Encountering Silence

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Explore the beauty, spirituality, and meaning of silence with hosts Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson, and Carl McColman. Silence is a topic most of us think little about — yet it is vitally important to our physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. We examine silence from spiritual, religious, psycholo…

Cassidy Hall, Kevin Johnson, Carl McColman


    • Nov 9, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • monthly NEW EPISODES
    • 16h 53m AVG DURATION
    • 251 EPISODES

    Listeners of Encountering Silence that love the show mention: carl, kevin, volume, engaging, sound, hosts, thank, guests, show, love, great, encountering silence.



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    Latest episodes from Encountering Silence

    The Rev. Dr. Jacqui Lewis: Encountering Silence in Fierce Love

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 55:46

    A conversation with noted author and activist Jacqui Lewis to celebrate the publication of "Fierce Love."

    Nikki Grimes: Encountering Glory, and Silence, in the Margins

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:27

    A conversation with award-winning poet and children's author Nikki Grimes.

    Amy Frykholm: Encountering the Wilderness of Silence

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 54:47

    A conversation with contemplative author Dr. Amy Frykholm, whose books include "Wild Woman" and "Julian of Norwich: A Contemplative Biography."

    Kevin Quashie: The Aesthetics and Poesis of Silence

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 81:33

    Interview with contemplative scholar Dr. Kevin Quashie (Brown University).

    Maisie Sparks: Enjoying God in the Silence

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 55:54

    A conversation with spiritual director and author Maisie Sparks (Holy Shakespeare, Christmas Quiet).

    Encountering a New Silence with Dr. Beverly Lanzetta

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2021 50:00

    A conversation with visionary contemplative author Dr. Beverly Lanzetta, author of "A New Silence."

    Sophfronia Scott: Silence, the Seeker, and the Monk

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 61:37


    Sophfronia Scott speaks to Encountering Silence about her latest book, in which she explores her interest in the Trappist monk Thomas Merton.


    Barbara Brown Taylor: Silence, Vulnerability, and Love (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2021 29:00


    Part Two of Our Episode with New York Times bestselling author Barbara Brown Taylor, author of "When God is Silent" and many other books.


    Barbara Brown Taylor: Silence, Vulnerability, and Love (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 31:40


    Part one of our two-part conversation with New York Times bestselling author Barbara Brown Taylor.


    Encountering Silence and Contemplating Now

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 44:36


    In today's episode of Encountering Silence, we visit co-host Cassidy Hall's new podcast, Contemplating Now: A Podcast Exploring the Intersection of Contemplation and Social Justice. Join us as we listen to wisdom from previous Encountering Silence guest, Therese Taylor-Stinson: spiritual director, author, and ordained deacon and elder in the Presbyterian Church (PCUSA).


    Silence in Sound: A Collection of Ambient Field Recordings

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021 34:30

    A collection of ambient field recordings from birds to surf to wind. Listen to how subtle nature is, and listen for the silence in the sound.

    Sarah Griffith Lund: Silence, Marriage and Mental Health (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2021 36:21

    The conclusion of our conversation with Pastor Sarah Griffith Lund.

    Sarah Griffith Lund: Silence, Marriage and Mental Heath

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 40:53

    Pastor and mental health advocate Sarah Griffith Lund returns to Encountering Silence.

    Patrick Shen: Silence and the Dawn Chorus

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2021 42:58

    Our good friend Patrick Shen returns to tell us about his latest project, "The Dawn Chorus."

    Kaya Oakes, Silence, the Body, and Women Mystics (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2021 29:41

    The conclusion of our conversation with writer Kaya Oakes.

    Kaya Oakes, Silence, the Body, and Women Mystics (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2020 38:21

    The first part of our two-part conversation with author Kaya Oakes.

    Zenju Earthlyn Manuel: Silence, Ritual, and the Earth (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2020 38:04

    The conclusion of our conversation with Zenju Earthlyn Manuel, Zen priest, author, and poet.

    Zenju Earthlyn Manuel: Silence, Ritual, and the Earth (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2020 40:03

    Zenju Earthlyn Manuel, Zen priest, author, and poet, joins us for this first part of a two-part conversation.

    Emilie Townes: Silence, Storytelling, and Womanist Thought (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2020 24:52

    Our conversation with Dean Emilie M. Townes concludes.

    Emilie Townes: Silence, Storytelling, and Womanist Thought (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2020 35:20

    Part one of a two-part interview with Womanist theologian Emilie M. Townes.

    Marie Howe: Silence and the Depth of Poetry (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2020 29:44

    The conclusion of our conversation with poet Marie Howe.

    Marie Howe: (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 37:47

    The first part of our conversation with Marie Howe, former poet laureate of New York.

    Cynthia Bourgeault: Silence and the Imaginal Realm (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2020 40:44

    Part Two of Our 2020 Conversation with Cynthia Bourgeault.

    Cynthia Bourgeault: Silence and the Imaginal Realm (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2020 45:09

    Cynthia Bourgeault returns to Encountering Silence to discuss her new book, Eye of the Heart. Part one of a two-part interview.

    Rick Hanson: Silence, Buddhism and the Brain

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 50:01


    A conversation with New York Times bestselling author Rick Hanson, PhD.


    Rick Hanson: Silence, Buddhism and the Brain

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 50:02


    Rick Hanson, PhD, is a psychologist, senior fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times bestselling author. His books include Neurodharma, Resilient, Hardwiring Happiness, Just One Thing, Buddha’s Brain, and Mother Nurture. He has released an audio series called The Enlightened Brain and is the creator of the Just One Thing Card Deck. Rick is the founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, he has been an invited speaker at Google, NASA, Oxford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide. He has several online offerings—including the Neurodharma experiential program—and more than 150,000 people receive his free weekly newsletter. He and his wife live in Northern California and have two adult children. Tell the truth about your suffering. — Rick Hanson, PhD Rick joined us recently to share some insights into the science of silence, particularly in light of his work as a psychologist and practicing Buddhist. Come home to yourself, to find your footing, over the course of a single breath. We know what that's like... What's it like to be me? And then in the middle of all that, finding what feels like refuge. Stabilizing, protective, refueling, renewing, refuge. — Rick Hanson, PhD Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Rick Hanson, Neurodharma Rick Hanson & Forrest Hanson, Resilient Rick Hanson, Hardwiring Happiness Rick Hanson, Just One Thing Rick Hanson & Richard Mendius, Buddha’s Brain Rick Hanson, Jan Hanson & Ricki Pollycove, Mother Nurture Rick Hanson, The Enlightened Brain Rick Hanson, Just One Thing Card Deck Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning The Buddha, Teachings of the Compassionate Buddha Barack Obama, The Promised Land Peggy Noonan, The Time of Our Lives Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina Sylvia Boorstein, It's Easier Than You Think Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own Mary Oliver, Devotions: The Selected Poems Chana Shapiro, The Rabbi's In Trouble Simon & Garfunkel, "The Sound of Silence" from Wednesday Morning, 3 AM Patanjali, The Yoga Sutras Find a spiritual practice that really feels good... that you're drawn to do it... that it feels good for the minute, or five minutes, or forty minutes that you do it; it's calming, it's restorative, it feels like home, and you like it. It adds value to you and it it's good for you. — Rick Hanson, PhD Episode 114 : Silence, Buddhism, and the Brain: A Conversation with Rick Hanson Hosted by: Carl McColman With: Cassiday Hall and Kevin Johnson Guest: Dr. Rick Hanson Date Recorded: May 18, 2020


    Jim Forest: Silence, Protest, and Radical Love (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2020 1908:00


    Returning Guest Jim Forest is a noted author, biographer, photographer, peacemaker, and friend. He is the author of numerous books, including most recently Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir. Some of his previous titles include The Ladder of the Beatitudes, Loving Our Enemies: Reflections on the Hardest Commandment, and Praying with Icons. He has written several biographies, including All Is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton and At Play in the Lions' Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan. This is part two of a two part episode. To listen to part one, click here. Musician Joan Baez writes of Jim’s latest book, “Jim, my brother in nonviolent arms, writes beautifully about his dedication to truth, love, and activism.” Jim Forest serves as the International Secretary of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship. And he lives in Alkmaar, the Netherlands with his wife Nancy. We tend to turn things into ideologies, and I find in general I'm an ideology-avoider. — Jim Forest Cassidy Hall says this of her friendship with Jim and Nancy, "I got to meet Jim a few years ago when we crossed paths at Voices for Peace in Toronto and then we reconnected in The Netherlands. He and Nancy graciously hosted me — they housed me, fed me, and most importantly nurtured me spiritually. His humble, gentle, and kind presence makes any guest in his company feel like one of his dear friends." By "his dear friends," Cassidy is alluding to the remarkable relationships that Jim has nurtured over the years, with some of the most significant spiritual leaders and activists of our time — people such as Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton, Daniel Berrigan, Henri Nouwen, and Thich Nhat Hanh. In his words and the witness of his life, Jim Forest reveals the power of relationship in all activist-oriented work. This is part one of a two-part episode. Our next episode will feature the conclusion of this interview. Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Jim Forest, Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir Jim Forest, The Ladder of the Beatitudes Jim Forest, Praying with Icons Jim Forest, Road to Emmaus Jim Forest, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton Jim Forest, All is Grace:  A Biography of Dorothy Day Jim Forest, At Play in the Lion’s Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan Jim Forest, The Root of War is Fear: Thomas Merton’s Advice to Peacemakers Jim Forest, Saint George and the Dragon Jim Forest, Saint Nicholas and the Nine Gold Coins Jim Forest, Silent as a Stone: Mother Maria of Paris and the Trash Can Rescue Joan Baez, And A Voice to Sing With: A Memoir Daniel Berrigan, Essential Writings Dorothy Day, Loaves and Fishes Dorothy Day, The Long Loneliness Jane Brox, Silence: A Social History of One of the Least Understood Elements in Our Lives Henri Nouwen, Reaching Out Hillary Rodham Clinton, It Takes a Village Vincent Van Gogh, Dear Theo Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground Robert Ellsberg, ed., Dorothy Day: Selected Writings Vladimir Menshov (dir.), Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears Mikhail Gorbachev, What is at Stake Thomas Merton, Essential Writings Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude Visit Jim and Nancy Forest’s website www.jimandnancyforest.com. Episode 113 : Silence, Protest, and Radical Love: A Conversation with Jim Forest (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Jim Forest Date Recorded: September 10, 2020 Featured photo: Jim Forest with Thich Nhat Hanh,


    Jim Forest: Silence, Protest, and Radical Love (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2020 31:48


    Returning Guest Jim Forest is a noted author, biographer, photographer, peacemaker, and friend. He is the author of numerous books, including most recently Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir. Some of his previous titles include The Ladder of the Beatitudes, Loving Our Enemies: Reflections on the Hardest Commandment, and Praying with Icons. He has written several biographies, including All Is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton and At Play in the Lions' Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan. This is part two of a two part episode. To listen to part one, click here. Musician Joan Baez writes of Jim’s latest book, “Jim, my brother in nonviolent arms, writes beautifully about his dedication to truth, love, and activism.” Jim Forest serves as the International Secretary of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship. And he lives in Alkmaar, the Netherlands with his wife Nancy. We tend to turn things into ideologies, and I find in general I'm an ideology-avoider. — Jim Forest Cassidy Hall says this of her friendship with Jim and Nancy, "I got to meet Jim a few years ago when we crossed paths at Voices for Peace in Toronto and then we reconnected in The Netherlands. He and Nancy graciously hosted me — they housed me, fed me, and most importantly nurtured me spiritually. His humble, gentle, and kind presence makes any guest in his company feel like one of his dear friends." By "his dear friends," Cassidy is alluding to the remarkable relationships that Jim has nurtured over the years, with some of the most significant spiritual leaders and activists of our time — people such as Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton, Daniel Berrigan, Henri Nouwen, and Thich Nhat Hanh. In his words and the witness of his life, Jim Forest reveals the power of relationship in all activist-oriented work. This is part one of a two-part episode. Our next episode will feature the conclusion of this interview. Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Jim Forest, Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir Jim Forest, The Ladder of the Beatitudes Jim Forest, Praying with Icons Jim Forest, Road to Emmaus Jim Forest, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton Jim Forest, All is Grace:  A Biography of Dorothy Day Jim Forest, At Play in the Lion’s Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan Jim Forest, The Root of War is Fear: Thomas Merton’s Advice to Peacemakers Jim Forest, Saint George and the Dragon Jim Forest, Saint Nicholas and the Nine Gold Coins Jim Forest, Silent as a Stone: Mother Maria of Paris and the Trash Can Rescue Joan Baez, And A Voice to Sing With: A Memoir Daniel Berrigan, Essential Writings Dorothy Day, Loaves and Fishes Dorothy Day, The Long Loneliness Jane Brox, Silence: A Social History of One of the Least Understood Elements in Our Lives Henri Nouwen, Reaching Out Hillary Rodham Clinton, It Takes a Village Vincent Van Gogh, Dear Theo Fyodor Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground Robert Ellsberg, ed., Dorothy Day: Selected Writings Vladimir Menshov (dir.), Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears Mikhail Gorbachev, What is at Stake Thomas Merton, Essential Writings Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude Visit Jim and Nancy Forest’s website www.jimandnancyforest.com. Episode 113 : Silence, Protest, and Radical Love: A Conversation with Jim Forest (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Jim Forest Date Recorded: September 10, 2020 Featured photo: Jim Forest with Thich Nhat Hanh, 1980s. Photographer unknown.   


    Jim Forest: Silence, Protest, and Radical Love (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2020 2237:00


    Returning Guest Jim Forest is a noted author, biographer, photographer, peacemaker, and friend. He is the author of numerous books, including most recently Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir. Some of his previous titles include The Ladder of the Beatitudes, Loving Our Enemies: Reflections on the Hardest Commandment, and Praying with Icons. He has written several biographies, including All Is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton and At Play in the Lions' Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan. Musician Joan Baez writes of Jim’s latest book, “Jim, my brother in nonviolent arms, writes beautifully about his dedication to truth, love, and activism.” Jim Forest serves as the International Secretary of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship. And he lives in Alkmaar, the Netherlands with his wife Nancy. Dorothy Day used to say, 'Hope is a duty, not an option.' It's an obligation. — Jim Forest Cassidy Hall says this of her friendship with Jim and Nancy, "I got to meet Jim a few years ago when we crossed paths at Voices for Peace in Toronto and then we reconnected in The Netherlands. He and Nancy graciously hosted me — they housed me, fed me, and most importantly nurtured me spiritually. His humble, gentle, and kind presence makes any guest in his company feel like one of his dear friends." By "his dear friends," Cassidy is alluding to the remarkable relationships that Jim has nurtured over the years, with some of the most significant spiritual leaders and activists of our time — people such as Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton, Daniel Berrigan, Henri Nouwen, and Thich Nhat Hanh. In his words and the witness of his life, Jim Forest reveals the power of relationship in all activist-oriented work. This is part one of a two-part episode. Our next episode will feature the conclusion of this interview. When you say the same things every Sunday, it becomes silence... Far from being infinitely boring, it becomes infinitely alive. — Jim Forest Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Jim Forest, Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir Jim Forest, The Ladder of the Beatitudes Jim Forest, Praying with Icons Jim Forest, Road to Emmaus Jim Forest, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton Jim Forest, All is Grace:  A Biography of Dorothy Day Jim Forest, At Play in the Lion’s Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan Jim Forest, The Root of War is Fear: Thomas Merton’s Advice to Peacemakers Jim Forest, Saint George and the Dragon Jim Forest, Saint Nicholas and the Nine Gold Coins Jim Forest, Silent as a Stone: Mother Maria of Paris and the Trash Can Rescue Joan Baez, And A Voice to Sing With: A Memoir Thomas Merton, Essential Writings Thomas Merton, The Literary Essays Dorothy Day, Loaves and Fishes Dorothy Day, The Long Loneliness Henri Nouwen, Reaching Out Daniel Berrigan, Essential Writings Thich Nhat Hanh, Essential Writings Boris Pasternak, Doctor Zhivago Franz Jägerstätter, Letters and Writings from Prison Terence Malick, A Hidden Life Visit Jim and Nancy Forest’s website www.jimandnancyforest.com. Protest alone will not keep you going. — Jim Forest Episode 112 : Silence, Protest, and Radical Love: A Conversation with Jim Forest (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Jim Forest Special Guest: Nancy Forest-Flier Date Recorded: September 10, 2020  


    Jim Forest: Silence, Protest, and Radical Love (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2020 37:17


    Returning Guest Jim Forest is a noted author, biographer, photographer, peacemaker, and friend. He is the author of numerous books, including most recently Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir. Some of his previous titles include The Ladder of the Beatitudes, Loving Our Enemies: Reflections on the Hardest Commandment, and Praying with Icons. He has written several biographies, including All Is Grace: A Biography of Dorothy Day, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton and At Play in the Lions' Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan. Musician Joan Baez writes of Jim’s latest book, “Jim, my brother in nonviolent arms, writes beautifully about his dedication to truth, love, and activism.” Jim Forest serves as the International Secretary of the Orthodox Peace Fellowship. And he lives in Alkmaar, the Netherlands with his wife Nancy. Dorothy Day used to say, 'Hope is a duty, not an option.' It's an obligation. — Jim Forest Cassidy Hall says this of her friendship with Jim and Nancy, "I got to meet Jim a few years ago when we crossed paths at Voices for Peace in Toronto and then we reconnected in The Netherlands. He and Nancy graciously hosted me — they housed me, fed me, and most importantly nurtured me spiritually. His humble, gentle, and kind presence makes any guest in his company feel like one of his dear friends." By "his dear friends," Cassidy is alluding to the remarkable relationships that Jim has nurtured over the years, with some of the most significant spiritual leaders and activists of our time — people such as Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton, Daniel Berrigan, Henri Nouwen, and Thich Nhat Hanh. In his words and the witness of his life, Jim Forest reveals the power of relationship in all activist-oriented work. This is part one of a two-part episode. Our next episode will feature the conclusion of this interview. When you say the same things every Sunday, it becomes silence... Far from being infinitely boring, it becomes infinitely alive. — Jim Forest Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Jim Forest, Writing Straight with Crooked Lines: A Memoir Jim Forest, The Ladder of the Beatitudes Jim Forest, Praying with Icons Jim Forest, Road to Emmaus Jim Forest, Living with Wisdom: A Life of Thomas Merton Jim Forest, All is Grace:  A Biography of Dorothy Day Jim Forest, At Play in the Lion’s Den: A Biography and Memoir of Daniel Berrigan Jim Forest, The Root of War is Fear: Thomas Merton’s Advice to Peacemakers Jim Forest, Saint George and the Dragon Jim Forest, Saint Nicholas and the Nine Gold Coins Jim Forest, Silent as a Stone: Mother Maria of Paris and the Trash Can Rescue Joan Baez, And A Voice to Sing With: A Memoir Thomas Merton, Essential Writings Thomas Merton, The Literary Essays Dorothy Day, Loaves and Fishes Dorothy Day, The Long Loneliness Henri Nouwen, Reaching Out Daniel Berrigan, Essential Writings Thich Nhat Hanh, Essential Writings Boris Pasternak, Doctor Zhivago Franz Jägerstätter, Letters and Writings from Prison Terence Malick, A Hidden Life Visit Jim and Nancy Forest’s website www.jimandnancyforest.com. Protest alone will not keep you going. — Jim Forest Episode 112 : Silence, Protest, and Radical Love: A Conversation with Jim Forest (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Jim Forest Special Guest: Nancy Forest-Flier Date Recorded: September 10, 2020  


    Paul Quenon, OCSO: Silence, Poetry and Monastic Wisdom (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2020 26:44


    Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO, Trappist monk, poet, and photographer, is the author of books like In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir and Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems. He returned to Encountering Silence for a conversation recorded last April (to hear his previous conversations on this podcast, click here and here). In this episode he speaks about the spirituality of nature, how God sometimes feels absent, and the challenge of being a poet in a time of dejection. This is part two of a two-part interview. To listen to part one, click here. Nature for me is very congenial... the birds are my teachers, they always seem to be exhilarated, no matter how bad the world is, they're singing that same tune, and it picks up the heart: there's something larger than ourselves and our concerns. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Brother Paul entered monastic life in 1958, when he was only 17 years old — back before the reforms of the Second Vatical Council, when the life of a Trappist was even more austere than it is today. His novice master turned out to be Thomas Merton, who eventually became an inspiration to Brother Paul not only as a monk, but as a writer. It might be a mistake to seek the fullness of God. God, to our perception, is more like nothing, nothingness and emptiness. You have to allow God to manifest the way God will. Sometimes it's consoling, sometimes you feel a presence... on the other hand, sometimes you just have to prepare yourself to the reality that God does not speak sometimes. — Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Paul Quenon, Amounting to Nothing Paul Quenon, In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir Paul Quenon, Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems Paul Quenon, Bells of the Hours Paul Quenon, Afternoons with Emily Paul Quenon, Monkswear Paul Quenon, Laughter: My Purgatory Paul Quenon, Terrors of Paradise Paul Quenon with Judith Valente and Michael Bever, The Art of Pausing Julian of Norwich, The Showings of Julian of Norwich: A New Translation Eugene Peterson, Earth & Altar: The Community of Prayer in a Self-Bound Society Saint Benedict, The Rule of Saint Benedict The Buddha, Teachings of the Buddha Daniel C. Walsh, Correspondence Thomas Merton, Essential Writings The Beatles, Sergeant Peppers' Lonely Hearts Club Band Matthew Kelty, Singing For The Kingdom: The Last of the Homilies I think a lot of people are feeling very dejected, at a loss, and maybe what the Lord wants me to do is feel at a loss with them. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Episode 111: Silence, Poetry, and Monastic Wisdom: A Conversation with Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Date Recorded: April 30, 2020


    Paul Quenon, OCSO: Silence, Poetry and Monastic Wisdom (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2020 1604:00


    Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO, Trappist monk, poet, and photographer, is the author of books like In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir and Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems. He returned to Encountering Silence for a conversation recorded last April (to hear his previous conversations on this podcast, click here and here). In this episode he speaks about the spirituality of nature, how God sometimes feels absent, and the challenge of being a poet in a time of dejection. This is part two of a two-part interview. To listen to part one, click here. Nature for me is very congenial... the birds are my teachers, they always seem to be exhilarated, no matter how bad the world is, they're singing that same tune, and it picks up the heart: there's something larger than ourselves and our concerns. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Brother Paul entered monastic life in 1958, when he was only 17 years old — back before the reforms of the Second Vatical Council, when the life of a Trappist was even more austere than it is today. His novice master turned out to be Thomas Merton, who eventually became an inspiration to Brother Paul not only as a monk, but as a writer. It might be a mistake to seek the fullness of God. God, to our perception, is more like nothing, nothingness and emptiness. You have to allow God to manifest the way God will. Sometimes it's consoling, sometimes you feel a presence... on the other hand, sometimes you just have to prepare yourself to the reality that God does not speak sometimes. — Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Paul Quenon, Amounting to Nothing Paul Quenon, In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir Paul Quenon, Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems Paul Quenon, Bells of the Hours Paul Quenon, Afternoons with Emily Paul Quenon, Monkswear Paul Quenon, Laughter: My Purgatory Paul Quenon, Terrors of Paradise Paul Quenon with Judith Valente and Michael Bever, The Art of Pausing Julian of Norwich, The Showings of Julian of Norwich: A New Translation Eugene Peterson, Earth & Altar: The Community of Prayer in a Self-Bound Society Saint Benedict, The Rule of Saint Benedict The Buddha, Teachings of the Buddha Daniel C. Walsh, Correspondence Thomas Merton, Essential Writings The Beatles, Sergeant Peppers' Lonely Hearts Club Band Matthew Kelty, Singing For The Kingdom: The Last of the Homilies I think a lot of people are feeling very dejected, at a loss, and maybe what the Lord wants me to do is feel at a loss with them. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Episode 111: Silence, Poetry, and Monastic Wisdom: A Conversation with Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Date Recorded: April 30, 2020


    Paul Quenon, OCSO: Silence, Poetry and Monastic Wisdom (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 30:50


    Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO, Trappist monk, poet, and photographer, is the author of books like In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir and Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems. He returned to Encountering Silence for a conversation recorded last April (to hear his previous conversations on this podcast, click here and here). This time, he offers a fascinating conversation drawing lines of connection between the monk's experience of cloistered solitude and the challenges that the public at large has faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. I think there's something within everybody that really wants to have quiet time... There's something about the heart that thirsts for that kind of quiet and silence. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Brother Paul entered monastic life in 1958, when he was only 17 years old — back before the reforms of the Second Vatical Council, when the life of a Trappist was even more austere than it is today. His novice master turned out to be Thomas Merton, who eventually became an inspiration to Brother Paul not only as a monk, but as a writer. Here's a video of Brother Paul reading one of his poems, from our conversation this year: https://vimeo.com/413749815 A habit can be a very supportive thing, a routine can be a deadening thing a ritual should always be a vital thing and should always be done mindfully. — Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Paul Quenon, In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir Paul Quenon, Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems Paul Quenon, Bells of the Hours Paul Quenon, Afternoons with Emily Paul Quenon, Monkswear Paul Quenon, Laughter: My Purgatory Paul Quenon, Terrors of Paradise Paul Quenon with Judith Valente and Michael Bever, The Art of Pausing Thomas Merton, Essential Writings Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude Greg Hillis, Bodhisattva Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems, edited by Thomas H. Johnson Marty Gervais, Nine Lives: A Reunion in Paris Wallace Stevens, The Collected Poems T.S. Eliot, The Complete Poems and Plays Ignatius of Loyola, Personal Writings In a monastery you're living in a poetic environment, and the countryside that we live in, I think it exposes the mind to open up to poetry. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Episode 110: Silence, Poetry, and Monastic Wisdom: A Conversation with Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Date Recorded: April 30, 2020


    Paul Quenon, OCSO: Silence, Poetry and Monastic Wisdom (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 1850:00


    Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO, Trappist monk, poet, and photographer, is the author of books like In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir and Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems. He returned to Encountering Silence for a conversation recorded last April (to hear his previous conversations on this podcast, click here and here). This time, he offers a fascinating conversation drawing lines of connection between the monk's experience of cloistered solitude and the challenges that the public at large has faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. I think there's something within everybody that really wants to have quiet time... There's something about the heart that thirsts for that kind of quiet and silence. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Brother Paul entered monastic life in 1958, when he was only 17 years old — back before the reforms of the Second Vatical Council, when the life of a Trappist was even more austere than it is today. His novice master turned out to be Thomas Merton, who eventually became an inspiration to Brother Paul not only as a monk, but as a writer. Here's a video of Brother Paul reading one of his poems, from our conversation this year: https://vimeo.com/413749815 A habit can be a very supportive thing, a routine can be a deadening thing a ritual should always be a vital thing and should always be done mindfully. — Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Paul Quenon, In Praise of the Useless Life: A Monk's Memoir Paul Quenon, Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems Paul Quenon, Bells of the Hours Paul Quenon, Afternoons with Emily Paul Quenon, Monkswear Paul Quenon, Laughter: My Purgatory Paul Quenon, Terrors of Paradise Paul Quenon with Judith Valente and Michael Bever, The Art of Pausing Thomas Merton, Essential Writings Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude Greg Hillis, Bodhisattva Emily Dickinson, The Complete Poems, edited by Thomas H. Johnson Marty Gervais, Nine Lives: A Reunion in Paris Wallace Stevens, The Collected Poems T.S. Eliot, The Complete Poems and Plays Ignatius of Loyola, Personal Writings In a monastery you're living in a poetic environment, and the countryside that we live in, I think it exposes the mind to open up to poetry. — Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Episode 110: Silence, Poetry, and Monastic Wisdom: A Conversation with Brother Paul Quenon, OCSO (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Br. Paul Quenon, OCSO Date Recorded: April 30, 2020


    Dr. Leah Gunning Francis: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 35:24

    In this episode we conclude our conversation with Dr. Leah Gunning Francis, the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, Indiana. This is part two of a two-part episode. Click here to listen to part one. During the Ferguson uprising in 2014, Dr. Gunning Francis was serving as the Associate Dean for Contextual Education and Assistant Professor of Christian Education at Eden Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. As a result, Dr. Gunning Francis wrote the book Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community. In the book, She interviewed more than two dozen clergy and young activists who were actively involved in the movement for racial justice in Ferguson and beyond. Dr. Gunning Francis earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from Hampton University; a Master of Divinity degree from the Candler School of Theology; and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. White supremacy has disembodied the white body... White supremacy has disembodied and disconnected white people from the very bodies they inhabit. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis A native of New Jersey, Dr. Gunning Francis is married to Rev. Rodney Francis and they live in Indianapolis with their tween-aged children. In the end of her book, she writes a message as relevant today as it was during her book’s release in 2015: “The fight for racial justice emerges out of the fight for human dignity. If there is any group of people who should be compelled to join this fight, it is the people who call themselves, “children of God.” Staying awake to the injustices that have been revealed through the Ferguson-related events is a critical task for communities fo faith. Our connectedness to our brothers and sisters is rooted in our connectedness to God, for we are all God’s children. And, in the words of the Civil Rights freedom fighter Ella Baker: “Until the killing of black men, black mothers’ sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother’s son—we who believe in freedom cannot rest until this happens.” Learn more about Dr. Gunning Francis by visiting www.leahgunningfrancis.com. This isn't the time to retreat into silence... This is the very time where you as a well-meaning individual need to look right in your circle of influence and start broaching what can be seen as difficult conversations, to say we can't keep pretending that black people are valued in this county in the same way as white people. We have to look around and see how we can influence the change, right where we are, in our neighborhoods, in our churches, faith communities, schools, mom's groups, all these various kinds of spaces need to hear a voice for black lives. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Leah Gunning Francis, Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community Leah Gunning Francis, Faith Following Ferguson: Five Years of Resilience and Wisdom Carol Anderson, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide When you teach your children not to see color, you teach them not to see me or anybody else. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Episode 109: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part One): A Conversation with Dr. Leah Gunning Francis (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Date Recorded: July 28, 2020

    Dr. Leah Gunning Francis: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 2124:00

    In this episode we conclude our conversation with Dr. Leah Gunning Francis, the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, Indiana. This is part two of a two-part episode. Click here to listen to part one. During the Ferguson uprising in 2014, Dr. Gunning Francis was serving as the Associate Dean for Contextual Education and Assistant Professor of Christian Education at Eden Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. As a result, Dr. Gunning Francis wrote the book Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community. In the book, She interviewed more than two dozen clergy and young activists who were actively involved in the movement for racial justice in Ferguson and beyond. Dr. Gunning Francis earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from Hampton University; a Master of Divinity degree from the Candler School of Theology; and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. White supremacy has disembodied the white body... White supremacy has disembodied and disconnected white people from the very bodies they inhabit. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis A native of New Jersey, Dr. Gunning Francis is married to Rev. Rodney Francis and they live in Indianapolis with their tween-aged children. In the end of her book, she writes a message as relevant today as it was during her book’s release in 2015: “The fight for racial justice emerges out of the fight for human dignity. If there is any group of people who should be compelled to join this fight, it is the people who call themselves, “children of God.” Staying awake to the injustices that have been revealed through the Ferguson-related events is a critical task for communities fo faith. Our connectedness to our brothers and sisters is rooted in our connectedness to God, for we are all God’s children. And, in the words of the Civil Rights freedom fighter Ella Baker: “Until the killing of black men, black mothers’ sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother’s son—we who believe in freedom cannot rest until this happens.” Learn more about Dr. Gunning Francis by visiting www.leahgunningfrancis.com. This isn't the time to retreat into silence... This is the very time where you as a well-meaning individual need to look right in your circle of influence and start broaching what can be seen as difficult conversations, to say we can't keep pretending that black people are valued in this county in the same way as white people. We have to look around and see how we can influence the change, right where we are, in our neighborhoods, in our churches, faith communities, schools, mom's groups, all these various kinds of spaces need to hear a voice for black lives. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Leah Gunning Francis, Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community Leah Gunning Francis, Faith Following Ferguson: Five Years of Resilience and Wisdom Carol Anderson, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide When you teach your children not to see color, you teach them not to see me or anybody else. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Episode 109: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part One): A Conversation with Dr. Leah Gunning Francis (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Date Recorded: July 28, 2020

    Dr. Leah Gunning Francis: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2020 32:33

    Dr. Leah Gunning Francis is the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the Ferguson uprising in 2014, Dr. Gunning Francis was serving as the Associate Dean for Contextual Education and Assistant Professor of Christian Education at Eden Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. As a result, Dr. Gunning Francis wrote the book Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community. In the book, She interviewed more than two dozen clergy and young activists who were actively involved in the movement for racial justice in Ferguson and beyond. Dr. Gunning Francis earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from Hampton University; a Master of Divinity degree from the Candler School of Theology; and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. We can not be silent to the racial injustice in our time. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis A native of New Jersey, Dr. Gunning Francis is married to Rev. Rodney Francis and they live in Indianapolis with their tween-aged children. In the end of her book, she writes a message as relevant today as it was during her book’s release in 2015: “The fight for racial justice emerges out of the fight for human dignity. If there is any group of people who should be compelled to join this fight, it is the people who call themselves, “children of God.” Staying awake to the injustices that have been revealed through the Ferguson-related events is a critical task for communities fo faith. Our connectedness to our brothers and sisters is rooted in our connectedness to God, for we are all God’s children. And, in the words of the Civil Rights freedom fighter Ella Baker: “Until the killing of black men, black mothers’ sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother’s son—we who believe in freedom cannot rest until this happens.” Learn more about Dr. Gunning Francis by visiting www.leahgunningfrancis.com. This is part one of a two-part episode. Part two will be released later this month. Look for the leader within. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Here is a video produced to introduce readers to Ferguson and Faith. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgcIJ3GvKss Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Leah Gunning Francis, Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community Leah Gunning Francis, Faith Following Ferguson: Five Years of Resilience and Wisdom John O'Donohue, Eternal Echoes: Celtic Reflections on Our Yearning to Belong White supremacy has disembodied the white body. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Episode 108: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part One): A Conversation with Dr. Leah Gunning Francis (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Date Recorded: July 28, 2020 Featured photograph by Cassidy Hall.

    Dr. Leah Gunning Francis: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2020 1953:00

    Dr. Leah Gunning Francis is the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the Ferguson uprising in 2014, Dr. Gunning Francis was serving as the Associate Dean for Contextual Education and Assistant Professor of Christian Education at Eden Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. As a result, Dr. Gunning Francis wrote the book Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community. In the book, She interviewed more than two dozen clergy and young activists who were actively involved in the movement for racial justice in Ferguson and beyond. Dr. Gunning Francis earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from Hampton University; a Master of Divinity degree from the Candler School of Theology; and a Doctor of Philosophy degree from Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. We can not be silent to the racial injustice in our time. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis A native of New Jersey, Dr. Gunning Francis is married to Rev. Rodney Francis and they live in Indianapolis with their tween-aged children. In the end of her book, she writes a message as relevant today as it was during her book’s release in 2015: “The fight for racial justice emerges out of the fight for human dignity. If there is any group of people who should be compelled to join this fight, it is the people who call themselves, “children of God.” Staying awake to the injustices that have been revealed through the Ferguson-related events is a critical task for communities fo faith. Our connectedness to our brothers and sisters is rooted in our connectedness to God, for we are all God’s children. And, in the words of the Civil Rights freedom fighter Ella Baker: “Until the killing of black men, black mothers’ sons, becomes as important to the rest of the country as the killing of a white mother’s son—we who believe in freedom cannot rest until this happens.” Learn more about Dr. Gunning Francis by visiting www.leahgunningfrancis.com. This is part one of a two-part episode. Part two will be released later this month. Look for the leader within. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Here is a video produced to introduce readers to Ferguson and Faith. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgcIJ3GvKss Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Leah Gunning Francis, Ferguson & Faith: Sparking Leadership and Awakening Community Leah Gunning Francis, Faith Following Ferguson: Five Years of Resilience and Wisdom John O'Donohue, Eternal Echoes: Celtic Reflections on Our Yearning to Belong White supremacy has disembodied the white body. — Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Episode 108: Silence, Ferguson, and Faith (Part One): A Conversation with Dr. Leah Gunning Francis (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Dr. Leah Gunning Francis Date Recorded: July 28, 2020 Featured photograph by Cassidy Hall.

    Sarah Lund: Silence and Mental Health in the Church (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2020 29:36

    The Reverend Doctor Sarah Griffith Lund is the author of Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church. She is an ordained minister and has served as pastor to churches in Brooklyn, NY, Minneapolis, MN, and New Smyrna Beach, FL. She holds degrees from Trinity University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Rutgers University, and McCormick Theological Seminary. This is part two of a two-part episode. To listen to part one, click here. She is on the leadership team for Bethany Ecumenical Fellows, a mentoring program for young clergy, and serves as the Vice Chair for the United Church of Christ Mental Health Network. Dr. Lund received the Dell Award for Mental Health Education at the 30th General Synod of the UCC. She currently serves as a Vice President for Advancement at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, IN. You can get to know her better by reading her blog at www.sarahgriffithlund.com. Our society and our church is ableist. We have a preference for people who are able-bodied. And so when we view candidates for ministry who have a physical disability, we are biased, and we automatically think that they are not able. — Sarah Griffith Lund. Here is a video produced to introduce readers to Blessed Are the Crazy. As a pastor I have started a monthly day of prayer where I go to a local retreat center and have a day of silence. I find that that's really crucial for my own sense of grounding and creating space to discern and to listen to the spirit. — Sarah Griffith Lund Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Sarah Griffith Lund, Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church Michel Foucault, Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason Nancy L. Eiesland, The Disabled God: Toward a Liberatory Theology of Disability Martin Luther King Jr., Strength to Love Richard Rohr, The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation Silence, in order for it to feel safe for a lot of us, needs to have a host — a person who holds that silence, and who is hosting our visit. — Sarah Griffith Lund Episode 107: Silence, Mental Health, and the Church: A Conversation with Sarah Griffith Lund (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Sarah Griffith Lund Date Recorded: April 14, 2020

    Sarah Lund: Silence and Mental Health in the Church (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2020 1776:00

    The Reverend Doctor Sarah Griffith Lund is the author of Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church. She is an ordained minister and has served as pastor to churches in Brooklyn, NY, Minneapolis, MN, and New Smyrna Beach, FL. She holds degrees from Trinity University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Rutgers University, and McCormick Theological Seminary. This is part two of a two-part episode. To listen to part one, click here. She is on the leadership team for Bethany Ecumenical Fellows, a mentoring program for young clergy, and serves as the Vice Chair for the United Church of Christ Mental Health Network. Dr. Lund received the Dell Award for Mental Health Education at the 30th General Synod of the UCC. She currently serves as a Vice President for Advancement at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, IN. You can get to know her better by reading her blog at www.sarahgriffithlund.com. Our society and our church is ableist. We have a preference for people who are able-bodied. And so when we view candidates for ministry who have a physical disability, we are biased, and we automatically think that they are not able. — Sarah Griffith Lund. Here is a video produced to introduce readers to Blessed Are the Crazy. As a pastor I have started a monthly day of prayer where I go to a local retreat center and have a day of silence. I find that that's really crucial for my own sense of grounding and creating space to discern and to listen to the spirit. — Sarah Griffith Lund Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Sarah Griffith Lund, Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church Michel Foucault, Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason Nancy L. Eiesland, The Disabled God: Toward a Liberatory Theology of Disability Martin Luther King Jr., Strength to Love Richard Rohr, The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation Silence, in order for it to feel safe for a lot of us, needs to have a host — a person who holds that silence, and who is hosting our visit. — Sarah Griffith Lund Episode 107: Silence, Mental Health, and the Church: A Conversation with Sarah Griffith Lund (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Sarah Griffith Lund Date Recorded: April 14, 2020

    Sarah Lund: Silence and Mental Illness in the Church (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 32:45

    The Reverend Doctor Sarah Griffith Lund is the author of Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church. She is an ordained minister and has served as pastor to churches in Brooklyn, NY, Minneapolis, MN, and New Smyrna Beach, FL. She holds degrees from Trinity University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Rutgers University, and McCormick Theological Seminary. She is on the leadership team for Bethany Ecumenical Fellows, a mentoring program for young clergy, and serves as the Vice Chair for the United Church of Christ Mental Health Network. Dr. Lund received the Dell Award for Mental Health Education at the 30th General Synod of the UCC. She currently serves as a Vice President for Advancement at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, IN. You can get to know her better by reading her blog at www.sarahgriffithlund.com. This is part one of a two-part episode. The conclusion to this interview will be released as our next episode. Here is a video produced to introduce readers to Blessed Are the Crazy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anAW2ZqsejE&app=desktop Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Sarah Griffith Lund, Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc: By Herself and Her Witnesses Julian of Norwich, The Showings of Julian of Norwich: A New Translation Alice Walker, In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens: Womanist Prose Toni Morrison, The Source of Self-Regard Ignatius of Loyola, Personal Writings Teresa of Ávila, The Book of My Life The Desert Fathers and Mothers, Early Christian Wisdom Sayings John Cassian, The Conferences Augustine of Hippo, Confessions Anna Carter Florence, Preaching as Testimony Episode 106: Silence, Mental Illness, and the Church: A Conversation with Sarah Griffith Lund (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Sarah Griffith Lund Date Recorded: April 14, 2020 Featured photo (frog) by Crystal McClernon on Unsplash.

    Sarah Lund: Silence and Mental Illness in the Church (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2020 1965:00

    The Reverend Doctor Sarah Griffith Lund is the author of Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church. She is an ordained minister and has served as pastor to churches in Brooklyn, NY, Minneapolis, MN, and New Smyrna Beach, FL. She holds degrees from Trinity University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Rutgers University, and McCormick Theological Seminary. She is on the leadership team for Bethany Ecumenical Fellows, a mentoring program for young clergy, and serves as the Vice Chair for the United Church of Christ Mental Health Network. Dr. Lund received the Dell Award for Mental Health Education at the 30th General Synod of the UCC. She currently serves as a Vice President for Advancement at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, IN. You can get to know her better by reading her blog at www.sarahgriffithlund.com. This is part one of a two-part episode. To hear part two, click here. Here is a video produced to introduce readers to Blessed Are the Crazy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anAW2ZqsejE&app=desktop Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Sarah Griffith Lund, Blessed Are the Crazy: Breaking the Silence about Mental Illness, Family and Church Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc: By Herself and Her Witnesses Julian of Norwich, The Showings of Julian of Norwich: A New Translation Alice Walker, In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens: Womanist Prose Toni Morrison, The Source of Self-Regard Ignatius of Loyola, Personal Writings Teresa of Ávila, The Book of My Life The Desert Fathers and Mothers, Early Christian Wisdom Sayings John Cassian, The Conferences Augustine of Hippo, Confessions Anna Carter Florence, Preaching as Testimony Episode 106: Silence, Mental Illness, and the Church: A Conversation with Sarah Griffith Lund (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Carl McColman and Kevin Johnson Guest: Sarah Griffith Lund Date Recorded: April 14, 2020 Featured photo (frog) by Crystal McClernon on Unsplash.

    Kaitlin Curtice: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 1887:00

    Kaitlin B. Curtice is a member of the Potawatomi Nation, as well as a Christian, public speaker, and poet. She is the author of Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God, which has been highly praised by Barbara Brown Taylor ("Kaitlin Curtice is one of the braver writers I know. She won't smooth any edges for you, and she won't let you change the subject, but she'll support you digging as deeply for your roots as she has for hers.") and Richard Rohr ("Curtice is a brave truth-teller and a prophetic voice we need to be listening to, and Native is a book that will guide us toward a better future"). Kaitlin is also the author of Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places. This is part two of a two part episode. To listen to part one, click here. She travels widely, speaking on matters of faith and justice within the church as it relates to indigenous peoples, and has been a featured speaker at conferences such as Why Christian, Evolving Faith, the Wild Goose, and the Festival of Faith and Writing. Kaitlin B. Curtice is a monthly columnist for Sojourners, has contributed to On Being and Religious News Service, and has been featured on CBS and in USA Today and the New Yorker for her work on having difficult conversations within the church about colonization. You can learn more about her and explore her blog at www.kaitlincurtice.com. You don't have to have children to believe in the next generation. We all should be caretakers of each other's children, no matter who we are. — Kaitlin B. Curtice Universally, as humans, we belong to the earth... as children, we are born with this longing to connect to the earth... we have to take ourselves  — Kaitlin B. Curtice Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Kaitlin B. Curtice, Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God Kaitlin B. Curtice, Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants Richard Twiss, One Church Many Tribes: Following Jesus the Way God Made You Peter Rollins, How (Not) to Speak of God Brian McLaren, A Generous Orthodoxy Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype Richard Wagamese, One Story, One Song Dara Molloy, The Globalization of God: Celtic Christianity's Nemesis Richard Rohr, What Do We Do With the Bible? St. Francis of Assisi, The Complete Francis of Assisi Mirabai Starr, Wild Mercy: Living the Fierce and Tender Wisdom of the Women Mystics Episode 105: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture: A Conversation with Kaitlin B. Curtice (Part Two) Hosted by: Carl McColman With: Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson Guest: Kaitlin B. Curtice Date Recorded: April 20, 2020 Featured photo by Srikanth Peetha on Unsplash.

    Kaitlin Curtice: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 31:27


    Kaitlin B. Curtice is a member of the Potawatomi Nation, as well as a Christian, public speaker, and poet. She is the author of Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God, which has been highly praised by Barbara Brown Taylor ("Kaitlin Curtice is one of the braver writers I know. She won't smooth any edges for you, and she won't let you change the subject, but she'll support you digging as deeply for your roots as she has for hers.") and Richard Rohr ("Curtice is a brave truth-teller and a prophetic voice we need to be listening to, and Native is a book that will guide us toward a better future"). Kaitlin is also the author of Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places. This is part two of a two part episode. To listen to part one, click here. She travels widely, speaking on matters of faith and justice within the church as it relates to indigenous peoples, and has been a featured speaker at conferences such as Why Christian, Evolving Faith, the Wild Goose, and the Festival of Faith and Writing. Kaitlin B. Curtice is a monthly columnist for Sojourners, has contributed to On Being and Religious News Service, and has been featured on CBS and in USA Today and the New Yorker for her work on having difficult conversations within the church about colonization. You can learn more about her and explore her blog at www.kaitlincurtice.com. You don't have to have children to believe in the next generation. We all should be caretakers of each other's children, no matter who we are. — Kaitlin B. Curtice Universally, as humans, we belong to the earth... as children, we are born with this longing to connect to the earth... we have to take ourselves  — Kaitlin B. Curtice Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Kaitlin B. Curtice, Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God Kaitlin B. Curtice, Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants Richard Twiss, One Church Many Tribes: Following Jesus the Way God Made You Peter Rollins, How (Not) to Speak of God Brian McLaren, A Generous Orthodoxy Clarissa Pinkola Estés, Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype Richard Wagamese, One Story, One Song Dara Molloy, The Globalization of God: Celtic Christianity's Nemesis Richard Rohr, What Do We Do With the Bible? St. Francis of Assisi, The Complete Francis of Assisi Mirabai Starr, Wild Mercy: Living the Fierce and Tender Wisdom of the Women Mystics Episode 105: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture: A Conversation with Kaitlin B. Curtice (Part Two) Hosted by: Carl McColman With: Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson Guest: Kaitlin B. Curtice Date Recorded: April 20, 2020 Featured photo by Srikanth Peetha on Unsplash.


    Kaitlin Curtice: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2020 1776:00


    Kaitlin B. Curtice is a member of the Potawatomi Nation, as well as a Christian, public speaker, and poet. She is the author of Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God, which has been highly praised by Barbara Brown Taylor ("Kaitlin Curtice is one of the braver writers I know. She won't smooth any edges for you, and she won't let you change the subject, but she'll support you digging as deeply for your roots as she has for hers.") and Richard Rohr ("Curtice is a brave truth-teller and a prophetic voice we need to be listening to, and Native is a book that will guide us toward a better future"). Kaitlin is also the author of Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places. This is part one of a two part episode. Part Two will be released on June 22, 2020. She travels widely, speaking on matters of faith and justice within the church as it relates to indigenous peoples, and has been a featured speaker at conferences such as Why Christian, Evolving Faith, the Wild Goose, and the Festival of Faith and Writing. Kaitlin B. Curtice is a monthly columnist for Sojourners, has contributed to On Being and Religious News Service, and has been featured on CBS and in USA Today and the New Yorker for her work on having difficult conversations within the church about colonization. You can learn more about her and explore her blog at www.kaitlincurtice.com. If my identity as an indigenous person matters, whatever my spirituality is... it has to be tied to breaking apart systems of colonization if I'm going to be a person that is made to love others. — Kaitlin B. Curtice Being outside... isn't perfect silence, but it's silence with the sounds of what nature offers us, and I think that is a kind of silence, because it quiets us, and it allows us to hear something other than ourselves... that's the deep well that I draw from. — Kaitlin B. Curtice Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Kaitlin B. Curtice, Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God Kaitlin B. Curtice, Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places. Richard Rohr, What Do We Do With the Bible? Gregory Alan Isakov, This Empty Northern Hemisphere Kerry Connelly, Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice Episode 104: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture: A Conversation with Kaitlin B. Curtice (Part One) Hosted by: Carl McColman With: Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson Guest: Kaitlin B. Curtice Date Recorded: April 20, 2020 Featured photo by Karim Sakhibgareev on Unsplash.


    Kaitlin Curtice: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2020 29:36


    Kaitlin B. Curtice is a member of the Potawatomi Nation, as well as a Christian, public speaker, and poet. She is the author of Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God, which has been highly praised by Barbara Brown Taylor ("Kaitlin Curtice is one of the braver writers I know. She won't smooth any edges for you, and she won't let you change the subject, but she'll support you digging as deeply for your roots as she has for hers.") and Richard Rohr ("Curtice is a brave truth-teller and a prophetic voice we need to be listening to, and Native is a book that will guide us toward a better future"). Kaitlin is also the author of Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places. She travels widely, speaking on matters of faith and justice within the church as it relates to indigenous peoples, and has been a featured speaker at conferences such as Why Christian, Evolving Faith, the Wild Goose, and the Festival of Faith and Writing. Kaitlin B. Curtice is a monthly columnist for Sojourners, has contributed to On Being and Religious News Service, and has been featured on CBS and in USA Today and the New Yorker for her work on having difficult conversations within the church about colonization. You can learn more about her and explore her blog at www.kaitlincurtice.com. If my identity as an indigenous person matters, whatever my spirituality is... it has to be tied to breaking apart systems of colonization if I'm going to be a person that is made to love others. — Kaitlin B. Curtice Being outside... isn't perfect silence, but it's silence with the sounds of what nature offers us, and I think that is a kind of silence, because it quiets us, and it allows us to hear something other than ourselves... that's the deep well that I draw from. — Kaitlin B. Curtice Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Kaitlin B. Curtice, Native: Identity, Belonging, and Rediscovering God Kaitlin B. Curtice, Glory Happening: Finding the Divine in Everyday Places. Richard Rohr, What Do We Do With the Bible? Gregory Alan Isakov, This Empty Northern Hemisphere Kerry Connelly, Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice Episode 104: Silence, Faith, and Indigenous Culture: A Conversation with Kaitlin B. Curtice Hosted by: Carl McColman With: Cassidy Hall and Kevin Johnson Guest: Kaitlin B. Curtice Date Recorded: April 20, 2020 Featured photo by Karim Sakhibgareev on Unsplash.


    Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD: Silence, the Disinherited, and the Wisdom of Howard Thurman for Our Time

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 74:12


    One of the first guests on this podcast was Dr. Lerita Coleman Brown, who joined us on our episode #9 in 2018. Today we are delighted to welcome her back to the podcast. You can hear Professor Brown's previous conversation with us here. Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD is the author of When the Heart Speaks, Listen: Discovering Inner Wisdom, detailing her remarkable spiritual journey as a heart transplant recipient. She has also contributed essays to books including Embodied Spirits: Stories of Spiritual Directors of Color, Living Into God’s Dream: Dismantling Racism in America, and Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice. Professor Brown is the Ayse I. Carden Distinguished Professor Emerita of Psychology at Agnes Scott College. She has survived over 25 years with her transplanted heart, and 14 years with a transplanted kidney as well. She has also endured a heart valve replacement and a pacemaker implant. In addition to her work as a psychologist and educator, she is a spiritual director and retreat leader who often shares her love for the contemplative wisdom of the renowned African-American mystic, Howard Thurman. You can learn more about her online at www.peaceforhearts.com. Our answers are in the silence. — Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD Given the extraordinary moment that we find ourselves in, and especially our commitment here at the podcast not only to celebrate the gift of silence (and to dismantle all forms of toxic silence, including racism), it seemed natural to invite Lerita back — not only for her insight into the towering contemplative genius of Thurman, but also for her own perceptive words of wisdom about how we can spiritually navigate the urgency for fighting racism and other forms of injustice in our time. One of the problems with white and black is that they're totally constructed sociopolitical identities... disinherited people have no protection from the state. — Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD Dr. Lerita Coleman Brown with 2/3 of Encountering Silence. Left: with Cassidy at the Wild Goose Festival, 2019. Right: with Carl, 2018. (photos by Cassidy Hall and Fran McColman) You've got to be able to center down and feel that sense of renewal from the Spirit, and I think it's really important to learn to listen... We're all called to do something to help restore God's beloved creation... Every single person has a role to play. What is your role in this? — Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Lerita Coleman Brown, When the Heart Speaks, Listen: Discovering Inner Wisdom Sherry Bryant-Johnson (ed.), Embodied Spirits: Stories of Spiritual Directors of Color Cathering Meeks (ed.), Living Into God’s Dream: Dismantling Racism in America Therese Taylor-Stinson (ed.), Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice Howard Thurman, Essential Writings Howard Thurman, Jesus and the Disinherited Howard Thurman, The Living Wisdom of Howard Thurman: A Visionary for Our Time (audio recordings of sermons on a 6-CD set) Howard Thurman, Meditations of the Heart Howard Thurman, The Centering Moment Howard Thurman, Disciplines of the Spirit Howard Thurman, Footprints of a Dream Howard Thurman, The Luminous Darkness Howard Thurman, The Creative Encounter Howard Thurman, Deep is the Hunger Howard Thurman, The Papers of Howard Washington Thurman Volume One Volume Two Volume Three Volume Four Volume Five Howard Thurman, The Inward Journey Howard Thurman, A Strange Freedom Howard Thurman, With Head and Heart: The Autobiography of Howard Thurman


    Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD: Silence, the Disinherited, and the Wisdom of Howard Thurman for Our Time

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 74:12


    One of the first guests on this podcast was Dr. Lerita Coleman Brown, who joined us on our episode #9 in 2018. Today we are delighted to welcome her back to the podcast. You can hear Professor Brown's previous conversation with us here. Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD is the author of When the Heart Speaks, Listen: Discovering Inner Wisdom, detailing her remarkable spiritual journey as a heart transplant recipient. She has also contributed essays to books including Embodied Spirits: Stories of Spiritual Directors of Color, Living Into God’s Dream: Dismantling Racism in America, and Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice. Professor Brown is the Ayse I. Carden Distinguished Professor Emerita of Psychology at Agnes Scott College. She has survived over 25 years with her transplanted heart, and 14 years with a transplanted kidney as well. She has also endured a heart valve replacement and a pacemaker implant. In addition to her work as a psychologist and educator, she is a spiritual director and retreat leader who often shares her love for the contemplative wisdom of the renowned African-American mystic, Howard Thurman. You can learn more about her online at www.peaceforhearts.com. Our answers are in the silence. — Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD Given the extraordinary moment that we find ourselves in, and especially our commitment here at the podcast not only to celebrate the gift of silence (and to dismantle all forms of toxic silence, including racism), it seemed natural to invite Lerita back — not only for her insight into the towering contemplative genius of Thurman, but also for her own perceptive words of wisdom about how we can spiritually navigate the urgency for fighting racism and other forms of injustice in our time. One of the problems with white and black is that they're totally constructed sociopolitical identities... disinherited people have no protection from the state. — Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD Dr. Lerita Coleman Brown with 2/3 of Encountering Silence. Left: with Cassidy at the Wild Goose Festival, 2019. Right: with Carl, 2018. (photos by Cassidy Hall and Fran McColman) You've got to be able to center down and feel that sense of renewal from the Spirit, and I think it's really important to learn to listen... We're all called to do something to help restore God's beloved creation... Every single person has a role to play. What is your role in this? — Lerita Coleman Brown, PhD Some of the resources and authors we mention in this episode: Lerita Coleman Brown, When the Heart Speaks, Listen: Discovering Inner Wisdom Sherry Bryant-Johnson (ed.), Embodied Spirits: Stories of Spiritual Directors of Color Cathering Meeks (ed.), Living Into God’s Dream: Dismantling Racism in America Therese Taylor-Stinson (ed.), Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice Howard Thurman, Essential Writings Howard Thurman, Jesus and the Disinherited Howard Thurman, The Living Wisdom of Howard Thurman: A Visionary for Our Time (audio recordings of sermons on a 6-CD set) Howard Thurman, Meditations of the Heart Howard Thurman, The Centering Moment Howard Thurman, Disciplines of the Spirit Howard Thurman, Footprints of a Dream Howard Thurman, The Luminous Darkness Howard Thurman, The Creative Encounter Howard Thurman, Deep is the Hunger Howard Thurman, The Papers of Howard Washington Thurman Volume One Volume Two Volume Three Volume Four Volume Five Howard Thurman, The Inward Journey Howard Thurman, A Strange Freedom Howard Thurman, With Head and Heart: The Autobiography of Howard Thurman Martin Doblmeier (director), Backs Against the Wall: The Howard Thurman Story (DVD) Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation Billy Graham, Angels Gustavo Gutierrez, A Theology of Liberation James Cone, The Cross and the Lynching Tree Luther Smith, Jr.,


    Kerry Connelly: Silence, Privilege, and Dismantling Racism (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 1749:12


    This episode continues our conversation with blogger/activist Kerry Connelly. As in part one of this interview, we explore one of the most pervasive forms of toxic silence in our culture: the silence embedded in white privilege and systemic racism. Kerry Connelly is a writer, certified life coach, creator of the no-nonsense blog Jerseygirl, JESUS, and host of the "White on White" podcast, which reimagines white identity apart from the dead end of pseudo-supremacy. This is part two of a two-part episode. To listen to part one, click here. Her latest book is Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice. Kerry Connelly is currently pursuing a Master of Divinity at Christian Theological Seminary (where she first met Cassidy Hall). She lives in New Jersey with her family. I have to always be aware, practice awareness of who's in the room, what's happening, and what might be my call as a white anti-racist in that particular context, and it's not always going to be the same, there's not one answer. — Kerry Connelly Dr. Robyn Henderson-Espinoza (who has also been a guest on this podcast) praised Good White Racist? by saying, “The work that needs to be done is white-on-white race talk. By that I mean, white folks talking to white folks about the ways white supremacy is internalized and therefore shows up in their social practice. Kerry endeavors to do just this, and I think we all should invest our time in this book!” I don't recommend getting involved with Jesus if you don't want to be radically challenged... I can't be in relationship with Jesus and then be permitted to go about propping up the status quo. — Kerry Connelly Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Kerry Connelly, Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice Therese Taylor-Stinson (ed.), Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice The Buddha, Teachings of the Buddha edited by Jack Kornfield The Desert Mothers and Fathers, Early Christian Wisdom Sayings Ruby Sales, The Inner Life of Social Change Simone Weil, Gravity and Grace George Stephanopoulos, All Too Human: A Political Education The Matrix Kenneth Leech, Soul Friend: Spiritual Direction in the Modern World Kenneth Leech, True Prayer: An Invitation to Christian Spirituality Kenneth Leech, Experiencing God: Theology as Spirituality Jennifer Worth, The Complete Call the Midwife Stories Find Kerry Connelly at www.kerryconnelly.com. I wonder what it must have been like, to have been Jesus, and be embodied in the way Jesus was embodied, and then experience that kind of silence in the desert... to be in that place, and to think about silence in that context, is a little mind-blowing. — Kerry Connelly Episode 102: Silence, Privilege, and Dismantling Racism: A Conversation with Kerry Connelly (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Kevin Johnson, Carl McColman Guest: Kerry Connelly Date Recorded: April 13, 2020 Featured image photo by Cassidy Hall.


    Kerry Connelly: Silence, Privilege, and Dismantling Racism (Part Two)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 29:09


    This episode continues our conversation with blogger/activist Kerry Connelly. As in part one of this interview, we explore one of the most pervasive forms of toxic silence in our culture: the silence embedded in white privilege and systemic racism. Kerry Connelly is a writer, certified life coach, creator of the no-nonsense blog Jerseygirl, JESUS, and host of the "White on White" podcast, which reimagines white identity apart from the dead end of pseudo-supremacy. This is part two of a two-part episode. To listen to part one, click here. Her latest book is Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice. Kerry Connelly is currently pursuing a Master of Divinity at Christian Theological Seminary (where she first met Cassidy Hall). She lives in New Jersey with her family. I have to always be aware, practice awareness of who's in the room, what's happening, and what might be my call as a white anti-racist in that particular context, and it's not always going to be the same, there's not one answer. — Kerry Connelly Dr. Robyn Henderson-Espinoza (who has also been a guest on this podcast) praised Good White Racist? by saying, “The work that needs to be done is white-on-white race talk. By that I mean, white folks talking to white folks about the ways white supremacy is internalized and therefore shows up in their social practice. Kerry endeavors to do just this, and I think we all should invest our time in this book!” I don't recommend getting involved with Jesus if you don't want to be radically challenged... I can't be in relationship with Jesus and then be permitted to go about propping up the status quo. — Kerry Connelly Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Kerry Connelly, Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice Therese Taylor-Stinson (ed.), Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice The Buddha, Teachings of the Buddha edited by Jack Kornfield The Desert Mothers and Fathers, Early Christian Wisdom Sayings Ruby Sales, The Inner Life of Social Change Simone Weil, Gravity and Grace George Stephanopoulos, All Too Human: A Political Education The Matrix Kenneth Leech, Soul Friend: Spiritual Direction in the Modern World Kenneth Leech, True Prayer: An Invitation to Christian Spirituality Kenneth Leech, Experiencing God: Theology as Spirituality Jennifer Worth, The Complete Call the Midwife Stories Find Kerry Connelly at www.kerryconnelly.com. I wonder what it must have been like, to have been Jesus, and be embodied in the way Jesus was embodied, and then experience that kind of silence in the desert... to be in that place, and to think about silence in that context, is a little mind-blowing. — Kerry Connelly Episode 102: Silence, Privilege, and Dismantling Racism: A Conversation with Kerry Connelly (Part Two) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Kevin Johnson, Carl McColman Guest: Kerry Connelly Date Recorded: April 13, 2020 Featured image photo by Cassidy Hall.


    Kerry Connelly: Silence, Privilege, and Dismantling Racism (Part One)

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2020 1868:12


    On this podcast we often explore the toxic side of silence. In this episode we explore one of the most pervasive forms of toxic silence in our culture: the silence embedded in white privilege and systemic racism. Guiding us in this exploration is author Kerry Connelly. Kerry Connelly is a writer, certified life coach, creator of the no-nonsense blog Jerseygirl, JESUS, and host of the "White on White" podcast, which reimagines white identity apart from the dead end of pseudo-supremacy. Her latest book is Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice. Kerry Connelly is currently pursuing a Master of Divinity at Christian Theological Seminary (where she first met Cassidy Hall). She lives in New Jersey with her family. I am much more of an actor, a doer, a go out and push — and that's something that I have to work to heal a little bit in myself, through silence. — Kerry Connelly Dr. Robyn Henderson-Espinoza (who has also been a guest on this podcast) praised Good White Racist? by saying, “The work that needs to be done is white-on-white race talk. By that I mean, white folks talking to white folks about the ways white supremacy is internalized and therefore shows up in their social practice. Kerry endeavors to do just this, and I think we all should invest our time in this book!” This is part one of a two-part episode. Click here to listen to part two. A systemic example of white silence is, for example, the way that we as a society will gaslight people of color who are trying to call out racism, and the Take a Knee movement is a great example of that. The Take a Knee movement is a perfect example of people of color attempting to peacefully bring attention to a very specific result of systemic racism in our country, which is police brutality, and white people will talk about everything but the issue at hand — we will talk about the flag, we will talk about our soldiers, we will talk about national pride, we will talk about patriotism... but we refuse, we insist upon remaining silent about discussing the actual problem. — Kerry Connelly Some of the resources and authors mentioned in this episode: Kerry Connelly, Good White Racist? Confronting Your Role in Racial Injustice Therese Taylor-Stinson (ed.), Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around — Stories of Contemplation and Justice The Buddha, Teachings of the Buddha edited by Jack Kornfield The Desert Mothers and Fathers, Early Christian Wisdom Sayings Ruby Sales, The Inner Life of Social Change Simone Weil, Gravity and Grace For white people to find our meaning, and to find our essence of being apart from this construct of pseudo-supremacy, that's the real work that white people have to do. Because until we can do that, we're never going to be truly willing to dismantle racist systems. — Kerry Connelly Episode 101: Silence, Privilege, and Dismantling Racism (Part One): A Conversation with Kerry Connelly (Part One) Hosted by: Cassidy Hall With: Kevin Johnson, Carl McColman Guest: Kerry Connelly Date Recorded: April 13, 2020 Featured photo: George Washington Bridge, photo by James Ting on Unsplash.


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