Podcasts about United Kingdom

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

Country in Western Europe

  • 24,797PODCASTS
  • 87,737EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 9DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 13, 2022LATEST
United Kingdom

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about United Kingdom

    Show all podcasts related to united kingdom

    Latest podcast episodes about United Kingdom

    TIARAS TEARS AND TRIUMPHS with SANDY J Podcast - Helping Victims and Survivors of Abusive Relationships Heal and Grow
    Ep 109 - How this podcast can help you to recover, renew and rebuild your life

    TIARAS TEARS AND TRIUMPHS with SANDY J Podcast - Helping Victims and Survivors of Abusive Relationships Heal and Grow

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 38:08


    EPISODE NOTES FOR HOW THIS PODCAST CAN HELP YOU TO RECOVER, RENEW AND REBUILD YOUR LIFE EPISODE   PLUS A LIFE SUPPORT RESOURCE LIST   Are you one of the 35,000 recent new listeners?  Or have you recently found this podcast and would like to know if this podcast is for you? We would love to hear from you. How can we help and support you? What are the challenges that you are struggling with most? What are your dreams, hopes, and desires? The more we understand your unanswered questions, the more we know what changes you need help making in your life, then the better we will be able to help and support you.  Email us at sandyj.thekey@gmail.com Include subject heading: Podcast listener Stick with the Tiaras Tears and Triumphs podcast so we can help you get started with designing a life you love. Tune in now to hear how you can learn to think and grow rich.  Let's explore this in this episode of Tiaras Tears and Triumphs. As many as one in four, or one in three women, depending on where you live has experienced some form of relationship abuse. I was one of them. They say we teach what we need to learn.  And breakthroughs to recover, renew and rebuild on the other side of an abusive relationship is what I needed to learn and I know other women just like me need to learn too.  I am now a Money Minded Coach and a Transformational Life Coach, Pranic Healer and Angel Intuitive. Hope you can draw support and inspiration from all of the resources on offer. Here is to a better brighter future. Stay well and stay safe.   If you are a victim or survivor of an abusive relationship you may need support to help you with your challenges. Get your crisis support list for Australia here For those outside Australia google domestic abuse free online counseling support services.    Let us help you find your Zen again, we have a free guided meditation for love and abundance for anyone who signs up to our mailing list, which also keeps you up to date with all of our latest, greatest offers. Get your free guided meditation here   This podcast needs support to grow and reach more victims and survivors of abusive relationships. Become a Patron of the Tiaras Tears and Triumphs Podcast here Or contact us at sandyj.thekey@gmail.com Include subject heading: podcast support   If you are a victim or survivor of an abusive relationship and you need financial support to help you transition out of an abusive relationship explore the link below. Seek financial support in Australia to leave an abusive relationship, a $5,000 grant    If you would like to close the door on fearfulness and open the doors to making your dreams come true visit our website The Key To Be Free   Ready to invest in your success, ready to stop thinking about what you don't want, and get clear on your dreams and desires? Book a call with Sandy   Need help making money stretch? Have you gone through financial abuse? Why not get your free copy of the Money Mindset & Freedom Journal today to help you take back control of your finances? FREE Freedom Planner   Have you forgotten your value? Have you lost your confidence? Did you know that low self-worth is the greatest block to abundance?  Why not join the next online women's healing and empowerment workshop to Unlock the Treasures Within? Email us at sandyj.thekey@gmail.com Include subject heading: Workshop enquiry   Looking for a safe supportive social media online community? Your net worth is equal to your network, so start rebuilding your social and professional network today. Why not join women from all around the world from all walks of life in the  Rise Up with Tiaras Tears and Triumphs Facebook Group   If you like inspiring stories you may like to read By God's Grace I Go and other real-life stories of women of faith. You can do this by getting a copy of When Grace Found Me Volume Three in Australia here in USA here in United Kingdom here    Subscribe Enjoy Share CAUTION If you feel unsafe at any time please STOP LISTENING. You can come back anytime you are in a safe place to listen to the rest of the Podcast. YOUR SAFETY is the most important thing to consider, closely followed by your sanity. As impossible as it may seem, everything else is figure-out-able, especially when you get the right keys to open the right doors and close the doors of fearfulness behind you.   If you are in immediate DANGER call the Police.   NOTE OF ENCOURAGEMENT If you are struggling with your mental health please reach out for support with some form of counseling, therapy, or coaching.  If you don't know where to start to find a counselor, a good place to start is to talk to your Doctor. There are also online counseling supports now available. If the Support Person is not a good fit for you, try another and another, until you have one that is the right fit for you. And don't forget, we help women to recover, renew and rebuild, and help them to meet their challenges head-on, to move towards a life they love, so feel free to book in the key to be clarity call.   BEFORE YOU GO…. If you listen to the Podcast and you like it, please SUBSCRIBE, you will automatically be updated with new episodes as soon as they are available. If you like the episode, please leave a REVIEW for other people to know that this has value. If you know of anyone you think this Podcast might help, please SHARE it with others.   Until next time, stay well and stay safe. Sending you love, light, peace, and joy, Sandy J    

    PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists
    67. @beauinstitute: Rose Marie Beauchemin-Verzella, Founder, Director of Education at the Beau Institute of Permanent and Corrective Cosmetics

    PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 4:57


    Have you ever wondered how a PMU artist earns the trust of their first-ever client? Even without any before-and-after photos or history with the client? In this episode, Rose Marie talks about the importance of authenticity and letting your passion shine through when interacting with clients for the first time. You don't want to miss this! Are you someone interested in becoming a PMU artist but are scared to take that first step? In this episode, we continue our conversation with Rose Marie as she shares her advice for those looking to take that first step in the beauty world. Tune in :) Meet Rose Marie: “I never tire of watching the transformations and the exhilaration they bring about. I feel so blessed to have found this profession, and it gives me great pleasure to share my knowledge with all who are interested in learning.”  Beau Institute founder Rose Marie Beauchemin-Verzella is an internationally acclaimed expert in the field of permanent cosmetics, microblading, areola tattooing, permanent camouflage, and color lifting, with more than 29 years of experience as an industry leading practitioner, trainer, and speaker. Her talents  and business acumen have allowed it to grow into one of the top permanent makeup institutes in the world.   As an Instructor…Rose Marie displays her passion for excellence in her extraordinary teaching abilities that pave the way for her trainees to become excellent practitioners. Her patience and thoroughness allow her to educate trainees in the physical skills while instilling the confidence they need to launch their own successful permanent makeup careers. Rose Marie's students hail from around the world including the United States, Australia, India, Azerbaijan, Van Couver, Oman, South Africa, Amsterdam, Egypt, Bermuda, United Kingdom, Switzerland, and Latvia. They include medical professionals from prestigious medical institutions from Sloan Kettering,  University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University's Stephanie Spielman Breast Cancer Hospital, City of Hope, Long Island Plastic Surgery, Garden State Plastic Surgery, and many more. Training classes consist of surgeons, physician's assistants, nurses, aestheticians, as well as makeup artists, tattoo artists, and newcomers to the field. Many of the certified trainers in the United States have trained under Rose Marie's instruction. Rose Marie's dedication to helping breast cancer patients restore their physical and emotional health, as well as their self-confidence, is made clear by her founding, The Beau Institute's Annual Day of Hope, where areola tattooing is performed, complimentary. This year, with the help of the AAM, The Beau Institute's x Day of Hope has swept across 7-countries. Countless women were helped to regain their femininity and familiarity.  Rose Marie is a contributing author of the medical text called Micropigmentation Millennium, with Dr. Charles Zwerling, Ophthalmic Surgeon, and Dr. Norman Goldstein, former Chief of Dermatology, University of Hawaii, and Dr. Linda Dixon. She was also referenced as an expert in another medical text, Micropigmentation: State of the Art also by Dr. Norman Goldstein and Dr. Charles Zwerling.  Rose Marie is a supporter of the TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRBs), which provides valuable information and assistance to those struggling with Trichotillomania. She has performed countless permanent eyebrow procedures on clients who struggle with Trichotillomania, as well as Alopecia. She is a member of the Phoenix Burn Society and teaches camouflage for Self-Injury scars and Vitiligo. Find Rose Marie on Insta: @beauinstitute

    All Things - Unexplained
    UFO Research w/special guest Cheryl Costa PART 1

    All Things - Unexplained

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 34:37


    Aliens. UFOs. Bigfoot. Paranormal mysteries --- All Things - Unexplained.**************************THIS EPISODECheryl Costa is a native New Yorker and currently a resident of Ohio. She's a two-service military veteran and a retired 32-year professional from the aerospace industry. Post-retirement, Cheryl as a journalist, wrote the wildly popular UFO column “New York Skies” for the SyracuseNewTimes.com (2013-2019). She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the State University of New York at Empire State College in Entertainment Writing and Production. She was awarded “Researcher of the Year-2018” by the International UFO Congress, and her papers have been inducted into the SUNY Albany archives. Her new book is "Magickal Musings of a Rogue Witch."Other books by Cheryl Costa available on Amazon include:* UFO Sightings Desk Reference: United States of America 2001 - 2020 * UFO Sightings Desk Reference: United States of America 2001 - 2015* The UFO Beat: The New York Skies Column July 2013 to June 2019* Charmaine's Tales of Wonder: Fantastic, weird, and disturbing storiesIn retirement from the aerospace industry, she is a freelance journalist and talk-radio host. Cheryl “Lady Tashi” Costa is also a retired Parish Priestess and a Mystical Talk Radio host based in the United Kingdom. ****************************************

    All In with Narada Michael Walden
    Episode 018 - Interview with Keni Burke

    All In with Narada Michael Walden

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 80:25


    Narada speaks with American singer, songwriter, record producer, and multi-instrumentalist who began his career with four siblings in the 1970s band the Five Stairsteps. Skilled as a guitarist and bassist, Burke continued to work for the Dark Horse label as a session musician, while burgeoning a solo career of his own. During this period he contributed instrumentation to songs by a diverse range of artists such as Sly & the Family Stone, Natalie Cole, Billy Preston, Terry Callier, Curtis Mayfield, Bill Withers, Dusty Springfield, Diana Ross, and Gladys Knight and more. In 1981, Burke released his self-produced follow-up solo album, You're the Best, but it was his third album, Changes, which appeared the following year, that made a more significant impact.[2] This album included the singles "Hang Tight" and his signature hit "Risin' to the Top," a big success in Chicago.[2] The latter song has become a popular sampling choice for hip hop artists, having been borrowed by artists such as Doug E Fresh ("Keep Risin to the Top"), Big Daddy Kane ("Smooth Operator"), LL Cool J ("Around the Way Girl"), Pete Rock & CL Smooth ("Take You There"), Mary J. Blige ("Love No Limit"), O.C. ("Born 2 Live"), and Sean Price ("Sabado Gigante"), "Rising to the Top" appeared in the soundtrack for the video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories, on fictional radio station Vice City for Lovers. Throughout the '80s and into the '90s, Burke continued his session and production work for artists such as Peabo Bryson, The O'Jays, The Jones Girls and Keith Sweat, and in 1998 released his last album to date Nothin' but Love, containing the hit "Indigenous Love", which was popular in the United Kingdom via the Expansion Records LabelVisit Narada at his website and socials and leave a comment, like and subscribe if you enjoyed the podcast!Website: https://www.naradamichaelwalden.com/allinpodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/officialnaradaApple Music https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-in-with-narada-michael-walden/id1470173526

    Classical Music Discoveries
    Episode 400: 18400 Guilty Pleasures - Baron Manchausen

    Classical Music Discoveries

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 60:38


    The Adventures of Baron Munchausen is a 1988 adventure fantasy film co-written and directed by Terry Gilliam, and starring John Neville, Sarah Polley, Eric Idle, Jonathan Pryce, Oliver Reed, Robin Williams, and Uma Thurman. An international co-production between the United Kingdom, the United States, and Germany, the film is based on the tall tales about the 18th-century German nobleman Baron Munchausen and his wartime exploits against the Ottoman Empire.The film was a notorious box office bomb, grossing just $8 million, and losing Columbia Pictures $38 million. Despite this, it received positive reviews from critics and was nominated for four Academy Awards: Best Art Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Visual Effects, and Best Makeup.Purchase the LP at The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (classicalsavings.com)

    Royally Obsessed
    A Tell-All About Andrew? + Special Guest Ed Perkins of HBO's ‘The Princess'

    Royally Obsessed

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 44:00


    It may be mostly quiet on the royal front, but we're still excited to dive in to some news that's caught our attention, like Prince Andrew settlement updates, Fergie's AirBnb, Prince William in New York City and Bea's b-day. We're also looking back in history at an awkward (but extremely revelatory) Prince Charles story, and reflecting on Dame Olivia Newton-John's passing. But we've saved the best for last: We're delighted to have director Ed Perkins, whose new film The Princess arrives on HBO August 13, on to discuss the movie that will give you chills. (You also might want to have a box of tissues at the ready.) Grab something caffeinated and tune in.--Presented by PureWow and Gallery Media Group. Follow all the royal happenings at purewow.com/royals. Shop Royally Obsessed sweatshirts and totes at shop.royallyobsessed.com. Follow us on Instagram at @RoyallyObsessedPodcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Fab 4 Free 4 All
    241-Fab 4 Free 4 All Talks With Patrick O'Connell

    Fab 4 Free 4 All

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 85:02


    Mitch Axelrod speaks with Patrick O'Connell, father of Bille Eilish and Finneas O'Connell.

    PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists
    66. @beauinstitute: Rose Marie Beauchemin-Verzella, Founder, Director of Education at the Beau Institute of Permanent and Corrective Cosmetics

    PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 3:53


    Our conversation with Rose Marie continues as she gives advice for up and coming artists who may be feeling nervous or not confident when starting their PMU career. Tune in! Are you someone interested in becoming a PMU artist but are scared to take that first step? In this episode, we continue our conversation with Rose Marie as she shares her advice for those looking to take that first step in the beauty world. Tune in :) Meet Rose Marie: “I never tire of watching the transformations and the exhilaration they bring about. I feel so blessed to have found this profession, and it gives me great pleasure to share my knowledge with all who are interested in learning.”  Beau Institute founder Rose Marie Beauchemin-Verzella is an internationally acclaimed expert in the field of permanent cosmetics, microblading, areola tattooing, permanent camouflage, and color lifting, with more than 29 years of experience as an industry leading practitioner, trainer, and speaker. Her talents  and business acumen have allowed it to grow into one of the top permanent makeup institutes in the world.   As an Instructor…Rose Marie displays her passion for excellence in her extraordinary teaching abilities that pave the way for her trainees to become excellent practitioners. Her patience and thoroughness allow her to educate trainees in the physical skills while instilling the confidence they need to launch their own successful permanent makeup careers. Rose Marie's students hail from around the world including the United States, Australia, India, Azerbaijan, Van Couver, Oman, South Africa, Amsterdam, Egypt, Bermuda, United Kingdom, Switzerland, and Latvia. They include medical professionals from prestigious medical institutions from Sloan Kettering,  University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University's Stephanie Spielman Breast Cancer Hospital, City of Hope, Long Island Plastic Surgery, Garden State Plastic Surgery, and many more. Training classes consist of surgeons, physician's assistants, nurses, aestheticians, as well as makeup artists, tattoo artists, and newcomers to the field. Many of the certified trainers in the United States have trained under Rose Marie's instruction. Rose Marie's dedication to helping breast cancer patients restore their physical and emotional health, as well as their self-confidence, is made clear by her founding, The Beau Institute's Annual Day of Hope, where areola tattooing is performed, complimentary. This year, with the help of the AAM, The Beau Institute's x Day of Hope has swept across 7-countries. Countless women were helped to regain their femininity and familiarity.  Rose Marie is a contributing author of the medical text called Micropigmentation Millennium, with Dr. Charles Zwerling, Ophthalmic Surgeon, and Dr. Norman Goldstein, former Chief of Dermatology, University of Hawaii, and Dr. Linda Dixon. She was also referenced as an expert in another medical text, Micropigmentation: State of the Art also by Dr. Norman Goldstein and Dr. Charles Zwerling.  Rose Marie is a supporter of the TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRBs), which provides valuable information and assistance to those struggling with Trichotillomania. She has performed countless permanent eyebrow procedures on clients who struggle with Trichotillomania, as well as Alopecia. She is a member of the Phoenix Burn Society and teaches camouflage for Self-Injury scars and Vitiligo. Find Rose Marie on Insta: @beauinstitute

    Logo Geek | The Logo Design & Branding Podcast
    Archetypes in Branding with Kaye Putnam

    Logo Geek | The Logo Design & Branding Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 56:36


    This episode is sponsored by The Perfect Match.Take 30 minutes to create a quick mood board as a design exercise. You'll get a $50 USD gift card for your submission, and if your mood board communicates clearly, you might be a contestant on the live game show and play to win $1,000 USD and a Wacom* tablet! Don't freak out: submissions are not spec work and are only used as entries for game play.This month's mood board challenge is open to creatives residing in the United States, Canada (excluding Quebec), the United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway, Ireland, Finland, and the Netherlands. Government employees are NOT eligible to participate. Entrants that meet the requirements receive a $50 USD gift card and a $25 will be donated to the National Partnership for Women & Families on behalf of your entry.To learn more and play head to https://www.theperfectmatch.co/play*Game show contestants are eligible to win prizes sponsored by Wacom in August and September.

    Too Much Information
    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

    Too Much Information

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 62:54 Very Popular


    Cowabunga, dudes! Alex and Jordan explore the rise of everyone's favorite pizza-loving, butt-kicking reptile, tracing their development from underground comic to the TV that launched a million action figures, record-breaking film and a truly bizarre musical. They'll talk about the killer costumes for the movies that caused the actors to lose 10 pounds in sweat, how the success of the show inadvertently led to an ecological crisis in the United Kingdom. — plus the surprising influence of Jim Henson, Marvel, 'Two and a Half Men' creator Chuck Lorre, and watermelon-smashing comedian Gallagher. You'll also learn about the turtle's wet 'n' wild appearance on Barbara Walters, the origin of their famous "Cowabunga" catch-phrase, and how TMNT superfan Robin Williams helped actress Judith Hoag prepare for her role as April.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 171 - Music From America

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:12


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 0168 - Downbeat - Freddy Martin first Song Lily Belle

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 15:07


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 185 - Mail Call - Dinah Shore - Andy Russell 03-06-46

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:10


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 0296 - Remember - host Robert Young - first Song What Is This Thing Called Love

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 15:05


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 132 - Family Hour replaced By Harvest Of Stars - Pikes Peak Or Bust - Raymond Massey 01-13-46

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 29:58


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 123 - Waltz Time first Song If I Had A Dozen Hearts 02-08-46

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:22


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    RTÉ - Liveline
    Weever Stings - Irish Map - Frank McCann - The Puck Goat

    RTÉ - Liveline

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 69:22


    Orla was in severe pain from a weever fish sting. Grace noticed a book of maps in which Ireland was listed as United Kingdom. Marian and Esther Leonard live in fear of Frank McCann's release. Patrick is a sculptor who keeps goats and will make a sculpture for Puck Fair.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 0732 - One Night Stand - Jan Savitt first Song Rose Room 09-18-45

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:08


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 154 - Hit Parade - 09-29-45

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 29:59


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 166 - Music For Sunday guest Bing Crosby

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:12


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 167 - Music Hall - Bing Crosby - Frank Morgan 02-14-46.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:17


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 0295 - Remember - host Robert Young - first Song String Of Pearls - Glenn Miller.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 15:07


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    The Today's Leader Podcast
    430 Developing Cross Cultural Skills Dr Rajesh Kumar

    The Today's Leader Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 37:22


    Welcome to episode 430 of The Today's Leader Podcast, Building Tomorrow's Best Leaders Today. The world in many ways seems both larger and smaller than ever before with the recent years of turmoil brought on by the response to Covid. Travel seems harder, international expansion seems harder, yet we can be be meeting and training with leaders in other countries through our online connections, at any time.International organisations deal with this on a daily basis. And today we discuss doing business globally, how to develop cross cultural skills as a leader. With a true global expert. Meet Dr. Rajesh Kumar. As a CEO & Founder of Global Strategic Advisory, he helps international brands navigate cross-cultural differences and avoid multi-billion expansion mistakes. Originally from India, Dr. Kumar has lived and worked in the United States, France, Finland, Netherlands, New Zealand, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. He has taught at Penn State, Ohio State, Babson College, and Menlo College in the United States, the University of Nottingham in the U.K., and the University of Aarhus in Denmark, among others.----------------------------------------------------Dr Kumar can be contacted by:Website: https://globalstrategicadvisory.com/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rajesh-kumar-81aa6a10/------------------------------------------------------------------Video versions of this podcast are available on Youtube at https://www.youtube.com/c/TonyCurl/If you are looking to build better leadership skills, check out The Today's Leader website at todaysleader.com.auWe are driving a leadership revolution and BUILDING TOMORROW'S BEST LEADERS, TODAY!Today's Leader is a collective, The mindset to make a difference and the ability to create an impact. Our Emerging Leaders Masterclass can be found at https://www.tomorrowsbestleaders.com/course/emerging-leaders-roundtable-masterclass#/homeThink & Grow Business Hosts our Today's Leader Masterminds. TAGB where we focus on personal, professional, and business growth. Book your free 30-minute discovery call at https://thinkandgrowbusiness.com.au/book-your-free-discovery-call/You are standing Stronger, Braver, and Wiser. Don't forget the golden rule  Don't be an A-HoleWatch our Video Podcasts on Youtube https://www.youtube.com/c/TonyCurl/Follow on Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-todays-leader-podcast/Check Out our Top 10 Leadership Podcasts: https://todaysleader.com.au/the-best-leadership-podcasts-for-2021/#purpose #leadership #communication #conversations #clarity #todaysleader #tomorrowsbestleaders #mentoring #mondaymentoring #development #developmentplan #highpotentiall #techready #careerskills #management #people #process #crisisleadership #simplebusiness #productivity #legacy #resilience #personalgrowth #leadershipgrowth #business #recruitment

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 0870 - One Night Stand - Jimmy Dorsey first Song Let It Snow 01-23-46

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:06


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    FIVE MINUTE NEWS
    FBI agents seize cellphone of Congressman Scott Perry.

    FIVE MINUTE NEWS

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 7:22


    FBI agents seize cellphone of Congressman Scott Perry. Explosions at Russian air base in Crimea. Another 'extreme heat' warning for the United Kingdom. You can subscribe to Five Minute News with Anthony Davis on YouTube, with your preferred podcast app, ask your smart speaker, or enable Five Minute News as your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing skill.  Subscribe, rate and review at www.fiveminute.news  Five Minute News is an Evergreen Podcast, covering politics, inequality, health and climate - delivering independent, unbiased and essential world news, daily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists
    65. @beauinstitute: Rose Marie Beauchemin-Verzella, Founder, Director of Education at the Beau Institute of Permanent and Corrective Cosmetics

    PMU School: A Podcast For Artists by Artists

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 4:21


    Our conversation with Rose Marie continues as she delves into other skills outside of artistry that she believes all PMU artists should learn. Check it out! Are you someone interested in becoming a PMU artist but are scared to take that first step? In this episode, we continue our conversation with Rose Marie as she shares her advice for those looking to take that first step in the beauty world. Tune in :) Meet Rose Marie: “I never tire of watching the transformations and the exhilaration they bring about. I feel so blessed to have found this profession, and it gives me great pleasure to share my knowledge with all who are interested in learning.”  Beau Institute founder Rose Marie Beauchemin-Verzella is an internationally acclaimed expert in the field of permanent cosmetics, microblading, areola tattooing, permanent camouflage, and color lifting, with more than 29 years of experience as an industry leading practitioner, trainer, and speaker. Her talents  and business acumen have allowed it to grow into one of the top permanent makeup institutes in the world.   As an Instructor…Rose Marie displays her passion for excellence in her extraordinary teaching abilities that pave the way for her trainees to become excellent practitioners. Her patience and thoroughness allow her to educate trainees in the physical skills while instilling the confidence they need to launch their own successful permanent makeup careers. Rose Marie's students hail from around the world including the United States, Australia, India, Azerbaijan, Van Couver, Oman, South Africa, Amsterdam, Egypt, Bermuda, United Kingdom, Switzerland, and Latvia. They include medical professionals from prestigious medical institutions from Sloan Kettering,  University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University's Stephanie Spielman Breast Cancer Hospital, City of Hope, Long Island Plastic Surgery, Garden State Plastic Surgery, and many more. Training classes consist of surgeons, physician's assistants, nurses, aestheticians, as well as makeup artists, tattoo artists, and newcomers to the field. Many of the certified trainers in the United States have trained under Rose Marie's instruction. Rose Marie's dedication to helping breast cancer patients restore their physical and emotional health, as well as their self-confidence, is made clear by her founding, The Beau Institute's Annual Day of Hope, where areola tattooing is performed, complimentary. This year, with the help of the AAM, The Beau Institute's x Day of Hope has swept across 7-countries. Countless women were helped to regain their femininity and familiarity.  Rose Marie is a contributing author of the medical text called Micropigmentation Millennium, with Dr. Charles Zwerling, Ophthalmic Surgeon, and Dr. Norman Goldstein, former Chief of Dermatology, University of Hawaii, and Dr. Linda Dixon. She was also referenced as an expert in another medical text, Micropigmentation: State of the Art also by Dr. Norman Goldstein and Dr. Charles Zwerling.  Rose Marie is a supporter of the TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors (BFRBs), which provides valuable information and assistance to those struggling with Trichotillomania. She has performed countless permanent eyebrow procedures on clients who struggle with Trichotillomania, as well as Alopecia. She is a member of the Phoenix Burn Society and teaches camouflage for Self-Injury scars and Vitiligo. Find Rose Marie on Insta: @beauinstitute

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs - variety Replacement Ozzie Harriet - Ozzies Good Deed 12-03-44

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 29:48


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 0871 - One Night Stand - Harry James first Song Jump Sauce 02-10-46.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 30:11


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 013 - Great Gildersleeve - Royal Visit 11-21-43

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 29:47


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.