Podcasts about Communist party

political party that promotes communist philosophy and values

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Latest podcast episodes about Communist party

History Off the Page
1929a: Stalin's Soviet Union Part I: the Nightmare

History Off the Page

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 90:34


Born as Ioseb Jughashvili, this son of a cobbler would strike fear in the hearts of millions as the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. In the first episode of this two part series, learn how Stalin built perhaps history's most ruthless dictatorship, why it became a living nightmare for those who lived through it (especially for members of the Communist Party).  Among other topics, the episode discusses the leadership battle to succeed Lenin (20:39), the Great Purges of  1930s (43:00), the establishment of GULAGs (1:05:30), Collectivization (1:17:23) and the Holodomor – a Holocaust-like planned famine that targeted Soviet Ukraine (1:21:21).

Democracy IRL
Have We Reached Peak China? Interview with Andrew G. Walder

Democracy IRL

Play Episode Play 32 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 43:41


Political sociologist Andrew G. Walder, the Denise O'Leary and Kent Thiry Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, is a specialist on the sources of conflict, stability, and change in communist regimes and their successor states. Walder joins Francis Fukuyama to discuss China's economic slowdown, why it suffers from high inequality, and whether the country has peaked and is now facing long-term stagnation.Andrew G. Walder is the Denise O'Leary and Kent Thiry Professor of Sociology at Stanford University and Senior Fellow at Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. His research has focused on the social impact of revolutions, particularly the sources of stability and change in communist regimes and their successor states, with a special emphasis on China. His book on Communist Neo-Traditionalism: Work and Authority in Chinese Industry (1986) examined the way that Communist Party organization and reward structures created patron-client forms of authority in post-revolution urban China. Professor Walder's subsequent work examined the evolution of property rights and economics organization under the impact of market reform and the consequences for social stratification, career and intergenerational mobility, and political conflict. He is the author of Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement (2009), which analyzed the origins of political factionalism during the Cultural Revolution and explored how this phenomenon altered the direction of the student movement and its social impact. At Stanford, he has served as Chair of the Department of Sociology; Director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center; and Director of the Division of International, Comparative and Area Studies. Professor Walder is a past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a former Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His books have received awards from the American Sociological Association and the Association for Asian Studies.

Fault Lines
Episode 170: China Changes?

Fault Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 9:53


Today, Les, Jess, and special guest host NSI Senior Fellow and Senior Principal at Navigators Global Andy Keiser discuss the recent announcement that China's population declined for the first time since 1961, when the country was wracked by famine as a direct result of horrendous economic planning. China also announced that its economy grew at only 3% last year, the lowest growth rate in history.How will these deep changes to China's population and economy affect the Chinese Communist Party's national security policy? Can Xi Jinping stay in power when the economic success of the past four decades that has sustained the Communist Party is at risk? Should the United States change its estimation of China as a peer competitor?Hear our experts debate these issues and more in less than 10 minutes on our latest episode of Fault Lines!Want to learn more about this topic? Check out these articles that our experts used to frame our discussion: https://www.reuters.com/world/china/chinas-population-shrinks-first-time-since-1961-2023-01-17/ https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/18/world/asia/china-population-shrinking.html Follow our experts on Twitter:@jamil_n_jaffer@NotTVJessJones@lestermunson@AndyKeiserLike what we're doing here? Be sure to rate, review, and subscribe. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

HistoryPod
15th January 1919: Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht killed by members of the Freikorps after the Spartacist Revolt

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023


The two German socialists were joint-founders of the Spartacist League and the Communist Party of Germany, and were captured following the Spartacist uprising that began on 4 ...

VPM Daily Newscast
01/13/23 - Virginia State Police is using software to track cellphone location data

VPM Daily Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 6:24


Virginia State Police have begun using a new service that allows them to access cellphone location data without a warrant; The YMCA of Greater Richmond president and CEO will soon be part of the organization's national leadership; Governor Glenn Youngkin wants to ban Chinese companies connected to the Communist Party from purchasing farmland in Virginia; and other local news stories.

The Alan Sanders Show
Legacy mainstream media running cover for Biden and ignorning their jobs

The Alan Sanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 40:57


Today we look at how poorly the Legacy/mainstream media seems to understand any of the basic tenants of democracy. If you believe in democratic principles, you have to believe in the value of debate. You have to cherish the concept of sharing ideas and arguing the merits. Unfortunately, we have unintelligent people who call themselves journalists. Leslie Stahl beclowned herself on the most recent edition of 60 Minutes talking about the 5 day delay for the Congress to start because of the 20 holdouts. She doesn't even really hear the argument she thinks she is making. Were she in a debate, she would have lost before even opening her mouth. I explain why taking time to establish the rules and confidence in a leader may be the most important vote these members of the House will cast. Mollie Hemingway, Editor in Chief of The Federalist, was on the Guy Benson Show where she was asked to comment on Leslie Stahl's inane comment about the opening of the 118th Congress. Without surprise, another Constitutionalist sees things in the same logical and methodical way we do here at The Alan Sanders Show. Next we move to the classified documents discovered back in early November at a private office used by, at the time, Vice President Joe Biden on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania. CNN, in a move of brain-dead desperation, decided the best way to spin the issue to protect Joe Biden was to make a side-by-side comparison between the docs found in Biden's possession versus those found in Donald Trump's possession. While they attempt to excuse Biden, they have to hope you do not know the massive distinction they purposely left out of the discussion. That distinction, as we've discussed ad nauseum, Presidents have the Constitutional power to declassify anything they want for any reason, while no other position in government has that same power. Seems the documents contained highly classified subjects related to Iran, the United Kingdom and Ukraine. Why does it seem Ukraine is always part of the discussion over corruption and the Biden Crime Family. We cannot help but remember when he was VP, Joe Biden was asked by President Obama to manage the Ukraine portfolio right at the time his son, Hunter, was placed on the board of the corrupt energy company, Burisma. Constitutional expert and Law Professor Jonathan Turley put out a piece in the New York Post discussing the blatant hypocrisy of Joe Biden and how the Legacy/mainstream media is bending themselves over backwards to provide cover for him. Similarly, Representative Andy Biggs (R-AZ) tweeted Biden broke the law taking classified documents and now we know the Biden Center also received over $54 million dollars from anonymous Chinese donors with ties to the Communist Party. And the timing of those donations happened at the same time Hunter Biden was negotiation with the CEFC energy company in China where Joe Biden was designated as the Big Guy who was owed 10%. Representative Elise Stefanik (R-NY) brings up national security concerns related to these findings, especially related to why the DOJ knew about the issue in early November and we are only just now hearing about it. This ties into the need for the new “Church” committee to be chaired by Representative Jim Jordan (R-OH). The vote to create the committee was voted YES by every Republican, while every Democrat voted NO. That means the modern democrat party has fallen so far from the days of JFK, where today they are admitting they want an authoritarian regime and do not care to follow the Constitution or abide by the Bill of Rights. We end on a moment of stupidity, illustrating just how far gone the Joe Biden Administration has become. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission is looking to ban the use of natural gas stove and ranges for cooking. The absurdity is beyond belief and shows how much this government wants to control every element of your life. Take a moment to rate and review the show and then share the episode on social media. You can find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, GETTR and TRUTH Social by searching for The Alan Sanders Show. You can also support the show by visiting my Patreon page!

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily
Jackie “Toxic Black Belt” Chan

Celebrity Book Club with Steven & Lily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 57:18


Kung who? Pour one out for the original Drunken Master—global action superstar Jackie Chan—and his high-flying 2015 memoir “Never Grow Up.” From his childhood class dysphoria to becoming the most toxic millionaire in Hong Kong, buying watches for all your boys, cheating on your wife, why Mao was a narcissist, shitting on set, Communist Party propaganda, and Lily's tween foray into karate—this one's gonna hurt.PLUS! In the VIP Lounge this Friday—2023 predictions, Zero Dark Thirty, and a hot new Williamsburg restaurant earns Steven's coveted “This Restaurant Should Not Exist” Award. Subscribe at http://patreon.com/cbcthepod Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security
49. ENCORE: Genshin Impact's balances mass appeal with Beijing's blessing

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 24:41 Very Popular


Genshin Impact put the Chinese video gaming industry on the map. While the game has delighted players, it begs the question: Can China's Communist Party and a massively popular video game peacefully co-exist?

HistoryPod
7th January 1979: Pol Pot of the Communist Party of Kampuchea (Cambodia) overthrown when Vietnamese forces capture the capital city Phnom Penh

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023


After the Vietnamese forces captured Phnom Penh on 7 January 1979, Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge forces fled into the ...

DryCleanerCast a podcast about Espionage, Terrorism & GeoPolitics

Happy New Year everyone and welcome to Espresso Martini episode Four, which is our first podcast of 2023. On todays episode of Espresso Martini, Chris & Matt take a look at a coup plot in Germany that was discovered by the German authorities and they also take a look at the rising Covid numbers in China and the official denials coming from the ruling Communist Party. Related articles to the discussion: German Coup Plot: Germany arrests 25 accused of plotting coup https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-63885028 The Motley Crew that Wanted to Topple the German Government https://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/prince-putsch-and-his-gang-the-motley-crew-that-wanted-to-topple-the-german-government-a-07a32d7c-96e6-4b61-a282-9e9ab2ffa288 Is a far-right coup possible in Germany? https://www.dw.com/en/is-a-far-right-coup-possible-in-germany/a-64041643 Rise of Covid in China: China Covid: experts estimate 9,000 deaths a day as US says it may sample wastewater from planes https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/dec/30/china-covid-experts-estimate-9000-deaths-a-day-as-us-says-it-may-sample-wastewater-from-planes How deadly will China's covid surge get? Answers to that and more. https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2022/12/31/china-covid-virus-evolution/ China's COVID vaccines: Do the jabs do the job? https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2022/12/30/1143696652/chinas-covid-vaccines-do-the-jabs-do-the-job Other Stories of note: Russian influencers at work in Germany https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/ukraine-crisis-germany-influencers Clergymen or spies - Russian Orthodox churches used for espionage https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/31/world/europe/orthodox-church-ukraine-russia.html Suspected Neo Nazi Attacks on US power-grids https://www.nationalreview.com/the-morning-jolt/whos-attacking-our-power-grid/ Writing aids mentioned by Chris & Matt Scrivener https://www.literatureandlatte.com/ Trello https://trello.com/ Find out more about Matt and his book “Active Measures.”  https://mattfulton.net/ Music on this podcast is provided by Andrew R. Bird (Andy Bird) You can check out his work here: https://soundcloud.com/andrewbirduk For more information about the podcast, check out our website: https://secretsandspiespodcast.com/  Secrets and Spies is part of the Spy Podcast Network. Check out our other excellent spy-related podcasts here: https://www.spypodcasts.com/  You can support Secrets and Spies in a few ways:    * Subscribe to our Youtube page: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDVB23lrHr3KFeXq4VU36dg * Become a “Friend of the podcast”  on Patreon for £3 www.patreon.com/SecretsAndSpies * You can buy merchandise from our shop: https://www.redbubble.com/shop/ap/60934996?asc=u Connect with us on social media  TWITTER twitter.com/SecretsAndSpies  FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/secretsandspies    Check out our short spy film “THE DRY CLEANER” which is now available to buy on Apple TV & Amazon Prime.  Watch the trailer here: https://youtu.be/j_KFTJenrz4

The Asianometry Podcast
The Soviet Oil Juggernaut: How It All Began

The Asianometry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 18:47


At the start of the 1960s, the Soviet Union was the world's second largest oil producer - trailing only the United States. By itself, the Soviet Union nearly matched oil production from the entire Middle East. Many European countries depended on Soviet oil, and the Communist Party used that to their own advantage. In this video, we will look at the beginnings and rise of the titanic Soviet oil apparatus. From its start with the Russian Empire in the late 1880s to its ascendancy after World War II.

The Asianometry Podcast
The Soviet Oil Juggernaut: How It All Began

The Asianometry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 18:47


At the start of the 1960s, the Soviet Union was the world's second largest oil producer - trailing only the United States. By itself, the Soviet Union nearly matched oil production from the entire Middle East. Many European countries depended on Soviet oil, and the Communist Party used that to their own advantage. In this video, we will look at the beginnings and rise of the titanic Soviet oil apparatus. From its start with the Russian Empire in the late 1880s to its ascendancy after World War II.

Mass Struggle
When the Bolsheviks Militarized the Party

Mass Struggle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 34:42


This episode is a reading of and reflection on a 10th Party Congress document (1921) of the Communist Party of Russia on party building that discusses the Bolshevik's experience pertaining to changing conditions that consequently determined the form of organization, methods of work and primacy of tasks.Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/massstruggleFollow Mass Struggle on instagram: @MassStrugglePodFollow Mass Struggle on twitter: @MassStrugglePod Email: massstrugglepod@gmail.comSupport the show

BIC TALKS
212. Radical Science and Restless Politics

BIC TALKS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 29:24


When JBS Haldane died in 1964 in Bhubhaneswar, he was an Indian scientist. He had the passport, but he also had a deep and abiding love for the country. His move to India was the final act in the boisterous life of Haldane - a geneticist, a staunch Communist and an all-round rabble-rouser. This story of a man who wrote his first scientific paper in the trenches of the First World War; who was a card-carrying member of the Communist Party; who went to Spain to fight the Fascists during the civil war; who was under heavy suspicion of being a spy for the Soviets; who courted trouble and ticked off the establishment repeatedly. In this episode of BIC Talks, historian of science, Jahnavi Phalkey and author of A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Politics of JBS Haldane, Samanth Subramanian discuss how Haldane's contributions to genetics which are singular, and  in tandem with his Communist beliefs, they make us think about how science and politics intersect, along with how genetics continues to throw up great ethical and political conundrums today, as it did in Haldane's time. Subscribe to the BIC Talks Podcast on your favourite podcast app! BIC Talks is available everywhere, including iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Castbox, Overcast and Stitcher.

Hidden History
131: The Plot Against Democracy

Hidden History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 328:00


In July 1933, two mysterious men approached one of the most decorated soldiers in American history with what initially appeared to be a simple proposal. He didn't know it at the time, but Major General Smedley Butler, whose prominent career mirrored the rise of the American Empire, was being recruited into a sordid plan to overthrow President Franklin Roosevelt, and bring fascism to the United States. In this episode, take a deep look at the rise and expansion of Imperial America, and the time we came within a hair's breadth of losing democracy.Twitter: Link Patreon: LinkShirts and more: LinkSources and Further ReadingBooksThe Plot to Seize the White House, by Jules Archer: LinkGangsters of Capitalism: Smedley Butler, the Marines, and the Making and Breaking of America's Empire, by Jonathan Katz: LinkMaverick Marine: General Smedley D. Butler and the Contradictions of American Military History: LinkWebsitesMcKinley and the Spanish-American War: LinkThe Signaling at Cuzco Well: LinkMarine Lieutenant Colonel Robert W. Huntington to Marine Colonel Charles Heywood, 6/17/1898: LinkBattle of Manila Bay, 1 May 1898: LinkTheodore Roosevelt, “The Strenuous Life” (10 April 1899): LinkTheodore Roosevelt: Confident Imperialist: LinkReview: Not so Benevolent Assimilation: The Philippine-American War: LinkMcKinley's Benevolent Assimilation Proclamation: LinkThe Insular Cases: A Comparative Historical Study of Puerto Rico, Hawai‘i, and the Philippines: LinkASKS GEN. BUTLER TO EXPLAIN SPEECH; Secretary Adams Calls for a Full Report on His References to Nicaraguan Policy. NAVY OFFICIALS SILENT Stimson Also Refuses Comment on the General's Reputed Remarks at Pittsburgh Dec. 5.: LinkMark Twain, To the Person Sitting in Darkness: LinkGunboat USS Petrel: LinkGunboat Callao: LinkThe Opium Wars in China: LinkYellow River Floods, Los Angeles Herald, Volume 26, Number 48, 17 November 1898: LinkGreat Flood of the Huang-Ho River: LinkWilhelm II: "Hun Speech" (1900): LinkMahan, a “Place in the Sun,” and Germany's Quest for Sea Power: LinkThe Liscum Bowl: LinkGeneral Jacob H. Smith & the Philippine War's Samar Campaign: LinkThe Water Cure: LinkThe Lobby- The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914: LinkHepburn Suspects a Plot to Delay Building Canal: LinkBunau-Varilla, Russia, and the Panama Canal: LinkThe Strange Affair of the Taking of the Panama Canal Zone: LinkUSS Nashville (PG 7) and the Building of the Panama Canal: LinkA Roundtable on John M. Thompson, Great Power Rising: Theodore Roosevelt and the Politics of U.S. Foreign Policy: LinkThe New Japanese Treaty of Commerce and Navigation: LinkGentlemen's Agreement of 1907-1908: LinkHemispheric Orientalism and the 1907 Pacific Coast Race Riots: LinkMuseum of the City of San Francisco, Japanese and Korean Exclusion League- 1906: LinkMerchants, Mining, and Concessions on Nicaragua's Mosquito Coast: Reassessing the American Presence, 1893-1912: LinkAmerican Policy in Nicaragua- Dawson Agreements—Brown Brothers Loan: LinkA Note on the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty and German Interest in a Nicaraguan Canal, 1914: LinkRiot at Cocoa Grove, Panama City, July 4, 1912: LinkThe Wilson Administration and Panama, 1913-1921: LinkThe Minister of the Netherlands to the Secretary of State- Determining Indemnities Owed to the United States by Panama: LinkCANAL IS OPENED BY WILSON'S FINGER; Gamboa Dike Blown Away as President in Washington Presses Button.: LinkU.S. ambassador plots against Mexican president, Feb. 16, 1913: LinkHenry Lane Wilson and the Overthrow of Madero: LinkEl Porfiriato (1877-1911): LinkThe structural evolution of the Golden Lane, Tampico embayment, Mexico: LinkOil and Revolution in Mexico- Chapter 2: The Great Mexican Oil Boom: LinkMr. De In Mexico: LinkAddress to a Joint Session of Congress on the Tampico Incident: LinkApril 20, 1914: Message Regarding Tampico Incident: LinkTWE Remembers: The Tampico Incident: LinkThe Banana Wars: United States Intervention in the Caribbean, 1898–1934: Link'Take Veracruz at Once'- USNI: LinkThe Battle of Veracruz and the Medal of Honor: LinkHow the U.S. Came to Dominate Haiti: Seizing the Gold: LinkInvade Haiti, Wall Street Urged. The U.S. Obliged.: Link'The Greatest Heist In History': How Haiti Was Forced To Pay Reparations For Freedom: LinkHow the U.S. Came to Dominate Haiti: Military Occupation: LinkHAITI, SMEDLEY BUTLER, AND THE RISE OF AMERICAN EMPIRE: LinkFreedom and Sovereignty: Notes on 1826 Haitian Rural Code: LinkThe U.S. Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934: LinkAmericans and Chinese Communists, 1927–1945: A Persuading Encounter: Link1927: 'China Marines' in Shanghai (photo): LinkSmedley D. Butler and Prohibition Enforcement in Philadelphia, 1924-1925: LinkThe Machine, the Mayor, and the Marine:The Battle over Prohibition in Philadelphia, 1924–1925: LinkGeneral Butler Cleans Up: LinkBUTLER NEAR BLOWS WITH A MAGISTRATE; Former Wants Philadelphia Ritz-Carlten Patrons to Tell About Liquor Seizure.: LinkAn Alternative to Kuomintang—Communist Collaboration: Sun Yat-sen and Hong Kong, January–June 1923: LinkThe Nationalist Party in Power: Unification of China Under Kuomintang Programs: LinkThe Birth of Communist Party and Soviet Constitution between China and Hungary: LinkSoviet Diplomacy and the First United Front in China: LinkBefore and After the May Fourth Movement: LinkPrinciples and Profits: Standard Oil Responds to Chinese Nationalism, 1925-1927: LinkSS PRESIDENT MCKINLEY Painting: LinkDecember 7, 1929, Buffalo Courier-Express, Author Asks for Senate Quiz of Butler's Speech; Sinclair Lewis says general confirmed charges against marines in Haiti, Nicaragua: LinkA Mussolini Alfa Romeo Mystery: LinkInterview with E.Z. Dimitman, June 23, 1982: LinkBonus Army- Oregon Encyclopedia: LinkWalter W. Waters, Commander of the Bonus Expeditionary Force: LinkFox Movietone News Collection- Butler addresses demonstration--outtakes: LinkSmedley Butler's fiery speech to World War I veterans is still relevant today: LinkBonus Expeditionary Forces March on Washington- National Park Service: LinkZangara's Attempted Assassination of Franklin D. Roosevelt: LinkRoosevelt's Gold Program: LinkWar Is A Racket (1935) Full Text: LinkThe American Legion 15th National Convention: official program, 1933: LinkHe Put the Funds in Our Foundation: How Robert Sterling Clark Got His Money: Link“Every Citizen a Sentinel! Every Home a Sentry Box!” The Sentinels of the Republic and the Gendered Origins of Free-Market Conservatism: LinkGerald L. K. Smith: Minister of Hate: LinkThe National Committee to Uphold Constitutional Government, 1937-1941: LinkThe Nye Revelations: LinkFDR and the Nye Committee: A Reassessment: LinkFrantz Fanon, Concerning Violence: Link

Mass Struggle
"The Mass Line" - Communist Party of Peru

Mass Struggle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 46:05


This episode is a reading and reflection on "The Mass Line" by the Communist Party of Peru (PCP).Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/massstruggleFollow Mass Struggle on instagram: @MassStrugglePodFollow Mass Struggle on twitter: @MassStrugglePod Email: massstrugglepod@gmail.comSupport the show

New Books in Critical Theory
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 3 of 3

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 113:44


Part 3 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in History
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 3 of 3

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 113:44


Part 3 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 3 of 3

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 113:44


Part 3 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 3 of 3

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 113:44


Part 3 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 3 of 3

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 113:44


Part 3 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 2 of 3

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 89:42


Part 2 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 2 of 3

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 89:42


Part 2 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in American Studies
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 2 of 3

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 89:42


Part 2 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
2215: Surveillance State - Technology and a New Era of Social Control

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 37:10


Surveillance State tells the gripping, startling, and detailed story of how China's Communist Party is building a new kind of political control: shaping the will of the people through the sophisticated—and often brutal—harnessing of data. It is a story born in Silicon Valley and America's “War on Terror,” and now playing out in alarming ways on China's remote Central Asian frontier. As a minority separatist movement strains against Party control, China's leaders have built a dystopian police state that keeps millions under the constant gaze of security forces armed with AI. But across the country in the city of Hangzhou, the government is weaving a digital utopia, where technology helps optimize everything from traffic patterns to food safety to emergency response. Award-winning journalists Liza Lin takes listeners on a journey through the new world China is building within its borders, and beyond. Telling harrowing stories of the people and families affected by the Party's ambitions, Surveillance State reveals a future that is already underway—a new society engineered around the power of digital surveillance.

New Books in History
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 2 of 3

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 89:42


Part 2 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Critical Theory
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 2 of 3

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 89:42


Part 2 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Critical Theory
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 1 of 3

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 73:36


Part 1 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Intellectual History
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 1 of 3

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 73:36


Part 1 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 1 of 3

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 73:36


Part 1 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 1 of 3

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 73:36


Part 1 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
The Emergence of Trotskyism in the United States: Part 1 of 3

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 73:36


Part 1 of 3. In the spring of 1942, James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, gave a series of lectures in New York on the first decade of the movement. The challenges, the setbacks, the accomplishments and the lessons learned were recounted with Cannon's trademark style that managed to be accessible while also maintaining the revolutionary militancy he was trying to carry on. The lectures would eventually become a book, The History of American Trotskyism, 1928-38: Report of a Participant. In a short editorial note, Joseph Hansen remarked “Historians of the future, writing the definitive history of American and world Trotskyism, will undoubtedly round out Cannon's history with additional material delved from original sources; but, while there is no pretension to exhaustive research or extensive documentation in this work, future historians utilizing it as source material will find that they must likewise depend heavily upon it as a guidepost.” This little remark has been proven correct by several later books on labor in the depression, but it now appears almost prophetic with the arrival of Bryan Palmer's latest work, James P. Cannon and the Emergence of Trotskyism, 1928-38 (Brill, 2021). Published as part of the Historical Materialism book series, it starts off right where it's sequel, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928, left off, with Cannon and several other comrades expelled from the Communist Party. With hardly a penny to their name, but an urgent political mission, they set about forming an oppositional faction, one that could both challenge the political degeneration emanating from a Moscow that was succumbing to Stalinism while also working to revitalize an American labor movement that was rediscovering it's own fighting spirit. Through Cannon and his comrades, Palmer is able to tell a story of class struggle that shows what even a small group can do when political militancy and clarity are brought to life, even in the face of obstacles that appear insurmountable. Clocking in at 1200 pages, the book is brimming with detail about both the day-to-day minutiae of class struggle in the period, but also spends a fair amount of time giving international and other historical context. Palmer's capacity to wander through vast archives of material is matched by his storytelling abilities, turning a huge mass of information into a highly readable and compelling narrative. While reading it cover-to-cover will be richly rewarding for those who do, it will also be an excellent resource for those who read it's chapters more selectively, whether looking to learn about the Minneapolis truckers strike of 1934, the Trotskyists entry into the Socialist Party or Trotsky's trial in which he defended himself against accusations emanating from Moscow. It deserves to be on the shelf of anyone interested in labor history and radical politics, and anyone who feels the realm of political possibility to be dire. This book itself is not the revolution, but it will provide lessons and inspiration for those who are hoping to bring it about. As an entry in the Historical Materialism book series, the book was originally published in hardcover by Brill, with the paperback made available by Haymarket. Bryan D. Palmer is Professor Emeritus and former Canada Research Chair of Canadian Studies at Trent University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Society, former editor of Labour/Le Travail, and has published widely on the history of labour and the revolutionary left. His numerous books include Marxism and Historical Practice, Revolutionary Teamsters, Cultures of Darkness and Descent into Discourse. He is also the co-editor with Paul LeBlanc and Thomas Bias of the 3-volume document collection US Trotskyism, 1928-65. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Stephanomics
The Era of Geoeconomics Has Arrived

Stephanomics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 40:30


Thirty years after the Cold War ended, a new one of sorts is emerging between China and the West, a leading economic scholar asserts. As a muscular China seeks to refashion trade and geopolitical organizations in its own image, the US and many of its allies face a key challenge: keeping Beijing on board with trade pacts and efforts to slow global warming without ceding ground on democratic freedoms. In this special episode of the Stephanomics podcast, host Stephanie Flanders talks economics and geopolitics with Paul Tucker, a former deputy governor of the Bank of England and author of the new book, Global Discord: Values and Power in a Fractured World Order. Years ago, world leaders could set their monetary, national security and human rights policies independently, but nowadays all of those things are interconnected and everything is more complicated. This new reality was evident when the Group of Seven leading economies, responding to the Kremlin's war on Ukraine, froze Russian currency reserves held in Western banks, Tucker says. Tucker predicts that developing nations will eventually topple the existing world order, shaping one in which the US, Europe and Japan no longer call all the shots. In this new iteration, international trade and diplomatic entities will have to be completely remade. But Tucker says that's still a few decades away, because while China is already a world power, India and a few other developing nations remain a ways off. For now, the US will enjoy a “lingering status quo” in global finance as issuer of the world's premier reserve currency, but global trade, cross-border investment and everything else will see more jostling for power, something between a “superpower struggle” and a “new Cold War.” Tucker sees China trying to influence global trade and politics much more in coming years, a real concern for the West since Beijing tends to prioritize Communist Party control over civil liberties. World leaders will need to walk a fine line when dealing with Beijing, he says, working with China on pressing global issues while distancing themselves on others. “I think the big thing is China is too powerful” for the US and its allies to tell it how to reorder its society, Tucker tells Flanders. Still, the West should “should find common cause” where it can.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Patriot Cause
The Spector of Communism (Replay)

The Patriot Cause

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 20:27


Communism is neither a trend of thought, nor a doctrine, no a failed new way of ordering human affairs. Instead, it should be understood as a devil - an evil specter forged by hate, degeneracy, and other elemental forces in the universe. How The Specter of Communism Is Ruling Our World https://www.theepochtimes.com/how-the-specter-of-communism-is-ruling-our-world   The Epoch Times here begins serializing a translation from the Chinese of a new book, “How the Specter of Communism Is Ruling Our World,” by the editorial team of the “Nine Commentaries on the Communist Party.”

In Black and White
BONUS EPISODE: The communist who flipped

In Black and White

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 29:33


Melbourne-born Louise Mackay was a dedicated Communist Party member who taught at the Marxist School, toured the Communist Bloc and promoted communism to her fellow Australians. But when she was expelled from the party, she turned the tables on her old comrades.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in East Asian Studies
Is China's Communist Party Threatened by the Protests?

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:23


This week, RBI Director John Torpey talked with William Hurst, Professor of Political Science at Cambridge University, about the origins of the protests in China, how they differ from those in 1989, and the possibilities of regime change. Hurst delves into the mobilization and contentious politics of China and its local-central interplay, where protesters act as rational actors who use different strategies of bargaining and signaling. Moreover, Hurst addresses the implications of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power for the economic model of China and the prospects of change in the near future. Finally, Hurst discusses the outlawing of extramarital and same-gender sex in Indonesia and the role of religion in politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Is China's Communist Party Threatened by the Protests?

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 42:23


This week, RBI Director John Torpey talked with William Hurst, Professor of Political Science at Cambridge University, about the origins of the protests in China, how they differ from those in 1989, and the possibilities of regime change. Hurst delves into the mobilization and contentious politics of China and its local-central interplay, where protesters act as rational actors who use different strategies of bargaining and signaling. Moreover, Hurst addresses the implications of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power for the economic model of China and the prospects of change in the near future. Finally, Hurst discusses the outlawing of extramarital and same-gender sex in Indonesia and the role of religion in politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Ayn Rand Institute Live!
The Dollar and the Gun Under Xi Jinping's Dictatorship with Scott McDonald, Adam Mossoff, and Elan Journo

Ayn Rand Institute Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 57:49


Rapid economic opening and growth since the 1980s led many to expect the People's Republic of China (PRC) to undergo political liberalization and assume a business-friendly environment. This panel will explore contemporary conditions in the Communist Party–ruled state and seek answers to the coming challenges posed by its approach to economics: What are the implications for foreign corporations investing in the PRC? What risks do they face to their intellectual property? How is the Party leveraging technology for geopolitical gain?Recorded live on July 6, 2022 as part of the Objectivist Summer Conference.

WSJ Minute Briefing
Brittney Griner Released From Russian Penal Colony in Prisoner Swap

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 2:14


Plus: Foxconn founder lobbied China's Communist Party to speed up its relaxing of Covid-19 restrictions. Federal Trade Commission seeks to block Meta's acquisition of virtual-reality fitness company Within Unlimited. Danny Lewis reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Savage Nation Podcast
The Weaponization of Loneliness: How Tyrants Stoke Our Fear of Isolation to Silence, Divide, and Conquer with Stella Morabito

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 61:02


Do you keep your opinions to yourself because you're afraid people will reject you? Do you sign on to a cause just because everyone around you acts like it's the right thing to do? StellaMorabito joins Savage to reveal how elites in Big Tech, Big Media, Big Government, academia, Hollywood, and the corporate world exploit our terror of social isolation. Their divide-and-conquer tactics include identity politics, political correctness, and mob agitation. Their media monopoly spawns the propaganda essential to demonization campaigns, censorship, cancel culture, snitch culture, struggle sessions, the criminalization of comedy, and the subversion of society's most fundamental institutions. It all adds up to a machinery of loneliness. Morabito decodes how dictators—from the French Revolution to the Communist Party of China to today's globalists—aim to atomize us in order to control us. Savage shares his experience of isolation; being an outspoken conservative in the liberal Bay Area.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices