIL10 for a 10% discount.

Business Extra
Why GCC economies are growing so fast

Business Extra

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 18:31


Recent data shows strong business activity growth in both the UAE and Saudi Arabia. This is expected amid pandemic recovery and higher oil prices, according to Khatija Haque, chief economist and head of research at Emirates NBD. But global market forces are also at play. She joins co-hosts Mustafa Alrawi and Kelsey Warner this week, sharing her outlook on how GCC economies will fair against rising inflation and global recession fears — and why growth is still possible even in this environment. In this episode: The economic outlook (0m 14s) Is it a seperate story in the Gulf? (2m 37s) Inflation in the GCC (4m 39s) The outlook in growth of the non-oil sector (10m 45s)   Read more on our website: Solid growth on the cards for the UAE despite accelerating inflation Opec maintains 2022 demand outlook but says Ukraine conflict and pandemic pose a risk Mohamed El Erian: US inflation could reach 9% and lead to a recession Subscribe to Business Extra for free to receive new episodes every week Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Podbean

Louisiana Considered Podcast
New research shows correlation between diabetes, race, and food insecurity

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 24:30


Last week The American Diabetes Association hosted their eighty second Scientific Sessions in New Orleans. At the event, researchers, doctors, and ADA leaders presented groundbreaking diabetes research, notably how diabetes correlates to food insecurity as well as racial residential segregation. Dr. Otis W. Kirksey, ADA President of Health Care and Education tells us more about the recent findings and what we can learn from them. But first, criminal cases in New Orleans headed back online at the beginning of this week, not due to COVID, but due to violence and staffing issues. Will Snowden, Director of Vera Institute of Justice - New Orleans, tells us more about the recent increase of violence and deaths at New Orleans jails and how Sheriff Susan Hutson is responding.  And, while Louisianans are gearing up for another hurricane season, one frequently overlooked factor of forecasting is the Loop Current: an ocean current that curls north past Yucatan into the Gulf and then swings east past Florida before joining the Gulf Stream. Professor of Oceanography at the University of Miami, Dr. Nick Shay joins us to share more about the Loop Current and what its impact might be. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Adam Vos. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman, Aubry Procell, and Thomas Walsh.  You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts.  Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
Brookings Institution President Resigns Amid FBI Probe (news)

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 18:49


Nonprofitnewsfeed.com   Brookings Institution President Resigns Amid FBI Foreign Lobbying Probe   Brookings Institution President John Allen has resigned after national press outlets reported he was under FBI investigation for undisclosed lobbying efforts on behalf of the government of Qatar. While Allen denies any wrongdoing, he was revealed in court filings to be the target of an FBI probe into violations of FARA (Foreign Agent Registration Act), which requires the registration of anyone conducting lobbying activities on behalf of foreign governments. Court documents also show he lied to federal investigators and attempted to withhold evidence saught by a federal subpoena. Allen, a retired four star U.S. Marine Corps general and former commander of NATO and U.S. troops in Afghanistan, publically resigned on Sunday after being placed on administrative leave. This comes amid increasing scrutiny of foreign influence in D.C.-based think tanks, and represents law enforcement efforts to curb illegal lobbying especially by wealthy Gulf countries like Qatar. Most of these policy-based think tanks are registered 501(c)3's and wield enormous influence in shaping federal public policy.     Summary:   Senators reach a bipartisan deal on gun safety legislation : NPR NPR.org Apple Adds iOS Safety Check for People Facing Domestic Violence CNET Jennifer Lopez Partners With Microfinance Nonprofit To Give Latina Entrepreneurs $14 Billion Capital Boost | Forbes Coastal Bend nonprofit offers summer program for students with special needs | KIIITV.com  The Kelsey Ayer Station Groundbreaking Community Celebration | The Kelsey

MidPoint from WMNF News
Florida activists call for an end to new oil and gas drilling leases in the Gulf of Mexico

MidPoint from WMNF News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022


The Real Estate Sessions
Episode 322 – Brittany Ranew, Premier Sotheby's International Realty

The Real Estate Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 30:10


  Before moving to St. Petersburg and working in http://premiersothebysrealty.com/ (Premier Sotheby's International Realty), https://www.linkedin.com/in/brittanyranewrealtor/ (Brittany Ranew) lived in Mobile, Alabama. And, life there was slower so Brittany really had to re-adjust to everything. She later found that the best way to do that is to be a part of the community. To build strong relationships first and business transactions will come. When you give freely in life, you will get in return. Join Bill Risser as he talks to Brittany about her real estate journey. Discover her love for jazz and soul and how that translated into her own podcast, https://open.spotify.com/show/3vDoZfu1FqETNaFj2VGxnW (St. Pete Soul). Learn how she learned real estate by finding mentorship in others. Find out why you need to start building those relationships right now! --- Brittany Ranew, Premier Sotheby's International Realty I get to talk to somebody I've known for a long time here in St. Pete since I moved here in 2017. I met Brittany Ranew. She's with https://www.premiersothebysrealty.com/ (Premier Sotheby's International Realty). She was a realtor who came to some of the sessions I was doing for Fidelity National Title. She was doing some cool stuff. She launched her own podcast, and we're going to talk about that. She's a classically trained singer, which makes me insanely jealous, and all cool stuff. Let's get this thing going. Brittany, welcome to the show. Bill, thanks so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here. It's great seeing you and talking to you. We've known each other for as long as I've been in St. Petersburg when I moved here with Fidelity National Title. You might have been one of the first realtors I met pretty early on in the game because you were in St. Pete, and I was working out of the St. Pete office. We always talked. You had some great ideas. I know you're a dog lover. I know that we're going to talk about your podcast. I know you love music. We're going to have some fun with this conversation. Like me, you're not a native Floridian. Many of the people we talk to here in St. Pete are not. Although a lot of people are, it's shocking how many people are natives that live in this town, which makes sense. What was home for you? Where did you grow up? I'm from Mobile, Alabama. Whenever I tell people that, they're like, "You don't have an accent." I'm like, "It's there. There are certain words. From talking to my family, it will come out." I know Mobile's on the Gulf Coast. I know Interstate 10 runs right through it because when we were relocating to St. Pete, we stayed the night in Mobile. A tornado had hit a few miles South of the hotel. Everything was flooded. It was raining, and all kinds of stuff were happening. Tell me. That's not much to know about Mobile that I stayed there, and it's on the Gulf Coast. Tell me a little bit about where you grew up. You're talking about the weather, which is a thing. Mobile is one of the rainiest cities in the country. That was the cool thing about moving to St. Pete being the Sunshine City because it's sunny all the time. In Mobile, it rains all the time. It's funny. It's on the Gulf Coast, and you're still living on the Gulf Coast, but it's quite a difference. Something about the Gulf into Mobile Bay and weather patterns sweeps across the panhandle from New Orleans all the way across to the panhandle. There are lots of stormy weather. It's hot and humid. I was used to the heat from growing up there. I like to describe it as a small version of New Orleans. It's got the same history with the French and Spanish colonization and all that. You've got some of those influences with food like the Cajun, Creole, all of that. New Orleans is a bigger city, and they took it all to a different level, but we have some of those same vibes on a smaller scale. A fun fact that most people don't know is that Mobile is the birthplace of Mardi...

The John Batchelor Show
2/2: #Russia: Lavrov in the Gulf for oil and food. Ekaterina Zolotova, Geopolitical Futures, covering Eurasia.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 8:07


Photo: Dessert for a Russian Easter feast; created by the genius chef and baker Natalia M.  (private photo) 2/2: #Russia: Lavrov in the Gulf for oil and food. Ekaterina Zolotova, Geopolitical Futures, covering Eurasia.   https://geopoliticalfutures.com/chances-for-russias-outreach-to-the-middle-east/

The John Batchelor Show
1/2: #Russia: Lavrov in the Gulf for oil and food. Ekaterina Zolotova, Geopolitical Futures, covering Eurasia.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 10:26


Photo:  Sauce "Mayonnaise": An excellent seasoning for all cold meat, fish and vegetable dishes. People's Commissariat of Food Industry of the USSR; Glavmargarin; artistic – Color lithograph, 1 sheet, 61 × 41 cm. – 5000 copies. 1/2: #Russia: Lavrov in the Gulf for oil and food. Ekaterina Zolotova, Geopolitical Futures, covering Eurasia.  https://geopoliticalfutures.com/chances-for-russias-outreach-to-the-middle-east/

The Take
Is normalization the new normal?

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 20:39


In the Gulf, normalization with Israel is paying off: there's a major free trade deal, Israeli tourism to the United Arab Emirates is booming, and the prospect is brewing of normalization with Saudi Arabia, the largest Arab economy. The occupation is still center stage to Palestinians, and for decades, Israel's relationship with the Arab world has been at most a cold peace. What does it mean for that to change? In this episode:  Gregg Carlstrom (@glcarlstrom), Middle East correspondent, The Economist Episode credits: This episode was produced by Alexandra Locke with Ney Alvarez, Negin Owliaei, Ruby Zaman, Amy Walters, and Malika Bilal. Our sound designer is Alex Roldan. Our engagement producers are Aya Elmileik and Adam Abou-Gad. Connect with us: @AJEPodcasts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

Big Picture Science
Dinosaurs' Last Gasp

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 51:30


Do we have physical evidence of the last day of the dinosaurs? We consider fossilized fish in South Dakota that may chronicle the dramatic events that took place when, 66 million years ago, a large asteroid slammed into the Gulf of Mexico and caused three-quarters of all species to disappear.  Also, what new discoveries have paleontologists made about these charismatic animals, and the director of Jurassic World: Dominion talks about how his film hews to the latest science. Hint: feathers! It's deep history, as we look at what happened as terrestrial life experienced its worst day ever. Guests: Colin Trevorrow – Director of Jurassic World: Dominion Riley Black – Science writer and author of “The Last Days of the Dinosaurs” Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan – Paleontologist at the University of Cape Town, South Africa This episode brought to you in part by DRAGON BALL Z: KAKAROT and Hero Wars. Learn more about Hero Wars at hero-wars.com Big Picture Science is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to inquire about advertising on Big Picture Science. You can get early access to ad-free versions of every episode by joining us on Patreon. Thanks for your support!             Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Kitchen Sisters Present
191—The Egg Wars and the Farallon Islands

The Kitchen Sisters Present

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 18:09


The Egg Wars—a hidden Gold Rush kitchen—when food was scarce and men died for eggs. We travel out to the forbidding Farallon Islands, 27 miles outside San Francisco's Golden Gate, home to the largest seabird colony in the United States. Over 250,000 birds on 14 acres. But it wasn't always so. One hundred seventy years ago it was the site of the “Egg Wars.” During the 1850s, egg hunters gathered over 3 million eggs, violently competing with each other, and nearly stripping the island bare. In 1969 the Point Reyes Bird observatory began working to protect the Farallones. The islands had been through a lot. The devastating fur trade of the 1800s. The Egg Wars. During WWII the Islands were used as a secret navy installation with over 70 people living on the island. From 1946-1970 nearly 50,000 drums of radioactive waste were dumped in the Farallon waters. Fisherman often shot high powered rifles at sea lions and helicopters were causing whales and other animals to panic. Today the Farallones are off limits to all but researchers, some who live out on the desolate island for months in the old lighthouse there. Surrounded by thousands of birds, they wear hard hats to keep the gulls from dive bombing their heads. The Islands are a sanctuary—The Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The Kitchen Sisters were given permission to travel out to the islands on one of the supply runs that goes out to the islands 2 times a month. The Farrallon National Wildlife Refuge is managed by US Fish and Wildlife Service Our story features: Gary Kamiya, journalist and author; Mary Jane Schram, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; Peter Pyle, Farallon Biologist; Ava Crosante, Illustrator; Peter White, Author of Farallon Islands—Sentinels of the Golden Gate; Skipper Roger Cunningham; Pete Warzybok, Scientist Farallon Islands; Russ Bradly, Farallon Program Leader for Point Blue Conservation Science. Special thanks to: Melissa Pitkin, Point Blue Conservation; Doug Cordell and the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex; Edward Jenkins; Julia Gulka; Sean Gee; Keith Hansen, Eve Williams, Gerry McChesnwey; and the Farallon Marine Sanctuary. The Kitchen Sisters Present is produced by The Kitchen Sisters, Nikki Silva and Davia Nelson, with Nathan Dalton and Brandi Howell. We are part of PRX's Radiotopia Network.

The Professional Noticer
The Heart Mender Movie?

The Professional Noticer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 55:07


This week, Andy is joined by the producers behind the major motion picture The Heart Mender—Noble Story Co. & Kingdom Story Company.   Tune in to hear everything (no spoilers!) from Andy finding the German artifacts and investigating how they arrived in the Gulf—to how these film makers heard about the book and why they're so excited to bring this story to life!    This is an exclusive behind the scenes look at this MASSIVE project and some of the key people working hard to make it happen—Adam Gregory, Andrew Teravskis, Dan Atchison, Jon Erwin, and Edgar Struble   Find more from these creators at their websites below:   www.noblestoryco.com www.kingdomstorycompany.com   If you have questions or comments for THE PROFESSIONAL NOTICER, please contact us at: Email: TheProfessionalNoticer@AndyAndrews.com Facebook.com/AndyAndrews YouTube.com/AndyAndrewsAuthor Twitter.com/AndyAndrews Instagram.com/AndyAndrewsAuthor

Congressional Dish
CD253: Escalation of War

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 104:52


Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine began, Congress has signed four laws that send enormous amounts of money and weapons to Ukraine, attempting to punish Russia for President Putin's invasion. In this episode, we examine these laws to find out where our money will actually go and attempt to understand the shifting goals of the Biden administration. The big picture, as it's being explained to Congress, differs from what we're being sold. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Content Ukraine and Russia CD249: A Few Good Laws CD248: Understanding the Enemy CD244: Keeping Ukraine CD229: Target Belarus CD167: Combating Russia (NDAA 2018) LIVE CD068: Ukraine Aid Bill CD067: What Do We Want In Ukraine? Syria CD172: The Illegal Bombing of Syria CD108: Regime Change CD041: Why Attack Syria? World Trade System What Is the World Trade System? CD230: Pacific Deterrence Initiative CD102: The World Trade Organization: COOL? Russian Blockade Shane Harris. May 24, 2022. “U.S. intelligence document shows Russian naval blockade of Ukraine.” The Washington Post. NATO Expansion Jim Garamone. Jun 1, 2022. “Russia Forcing Changes to NATO Strategic Concepts.” U.S. Department of Defense News. Matthew Lee. May 27, 2022. “US: Turkey's NATO issues with Sweden, Finland will be fixed.” AP News. Ted Kemp. May 19, 2022. “Two maps show NATO's growth — and Russia's isolation — since 1990.” CNBC. U.S. Involvement in Ukraine Helene Cooper, Eric Schmitt and Julian E. Barnes. May 5, 2022. “U.S. Intelligence Helped Ukraine Strike Russian Flagship, Officials Say.” The New York Times. Julian E. Barnes, Helene Cooper and Eric Schmitt. May 4, 2022. “U.S. Intelligence Is Helping Ukraine Kill Russian Generals, Officials Say.” The New York Times. Private Security Contractors Christopher Caldwell. May 31, 2022. “The War in Ukraine May Be Impossible to Stop. And the U.S. Deserves Much of the Blame.” The New York Times. Joaquin Sapien and Joshua Kaplan. May 27, 2022. “How the U.S. Has Struggled to Stop the Growth of a Shadowy Russian Private Army.” ProPublica. H.R. 7691 Background How It Passed Glenn Greenwald. May 13, 2022. “The Bizarre, Unanimous Dem Support for the $40b War Package to Raytheon and CIA: ‘For Ukraine.'” Glenn Greenwald on Substack. Catie Edmondson and Emily Cochrane. May 10, 2022. “House Passes $40 Billion More in Ukraine Aid, With Few Questions Asked.” The New York Times. Republican Holdouts Glenn Greenwald and Anthony Tobin. May 24, 2022. “Twenty-Two House Republicans Demand Accountability on Biden's $40b War Spending.” Glenn Greenwald on Substack. Amy Cheng and Eugene Scott. May 13, 2022. “Rand Paul, lone Senate holdout, delays vote on Ukraine aid to next week.” The Washington Post. Morgan Watkins. May 13, 2022. “Sen. Rand Paul stalls $40 billion in aid for Ukraine, breaking with Mitch McConnell USA Today. Stephen Semler. May 26, 2022. “The Ukraine Aid Bill Is a Massive Windfall for US Military Contractors.” Jacobin. Biden Signs in South Korea Biden signs Ukraine Bill and Access to Baby Formula Act in South Korea. Reddit. Kate Sullivan. May 20, 2022. “Flying the Ukraine aid bill to South Korea for Biden's signature isn't unheard of. It also may not be totally necessary.” CNN. How Much Money, and Where Will It Go? Stephen Semler. May 23, 2022. “A breakdown of the Ukraine aid bill.” Speaking Security on Substack. “CBO Estimate for H.R. 7691, Additional Ukraine Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2022, as Passed by the House of Representatives on May 10, 2022.” May 11 2022. Congressional Budget Office. Christina Arabia, Andrew Bowen, and Cory Welt. Updated Apr 29, 2022. “U.S. Security Assistance to Ukraine.” [IF12040] Congressional Research Service. “22 U.S. Code § 2346 - Authority.” Legal Information Institute, Cornell School of Law. Representatives' Raytheon and Lockheed Martin Stocks Kimberly Leonard. May 19, 2022. “20 members of Congress personally invest in top weapons contractors that'll profit from the just-passed $40 billion Ukraine aid package.” Insider. Kimberly Leonard. Mar 21, 2022. “GOP Rep. John Rutherford of Florida bought Raytheon stock the same day Russia invaded Ukraine.” Insider. Marjorie Taylor Green [@RepMTG]. Feb 24, 2022. “War is big business to our leaders.” Twitter. “Florida's 4th Congressional District.” GovTrack. “Rules Based Order” Anthony Dworkin. Sep 8, 2020. “Why America is facing off against the International Criminal Court.” “History of the multilateral trading system.” *The World Trade Organization “Facts: Global Inequality” Inequality.org “Timeline: Former Russian President Boris Yeltsin.” Apr 23, 2007. NPR. Crimea Kenneth Rapoza. Mar 20, 2015. One Year After Russia Annexed Crimea, Locals Prefer Moscow To Kiev Forbes. “Crimea exit poll: About 93% back Russia union. March 16, 2014. BBC. Shifting Strategies Economic War Larry Elliott. Jun 2, 2022. “Russia is winning the economic war - and Putin is no closer to withdrawing troops. The Guardian. Nigel Gould-Davies. May 12, 2022. “We Must Make Sure Russia Finishes This War in a Worse Position Than Before” The New York Times. Weapons Escalation Jake Johnson. Jun 1, 2022. “'Slippery Slope... Just Got a Lot Steeper': US to Send Ukraine Advanced Missiles as Russia Holds Nuke Drills.” Common Dreams. C. Todd Lopez. Jun 1, 2022. “Advanced Rocket Launcher System Heads to Ukraine.” U.S. Department of Defense News. Greg Norman. Jun 1, 2022. “Russia stages nuclear drills after US announces rockets to Ukraine.” Fox News. Christian Esch et al. May 30, 2022. “What's Next for Ukraine? The West Tries to Figure Out What Peace Might Look Like.” Spiegel International. See Image. Alastair Gale. May 24, 2022. “China and Russia Sent Bombers Near Japan as Biden Visited Tokyo.” The Wall Street Journal. Mike Stone. Mar 11, 2022. “Exclusive: Pentagon revives team to speed arms to Ukraine and allies, sources say.” Reuters. Secretary Austin and the Pentagon Jim Garamone. May 20, 2022. “Austin to Host Second Ukraine Contact Group Meeting Monday.” U.S. Department of Defense News. Natasha Bertrand et al. Apr 26, 2022. “Austin's assertion that US wants to ‘weaken' Russia underlines Biden strategy shift.” CNN. David Sanger. Apr 25, 2022. “Behind Austin's Call for a ‘Weakened' Russia, Hints of a Shift.” The New York Times. Mike Stone. Apr 12, 2022. “Pentagon asks top 8 U.S. weapons makers to meet on Ukraine -sources.” Reuters. Glenn Greenwald. Dec 8, 2020. “Biden's Choice For Pentagon Chief Further Erodes a Key U.S. Norm: Civilian Control.” Glenn Greenwald on Substack. Democrats Still All In Marc Santora. May 1, 2022. “Pelosi and Democratic lawmakers vow the U.S. will stand with Ukraine. The New York Times. RFE/RL's Ukrainian Service. May 1, 2022. “Civilians Evacuated From Mariupol; U.S. House Speaker Pelosi Visits Kyiv.” Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. “Ukraine war: Joe Biden calls for removal of Vladimir Putin in angry speech.” Mar 26, 2022. Sky News. The Laws H.R. 7691: Additional Ukraine Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2022 House Vote: 368-57 Senate Vote: 86-11 Transcript of House Debate S.3522: Ukraine Democracy Defense Lend-Lease Act of 2022 Passed by Voice Vote in the Senate House Vote 417-10 House "Debate" H.R.6968 - Ending Importation of Russian Oil Act Senate Vote: 100-0 House Vote: 413-9 House Debate H.R.7108: Suspending Normal Trade Relations with Russia and Belarus Act Senate Vote: 100-0 (amended the original House bill) Final House Vote: 424-8 House debate 1 (on original version) House debate 2 (final version) Audio Sources Joe Manchin at the World Economic Forum's meeting in Davos May 23, 2022 Clips Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV): Speaking about Ukraine, first what Putin, Putin's war on Ukraine and Ukraine's determination, resolving the sacrifices they've made for the cause of freedom has united the whole world, that it's united, US Senate and Congress, I think like nothing I've seen in my lifetime. I think we're totally committed to supporting Ukraine, in every way possible, as long as we have the rest of NATO and the free world helping. I think we're all in this together. And I am totally committed as one person to seeing Ukraine to the end with a win, not basically resolving in some type of a treaty. I don't think that is where we are and where we should be. Reporter: Can I just follow up and ask you what you mean by a win for Ukraine? ** Sen. Joe Manchin:** I mean, basically moving Putin back to Russia and hopefully getting rid of Putin. The Ukraine Crisis: Implications for U.S. Policy in the Indo-Pacific May 19, 2022 Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia, and Nonproliferation Witnesses: Charles Edel, Ph.D., Australia Chair and Senior Adviser, Center for Strategic and International Studies Bonny Lin, Ph.D., Director, China Power Project, Center for Strategic and International Studies Tanvi Madan, Ph.D.Director, The India Project, Brookings Institution Dan Blumenthal, Ph.D., Senior Fellow and Director of Asian Studies, American Enterprise Institute Clips 6:57 Tanvi Madan: One implication that is already evident, most visibly in Sri Lanka, is the adverse economic impact. The rise in commodity prices in particular has led to fiscal food and energy security concerns and these, in turn, could have political implications and could create a strategic vacuum. 7:15 Tanvi Madan: A separate and longer term economic impact of the crisis could be renewed goals, perhaps especially in India, for self reliance and building resilience not just against Chinese pressure, but also against Western sanctions. 7:28 Tanvi Madan: The second potential implication of the Russia-Ukraine war could be that Beijing might seek to take advantage in the Indo-Pacific while the world's focus is on Europe, between the Taiwan or the East or South China Sea contingencies. The contingency that would have the most direct impact in South Asia would be further action by the PLA at the China-India boundary, or at the Bhutan-China boundary that could draw in India. This potential for Sino-Indian crisis escalation has indeed shaped Delhi's response to the Russia-Ukraine war. Despite its recent diversification efforts, the Indian military continues to be dependent, if not over dependent, on Russia for supplies and spare parts for crucial frontline equipment. India has also been concerned about moving Moscow away from neutrality towards taking China's side. Nonetheless, there is simultaneously concern that Russia's war with Ukraine might, in any case, make Moscow more beholden to Beijing and also less able to supply India, and that will have implications for India's military readiness. 10:10 Tanvi Madan: The fourth implication in South Asia could flow from the war's effect on the Russia-China relationship flows. The Sino-Russian ties in recent years have benefited Pakistan. However, they have been of great concern to India. If China-Russia relations deepened further, it could lead to increased Indian concern about Russian reliability. And a Dheli that is concerned about Moscow's ability and willingness to supply India militarily or supported in international forums will seek alternative partners and suppliers a potential opportunity for the US as well as its allies and partners. 18:15 Bonny Lin: China has shifted its position on the Ukraine conflict to be less fully pro Russia. Xi Jinping has expressed that he is deeply grieved by the outbreak of war. China has engaged in diplomacy, called for a ceasefire, proposed a six point humanitarian initiative, and provided humanitarian aid to Ukraine. China's position on Ukraine, however, is far from neutral. China has not condemned Russia or called its aggression an evasion. Xi has yet to speak to President Zelenskyy. There is no evidence that China has sought to pressure Russia in any way or form. China has amplified Russian disinformation and pushed back against Western sanctions. To date, Beijing has not provided direct military support to Russia and has not engaged in systemic efforts to help Russia evade sanctions. However, China's ambassador to Russia has encouraged Chinese companies to quote "fill the void in the Russian market." 19:14 Bonny Lin: The Ukraine crisis has reinforced China's view that US military expansion could provoke conflict in the Indo-Pacific. Chinese interlocutors have voiced concern that the United States and NATO are fighting Russia today, but might fight China next. China views NATO expansion as one of the key causes of the Korean conflict and sees parallels between NATO activities in Europe and US efforts in the Indo-Pacific. Beijing is worried that increasing US and ally support for Taiwan and other regional allies and partners elevates the risk of US-China military confrontation. This pessimistic assessment is why Beijing will continue to stand by Russia as a close strategic partner. 19:56 Bonny Lin: The Ukraine crisis has reinforced and strengthened China's desire to be more self reliant. China is investing more to ensure the security of food, energy, and raw materials. Beijing is also seeking more resilient industrial supply chains, as well as PRC-led systems, including alternatives to Swift. At the same time, Beijing is likely to further cultivate dependencies on China, such that any potential Western led sanctions on China or international-community-led sanctions on China in the future will be painful to the West and difficult to sustain. 21:15 Bonny Lin: China has observed that Russia put its nuclear and strategic forces on high alert and NATO did not send conventional forces to Ukraine. This is leading China to question its nuclear policy and posture. 21:57 Bonny Lin: As Beijing watches the Western and particularly G7-led unity among advanced democracies, it is also seeing that a number of countries in the developing world are not joining in on the sanctions. As a result, Beijing has tried to increase its influence and in many ways building on Russian influence in developing regions. And Beijing is likely to try to get all that influence moving forward. 24:24 Dan Blumenthal: China took the opportunity of Russia's invasion on February 4 to lay out a document that criticizes, very specifically, almost all aspects of United States global policy. Very specifically, including Oculus for NATO enlargement to Oculus to the Indo Pacific strategy. It got Russia to sign up to Xi Jinping's theory that we're in a new era of geopolitics that will replace US leadership, that US leadership is faulty and it's dividing the world into blocks such as NATO, that NATO expansion is the problem, that Indo-Pacific strategy is the same thing as NATO expansion. 25:45 Dan Blumenthal: We should take very seriously what they say, particularly in Chinese, and what they're saying is very clearly pro-Russia and very clear, specific, searing critiques of the US-led world order. 26:47 Dan Blumenthal: And frankly, while the West is unified, and the US and the West and some of our Asian allies are unified, most of the rest of the world is not with us on this issue of China and Russia being these authoritarian, revisionist great powers, and that's a real problem. Middle East, North Africa, and Global Counterterrorism May 18, 2022 House Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on the Middle East, North Africa, and Global Counterterrorism Witnesses: Dr. Hanna Notte, Senior Research Associate, Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Dr. Frederic Wehrey, Senior Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Caitlin Welsh, Director of the Global Food Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies Grant Rumley, Senior Fellow, The Washington Institute for Near East Policy Clips 12:55 Hanna Notte: First, Moscow's military presence in Syria has given it a buffer zone on its southern flank to counter perceived threats from within the region, but also to deter NATO outside the European theater. And second, Russia has turned to the region to diversify its economic relations with a focus on arms sales, civilian nuclear exports and wheat supplies. And in building influence, Russia has largely followed what I call a low cost high disruption approach, also using hybrid tactics such as private military companies and disinformation. Now, these Russian interests in the region will not fundamentally change with the invasion of Ukraine. Today, Russia's regional diplomacy remains highly active, aimed at offsetting the impact of Western sanctions and demonstrating that Moscow is not isolated internationally. 14:09 Hanna Notte: Starting with arms control and Non-Proliferation, though Moscow seemed intent on spoiling negotiations to restore the JCPOA [Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action] in early March. It subsequently dropped demands for written guarantees that its cooperation with Iran would not be hindered by sanctions imposed over Ukraine. But still, I think the geopolitical situation might make Moscow less willing to help finalize a nuclear deal. As in the past, Russia is also unlikely to support any US efforts to curb Iran's use of missiles and proxies in the region, because essentially, Iran's regional strategy pins down us resources while elevating Russia as a regional mediator, which serves Russian interests well. 15:17 Hanna Notte: Just a few words on Syria. Security Council resolution 2585 on the provision of humanitarian aid to northwest Syria is up for renewal in July. Now, Rationally speaking, the Kremlin should cooperate to avoid a worsening of serious food crisis, especially if an end game in Ukraine remains out of reach. But considering the current level of tensions between Russia and the West, I think the United States should be prepared for a Russian Security Council veto regardless, alongside continued Russian stalling on the Syrian constitutional committee. Moscow has no serious interest in seeing the committee advance. It will instead try to foster a Gulf Arab counterweight to Iran in Syria through normalization, especially for the contingency that Russia may need to scale back its own presence in Syria due to Ukraine. 16:14 Hanna Notte: First, unfortunately I think there's a widespread perception that the Ukraine war is not their war, that it's a Great Power NATO-Russia war, partially fueled by NATO and US actions visa vis Russia. 16:27 Hanna Notte: Second, there are accusations of Western double standards. The military support to Kyiv, the reception of Ukrainian refugees, these are rightly or wrongly viewed as proof that the West cares significantly more about conflict in Europe's neighborhood than those in the Middle East. 16:42 Hanna Notte: Third, regional elites worry about US conventional security guarantees. They fear that the threats posed by Russia and China will accelerate a decline in US power in the Middle East. And they also fear that the US will have limited bandwidth to confront Iran's missile and proxy activities. And with those fears, they feel they cannot afford to put all their eggs into the US basket. 17:07 Hanna Notte: And then finally, each regional state has very distinct business and security interests with Russia. As a result, and I'll end here, I think us opportunities to get regional states to turn against Russia are circumscribed. loosening these ties that states have been building with Russia will require a heavy lift. 18:57 Frederic Wehrey: This engagement is largely opportunistic and ad hoc. It seizes on instability and power vacuums and exploits the insecurities of US partners in the region about the reliability of US support, and their displeasure with the conditionality that the US sometimes attaches to its arms sales. Russian arms deliveries, in contrast, are faster and free from restrictions related to human rights. But Russia cannot provide the security guarantees that many Arab states have depended on from the United States. 19:29 Frederic Wehrey: Now, in the wake of its invasion of Ukraine, Russia is trying to reap dividends from its investment in the region, call in favors, and capitalize on local ambivalence and hostility to the United States, both from states and from Arab publics. America's Arab security partners have differed on joining the Western condemnation of Russian aggression, and some of refuse to join efforts to isolate Russia economically. 20:31 Frederic Wehrey: Russia's disastrous war in Ukraine is tarnishing its reputation as an arms supplier in the Middle East. Russian weapons have been shown to be flawed in combat and often fatally. So, Battlefield expenditures and attrition have whittled away Russia's inventory, especially precision munitions, and sanctions have eroded its defense industrial base, especially electronic components. As a result, Russia won't be able to fulfill its existing commitments, and potential buyers will be increasingly dissuaded from turning to Russia. This shortfall could be modestly exploited by China, which possesses large quantities of Russian made arms and spare parts, which you could use to keep existing inventories in the region up and running. It could also intensify its efforts to sell its own advanced weaponry like drones. 23:50 Caitlin Welsh: The war has reduced supplies and increased prices of foods exported from Ukraine and Russia, namely wheat, maize and sunflower oil, driven up demand for substitute products and reduced fertilizer exports from the Black Sea. Today's high cost of energy puts further pressure on food and fertilizer prices. Most vulnerable to the impact of these price spikes are countries for whom wheat is a major source of calories that rely on imports to meet their food security needs, and that source a significant proportion of their imports from Ukraine and Russia. 24:38 Caitlin Welsh: Egypt is the world's largest importer of wheat, sourcing over 70% of its wheat from the Black Sea. 25:42 Caitlin Welsh: The Russian Ukraine war is limiting access to wheat for Lebanon, already in one of the worst economic crises in the world. Lebanon has not recorded economic growth since 2017 and food price inflation inflation reached 400% in December 2021. Lebanon procures approximately 75% of its wheat from Russia and Ukraine. 28:48 Grant Rumley: Russia is one of the few countries in the world to maintain a relatively positive diplomatic standing with nearly every country in the Middle East. It does so through a combination of an active military presence, high level diplomatic engagement, and a concerted effort to position itself as a viable source of arms, should countries seek non-US material. 29:08 Grant Rumley: Russia's military presence in the region is well documented by Russian MOD statements. Russia has deployed over 60,000 troops to Syria since intervening in 2015. From its two bases in Syria, Hmeimim and Tartous, Russia is able to project power into the eastern Mediterranean, influence the course of the Syrian civil war, and intervene in countries like Libya. 29:47 Grant Rumley: Russia's invasion of Ukraine, however, threatens Russia standing in the region. Already reports indicate Russia has begun withdrawing some troops and mercenaries from the region to support its invasion of Ukraine. While we can expect these reports to continue if the war continues to go poorly for Russia, I'm skeptical of a full Russian withdrawal, and instead expect Russia to continue to consolidate its forces until it's left with a skeleton presence at Hmeimim and Tartous, its most strategic assets in the region. 30:26 Grant Rumley: On arms sales, the Russian defense industry, which has struggled to produce key platforms following sanctions initially placed after its 2014 invasion of Ukraine, will likely have to prioritize replenishing the Russian military over exporting. Further, customers of Russian arms may struggle with the resources to maintain and sustain the material in their inventory. Still, so long as Russia is able to make platforms, there will likely always be potential customers of Russian arms. 41:25 Grant Rumley: I definitely think customers of Russian arms are going to have several hurdles going forward, not only with simply maintaining and sustaining what they've already purchased, but in some of the basic logistics, even the payment process. Russian bank complained last month that it wasn't able to process close to a billion dollars in payments from India and Egypt over arms sales. I think countries that purchase Russian arms will also now have to consider the potential that they may incur secondary sanctions, in addition to running afoul of CAATSA [Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act-Related Sanctions]. I think from from our standpoint, there are many ways that we can amend our security cooperation approach. The Middle East, I think is a key theater for the future of great power competition, not only have we been competing with Russia in terms of arms sales there, but China increasingly has sold armed drones to the region. They've sold it to traditional partners, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and the UAE. And what they're doing is is oftentimes what we're not willing to do, our partners in the region seek co-production, they seek technology sharing. China and Russia are willing to work together to build these advanced platforms, Russia and the UAE inked an agreement several years ago to produce a fifth generation fighter. Nothing's come of that yet. China and Saudi Arabia, however, signed an agreement a couple of months ago to jointly produce armed drones in Saudi Arabia. And so I think the US may want to think creatively in terms of both what we sell, how we sell it, and what we're doing to make this more of a relationship and something beyond a strict transaction. 43:39 Grant Rumley: Their presence in Syria has evolved from a modest airstrip in 2015, to a base at Hmeimim that by open source reporting can serve as a logistics hub, a medical hub, it has the runways to host Russia's most advanced bombers. There was reports before Ukraine that Russia was deploying two 22 bombers there and hypersonic missiles. Their facility at Tartous, likewise. Their ability to stage naval assets there has expanded to they can now stage up to 11 ships there. So it has grown from from a rather modest beginning to something much more challenging from a US standpoint. In terms of what we can we can do, I think we can continue to support Ukraine and the defense of Ukraine, and the longer that Russia is bogged down in Ukraine, the harder it will be for Russia's military to extend and maintain its presence in the Middle East. 1:01:45 Grant Rumley: I think the US has several partners in the middle of major Russian arms purchases that we can, like Turkey and the S 400, that has requested the F 16, or Egypt and Sukhoi Su-35, that has requested the F 15. I'm not saying we have to make a deal right now for that, but I think it's clear that these countries are going to have gaps in their capabilities where they had planned on having Russian platforms to complement, and we can work with our partners and work with our own defense industry and see if there's ways in which we can provide off ramps for them to gradually disinvest these Russian platforms. 1:03:00 Frederic Wehrey: When countries in the in the region buy US arms, they believe they're buying much more than the capability, the hardware, that they're purchasing an insurance policy. I think especially for states in the Gulf, there's a fundamental sense of insecurity. These are states that face Iran, but they're also autocrats. They're insecure because of their political systems. They face dissent from within. We saw that with Egypt. So they're purchasing a whole stream of US assurances -- they believe they are. 1:06:00 Grant Rumley: The issue of of co-production is one means to address a common complaint, which is buying from America takes too long. That its too complicated, that if we get in line to buy something from the US, we're going to have to wait years to get it. A good example is the F 16. There are over 20 countries in the world that fly the F 16. We currently -- Lockheed Martin builds it out of one facility. That facility, if you get in line today, you're probably not getting the F 16 for five years from when you sign on the dotted line for it. In the 70s and 80s, we co-produced the F 16 with three other European countries and we were able to get them off the line faster. The initial order at those facilities was for 1000 F 16s. The initial order for the F 16 plant in South Carolina was for 90 F 16s for Taiwan and Morocco. And so from an industry standpoint, it's a question of scale. And so they're not able to ramp up the production because while the demand may get closer to 1000 over time, it's at 128. Last I checked, it's not there yet. And so I think we can use foreign military financing, longer security cooperation planning, working with our partners on multi-year acquisition timetables to then also communicate and send a signal to the defense industry that these are orders for upgrades, for new kits that are going to come down the road. You can start to plan around that and potentially address some of these production lags. 1:17:52 Grant Rumley: China has a lot of legacy Russian platforms, and will likely be a leading candidate to transfer some of these platforms to countries that had purchased Russian arms in the past and may be seeking maintenance and sustainment for them. I think China's already active in the Middle East, it's already flooding the market with armed drones. It's already looking to market other platforms as well. It's sold air defense systems to Serbia. It's looking to advance its arm sales. And so if if we aren't going to be the supplier, China is going to step in. 1:18:57 Caitlin Welsh: USDA has projected that 35% of the current wheat crop from Ukraine will not be harvested this year. So their exports are curtailed, at the same time Russia's exports are continuing. Russia has been exempted. Russia's agricultural exports and fertilizer has been exempted from sanctions for the United States, EU and other countries. So Russia continues to export. In fact, USDA is estimating that Russia's exports are increasing at this time. And I'm also seeing open source reporting of Russia stealing grain from Ukraine, relabeling it, and exporting it at a premium to countries in the Middle East and North Africa. Sen. Rand Paul: ‘We cannot save Ukraine by dooming the U.S. economy' May 12, 2022 NBC News Clips Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY): My oath of office is to the US Constitution, not to any foreign nation. And no matter how sympathetic the cause, my oath of office is to the national security of the United States of America. We cannot save Ukraine by dooming the US economy. This bill under consideration would spend $40 billion. This is the second spending bill for Ukraine in two months. And this bill is three times larger than the first. Our military aid to Ukraine is nothing new, though. Since 2014, the United States has provided more than $6 billion dollars in security assistance to Ukraine, in addition to the $14 billion Congress authorized just a month ago. If this bill passes, the US will have authorized roughly $60 billion in total spending for Ukraine Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY): The cost of this package we are voting on today is more than the US spent during the first year of the US conflict in Afghanistan. Congress authorized force, and the President sent troops into the conflict. The same cannot be said of Ukraine. This proposal towers over domestic priorities as well. The massive package of $60 billion to Ukraine dwarfs the $6 million spent on cancer research annually. $60 billion is more than the amount that government collects in gas taxes each year to build roads and bridges. The $60 billion to Ukraine could fund substantial portions or entire large Cabinet departments. The $60 billion nearly equals the entire State Department budget. The 60 billion exceeds the budget for the Department of Homeland Security and for the Department of Energy. And Congress just wants to keep on spending and spending. U.S. Efforts to Support Ukraine May 12, 2022 Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Witnesses: Jessica Lewis, Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs Erin McKee, Assistant Administrator for Europe and Eurasia, U.S. Agency for International Development Karen Donfried, Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, U.S. Department of State Beth Van Schaack, Ambassador-at-Large for Global Criminal Justice, U.S. Department of State Clips Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA): Are we making it very clear to Russia that we do not want to pose an existential threat to them, that our only goal is to restore the territorial integrity of Ukraine? Karen Donfried: We are making it very clear to Russia that this is not a conflict between Russia and the United States. We are not going to engage directly in this war. President Biden has been explicit in saying we are not sending US troops to fight in this war. So I do believe we have made that clear. Our goal here is to end a war not to enlarge it. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH): As you all are waking up every morning, I know with the thought in mind that America's role here is to help Ukraine win and I want to talk a little about how we define victory. When Secretary Austin said after meeting with President Zelenskyy, that we can win this war against Russia -- this happened a few weeks ago -- I thought that was positive. On Monday, the foreign minister of Ukraine, who all of us have had a chance to visit with said, of course, the victory for us in this war will be a liberation of the rest of the territory. So Assistant Secretary Donfried, first, just a yes or no. Do you believe Ukraine can win this war? Karen Donfried: Yes. Sen. Rob Portman: And how would you define victory? Would you define victory as requiring the return of all Ukraine sovereign territory, including that that the Russians seized in 2014? Karen Donfried: Well, Senator Portman, thank you for that question. And thank you for your engagement on these issues. Your question very much relates to where Chairman Menendez began, which is, are we in a position of believing that it is Ukraine that should be defining what winning means? And I agreed with Chairman Menendez's statement on that, and that is where the administration is. We believe Ukraine should define what victory means. And our policy is trying to ensure Ukraine success, both by — Sen. Rob Portman: So the administration's official position on victory is getting Crimea back and getting the Donetsk and Luhansk region back as well. Karen Donfried: Again, I believe that is for the Ukrainians to define. Karen Donfried: Against this threat to regional security, global stability, and our shared values, we are supporting freedom, democracy, and the rules based order that make our own security and prosperity and that of the world possible. Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ): I believe we must also think about reconstruction efforts in Ukraine, the tools and ongoing governance and economic reforms, specifically in the judicial space, that will facilitate rebuilding critical Ukrainian sectors and attracting foreign investment. The Impact of Russia's Invasion of Ukraine in the Middle East and North Africa May 11, 2022 House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Defense held a budget hearing on the Department of Defense. Witnesses: Lloyd J. Austin III, Secretary of Defense Michael J. McCord, Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller)/Chief Financial Officer General Mark A. Milley, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Clips 21:40 General Mark Milley: Alongside our allies and partners, at any given time approximately 400,000 of us are currently standing watch in 155 countries and conducting operations every day to keep Americans safe. 21:56 General Mark Milley: Currently we are supporting our European allies and guarding NATO's eastern flank, in the face of the unnecessary war of aggression by Russia, against the people of Ukraine, and the assault on the democratic institutions and the rules based international order that have prevented great power war for the last 78 years since the end of World War Two. We are now facing two global powers, China and Russia, each with significant military capabilities, both who intend to fundamentally change the current rules based order. Lindsey Graham declares, "let's take out Putin" and says there is "no off-ramp in this war" May 9, 2022 Clips Sen. Lindsay Graham (R-SC): If Putin still standing after all this then the world is going to be a very dark place China's going to get the wrong signal and we'll have a mess on our hands in Europe for decades to come so let's take out Putin by helping Ukraine Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary ofDefense Lloyd J. Austin III Remarks to Traveling Press April 25, 2022 Jen's Highlighted PDF Remarks by President Biden on the United Efforts of the Free World to Support the People of Ukraine March 26, 2022 Jen's Highlighted PDF U.S. Policy and Russian Involvement in Syria November 4, 2015 House Foreign Affairs Committee Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)