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Best podcasts about Fierce

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Latest podcast episodes about Fierce

Pushing The Limits
Understanding How Pain Works and Exploring Options for Chronic Pain Treatment with Dr Kal Fried

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 57:07


‘Learn to live with your pain.' How many times have you heard this statement? For people with chronic pain, this is common but unhelpful advice. Pain is more than just mechanical damage. Context and the expectations you have around it play a significant role in how you experience pain. Remember, it's possible to recover from pain. But you must be aware of the proper chronic pain treatment. Pain expert Dr Kal Fried joins us in this episode to discuss how pain is more complicated than we think. If we want to recover from pain, we must first understand how it works. He also shares the role of medication and lifestyle changes and how chronic pain treatments work differently for each person. What's important is to become active and involved in your recovery process. If you want to learn more about chronic pain treatment and how to break free from chronic pain, this episode is for you.  Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Learn how pain works and why it's more complicated than just a mechanical function of your body.  Understand how we can deal with and recover from pain through lifestyle changes and other chronic pain treatments.  Discover the importance of taking charge of your healing and recovery.  Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  A new programme, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September to Peak Wellness! Pain Revolution  Programmes that came out from Pain Revolution: Brain Changer | Permission to Move  Exsurgo  Explain Pain by David Butler and Lorimer Moseley Connect with Dr Kal: Website | The Rehabilitation Medicine Group | Phone: +613 9555 7769 | Fax: +613 8738 1504 | Email     Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/. Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching. Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, contact us at support@lisatamati.com. Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books. Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection. Episode Highlights [04:10] Dr Kal's Career Dr Kal is trained as a sports and exercise physician. He oversees the medical needs of athletes and regular people.  Through his work and experience, he observed that the severity of injuries could not predict the outcome. There were cases of minor injuries leading to terrible outcomes and vice versa.  These experiences led him to learn more about the science of pain and work with the organisation Pain Revolution.   [06:52] Why Pain is Complicated We're taught that pain is mechanical. But, bodies do not produce pain, per se.  The body only produces electrical signals that our sensory nerves pick up.  Your pain response is dependent on how much danger your brain thinks you're in.  Injuries are not always proportionate to pain. Pain has physical, contextual and sociological contributing factors.  Listen to the full episode to hear two stories about people who ignored — and created! — pain based on their circumstances! [13:42] How Pain Works  Pain is more complicated than we think. Thresholds don't explain pain completely either.  Your context plays a significant role in how you perceive and experience pain. There are other factors that contribute to you experiencing more pain, such as stress, living through a pandemic, your beliefs and expectations.   [14:52] Responding to Pain Lisa shares how there are various kinds of pain in her life. These include the changes women undergo at different times in their cycles.  Learn to accept that there is a lot involved with pain. Understanding and acceptance will help you change your pain response. Pain can become a habit. Injuries create a direct channel to the brain, which can remain even after someone's body heals. This is called sensitisation. While there are medications designed to stop this direct channel, the best method is to develop habits for desensitising this pain pathway.   [21:09] The Role of Distractions and Neurotransmitters  We often experience higher levels of pain at night because nothing distracts us from the pain. This then leads to sleep deprivation and fatigue, creating a cycle of pain.  People naturally develop intuitive strategies like distracting themselves from pain.  You can transform your pain experience by manipulating your neurotransmitters through a re-adaptive program.  Through this process, you change people's thoughts and actions.  [23:51] Medication is Not Always the Answer for Chronic Pain Treatment The brain naturally contains morphine-like chemicals.   Pain medication doesn't work for everyone. Some people are pain-sensitive and medication-resistant.  Too much medication can also lead to addiction and negatively impact your health.  [28:50] The Hardships of People with Chronic Pain People find it easier to empathise with those whose sicknesses are visible.  People with chronic pain often end up in a vicious cycle of social breakdown because there's little understanding and compassion for the condition.  Not only that, pain makes people more irritable.  [31:06] Options for Chronic Pain Treatment Meditation as a chronic pain treatment is slowly becoming more mainstream in the medical profession.  One method will not work for everyone as people relate to different things. It's vital to build an individualised program for chronic pain treatment or management.  Remember that pain is not harmful. It's just a protective mechanism.  It's common to hear that we need to learn to live with the pain, but this may not be effective for everyone.  Tune in to the full episode to hear Dr Kal talk about his work with Pain Revolution and the graded exposure program.  [34:56] Find What Works for You  It's difficult for doctors to understand your situation and condition fully. It would be best for you to take charge of your health by doing your research.  Question treatments and methods. Don't blindly accept answers.  However, when you start to read online resources, you also need to be wary of false information.  Be careful how you interpret science and research.   [44:01] Seeking Science-Backed Treatments Your health is an interconnected system. Pain can be a signal for many things.  Become more involved in your health; start with lifestyle changes.  Be careful with placebo treatments. There are cases where sugar pills seem to work because the brain believes that they will.  Placebo treatments' effectiveness will wane eventually and lead people to seek more aggressive types of interventions.    What's most important is understanding what methods work, their benefits and safety concerns before applying anything. [47:24] The Pain Revolution Approach Learn how pain works. There are a lot of reliable resources available that you can consult.  Pain Revolution has an annual outreach cycling tour. They also have a two-year course for local pain educators. Dr Kal hopes for the community to grow and focus on non-interventional techniques for chronic pain treatment. Know that you can adapt to pain. There is a way to recover.     7 Powerful Quotes ‘I like to think of pain in terms of not causes but contributors. The physical side is important… but it's only one contribution of many.' ‘By just getting people to conceptualise their pain properly, we can make a difference.' ‘The best model exists for understanding pain is that anytime we feel pain, or for that matter, all the sensations we feel, which are essentially produced by our brain, there are a lot of things going on at the same time.' ‘When pain persists, it takes a lot less contribution from the physical component to produce the same pain. Sometimes, no contribution at all and people remain in pain.' ‘I think the key thing is to try and avoid being too passive in your own health because reliance on external fixes can be a problem. A lot can be achieved by lifestyle changes.' ‘The people who do well in things like pain or recovery from injuries are often the people who have elected not to listen to the things they have been told.'  ‘If you've got a problem, you just need to create that adaptation pathway for yourself, which doesn't just involve the injury.' About Dr Kal Dr Kal Fried is a proud member and Medical Director of Pain Revolution. Before being recruited, he was involved in the group's first Rural Outreach Tour in 2017. Dr Kal is an independent medico-legal examiner who has consulted with the Transport Accident Commission and WorkSafe as a medical advisor. He was admitted as a Fellow of the Australian College of Sports and Exercise Physicians in 1995. Ever since then, he's helped sporting teams at all levels and across disciplines.  From his experience, Dr Kal observed how the context of pain consistently predicted clinical outcomes. He often shares his findings and observations on pain science and chronic pain treatment on his website. He is also part of the Rehabilitation Medicine Group focused on creating re-adaptive programs for people in pain.  Interested to learn more about Dr Kal's work? Check out his website. You can also reach him on The Rehabilitation Medicine Group through phone (+613 9555 7769), fax (+613 8738 1504), and email.        Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can learn more about pain and chronic pain treatment.  Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa The information contained in this show is not medical advice it is for educational purposes only and the opinions of guests are not the views of the show. Please seed your own medical advice from a registered medical professional

Make It Reign with Josh Smith
Ep 32: Drag Race Finalist Krystal Versace

Make It Reign with Josh Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 29:40


Don't say I don't treat you to an audience with real life queens on this podcast because this week I have dropped three special episodes of Reign with the finalists of Ru Paul's Drag Race UK 2021! And for our final special episode we are joined by the fashion queen with the name to match, Krystal Versace! Krystal started doing drag at just 17 years-old, and now at still only 19, she finds herself as a finalist in Ru Paul's Drag Race UK. And what a series it's been for Krystal after multiple Ru Peter Badge wins and looks to make Naomi Campbell quake on the runway! In this episode Krystal opens up about the reverse ageism she has faced for being a queen at 19 and how the bullies who tormented her at school have ultimately empowered her to be the fierce queen who stands before us today. As someone who was bullied at school for my sexuality, so much of what Krystal said really stuck with me so if you are being bullied or have experienced bullying in your past I hope this episode helps you feel less alone, too. I really hope you continue to listen and find the power to Reign in your own lives, too. If you love this episode get in touch (follow me across social media @joshsmithhosts), I love hearing from you. Love, Josh xxx P.S Make sure you tune into the final of Ru Paul's Drag Race this Thursday. May the best drag queen win! P.P.S Make sure you sashay to my Instagram page @joshsmithhosts to see the FIERCE look Krystal served while we recorded this episode.

The Flaws of Friendship
60. A Throne Room Thanksgiving

The Flaws of Friendship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 51:31


This isn't your typical Thanksgiving podcast, and we are over-flowingly grateful for that. We've just returned from the Fierce Women's Conference at Convergence Point Apostolic Hub in Independence, MO, where a banquet was set for us to feast around the table of the Lord. We laughed deeply, cried irreverently, worshiped with all we had, and made new connections with women who are giving their all in pursuit of Jesus. To say we are changed is an understatement. We are transformed. To Pastor Shelley Lowery, our dear friend Cathy Tully, and all of our Fierce new sisters, this one's for you. We now know: The Feast is different when you eat with Warriors. Thank you for your fierce passion and unwavering devotion. We have tasted and seen and will remain in pursuit of the One who came to us this weekend. "He came. We knew that He would come." May your Thanksgiving be different this year as one seated in the Presence of the One who prepares the table. Feast well, sisters. "The anointing of your presence satisfies me like nothing else. You are such a rich banquet of pleasure to my soul." Psalm 63:5 (TPT) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theflawsoffriendship/support

FriendsLikeUs
Democrats Message In A Bottle

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 86:59


Christina Greer, Abbi Crutchfield, and Zainab Johnson visit Friends and discuss democrats message issue, New York's new Mayor and more with host Marina Franklin Abbi Crutchfield is the host of Up Early Tonight on Hulu and co-host of the podcast “Flameout” on Spotify. She's been on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee on TBS, Broad City on Comedy Central, and she hosted You Can Do Better on TruTV. Her jokes on Twitter are consistently featured on best-of lists by publications such as Paste Magazine and The Huffington Post, who named her one of the 18 comedians you must follow on Twitter. She has trained at the renowned Upright Citizen's Brigade Theatre, taught at the People's Improv Theater, and she tours nationally with her stand-up. Christina M. Greer, PhD is an Associate Professor of Political Science and American Studies at Fordham University (Lincoln Center Campus). She was the 2018 Fellow for the McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research at New York University Silver School of Social Work, and co-host of the "What's in it for Us" podcast. Her primary research and teaching interests are racial and ethnic politics, American urban centers, presidential politics, and campaigns and elections. Her additional research interests also include transportation, mayors and public policy in urban centers. Her previous work has compared criminal activity and political responses in Boston and Baltimore as well as Baltimore and St. Louis. Prof. Greer's book Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013 ) investigates the increasingly ethnically diverse black populations in the US from Africa and the Caribbean and was the recipient of the WEB du Bois Best Book Award in 2014 given by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. Professor Greer is currently working on a manuscript detailing the political contributions of Barbara Jordan, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Stacey Abrams. She recently co-edited Black Politics in Transition, which explores gentrification, suburbanization, and immigration of Blacks in America. She is a member of the board of The Tenement Museum in NYC, the Center for Community Change, and serves on the Advisory Board at Tufts University.  She is also an ardent supporter of FIERCE in NYC and Project South in Atlanta, GA, and a former board member of BAJI (Black Alliance for Just Immigration), the Riders Alliance of New York, and the Human Services Council.She is a frequent political commentator on several media outlets, primarily MSNBC, WNYC, and NY1, and is often quoted in media outlets such as the NYTimes, Wall Street Journal, and the AP. She is the co-host of the New York centered podcast FAQ-NYC and co-host of the Black centered podcast What's In It For Us podcast, is the politics editor at thegrio.com, is the producer and host of The Aftermath and The Contender on Ozy.com as well as their editor-at-large, is a frequent author and narrator for the TedEd educational series, and also writes a weekly column for The Amsterdam News, one of the oldest black newspapers in the U.S.Greer received her B. A. from Tufts University and her M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University.  Zainab Johnson, a stand-up comedian, actress, and writer is quickly being propelled as one of the most unique and engaging performers on stage and screen. In 2019, Zainab was named one of Variety's Top 10 Comics To Watch. Recently, she was one of the hosts for Netflix's new show "100 Humans". You can also catch her as Aleesha on the new comedy series "Upload" on Amazon Prime. Zainab made her first late night stand up appearance on NBC's Late Night with Seth Meyers, and has also had appearances on HBO's All Def Comedy (2017), NBC's Last Comic Standing (2014), Arsenio (2014), BET's Comic View (2014), AXSTV's Gotham Comedy Live! She also just recently starred in a new web series titled Avant-Guardians. Zainab is a regular at the Improv Comedy Club in LA and the Comedy Cellar in NY, and has performed in the Montreal Just For Laughs Festival as one of the 2014 New Faces of Comedy and returned numerous times since. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf.

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The human wreckage of Waukesha is still piling up. The dead, the injured, many of whom will carry those scars for the rest of their lives

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Pipelines will be Blown Up—says an environmental radical—who says the Green New Deal is not negotiable—and if we don't accept their demands—they will make us pay—   TWO— An American Hero is defining herself on the national stage—but her star began to shine long ago and far away— There is a reason—legal immigration is such a blessing to our nation—   THREE— The human wreckage of Waukesha—is still piling up—the dead—the injured—many of whom will carry those scars for the rest of their lives—   You see not far from where I grew up—a man—a janitor blew up a schoolhouse—it happened way back in 1927 in Bath Michigan—scores of kids and teachers were killed—so was the killer—Andrew Kehoe—he was mad about the amount of taxes he was paying on his farm—so he decided to blow up the school—   38 kids and 6 adults were slaughtered that day when the building exploded—on the 18th of May—   But it was the survivors that were the reminders of that tragedy for decades to come—some with one eye—a permanent limp—a scar you could see—those things are always there—   This attack in Waukesha will leave permanent scars too—both physical and emotional—and for many it will never heal—how could it—   For the State of Wisconsin and Milwaukee County—the questions of how Darrell Brooks was even allowed to walk the streets will also echo through the years to come—who thought letting a violent felon walk the streets was ok?   Well let me tell you—it's the Socialist Democrats pushing these ideas—and trashing police and law enforcement—  

Cafe Mocha Radio
Rockin' in the Kitchen: A Fierce Holiday Competition

Cafe Mocha Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 40:26


Rockin' in the Kitchen: A Fierce Holiday Competition Tis' the season and Kym Whitley's got a holiday special on OWN TV. She joins Cafe Mocha to talk about her new cooking competition show, life with her son during the pandemic lockdown and her podcast with fellow comedy sister Sherri Shepherd. #OWNForTheHolidays #TwoFunnyMamas #CafeMochaRadio #MochaPodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The Covid Wars are heating up in the streets of Europe and Australia as citizens revolt against government mandates and lockdowns

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— A former Professor—and radical environmentalist—is charged with setting numerous California forest fires—think about that—A Green New Deal Radical—torching the forests—   TWO— An American Hero is born—but not in America—no her star began to shine long ago and far away—but there is a reason—legal immigration is such a blessing to our nation—   THREE— The Covid Wars are heating up in the streets of Europe and Australia—as citizens revolt against government mandates and lockdowns—   In the United States—More people have now died from Covid in 2021 than all of last year—  So under the Biden Administration— more people have succumbed to the black plague of the 21st century than did under the tenure of the previous President Donald Trump—and his administration—   The confusion now is this—why are we taking the vaccines— at all—if they are not stopping the spread—if they are not stopping people from getting sick—including those that are said to be fully vaccinated—   But stop right there—because what does fully vaccinated mean—and what will it mean in the near future?   Well as I have been warning for several weeks now—fully vaccinated will only mean whatever the government tells you it means—and it will not mean 2 shots—or 3 or 100—if they say you are not in compliance—then you are not—   I for one am hoping Merck has cracked the code by developing the new pill—based on the advances made in anti-viral medicines in the battle against Aids—   It seems I am certainly more willing to bet on a new horse—and not the pill being offered up by Pfizer—it could prove to be effective as well—but right now with vaccines appearing suspect to millions of us—I am not sure I can extend the benefit of the doubt—   Let's start with Anthony Fauci—the biggest media whore of all when it comes to the pandemic—he is now moving the goalposts again— and making the Sunday TV rounds—hitting pretty much every single network—to say we need boosters—maybe every 6 months—  

100 Things we learned from film
Episode 55 - BASEketball

100 Things we learned from film

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 147:02


This week YOUR SISTER'S GOING OUT... WITH DEAN! We are talking 1998's Trey Parker and Matt Stone's comedy Sports film BASEketball. The boys are learning what happened the the Oakland Raiders, Reel Big Fish's back catalogue and Dean treats the boys to a mini game of 'Are You A Dead'. Dean is the host of That Fking show: Part Gameshow, part chat show, all entertaining...that sounds like a decent elevator pitch. ThatFkingShow is another podcast looking to get some of that Spotify money. Join hosts former man-baby and recovering sh*tlord Boo Lemont, Art goth Nik Nak munching creeper magnet Yorkshire lass Abbie Stabby, and Fierce female pro-wrestling Amazon warrior queen Ayesha Raymond, as they talk about life, love and well... pretty much whatever task master producer ThatFKingGuy has made a trivia quiz about that week. Play along while listening to them compete in games such as "Are you a Dead?", "La La Land" and "Tuckers Luck" The only podcast gameshow dedicated to Chris Tucker. --- BASEketball is a 1998 American sports comedy film co-written and directed by David Zucker and starring South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, along with Yasmine Bleeth, Jenny McCarthy, Robert Vaughn, Ernest Borgnine, and Dian Bachar. The film follows the history of the sport of the same name (created by Zucker years earlier), from its invention by the lead characters as a game they could win against more athletic types, to its development as a nationwide league sport and a target of corporate sponsorship. This is the only work involving Parker and Stone that was neither written, directed, nor produced by them, although Zucker himself has stated that Parker and Stone contributed innumerable suggestions for the film, most of which were used.  --- Join us on the Socials: Twitter Instagram Facebook Support the show (Buy me a Coffee)  --- Transcription I guys an Nesho we're looking at an horn, machos fawn bog named McCarthy bleef stone in Park, Lookin N N N T it years, basketball, hello, everyone and welcome to this week's episode of one hundred things. We learned from film I'm one of your hosts and I'm a little bitch and I'm the other horse and I'm a beggar batch the bites back. I markes jump John. How are you I'm all right, ready, I'm, okay and I'm off for a week this week, so I'm just planning on drinking lots of bus. That's pretty much gonna be my way playing dead space and watching the Yujun bond that nats my plans. Okay! Well, you live in the life of Riley Leven Leven, the dream living the reader want to got a lover Pol, but I don't think on me got to be honest. Who knows you know you can always call in for a cup of low low sugar, I and brew on your way back exactly some o MIS and rules and sources for that. We that we, a greasy spin beside this he's, got very Carmilhan it. But yes, let's sit! Let's, let's stop our nonsense, because we're not alone this week we're being watched and joined and carried on with Lala by a certain Mr Dean Dean Hi. How are you doing all right pig focus? No only only my closest friends can call me pick. Fucker swain sway her. So I can call Dean is the host of a very, very funny, if not extremely not safe, for work podcast that F King Show Dean? Do you want to tell us a little bit about your you, your program and all of that nonsense? All right. I have a pitch for this at some point, but I've lost it part. Education, part, conversational, part, entertainment. I guess you could call it or some people call it in the Sayemon all bollocks. We generally, I generally pink up a quiz and presented to the other hosts or the other guests or contributors, and we lost one yeah. You Lot one of the battle, the podcast episodes. Definitely gonna Start doing some of them when we get to season free of the show want to have you to back on there against the film floggers or you be good to come back on when I'm not two bottles of wine in the way. So this is how that show ended. You can find this over at Tall Codino. That's where I, the links off of the social media and stuff, like that. This is the show subscribe like it. Try It. You might like it a smash that, like in US game, as I see, do, do it because ye it's a regular. For me, I kind of got about four and a half minutes into this week's podcast. Before I got a very long, meanderin phone call, one was in the car the other day, so I still haven't gotten around to it to the full story on that one. But it sounds like you with a psychotic. Yes, yes, like we did e end very good, cliff anger for season free, so we are going on hites for a little bit. So if you currently, it has forty episodes, you can get through fill your boots, HMM YEAH! Please do it's great and that's not just the episodes that me and John M Iturea was a fantastic Friday night. I love that John. What are we talking about this week? So that's were gone for one thousand nine hunded and ney eight basketball, okay, which I've not seen in the way, but when I watch that thought Jos, is it just to quite funny timeless, except for some of the gay panic, jokes timeless yeah, so dean? Thank you so much for bringing this one to was ninety eight John we've been to night. Yet before I'm certain of we having the so of anybody wants to see what phones were going in on thousand nine hundred and ninety eight have a lesson near a wedding singer, podcast with it all and Kayasthas of a ease music in that in that one that was a that was a lot of that. Yeah is good as good. You know the rules by now listeners unless you've never listened before. Then you know fucking clue what we're doing. We've all sat and watched the film we've all made a list of things that we wanted to learn a little bit more about. Do some research we're going to walk through the film he I'm going to walk to the film and these two a M to jump in whenever they want. We will have some bits and pieces facts informationbehind the scenes or just random thoughts that have come up. Are You, gentlemen? Both ready to start your remotes as it well read: Yeah Scotland Right, Elodie's? Okay, so we open in Yankee Stadium, Reggie Jackson, this Guy Reggie Jackson, who look I've got a level with you before before we get properly started. I don't know a lot too much about American sports right. My American sport is Hannibal. I mean sorry, football is American football. If I e work any of them yeah and a yes, that's the one and I I'm a Miami Dolphins Fan, which means that I, for about a week at the start of the season and very positive, I'm certainly going to win the Super Bowl. No for the rest of the season. I just shake my head and a disappointed. John. You don't like sports generally you're, not really a sportsman anyway. I not been brought in Policastro Ney. It was nothing. It was death thing an what's your association with the Murican Sports American sports. I tried getting into ice hockey for a bit a couple years back. I like the idea of isole know it's only port where fighting is part, the game as a trying to weed that out, but it is like you look at the history of it's like it's quite violent is quite fun. You know didn't really get very far with that, because you can't really watch it anywhere and the same thing having coupees, but I try I get into the baseball because I was in Japan for a couple of weeks and one night we was come back from the somewhere had a couple of drinks, but on TV and Japan's playing career in baseball really got into it. It s really enjoyable to watch and it's very slow, very pays you at a couple of drinks in you. It's great I've currently wearing my Hiroshima Cap, baseball, Jo wow. I did wonder what that was so yeah hey some of the best things I bought out there yeah I try and support them, but the same thing. You can't really watch over here that easily, if you, if you are interested in getting into ice socket, I do recommend going to a game because it is just as exciting when you're there I used to go and watch not an panthers when lived in the Midlands. So like we have a London team, don't we yeah, I couldn't couldn't tell you what they called anymore or all in all. I know is that not good panthers of there Nottingham G, MB, Panthers Bat back talking about unionizing again, John always with the unionized. We Open Up Reggie Jackson, batting for the Yankees. Now. What I do know about baseball is the Yankee Song Right. We have to hate the Yankees, because it's The New York team. I assume- and I think they've bought their way to a lot of titles, of something I don't know, but we don't like the Yankees. That's that's it. Even though our podcast baseball team is a Yankees of Filia. Isn't it John that really is a riders, the double a affiliate of the Yankees, which I wish I'd known before we picked them, but what ll get out eleven land, you leven yeah, absolutely she's a witch. The main thing about the men oponent a bit less a tag line yet line of the new of ow James Bomb Film. We've got a couple of facts. Last of at our start, I ca. If a sort, Yuyan kees were alleged and originally named the New York Hilanders, but the name was changed back in one thousand nine hundred and thirteen because Ne do is using Hal Anders. I don't know why Reggie Jackson's nickname was Mr October m yeah we'll get a bit about that late. Rest Yeah! I don't know much about Regie Jackson, because as soon as I went and looked him up, I actually looked up a basket Wolmar by mistake at likes. My regato you're, going to tell us about Reginald Jackson. This leave that ten, this shore, that one is they all look the same, don't hi, I lading in yea, they are going to ball involved of some subject is that's how much I do not like spots. Actually, the only sport I won't grow up grew up watching Robinia, no, not nero, because because it was my dad was always hung over and then they like noise, so cause its lacing play. We just watching the G, that's a that's! A look into the s and eight really, as that we expected. Isn't it and Tel become national sports is like darts snow up, Yep anything quiet, yea, Joe Blam, Baron Billard billiards. That kind of thing. I can tell you a little bit about this Reggie Jackson, John Thankful likes, please. He played for Oakland Baltimore, the Yankees, the California angels. It's fourteen all star titles, which I think is another smash mouth song will come to that later on at five world series championships, three most valuable players to term. I really don't like the idea of somebody being of a value he's for home, run leaders, Yankees, retired number, forty four, because of him, and for good reason, unlike Birmingham City, who recently retired a shirt for a lad that had played a handful of games for them because Birmingham city or a joke of a football club, it was inducted into the baseball hall of fame in one thousand nine hundred and ninety three, now I'm going to read you this story, the Batum as I as it was reported because this this is just the wording of this, the writing of this. At the time. It's so early S, so Jackson was a victim of an attempted shooting in the early morning, hours of June, the first one thousand nine hundred and eighteen a few hours after hitting the game, winning elevent inning home runner to a home game against the Toronto. Blue, Jays Jackson drove his vehicle to the singles bar he frequented in a push neighborhood of swinging pubs and night spots amid high rise apartments, man hands of the east side, while searching for a parking spot. He asked the driver of a vehicle that was blocking the way to move and a passenger in the vehicle began. Yelling absentes and racial slurs at Jackson before throwing a broken bottle. Its car after other passer, is recognized Jackson and began joking with him about apprehending them. One of the men in the car twenty five year old Manhattan resident Angel Viera, allegedly returned with a point. Thirty eight caliber revolver fired three shots at Jackson, each which missed the era was criminally charged. Attempted murder in legal possession of deadly weapon. News on the incident was the third ever story broadcast on CNN, which had its inaugeratin later. That day I mean that's too much going on. Then you know if that was to happen to a sports start day. I mean that like you'd, never hear the end of that, would you it's three shots is: will we get the Guy Washes with three shots at the hand, Canon so he's firing. These these home runs he's done to already goes for a third one and these kids, these coupon Rima kids, who I think, look just like the adult coop and Rebathe d. Some really good unreal, yeah they're cute enough kids, says yeah. Give us it give us a give us a third home run is no not no. Third, one he's already hit to coop. He hits it. Coop catches the ball some day, I'm going to become a big spot. Star says K, which is. This is something that I that I was tweeted about earlier one of the week now. We then have this this chap this narrator talking about the the rates. Actually Stephen Machat Y, all right WHO's, an insanely prolific, character, actor. The last fifty years he's started in TV shows from like star Skin Hush Kojak Mimi, Vice Beautin, the beast, both the original Ron, perman series and the newer one, which I didn't even know they did. It was like a couple years back SEINFELD GON to Le La Law, the XL DET space. Nine will be Texas ranger in the strain it's been in a ton of film star, ranging from Theodor Rex, the woe gobots dinosaur, buddy cop. Maybe I remember that sad lives, Cup free, three hundred watchman history of violence and the mother film has another exclamation a yeah. If you want to, for a podcast suggest this guy's career, because he's got two hundred and fifteen credits and in DB wow yeah, you know the worst. The worst thing of this is Davis. Now I have an idea for a podcast and my wife hates you, because I cannot do a third podcast suster one of my favorite horror, films, which I mentioned on. One of our shows recently were doing our top five horror films, and this was like one of the ones that always made it ponty pool and it's based in a radio station, a DJ yeah was yeah. That was a lot of fun yeah. I like one of the things I didn't know he was doing the narration on this until this podcast and I was doing with the facts for- and I realized- Oh Stephen Matty Kayano was a slow bunner, but it really I enjoyed that thing. I went. I didn't think it went because I was an fast pipes, action, zome movies, but that was proper slot bun and joy em, every minute, yeah and if you can't find it online anywhere to watch or can't find a DVD to buy, you can get the audio drama of the film on Youtube, which I was a it wasfilmed and recorded at the same time. I believe- and it was our long audio play and the long lines of awesome Wales broadcast o good God really yeah. That's that's right on my street. Okay I'll, be I'll. Add that to the to the mimory AD of things that I'll be listening to in the car next week. So this whole thing is about how sport is on its ass in America and surely you would think nothing is kind of is more prescient now than that. So it basically says that all they want to do is spend more time celebrating than they do the actual game. These American football players are doing a river doubt celebration which at the time would have been. You know very kind of Oh yeah. You know by the rive at the time was ye, but now of course, less so river dance, premed on the ninth of February thousand nine hundred and ninety five at the point theater Dublin was the Interval Act at one thousand, nine hundred and ninety four. Your revision show it has been seen by over twenty five million people- big Jesus Jesus- He a God, flatly made his money and he ah he, but he was only in it for like a yeah yeah, but his anchors gave it or something the is. Is a looks at you, your fatly. Looking you lie, you should be fat but you're, not not gonna go with Michael Fatally Joke Michael Battely, oh ileal, he'th loads, going on they're talking about. Does this the stadiums with awful names, so the color change names ones like the preparation, h, stadium and nice pad back the maxie tampon stadium at the rim. Think you know how much its gross to world wide. I dread to think more than a billion dollars, jeest seven point six million or were at that point: wow diculous amount. Monetary is its like it's crazy yeah. I think jay logs ass was less, you know, wasn't it it was con a million. I no more passes e t h the whole thing about river dances. Who is that for because i mean john yo, you've got the celtic connection. Of course you know being a scotsman yeah for you, i stuff a non it was. I don't even know who that was for it's a massive thing at a time and it's not like lane danson mars a freeze, but everybody could do it. You had to be really fast, so it was a really yeah. It was, i don't know who's directed that selling end. Do you think? That's why colin farrel so good at line dancing that is famously colin farel is a great line. Dancer is because he's irish right i go bein an is because he grew up in dublin and not on a fucking farm. The line from in bruce, which is something we have got to cover on. There really did as is going at some stadiums. I looked up. Philadelphia is the wells fargo center home with the philadelphia flyers philadelphia. I was going to say sixty nine, as that would be much better at the seventy sixes and the philadelphia wings. Nashville is the nis and micro state. A certain of the nissan stadium in his a microstation would be good, though, wouldn't it home of the tennessee titans of the nfl and the tennessee state tigers of tennessee state to university. Just where shack made all these millions charlotte is the bank of america, stadium they've also got the jerry richardson stadium and the trust field stadium, as well as the american legion memorial stadium was fucking poppies everywhere, but the yeah i mean i was astounded by how every stadium every single stadium is named after something, whereas of course in the uk, you've got a few. Stadiums have taken the opportunity to do that, but example down the road we've got. We've got carliles brunton park, which you wouldn't sponsor, i'm considering sponsor it for the podcast things probably going to cost ten quid. You know you've got celtic and rangers. Who will never do that and yes go, you know, but then you've got you've got things. You know like rother room play it some. You know some stupidly named stadium and you know people are accreton stanley who you can't afford not to, but if you did that with chelsea or spurs or man united, it would just be. You know it's sacristan, isn't it really almostt because of those big clubs? Although that doesn't stop man city with the ts leading i mean they do it arsenal as well. Wasn't it at type of course, nals the emerich yeah yeah, i mean as a forest fan. I know listeners it's a it's a sham. So as a far as fan, i don't think i've ever specifically purchased anything that sponsors forest, since it was le bat laga in the s and i used to drink a lot of the bats longer, but only because the the beer that sponsored them before no longer exists of, i guess neither does love back preparation. H, gentlemen: it's an american brand of medication made by our good friends at fizer. That's the twice on the truck. We've talked about fier in a jump yeh, that's a one! I go a we're in the dornaus old, her tea, all right. Okay, we're all you be e! Bad one, all the all the push farmers in penrith we got ours, it's using the treatment of hemoroid, of course, and emeroids are caused in part, at least by inflam blood vessels and most versions of preparation, each work by reducing inflammation in blood vessels, different formulas, but in greece it includes three percent shark liver oil. Get some of that short liver oil in uranus, gentlemen, is the story there. I think on she's also good for healing tattoos. I've heard all right, okay, sure if it's fully safe to use on them, but when i had a friend who's like you had tattoos, you always used to get it here, like four leaves on or use preparation age for it all right. I just wench hit to a pantin and a a in i plan a e pantin line of it and is happy with that. Tan was what i put on mine when i got mine on manafacter years ago, yeah, because it was the thing that you were told today, yeah, so there's this football player can't remember who we signed, for he thinks he's that miami is at minnesota. He's played here there and everywhere, which, as we would call it in the uk's a journeyman pro, i think, is the term that they use and then they're talking about all the teams that have moved the jazz moved to salt lake city, where they don't allow music as a dig at the mormons it. If you have not seen the the fantastic orgasmo listeners, a recommend, you go and watch that, what's what's the two a book, a mormon, musical correct the buck, mormon of the we saw a few years ago in some london was fantastic. Sa daly cassite we're sitting either way that that's the one yeah yeah, it's something something like no worries. Isn't it it's like the lion, king or something yeah yeah, the raiders, moved from la and then moved to la and then back to oakland. No one in la noticed now. Here's why that's so precent, because the raiders have moved again because he did they did the la thing and it didn't work and they've moved again. They are now the lost vegas raiders jesus, but don't worry because in twenty years time they'll be the space raiders. I was going to see that you're going to move on as this tin british crisp chat, great yeah, so basically they've decided. You know. The whole story is that we need a sport that people can get involved in. You know that that sport truly is in the hearts and minds of people who love sport and that one day will kind of get back to that. We now meet adult coop and adult rema and adult keeps saying bein mind earlier on. He said some day, i'm going to be a big sport star. What's he saying now there on a big sports bar i'm going to own a big spot, but which is a dream of a lot of people? It's not something i'm particularly into because i think the probablys dead fo ones, but should we want to own a big sports bar gentleman? I did a little bit of looking into this. If we want to own one in the eu, which i think we technically still can we can kind of do it, but we have to jump through some hoops now i don't know what's happening in bala medinas in spain right, but i can tell you they are giving sports bows away. I assume it's something to do with a pandemic and brexit right: fifteen thousand europe for a sports bar at six thousand nine hundred and fifty euro for a non sports bar. I mean that's just fucking pennies yeah. If we want to sports bar in tor fan in gwent north wales, which looks like the phoenix club i found it on there, it's too probably is an a workingman's club, two hundred and ninety five thousand pounds for that. A london cocktail bar somewhere in north landon, five hundred and seventy five thousand pounds. Meanwhile, in the us, if you want one, the presumptuously named fantastic sports bar and lounge in westchester new new york state is a hundred ninety five thousand dollars. An irish pub and grill in midtown manhattan will run you one point: one five million dollar reduce london. One! Isn't that bad? Considering north london, i told be pier yeah, you would- and i was looking at- that the the turnover was huge as well yeah. We have a cooperi watering, the plants aptly. You can use your in dort blunts, but not rash body waste like in the movie, so your in his rich in things that been used for a generation health plot to grow. Occasionally they will include dna from bacteria which includes genes for antibiotic resistance. Oh, so, if you piss on crops, you could get crops that give you antipatica resistance, which is a considered a greater frit humanity than the climate crisis. All right. This bacteria will die out pretty quickly. However, so you got to actually store it for a bit before using our plants or there's certain systems you can use to third lie plants. The moment where household is quite ego friendly, we're getting cat litter from a company called natter sam, which essentially gives us a delivery litter every month and every month they pick up the waste from the cat. So, every time the cat poop piece everywhere, we put it into a bag and we send it back to me in the month and they transfer that into first lizer. I have written that down because that sounds like something we need to do with the sea. All the eco friendly people at there with cats that just and codo ok, the fasti there you go not not sponsor in the podcast, but should probably sponsor the so yeah. That is not something i expected to learn, but that's what this podcast about. So i love it so they're at britney s house they walk in it's like a docker's commercial. In here everybody i've just written everybody's, a was per soul. Really i didn't think you'd show up. Well, look. We wouldn't miss this! No! No! I didn't you show, because i didn't invite you this place sucks at what o, what do you everyone's kind of doing all sorts of different things? What are you doing? You still sitting at home playing playing nintendo? Well, no, i'm in the first year of medical school. What are you doing? Still i'm playing intendo cuck does w. It's also advertisement for cosbi. Oh i i, the absolutely was yet and there's a little bit later on, where a guy's handing out cos beers in the in the stadium. So there was sponsors of the c y work. Life podcast, cosbi, yeah, jack j will be delighted. I give me some of that mountain man, beer in company with casern company founded in thousand eight hundred and seventy three okays, a hundred and forty eight years and they've, yet to still figure out to make a beer point no shape as a man. That's not drinking beer at the minute dan you could. You could have as money cause as you want just fucking. What was the line now used? Piss was rite, which kate says to me. All. The time was just part in o o an advertisement for chinos, because nell everybody was real, the chines and that that's that's the docket thing to it took me away because that i thought chines and khakis, but the same because it mentoit look up at this haly any difference. Apart from the thickness in the material, all right, obviously in kakis ave got pockets, but i was thinking, oh my god. For the years i thought i was ren chinos that to her khakis, i had no idea what i was wearing. She, no wine. I got colerne to it's. Just i think we is looking at to it. The majority was saying is more about the technic that we ever the actual things in the material so yeah, the more i or the more like. I assume what what you'd wear to know in the armed forces or to go adventuring. Perhaps i do the kaki yeah a skilled myself on the difference between chines and kakis. Here, okay- and we all now know that's great. Yes, they go to bricks. That's got britany room, they got the room, sniffins pants sniff in a pane and re logesi. Look at brit's vibrator. I am so jealous of you lintea. What are you doing in my mom's room? He's kind, the pats, a huge, no real bellarme kind of joke they had outside and they start shooting shooting basketball. You know, yeah we're really good at basketball. As long we have to run or dribble or anything like that, so you've got so so they bet these jokes. These jokes, like yeah, well, bet you two twenty dollar reimers like make it fifty do o got fifty dollar we've got twenty dollars, but he says we won't do what you guys do. You know this kind of the hood we're going to do the hood game that we know and it's baseball rules. So baseball rules is, you know, you've got a place that you shoot from and it's a single is a more difficult shot. The further away you go is that when i mentioned tors is that where horse comes, you mentions a hole yeah so horse. The only the only thing i know of horse right, i didn't know it was a thing. So if you miss a shot, you get a letter and if you get the forward horse, then that's when you that's, when you're out as it is, the only in is from those tony hawks games. You know the tony hawks pro skater games and you did you i was talking about you. There was a there was a bit of that where you had to do a various you to do a better trick than the person you're playing, and if i didn't, if you didn't get more points in thirty seconds on the first before due or hit the trick, you would get a letter, and that was horse. That's the only thing i knew it from right. Yeah re reference in two thousand and nine: it has the nba actually sanctioned a hall school petition. Okay, it was similar to the film, and that was renamed because of a sponsor, says sort of horse. It was called the nba all star, gyka competition, and you had to get ge. I co alright of ho. I see yo yehoi lasted two years because it's boring, i'm guessing stupid, yeah, so free froze. Ah it's like you're seven hand. Seven by in it, you need to get seventy one or ekart's by like having a toname with the affair, is to pinales out yeah, no sex, yeah you're all right, so they based this. This school they school these guys that coop spits beer at one of them is like. You can't do that. I said no, it's allowed it's a siout and they win, but the jokes get the girls is. What do we get, that it's the jobs? First, you get the jobs, then you get the khakis and then you get the cher an i'm like yeah nice that solace reference to it's a day later and they're playing in the driveway. The psycho in this case is steve. Perry, steve perry, that's go. Why is that boys? Why is the lead singer of journey a psycho? I could quite figure that out. Do any of us know anything about steve perry. That is he such a dig that no enough to sake anybody unattractive or what i don't an because he sings one of the songs. Lier one doesn't, i think, he's just the tone of his voice. He's kind of right. I have no idea. I know me and my friends used to play paul and we use to do psychos as well and the kinds of thing was. I just saying steve perry. That's like the shot. I always at everyone off well, we stay fire lit about journey in our in our current episode of everything we learned from the simpsons were man, tom were talking about the episode of vever ned flanders, which you can get elsewhere, just lit a good episode, so we learned a little bit about that. I used to use journeys, don't be be good to yourself. So as my interests music in wrestling, oh did you really really big uplifting song, and every time i hear i was like yeah, i'm gonna do me. Do you mentions now like yeah? I, like that great my question. My question to you is dean our journey crap rock or was rock? Oh man, the deftly l, the cheese scale, yeah very igh up on that because of everyone loves, don't stop believing, which is oh yeah. It was good, it's just it's well over played. Now it really is absolutely yeah. Well, i know someone who had it as their when they were getting married when they were coming down the aisle they played that so so, john, my jesus, so you did know them. You don't anymore yushan yourself from that a man well put it this way. It was part of the tv show, don't tell the bright, oh really right. If you ever watch that there was a show where they did the wrestling wedding m, and it was that wedding, i don't think they played. I because obviously coperate, but it was a way on. I think the wedding lasted about nine months. Jesus we well did this stop believing they told them not to stop believing that to parti didn't know who i so so that they're shooting and this this guy turns up this. This squeak right as to shut off the gaps right and this little tiny, scrawny actor gets mauled by the dog. I loved this character and i thought this character, as is basically just the butt of all the shitty things that happen to anybody. Yeah yeah the trip park arima on at de fate to get him a leading part. They only wanted to leads and the comedy and obviously gave him ham an exta all right. It would be the fort to get him an actual part in the movie he's brilliant. As sholde boy in orgasmo that guy i do that, have you seen it john yeah, a a bauta hamster style anymore. I knew you wouldn't as anymore, can't believe it's taken till now for you to tell us the story of how you don't want to do have stand. I do want to get the special edition. Dvid acts. Apparently they do a commentary matin tray and they do it completely drunk all right. Wow o, like im slagging, the movie off kind of jokingly, okay pop pot, the podcast before podcast yeah, a podcast for a thing yeah. I absolutely love these guys by the way, i can't believe i haven't had the opportunity to say it. I think they were robbed of best song for the south park. Blane, canada, yeah, absolutely brilliant. It's a great it's a great film. The music is exceptional. The writing is brilliant. It's i don't really watch south bark any more. I can't really watch the early stuff, because it's it's not great, but i can't watch any of the new stuff because i i don't know what's going on was what is going on with the new stuff. The last time i watched it, it was trump, possibly crooked, hillary yeah you, you do need to know what's going on in the current world. I i don't know half the things i talking about. Sometimes it's last time i watched it shif, wasn't it you're, ignorant you're, ignorant rage, train ride, train, that's still my utter favorite favorite episode that and you've been to you've been to japan dean. As you said, early run so you're a big fan of whale and dolphin. We and of an fukee yeah, i think about fuck, you wal fuck, you dolphin weekly and i haven't seen the episode in so long, but i think about that all the time i mean it makes sense. So this this character is shooting off the gas, isn't get more by the dog and they say, look take a shot and if you get the shot, then we'll let you shut off, shut off the gas. It takes the short and he misses. Of course, three months later, it's gained a crowd and it's basically this this kind of neighborhood game. That's people sat kind of on the garden and in the yard, watching them play it. Squeaks part of the team and one of the one of the lines is my absolute favorite of the syces. I hear your sister's going out with squeak. I go out with his sister now we're going to say, fucked up stuff to make a me shop wawes. We got out this sister fucked up. What's what's your favorite of the psychos boys, because it's plenty coming, i just i just i was a sucker for the nepean all right. Okay, i, like the one with the place, pinning small people, i'm so glad. You said that because that's like the last eva psycho, isn't it and it's really good. Just that the the mind one the mind one's creepy yeah. I like, of course i like there swear, he's, got his finger up and he cuts his finger off. It is yeah. It's like a fucking, forty movie. I really like that. All this as one way it makes their faces, where we all these retentis coming up to say i yeah that's a they're, all good they're, all good. To an extent that a d and squeak putting on all the masks in one of the montages, and only when he takes the mask off and they see, is real famous in a scare squeak, gets sacked and then move him in with them. Is it you guys rip on me? Thirty now forteen more times and i'm out of here we skipped to the final, it's being watched by there's a big crowd, there's local tv news and they win the world championship of basketball, which is like two neighborhoods: isn't it yeah? I got the shirts and skin steam, which is a tradicion method of denoting teams and school games yeah. This practice, not too short its promoted these days with, like girls and boys teams and and teachers being nance teachers are all manses. What do you? What did you leave tonight? Now, i'm going to get out stairs? I go. What did you learn tonight? Teachers are all not on yea a a suspicion. So let's say you got this, i know is an extra in this scene. I because i've seen this film so any time, but it's i've been watching it. So much s last couple of weeks and going back and watching bits here and they get notes. There's a scene where coo's about to shoot in the extra just behind him looks like he doesn't know how to clap. Oh right in he got make sound in on like extras and background and actors and he's got like a clear three inches of air between his hand. He's like doing this and at some point he looks, stops, looks down at his hands and starts doing it again. It's all these things are like a really awkward. I'm not going to go on see that now he's like second to the right second left of yeah taking the letter, the guy, when he's shooting and also you got the commentators in this game, one of them. The guy o, announces that the shirts, when the game is kato kalin right, i don't know if you know that is no, i don't anyone who's in to true crime will have. There is break up of that name. He is the most famous lodgin hollywood history, as he was living with o j simpson in his poor house with oj totally didn't, kill, nicol round simpson wow s. He was a prosecution star witness and his testimony win against o j's completely and he actually went out for burgers with oj right before he didn't do the thing he totally did. Do we his ain with the zuka previous firms of j simpson? I e linked in some sort of way, because that was on as before yeah i mean that that's great fact, but not only that it's it's super kind of like twisty. Isn't it you know, that's really come yeah. Maybe the gloves were him his, maybe that's why the glove didn't fit and that's why they had to acquit a is that the second week on the trut we've mentioned that o j simpson case is well john. She an that that episode isn't live, so you couldn't have known that we were talking about that now, yeah, that's always on people's minds. Oh no! It's absolutely people and again now. I said this last week and i'm not sorry to echo myself. Go away and watch that show the oj the people versus o j simpson. I think it's still on netflix ten. If you haven't seen it watch it. I know john hasn't seen it because he's got a week off so he's going to watch it this week at john, an it wants. Yet, as david swimmer go, that's who who's in it again david! So nathan, when i was a god's sake, is a was looking this up actually, so this isn't the face more a rumor, but apparently liam neeson has been approached by semantan were about reprising. The naked gun franchise o get out is so this year. Actually i to thousand and twenty one lea nesenus frank, drabbing yeah, i mean he's gone like full circle of his career, where he went like serious actor to random action star to like overplayed action. Stare he's like bruce willis at this point, where he he's doing any old crap with action in it, so him becoming a comedy actor. I, by there's a d of this, that i no t o from comin down to one of the first things: a shy. How we talk about spirits all the time on why it's not been an eye with peter o tool is a yeah is a great great funny is a funny steve, guttenberg film. I said it fine, i said it. Okay. Did you just see that? Yes, i said it's a steve, go funny, steve guttenberg film, and that first place comes to me movies. Great. I don't care who knows it. I bit about mission to moscow. Miami beach is pretty shit, but that's good to know. That's good, that we're in the same place jesus. What even is this a that we're not would not even we're not even in the fucking movie we're not even in the like today he sleep on sweet sic for the week yeah well, i could could well be the shirts when the skins do not. Here comes ted denslow, you love ted, denslow john, who is it yeah ogus, it's cabby canbys, giving new york in a it's. Do this see of jesus lay and gentlemen, the anti semitic podcast that you've always wanted i've written a board naniele i rat board name but sini translated. I borsten double oscar winner, of course, earlis borgnine, what you probably don't know about to, and actually we can't talk too much about him because we know he lived. He lived quite as old as he did because he liked wankin as we learned in the scannest, but he had a video documentary film about driving a called earnest borgnine on the bus. I get all the birds on my basket. Yehoi anis bore on on the bushes, where he drove a bus across the united states to meet his fans. You can get it it's on the internet somewhere. I couldn't find it for free, but i assume i'd be able to find it somewhere on the internet year. Forty five minutes in me, you find an panopeus me, a dish. Porlacu you give me a lift to to the station. You get darling. Look like a bus driver o. You look like a happy yeah on a helicopter pilot. One of the things on our show is we do. Are you a dead m yep? It's again will be sort of. I give some information about actor and we want to say when they died and how they died. So on a little mini game. When did his ball? Nine die, which yeah go you putting me on the spa, fucking podcast e went those born die two thousand and ten seven tis an incorrect, thud and entee is incorrect, is two thousand and twelve all right and how did you die got habeo cocteau, so i did elde failed miserably at the triple jump in the olympics in london. I assume you just died of old age, kidney failure right, okay, his kidneys died of old age, yeah yeah. So if he got a transplant, thou we'd have been pissing like a champion, find out later on. He in a movie which we will eventually get to. So we scored nothing there. Dan is what you're saying so we didn't add anything. Not anything. Co school draw, that's a ship. If ever there was a thing, so he says i i want to make basketball and actual will think he said you. He said the problem. Is you kids, with your dan fogelberg, you zima, and your pack, man, video games? You've got attention spans that are measured in miller seconds rather than minutes. Of course, you know me. I like to learn a little bit about whatever nonsense is just just mentioned in it. In a thing, zemer is a drink, zima, clear, molt, clear lightly, carbonated alcoholic beverage made en distributed by. Would you believe the cues viacom deal that phase in it yeah due one thousan, nine hundred and ninety three market is an alternative to be an example of what is now often referred to as a cooler, steve queen's a big fan. Four point: seven to five point: four percent algol by volume producing the united states ceased in october, two thousand and eight, but it's still marketed in japan and zima means winter in a number of slavic languages. They do like a cooler in japan. Actually do they really right? Okay, yeah, i think strong zeros are cool, is and apparently they're the ones that people drink it doesn't taste like alcohol is a like ten percent in and like giant can so you just will hammer them back and they absolutely kill people right. Okay thinks some term they use for as a guy jin killer, all right, okay, something like that. But yeah. Essentially people go over there drink them and they don't realize they have drunk. They are until they drunk out three or four of them, and i just staging around the place. I mean i'll, be honest with you. I like it. I like a strong beer like an pa or or something like that, i'm drinking a form bridge hook. Imperio. I pear at the moment seven point: four percent i'll know when i've drunk that i will sit ye. You just will know when i'm d pack, man, god. I can't believe we're talking about pack manners if three men of our rage and ours or just just general demean or don't know everything that there is to know about that fucking little yellow bastard, but listen, developed and owned by bandai. Namco, formerly an come midway of created them, a tari. Of course we know was the probably the big one mass mejor rink. The first entry was released. No kid in one thousand nine hundred and eighty packman is one of the longest running best selling and highest grossing video game franchises in history. Just behind dizzy. I assume no o, god yea a chuck egg, its willie h, horosho skin. It's regular releases over the last forty years, so many forty eight million copies across all platforms and as grossed fourteen billion dollars, most of which was from the original video game. Recently i played, i think it was packman infinite or something no packman, one thousand nine hundred nine on the switch, which was free, which was basically tetris, ninety nine, but with you doing pack man and when you got killed, you were out and if you didn't get killed you and not yet people get killed before you. You fuck off. Oh yeah. I've seen that and on lane thing, yeah, i'm teches. Ninety nine i'm one hundred percent behind it's brilliant yeah, because once i finished fourth fucking loser, i am packman of originally called puck. Man. Yes well do, but they change your name because of the graffiti nist. That's things we learned from scott pilgrim, the film yeah yeah, the future episode which i'm specifically laying off watching again. I've got a steel book blue rays somewhere on the shelf, but i'm specifically not watching it again until we do an episode, because i just i want to come into it- cleans yeah yeah what yo start hating the movie, because you've had to watch it so much. Well, i say yeah if you, if you want to look back through our back catalog every film that we've watched safer, probably airplane, i hate, because i've seen airplane or to link back to this movie so same director. Of course, i've seen air playing the same number of times, if not more than years. I've been on this earth, so i've seen airplane, probably forty five fifty times, and i'm only for two years old. So there you go that's and care mab dolge bar, which we all come to point eventually tonight. He wants it to be like the old days. No moving teams, no teams moving cities. He wants everyone to be paid the same just like when i was a kid and i want them all to be treated like indentured servants. I gin wow, so they agree they do it and five years later we're in this little statum. I think these stadium sets are really kind of the cute little sets that it looks really good. It's got like this. This, this baseball kind of diamond on the ground, yeah and they've all got this garage with this garage kind of a sad. What looks like a facade anyway, as we learned later on when coop goes flying a this loess. I thought t was quite funny. I like that at the house bands did anybody spot the house band for the beers, a real big fish, real big fish. I have seen real big fish, probably more times than i've seen any of the band. I have seen real big fish, maybe five or six times and i've got. To be honest, i have never seen the same line up twice at now. I think there's only one of them left i m by about them, but i'm guessing you know all about them anyway. Well, i they o listeners, don't so go for it. So there's a big scar, punk revival in the mid s, so they got pretty big off that they lacked the winston i lead to so they didn't they go. I got a son kind of popular, but not really big, because i need like a big front person charismatic or you know really good, looking to step over being scarp on to popular culture. Their albums actually tell a story as they go through them from the first one was everything sucks, which is a self release debut to turn the radio off. They were telling a story: the band trying to make it for me to style a pop, the culture, the biggest hit off, that album is called sell out, which they consider they actually did to get to the album release itself and the label contract. Then they had. Why do they rock so hard? This is the alban they released when the in the film. This is about how they made it during the tor on the album two members of the band leave, one of them after committing battery on a security yard at the venal. Oh you'll hate him specifically, then now we deserve it. He re, then they hit the area where they fed up with what they're doing and released cheer up, which was a contractual release and they made which they had to make and then follow that we we're not happy until you're happy, which is the bitter and angry album which they released. After being, let go from the label themselves so yeah they tell a story for other albums, but it's all bounty scarf funk anyway. Yeah no and i own each and every one of those albums on cd, because you know the s and w and yeah real a few episodes of that mostly featuring covers, which they do one in this film, which is a great cover. That's a funk ton there's only one original remaining member, and that is front man, aaron barret m yeah he's eating all the rest of them. I think, is a works. Yeah the it was weird because they always had kind of like there's, always a big offish job. It's weird, because there's there's two front men: isn't it you know they always kind of had you know the two from men depended on the song, but yeah you got me thinking about cheer up, which is a t he's a really fucking awful, like doldrum kind of album that ends with a wow. I just want to go. Listen real, big fishing in which it is a is a saturday night, and i am only forty two years old so on an they've. Also got these these fantastic and look. I've goin to love with it. They've got these absolutely superb cheer leaders these overly sexualized shibuya. So it's hard to believe that the commentation, a sense art believe five years ago. This was only played in driveways and it's hard to believe that five years ago those girls were in grade school. You just like a lamb, because the eldest, the oldest you can be in grade school. Gentlemen, he's fourteen years old that we're back to nuns teachers is a thanks. Not ten ounces, yeah, absolutely well yeah, there's plenty of them not just on the bbc wish. I was on the bbc gravy train anyway. Coop hits a home run and it's down to squeak to hit one so squeaks watching watching everything, even though it's this tiny little car and they do this on, but he's watching on this hand held tv and the one thing i thought about this, and i know dean you're a bit of a retro gamer as it were. All i could think was. Does anybody remember the game gear tv, which was the thing that you plugged in the top of your game? Gas? My so started game gear thing that you pulled in the top of your game, get which had a little dial on it where you strolled through to get your tv channel, and it also had a massive aerial that you put it like: a fucking police scanner, a antal tv anyway shock all right. Okay, that cause you yahmni. What was your model of handel tv job? It was all it was as alba old bo jessica, yeah like that, could have been that actually, you that are the usual technics techniques- ce right, okay, the model of tv he's watching the tv, the bright, yellow one is a v tg action, sport vision with a three point: two inch screen three point: two inches man, deponent of your pleasure, o like your pleasure right there. I did recently put the batteries in my in my game, boy color. So i could play monkey puncher after feature in on what the fuck do you want, because they were talking about monkey puncher in an episode, i've got a copy of monkey put jane. I put the batteries in, and i lasted probably about twenty minutes, for i have to give up with a headache. Yeah that screen is just far too small to small is far too small. Wasn't the back lit one either? No, no wit. No, it was the yeah just that just the standard one which i remember playing in the back of the car on the way home from a visit to family and when it gets dark. You know you can only play it when you know five. Second, two second intervals when you go past the street like yeah, so this is the denslow cup which is named after an this organized character. It's like the f, a cup final, of course, or the world series. Coops got the final shot dennis lo at the guy sykes him out by saying that looks like your boy: denzil is about to buy the farm he's choking on this hot dog, coop sies falls drops over, they lose he's like. I can't believe what you lose, do the happy dance and that and it just bought everything to swimming back the amount of times. I would say to myself and those pissed off tou the habitants to in the habitants. Do the song as well don't have to do this song. Do the sung during the happy dance haco tries to help denslow, but it's a dozen egg night, because that's what we do in american sports. We have stupid things to do so. We can't get to denslow because he's being he's been hit. Wele the slow motion looks like a kind of a thing out of an you know like an american war. Movie is been hit by all these these eggs and and he can't get to him now. I couldn't help but look up all of the stupid fucking ideas that american sports teams do to get people through right. So i came up with a couple. The seattle mariners apparently had a compost night right. Where, if you arrived for the game, they would send you home with a bag of compossible material. Now the composite material was a cigarette but a broken down hot dogs and all that shit yeah. That was underneath the bleachers. So let me do very well this one's brilliant, the charleston vever dogs, the nobody night. Apparently they thought it ud be a great idea and get the teams and headlines if they had an official attendance of zero for one of their games, which is why they called it. The nobody night fans would already paid for their ticket were locked out of the game and no one was allowed to enter the stadium until the fifth inning jesus, because that's when the games declared official and the attendance is recorded, they they lost five. Two and all of the runs were seen in the first five innings, the first four indins i mean fuck off american sports, just go home, you've drunk twenty cars and you can still probably drive, or even if you can't, you probably will, because america he gets to denslow denslow, is basically dying and he's like what is it at least he's waving the the hot dog bun. He paid love to get you one, but they stop serving them after the upto the seven days and in the you i look to it o. Is it true all right? Okay, so so, if you wanted, a hot dog lad, the the ball game, three dollars at yankee stadium at seven dollars, twenty five at the washington nationals, national park, jesus and six dollars. Seventy five, a it t park, which is home of san francisco dear dear dear, for got in bread in it, just basically be playing some baseball ik, because it's only fifty peop for a hot we're talking. So totanen was kate vine in london that it was the otto has like a little arena of the side of it. Was it round the back of the o tos that when he just put a couple of blokes in a cage in an alley this, the the indigo that was it so ben you on the side of it? I've seen cementeth to his spoken? More word? Oh a yeah! I was a lot like s, terrible acoustics in there. So him it was quite bad for the cage. Finding was quite good, but thou for one beer was eight pounds. Fifty for a pinted, belck, betes red shapes. Well, no you've been looking. It was red stroike to bog or something o fucking heats red sheep mine. I love red strike. No, it's not it's not gig! Unless it's red stripe, we hanekin, but all right. Okay, it's decent book! We went to were to new wore a couple of months ago in manchester in heaton park and the only beer i mean i was driving to a number beer any way, but the only beer on offer was, i think, seven quite a pint and it was pints of karlsburg. It was a pint can of karlsburg. They put they basically empty. A pint can into a plastic glass to set you on your way for seven quid, because you're a fucking cat go, go, don't do gangs better, they did yeah she'll, do the fucking ar so de denslow buys the farm, as is the line and they're interviewing the interviewing cooper at the end. In the thing, and it's a thing in a me in america, they're always wearing these like hats and tshirts, and things that save winner super bowl winner and all these kind things. But what they've done in this movie they've, given them their branded gear, but it says loser egret. This is a good time with that and the guys interview in him- and he says you know- is how are you doing this is yeah. I don't think i should be on my own tonightand, the guy. The guy turns away from him, and he just says it seems to be really raining shit on joe cooper tonight, they're in the car park, and he is so yasmin belief. I haven't thought about. Yasmin bleeds first for the i decades right, she's had some she's had some issues that girl she's had some many some problems, because she can't just run around in a red swimsuit, all the time yeah the these are gone. She wants celebrity jeopardy by the way ten ten sandolas to ten sandolas to bres canser jerry, let's disapear like post he playboy, because i in my head was like everyone from bay. What she's done play with, but he's never done it. No matter how far i looked, i could not find her naked sorry, it's folly, because i didn't struggle to find playmate of the year victoria self stead yeah en mcafee, obviously yeah. Absolutely i make to the year yeah, certainly better than seeing a cousin. It is which i discovered. I absolutely no idea her cousin is the actor musima lisele, no idea, i just don't know he married donny walberg as well. It was a new one, yeah and she's a fucking anti vaco, so fuck her. So you old rather see melis mock arfe than jenny mc coffee. These days yeah, i e donny walburg he's not the he's, not the one that hates asian people. That's his brother right, he's brothers, the one these brothers, the one that bad an asian guy because of vietnam was something fucking sees what our so people are still paying money to see. Marky mark films a mark anyway, i'm sure that's. We just keep reference in the same fucking things in series to very much nice series, one and so jesmin brief works for this dream. Come true foundation right yeah the dream come true foundation. Isn't a real thing, but the maker wish foundation is created in one thousand nine hundred and eighty. They do what it says on the tin and the celebrity that made the most wishes come true. Are there any guesses as tony that might be jesus? Well, he certainly made some nightmare come through jenny da. I know this is how do you now? You can't see me john seno, you can't see him, but you can still see him. Do six hundred and fifty making wish his co what s this john sena making come true. I just meeting him. I mean he's he's like a suber, really s a kiss e h. I s. He looks like a thong as well, but i know i've seen i seen him wrestle. I want some when i used to it for sky. I want some tickets for one of the wwf rest we for christ to mew rest wrestling things and i'm not in the w at all, but i went to see it with my ex. She has on the tickets at work and went see. Do what had a fantastic time. You know it was all done on a tv. It was in glasgow, john, at the at the ice hockey, the drina yeah, when e wan a fantastic time and it's i would rather go and watch it, i'm not massively into it, but i do like a smaller wrestling show which obviously donal appreciate, but we at a great time- and i kind of got back on w we for maybe six months till i realized it- was just all fucking putting money in the pockets of the worst human being alive, not donald trump, but one of his big supports. Yeah. I mean people. Look at johnsy, jose like the big suber and people look up to him. You think years ago, people looking up the whole cogan, hmm yeah yeah. Can i learn o coan, i learned the other day is a revisionist of history. He came out the other day to say that andrew the giant died two weeks after he power bombed him. We first of all, i do think hall co could ever power bombed and doing the giant to? I think they fought in like wrestle to right, which is something like seven years died in three there you can. Okay, yeah i mean revision is my free yeah. That was like a couple of years. I mean you died. Ninety two. So with me a free in track, the one recoes, a massive race, yeah he's awful yeah. Here you go, he loves. I ate one o cocolamus too much fuck too much of you not see that video google, that that's that's some shit right, okay, so contract. So i is signing autographs for them. Remer arrives and says it says. Oh, i know i love kids yeah and he says: hey kid. Heads up throws a ball at him. Hit him directly in the face and knocks him out. Travis is blind explains why i wasn't very good with his hands now this news report- and i think i probably mentioned this during the escape from new york episode. In fact, i know for a fact. I did because i wouldn't miss the opportunity, the guys talking about denslow. He says in a periods of time finally ran out for the old cock sucker, which i say it at the time, a lot of the time when somebody dies, especially if someone i don't like a lot of the time, a bit of audio, for that sounds so word because he's obviously a dr yes, when, yes, he said i've, no idea. Why, though, and if you try and look up online, if there's like any reason for it you to do old, cock ocker, it's worrying olthat, one yeah les before you got the rights when they start and winning the game. Can you tell me which sporting event in one tuan, nine hundred n? No nine is the first modern day right after a sporting event, which two teams are involved with it. They go will give you a bit of a clue which two teams evolved in the first ever sports, right, wolverhampton, wanderers yeah and i etonians ridges, so tic all right, jo rof course. It fucking was like an a v in it. Yeah o nine scottish cut fine. Also tic and ranges went to two or draw instead of going to an extra time the crowd invaded the pitch and the match was called off with a hundred people injured. O ousel abuse was up three hundred percent that day, as always, with a fucking old, firm game. That's a give the bloody are. This restaurant is round up pies the other line that he says is theodore denslow d, h, n. Eighty two, his hair piece was twenty four is now he's got this video will, which is really weird. So what i discovered from this was densil was an actor like he was a like a western movie actor right because he's talking throughout about about- and these are the chaps that i wore on rooting- toton some o god, so a yeah yeah and he says- and here's the poncho that saved me from the rain in such and such it's all kind of going on in the background. While everyone else is having a conversation, because i've watched it twice already, i was kind o what the fuck is dense saying in this scene. I do nothing, no vet and baxter as sat together, he's commiserating her. We all know she's going to be given the team there's this there's. This niece gets given a plate commemorating the pope's visit to dodger stadium, and i was like surely that never happened. Apparently, the pope visit dodger stadium in one thousand nine hundred and eighty seven, our old friend, pope j, p, doss, of course, so films don't always like it as it's the largest crowd in stadium history, at sixty three thousand and at the at the time at least. Now it's a hundred and fifteen thousand three hundred and one for a preseason friendly between the red socks and the dodges, a fucking preseason friendly. He leaves the team to coop, but only if they win the denslow cup this year and then, if they don't, if that will get the team, if that, of course, is his geny mccarthy, as e semi disgusted now coopid like to talk to you alone and nobody leaves the room like he gives them like seconds. Nobody leaves the room they all carry on. You remember that time. You had crabs and the only thing that would help was that lotion k now yeah. I well find another thing for it: us rubbin it into his body and singing i'm too sexy, which i mean i would like to say, really dates the film, but that sounds like seven years old at this point: yeah yeah, i'm too sexty by rights at fred. I sorry, if you got mtesa fred, do no no i've as got a fuck this guy on tunie hundred n ninety one w record number one in australia, austria, new zealand, holland, canada, the us and second in the uk, probably behind joe donty, should up be your face because that's always like number one over other things. Isn't it oh yeah, yes, number one over van correct to o vienna. It is platinum in australia and the us the fucks buy in that, even in ninety one, a lot of old shit, physical media yeah. Well i mean you know: welwet existed at the time, so why not? Oh janet jenna gets season tickets for the kids, which seems like a really like. Surely he could just do that even if he wasn't dead, you know. Why would you have to give those in his will and then that's only for like this season. I don't know there was just something about that. Just didn't didn't really make a lot of sense to me anyway. Yeah it's a bit easy like a millionaire, yeah yeah, i could have given it a lot more nolte or just created a box for the kids yeah exactly back to talking to a vet. You know look this isn't necessarily over for you maybe come over at some point and we can lay some carpets. I haven't mentioned that it's robert vaughan, robert bawn, is another one of these actors who seems to be very gain for all this kind of stuff like he, like borg, nine he's in on it. Isn't he he under one hundred percent, is in on the fun that they says and later on, we'll get to another zuckers kind of i wo

WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE (with doctor shannon) | Stop Drowning | Start Sipping | Daily Inspiration | Hope | Certainty | Abundanc

Do you feel as though you've lost your fierce? Your strength? Your force? Your power? Do you feel like you've lost your way? No worries…because today I share 4 discoveries that can change everything. Here's how to locate it. Think about this, Lady Lion, perhaps it's because of one of these... 1. Lost - You've lost your way. How do you gain back your ground? How do you identify your “found?” Start with the truth that you FEEL lost. Then locate yourself. Remember what you believe, desire, and trust. 2. Lack - You feel as though you don't have, or you're missing, something. Perhaps it's information, or a relationship? OR…TRUST? You haven't trusted yourself, the process, others…or maybe you haven't even trusted God. There is a trust issue that's led to lack in your life. What it takes to move from lack to abundance is focus and intense faith…in the process…what you believe, desire, and in whom you trust. Do you trust YOURSELF? Hope is belief, desire, and trust. And guess what? Faith is the substance of what you hope for. This will lead you to focus, and have the faith necessary to actually get your FIERCE back. 3. Love. Maybe you haven't yet discovered what you really LOVE. Excuses are oftentimes a symptom of not really being as “into it” as you say you are. You're doing it because you think you “should” be doing it. OR… It's a good idea, a maybe…"woulda, coulda, shoulda." It may sound like a good idea, but it's not YOUR call. It's not YOUR true love. It's not your INSPIRED place — YOUR life's work. If this is true... Then it's NOT for you. Even if it's a great thing. If you're not in love with it…set yourself free! It's time for you to get HONEST with yourself. It's okay for you to NOT be ALL iNTO it. ADMIT IT. QUIT PRETENDING. Allow yourself to see the truth. To know the truth, walk in it, and live out the truth. Because knowledge of the truth sets you free. Why? When you live in truth, you stop carrying around the heaviness of all the “woulda, coulda, shoulda,” and actually get down to business. You step into the freedom that's available — the fierce nature of who you are. 4. Lazy. Yes, you simply may be lazy. You may want it ALL without doing any work. Is this true?  Are you feeling lazy? You must take action. Stop saying you want, you want, you want. Because it will keep you in want. You must tap into your desire. When you do — along with your INSPIRE, and inspired inspiration — you'll tap into a power, and energy to actually get the work done. The do. That is who. Which is YOU, my dear. It's time to reclaim your FIERCE. Look at each of these areas and identify which one (or ones) requires your attention. What's asking for your attention? What are you committed to giving your focus and attention to, and where are you ALL IN to sharing your heart and soul…your undivided attention and care? Please grab your SACRED S.O.L. D.A.T.E. JOURNAL (Daily Action To Engage yourself.) TODAY'S SACRED S.O.L. STEP What do you desire to DO right now, but for some reason you've felt weak and uncommitted in following through and getting the results you desire? Write it down. Circle it. Take a look. Which one of these L-Words is YOU? Make a commitment today with laser sharp focus. That Lady Lion isn't missing. That FIERCE is in there. You must be willing to express the creative nature and power that is uniquely you, my dear! Thank you for being here, and allowing me to Sip On Life with you. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning in your life, please don't hesitate to reach out. YOU ARE NOT ALONE... Request a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well — The Best-Selling 12 Engagements Of Becoming The Great Lover Of Your Life (all you'll pay for is shipping.) www.dateyourselfwell.com If you've received value from the podcast, please let me know. I'd LOVE to hear from you — please email me at: drshannon@doctorshannon.com AND PLEASE TELL YOUR BESTIES AND INVITE THEM TO SIP ON LIFE WITH US. FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM @doctorshannon! See you there... And learn about an incredible opportunity for a select sacred group of 25 women who are ready and willing to RISE UP AND BE THE WOMAN. If you've been feeling like you're stuck, overwhelmed, or perhaps you still feel like you're drowning, please don't hesitate to reach out. I'd be more than happy to schedule a Discovery Call with you to see if Healing Life Coaching is a good fit for you. Email me at drshannon@doctorshannon.com Come over to the WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE S.O.L. MOVEMENT Closed FB Group and Join the MOVEMENT: https://www.facebook.com/groups/WSOLMovement/ By the way, if you haven't already listened/downloaded my new song (EPISODE 291), you can also listen to it here: letsnottalkaboutex.com, and cast your vote for your favorite version. Visit WomenSippingOnLife.com for more free resources, including my CHECKLIST FOR CHANGE, Engagement Checklist + Evaluation Rating, Six Sacred S.O.L. DATE Secrets…and a FREE copy of my best-selling book, Date Yourself Well. You can also check out my Dr. Shannon Facebook Page for more daily S.O.L. TRAINING. I look forward to seeing you again tomorrow. Please invite your best girlfriends to come and join our S.O.L. PARTY. xo Dr. Shannon. Inspiring minds that want to grow and hearts that want to know, so you can love you, your life, and your life's work well. ONE SIP AT A TIME. A special thanks to the following souls for helping me launch our WOMEN SIPPING ON LIFE podcast… Intro/Outro done by UNI V. SOL  Outro music by Jay Man: Mind Over Matter (www.ourmusicbox.com)  Podcast cover design and web site done by: Pablo Aguilar (www.webdesigncreator.com) Podcast cover photo by Kate Montague of KM Captured (www.kmcaptured.com)

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Democrats continue to call it quits in the U.S. Congress opting to sidestep the angry public over Democrats many failed policies

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Kamala Harris and President Pees in his Pants—are racing to see who can reach the ZERO approval rating first—Build Back Brandon—is going really well—   TWO— The U-S government makes deal to buy billions in anti-viral pills from Pfizer—while at the same time burying all the information on the vaccine for 55 years—its True!   THREE— Democrats continue to call it quits in the U-S Congress—opting to sidestep the angry public over Democrats many failed policies—   The most damning however are the runaway prices at the gas pump and the grocery store—which just about everyone sees—and can fully understand—   Progressives continue to deflect and pretend that the meltdown of the Biden Administration isn't happening—but the rest of the nation—and the world can see the catastrophic failure unfolding every single day— If you are on a fixed income or have a job that is toward the bottom of the income scale—its shaping up to be a long cold and mean winter—  

Pushing The Limits
Harnessing Natural Methods for True Recovery from Disease With Dr Thomas Levy

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 65:00


Dr Thomas Levy is a cardiologist and a lawyer and author of more than 13 books including his latest "Rapid Virus Recovery." In this podcast, we discuss ways to boost our immunity and protect ourselves from viruses. Our bodies are more capable than we think. If it has the correct nutrients, the human body can simultaneously recover from viruses and/or protect itself from them. We just need to make sure that we are supporting its innate abilities and Dr Levy gives us a list of things we can do to protect ourselves. He also shares that clinical recovery is often different from true recovery. Studies suggest that 40% of the novel virus-positive patients retain the virus — even after they think they've recovered!  If you want to learn more about how to achieve true recovery from disease and protect yourself, then this episode is for you! Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Understand how supporting your body's natural abilities, supported by vitamin C and hydrogen peroxide nebulisation, lead to true recovery from diseases.  Discover the concept of pathogen colonisation, where you may be clinically well but still harbor pathogens.  Learn why vaccines have side effects and what they do in your body.    Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Episode 167: Curing the Incurable with Vitamin C with Dr Thomas Levy MD, JD   Get Dr Thomas Levy's books https://www.peakenergy.com/books.php and be sure to check out Rapid Virus Recovery  Download the Hidden Epidemic E-Book for free! Get Magnesium: Reversing Disease also for free download Free Download! Get Death By Calcium Canceling the Spike Protein - Striking Visual Evidence Hydrogen Peroxide Nebulization and Virus Resolution - Impressive Anecdotal Results Learn more about Dr Paul Marik's protocol for sepsis using vitamin C and steroids.  Check out this study published on the International Society for Orthomolecular Medicine about comparing levels of ascorbic acid in plasma and white blood cells from vitamin C supplementation with hydrocortisone.       Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching Are you struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world? Then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third-party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third-party tested NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [02:22] Dr Thomas' Latest Book, Rapid Virus Recovery  Before the pandemic, Dr Thomas had been researching Vitamin C and hydrogen peroxide nebulisation.  He found that hydrogen peroxide is a natural product that the human body already produces in large amounts. The epithelial cells that line your lung airways produce hydrogen peroxide that acts as anti-pathogens.  In addition, the human body converts up to 5% of the oxygen you inhale into hydrogen peroxide. Dr Thomas shares that people can achieve a true recovery from the virus so much faster when we optimise our body's ability to protect and heal itself.  [06:37] Clinical Recovery Is Not True Recovery   The healthcare industry focuses on treatment methods that generate profit — hospitalisation, medication, therapy, and intubation. Even if you clinically get better from the virus, it does not mean that you have eliminated it from your body.   40% of novel virus positive patients become sick even after they recover from an acute episode.  All diseases involve excess oxidation, which stimulates the growth of new pathogens and toxins in your gut and cells.  [10:35] Is Hydrogen Peroxide Dangerous?  Hydrogen peroxide can kill pathogens both inside and outside the body.  Remember that many prescription drugs can be toxic when applied inappropriately and with the wrong dosage and concentration.  When nebulising 3% hydrogen peroxide, you can raise your blood oxygen level by 3% in around 1 minute.  Listen to the full episode to hear how a woman in Colombia treated twenty of twenty patients with advanced infection of the novel virus successfully in just five days!  [15:09] Don't Be Afraid, Let Your Body Heal Itself Don't be afraid of the novel virus — you can address it using easily-accessible methods.  Hydrogen peroxide nebulisation is not just for novel viruses — it can also help treat cancers. Dr Thomas shares how it can normalise the gut and cure tumours in the full episode. Cancers are caused by excess oxidative stress, which leads to chronic pathogen colonisation.  When you give your body more oxygen and nutrients, you give it the chance to heal itself. Utilise hydrogen peroxide nebulisation, hyperbaric oxygen treatments, and even vitamin C!  [24:40] How Vitamin C Works With Hydrogen Peroxide It's vital to remember to balance the effects of what you take — there are cases when you want pro-oxidant substances, like Vitamin C.  Dr Thomas shares that taking large amounts of Vitamin C can help the hydrogen peroxide break down.  This combination then leads to an oxidative effect that kills pathogens  Vitamin C can also produce more peroxide from which cells can mobilise iron. This iron then further supports the way Vitamin C and hydrogen peroxide work together.  Listen to the full episode to hear the in-depth explanation of how Vitamin C, hydrogen peroxide, and iron all work together.  [30:43] How Iron Works  All pathogens, cancers, and infections accumulate iron. The more iron you have, the more it can fuel pathogens.  However, iron key links can bring cancers and infections under control.  For people with too much iron, also called hemochromatosis, you can manage and mobilise iron levels with vitamin C therapies.  [33:37] Vitamin C Is Essential for Health Remember that inflammation means high oxidation levels in certain areas, which causes a depletion of Vitamin C.  Your body will fight against this inflammation using its antioxidants.  Dr Thomas argues that the immune system is all about supplying antioxidants in the form of Vitamin C.  If your cells, like macrophages, can't do their job due to a lack of Vitamin C, then you can help boost its cell absorption by combining a low dose of hydrocortisone with vitamin C.  [37:30] Vitamin C Can Also Be Used to Cure Sepsis  Dr Thomas shares that curing sepsis can be as easy as taking 12.5 to 25 grams of Vitamin C every six hours.  When you have high cortisol levels due to sepsis, you don't need to use cortisone.  You need Vitamin C to reduce the oxidised receptors and normalise your cortisol.  Cortisone is beneficial for those who have had their adrenal glands removed and can no longer produce cortisol on their own. [42:03] Vaccine Side Effects   Many vaccines use spike proteins instead of an inactivated virus, hoping to create antibodies to protect against the virus.  However, the spike protein can replicate on its own and, in many cases, be a toxin itself.  Different side effects often depend on the spike protein's binding site. For example, when it binds to the vascular endothelial, it can lead to blood clots.  Remember that once a pathogen enters and colonises your body, it will linger unless you eliminate them all. You can treat viruses, vaccine side effects, and even fungal infections with vitamin C and hydrogen peroxide.  [51:08] What Happens In The Body When There Are Spike Proteins  It's logical to think that having a lot of spike proteins in your body may deny the natural function of cells and their H2 receptors.  Side effects are not just dependent on spike protein's binding site — it can also be people's area of susceptibility to increased oxidative stress.  [55:00] How The Pandemic Will End  This pandemic can end faster when more people achieve true recovery using hydrogen peroxide nebulisation.  When people are afraid, they listen to only one narrative.  Take ownership of your health and figure out what's best for you   7 Powerful Quotes ‘Here's something that just about killed my extremely healthy 50-year-old best friend, and when is it going to hit me? So I understand the fear. However, you should understand... you don't have to have that fear because we have the information and the techniques to deal with it across the board.' ‘The healthcare industry is not the slightest bit interested in spending millions of dollars on research on something that will generate them nothing. Quite the contrary to generating nothing, it will take money out of their pocket and take away prolonged expensive hospitalisations, and antibiotics and intubations, and you name it.' ‘Actually, it shouldn't come as a surprise because your body has a mechanism if you support that mechanism for dealing with killing any pathogen you encounter. I mean, if the body didn't have that, we'd all be dead and we would have never survived as a species'. ‘If you don't do the legwork, and study for yourself, and figure out what's best for you, but instead, just walk into the doctor's office and say, “Here's my warm body, do whatever you think is best”, it's only you that's going to suffer.' ‘If you have a physician that doesn't have the time or inclination to talk with you and discuss things that you want clarification on, don't walk — run out of that office!' ‘Unless you have a specific biofilm-dissolving pathogen-killing intervention, such as hydrogen peroxide, but it's not the only thing that will do that, you're going to keep that colonisation for life. And this is why people have bowel disorders for life.' ‘Not everybody has that ability to do that or their willingness to do that. But you have to take responsibility for yourself. Nobody else can take that away from you. You really do have to put in the hard yards.'   About Dr Thomas Levy Dr Thomas Levy is a board-certified cardiologist and a bar-certified attorney. After practising adult cardiology for 15 years, he began to research the enormous toxicity associated with much dental work, as well as the pronounced ability of properly administered vitamin C to neutralise this toxicity. He has now written 11 books. Several of them address the wide-ranging benefits of Vitamin C and its capacity to neutralise toxins and resolve most infections, as well as its vital role in the effective treatment of heart disease and cancer. Others tackle the essential roles of dental toxicity and nutrition in disease and health. Recently inducted into the Orthomolecular Medicine Hall of Fame, Dr Levy continues to research the impact of the orthomolecular application of vitamin C and antioxidants in general on chronic degenerative diseases. His ongoing research involves documenting that all diseases are different forms and degrees of focal scurvy arising from increased oxidative stress, especially intracellular. Furthermore, they all benefit from protocols that optimise the antioxidant levels in the body.  He regularly gives lectures on this information at medical conferences around the world. If you want to learn more from Dr Levy, you may contact him at televymd@yahoo.com or through his website.    Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you were inspired to do your hard yards, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they too can find true recovery from diseases. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. The information contained in this show is not medical advice it is for educational purposes only and the opinions of guests are not the views of the show. Please seed your own medical advice from a registered medical professional. To pushing the limits, Lisa The information contained in this show is not medical advice it is for educational purposes only and the opinions of guests are not the views of the show. Please seed your own medical advice from a registered medical professional  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The economy is not treating average Americans well at all

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Michigan is now topping the list of the most Covid cases—for its population—in other states—death is raining in nursing homes—BUT why—the vaccines have been used—   TWO— The eyes of the nation—have remained focused on Kenosha Wisconsin and the murder trial of Kyle Rittenhouse for nearly 2-weeks—what will happen now?   THREE— The economy is not treating average Americans well at all—in fact—most are seeing prices on just about everything they have never seen before—and it is driving fear and anger about what comes next—   First the most expensive Thanksgiving in history—and then Christmas—when many items will never even make it on shore for the holiday season—   It has Americans rejecting Joe Bidens failing Presidency in record time—after all—he has not been in office ten months—and his polling numbers have reached their lowest level yet—with some prominent pollsters putting his support only in the mid-30's—   And the Real Clear Politics Average—Nate Silvers 538 and the Cook Political Report are all in agreement—Joe Biden and the Democrats are in real trouble—and that means people like Senator Joe Manchin—have all the power—and none of the risk to say no to the White House—and its demands to spend Trillions of welfare programs we cannot afford—  

Nerd It Through The Grapevine
68 - It's OK If The Kid Dies!

Nerd It Through The Grapevine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 71:06


This week, our rides get pimped and we become Perfect Poor, Santa from the 90s gives us a visit, Charles Schulz made Brown on more paper than anyone else, and tornados full of sharks are ravaging our dollar movie bins!  Come join the Backyard Bonanza in our Discord!https://discord.gg/QND8pNasHAWe have merch now?! Come get some!https://best-friends-tiny-inc.creator-spring.com/Malcolm's Cream (Guest Podcast Promo):Homicide Worldwide, Pick Me!, Haunt Her? I Barely Know Her!, and NightmareTownTheme Music:Jeremy Blake - Powerup!Nerd stuff and farts from this episode:Pimp My Ride    Xzibit    90s    Nostalgia    Toys    Mr. Bucket    Moon Shoes    Pogs    Wrestling Buddies    Hit Clips    Hitachi Magic Wand    Monster In My Pocket    Talk Boy    Home Alone    Mouse Trap    Shape Shifter Punisher    Marvel    Peanuts    Charlie Brown    Charles Schulz    Snoopy    Woodstock    Comics    Funny Papers    Stephen King    The Asylum    Independent Film    Sharknado    Mockbuster    Birdemic    Hobo With a Shotgun    Top Gun    Top Gunner    DMX    The Fast and the Furious    The Fast and the Fierce    Death Race    American Psychos    American Psycho    Homeward    Onward    Orcs    Elves    Battle Star Wars    Star Wars    Star Trek    Disney    Aladdin    Zoombies    Zombies    Two-Headed Shark Attack    Jaws    Alien Predator    Trasic World    Jurrasic World    Avengers Grimm    Avengers    Grimm Fairy Tales    Zombie Spring Breakers    Tomb Invader    Tomb Raider    Atlantic Rim    Pacific Rim    The VelociPastor    Troll 2    Rubber    Black Summer    Titanic 2    Stripper Cops    Island BoySupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/bestfriendstinyinc)

Weekend Rental
#112 - The Gamers Enter Uncharted Territory

Weekend Rental

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021


We close out Metroid and look to the future of Uncharted movies and Game Pass. Fierce competition ensues in Round 2 of the Smash Music Quiz.

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The pile of problems on President Joe Biden‘s doorstep is well overwhelming

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— More than 2- million at home Covid tests are being recalled—under orders from the FDA—and what does that mean if you bought one?   TWO— Former President Donald Trump and former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie—are going head to head in the war of words about a run for President in 2024—   THREE— The pile of problems on President Joe Bidens doorstep—is—well overwhelming—   Much of the misery he has invited himself—and he has made many of the problems much worse—   Supply chain jams—and despite promises of fixing them—they are only getting worse—   Dismissing inflation as something that would not be here for very long—and then realizing—it will likely be here for years to come—   Incompetent members of your cabinet—talking out loud when they really should say nothing at all—   The Holidays are coming and it seems all America wants for Christmas is leadership—and it's nowhere to be found—  

Pushing The Limits
How to Train for a Marathon and Face Life's Obstacles with Angie and Trevor Spencer

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 47:24


Are you facing an obstacle that you fear you can't overcome, or a milestone you can't seem to reach? Don't let this emotion trap you; everyone experiences difficulties when starting something new. Face the challenge head-on! Conquering will make you stronger. And what better way to challenge yourself than by running a marathon?   This week, Angie and Trevor Spencer from the Marathon Training Academy join us for a conversation on all things marathon running. They share their experiences about their running journey and the marathoning community they created. Angie discusses how she got into marathoning and how it led to their podcast. They also recount their most memorable marathons and the lessons that they learned along the way. Finally, we learn the value of facing challenges, staying in the present, and paying attention to our overall health.  If you want to overcome life's obstacles and know how to train for a marathon, this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Learn more about Marathon Training Academy and how Angie and Trevor can help you train for a marathon.  Discover how you can keep challenging yourself.  Understand that we're all built differently.    Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Harness the power of NAD and NMN for anti-aging and longevity with NMN Bio.  A new programme, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September to Peak Wellness!  Listen to my other Pushing the Limits episodes:  #8: Dean Karnazes - The Road to Sparta #183: Sirtuins and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova Newest Episode with Dean Karnazes  A Runner's High: My Life in Motion by Dean Karnazes Marathon Maniacs 50 States Marathon Club Spartan Race Spartan Up Podcasts Can You Endure? Lisa Tamati and Joe de Sena The Spartan Way by Joe de Sena Marathon Training Academy: Website | Podcast | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook      Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third-party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third-party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [05:43] About Marathon Training Academy Inspired by Angie's experiences with marathons, Angie and Trevor started Marathon Training Academy back in 2010. Marathon Training Academy helps people learn how to train for a marathon. They also provide tips, strategies, and principles on how to run marathons well.  To date, the show has over 10.8 million downloads.  [08:15] Angie's Marathoning Career Angie shares that we need to be careful about comparing our accomplishments to others.  At first, she started running to lose weight. After giving birth to her second child, Angie signed up for her first 5k race.  Then, she decided she needed a bigger challenge, so she signed up for her first marathon.  Although the experience itself was miserable, Angie knew that she wanted to experience the feeling of finishing a marathon again.  Her personal experiences paved the way for Marathon Training Academy. She wanted to teach others how to train for a marathon so that they won't get injured.  [14:19] Learning How to Train for a Marathon to Avoid Mistakes Many runners think they don't need coaches, but it's essential to have guidance.   Seek good advice on how to train for a marathon so you can reduce injuries.  Being part of a community can also help you avoid costly mistakes.   [16:14] Marathon Training Academy's Growth They started in 2010, around the second wave of podcasting. Back then, many people were still not aware of what podcasts are.  We're now in the fourth wave of podcasting, where even news agencies and TV shows have podcasts.  Trevor shared that connecting with their audience helped build the community from the start.  So, they would do shout-outs during their episodes. They are also active on social media.   Angie and Trevor also recognise the value of their audience's time. So, they try to keep their episodes short while giving out as much valuable information as possible. [20:31] Angie's Journey Towards 50 Marathons in 50 States Angie first heard about running challenges when she encountered the Marathon Maniacs. You can get into this club if you do two races in two weeks or three in 90 days.  At first, she thought that she wasn't up to the challenge, but she proved herself wrong. We often make excuses about not being able to do something. If you surround yourself with people taking on these big challenges, you push yourself as well.  She then challenged herself to run 50 races in 50 states. This endeavour took 12 years. Trevor shares that Angie ran her 50th marathon the fastest. This achievement only proves that age can't stop you from challenging yourself.   [24:47] We're All Different We're all built differently, so don't feel pressured to do back-to-back marathons. Find what works best for you and your health.  Don't be caught up in the misconception that running marathons can slim you down.  Also, don't compare yourself to others — focus on yourself and your progress.  [29:10] Angie and Trevor's Most Memorable Races Trevor's favourite race was the Jungfrau Marathon in Switzerland because of the views. He talks more about the experience in the full episode. Meanwhile, Angie loves the Loch Ness Marathon in Scotland. She also enjoys several other races in the US.  Trevor shares that his toughest race was a 50k race in Montana. He admits that he wasn't able to train for it.  On the other hand, Angie's toughest race is the Leadville Trail Marathon. Located in Colorado, this race starts at 10,000 feet and continues to go up.  [34:23] Lessons Learned from Running Marathons Marathons can teach you a lot about life. As people, we're continuously changing and evolving.  Running accomplishments are good. However, you need to take care of your overall health as you train for a marathon.  We also have to learn how to appreciate the present and the challenges that come with it. Doing hard things prepares you for the struggles ahead. Marathoning teaches you to have a singular focus to reach your goals. [38:50] How Running Marathons Builds Resilience When you do hard things, it becomes easier to push through the obstacles in life. This idea is called obstacle immunity. It's important to acknowledge difficult situations, but don't let that stop you. Instead, use these emotions to fuel you.  Once you overcome a challenge, your horizon expands. You see the other battles you can overcome.  [43:59] How Angie and Trevor Balances Life Angie shares that being self-employed helps them find the time to run and train for a marathon.  They also try to include their children in the marathoning journey.    7 Powerful Quotes from This Episode ‘Running is putting one step in front of the other and then being open to learning.' ‘I think doing things in community makes it so much richer.' ‘A lot of times we make excuses why we can't do something and sometimes, it seems very valid at the moment. But it's all a matter of priorities.' ‘For most of us, it is about you versus you. I think that's the beautiful thing about this sport. That we can all do this together but it's actually each of our journeys.' ‘It is important to have goals and everything, but I think it's also important to just look at your overall health.' ‘If I can't be happy now, I'm not going to be happy in the future. If I accomplish these goals, there's always going to be something else to chase.' ‘Having done hard things in the past prepares you for those challenges that you never wanted to take on in the first place.'   About Angie and Trevor Angie and Trevor Spencer started the Marathon Training Academy Podcast in 2010 to empower and inspire people to achieve better health with marathons. The show shares simple and actionable tips on how to train for a marathon.  Angie delved into the world of marathons after having her second child. However, she was plagued by training injuries. So, she was determined to find a better way to train for a marathon. Thus, the Marathon Training Academy was born.  She has since run 66 marathons with a PR of 3:19:55. She is also a Registered Nurse and a USATF Level 1 and RRCA Level 2 certified running coach. Meanwhile, Trevor is the manager and producer of the Marathon Training Academy. He has completed 17 marathons, one 50k, 21 half-marathons, and a Spartan Trifecta. Want to learn more about Marathon Training Academy? Check out their website and listen to their episodes on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also reach out to them on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.            Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends to inspire them to seek challenges and teach them why it's crucial to train for a marathon well. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You can also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Transcript Of The Podcast  Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com.  Lisa Tamati: Hi, everyone. Lisa Tamati here at Pushing the Limits. Welcome back to the show. Today, I have Trevor and Angie from the Marathon Training Academy in the United States, really well-known podcasters and run coaches. So our equivalent, over in the States. But these guys have been going for a long time and doing fantastic things. I heard their podcast when I was looking for information on my friend Dean Karnazes's latest book and listened to the podcast. I thought these guys are really rock stars, so I reached out to them. I have them on the show today so really exciting. They're in Montana in the United States, and they've got some great ideas and great information for you. This is one for the runners out there, and we get into all sorts of topics as well. Really, really exciting.  Before we head on over to the show, just want to let about our epigenetics program. We'd love you to come and do our flagship program about epigenetics to help you understand your genetics and how to optimise. This is really the future of personalised health is understanding what your genes are doing. All your health professionals should be personalising everything to your own genetics, and this information is pretty damn valuable. If you want to have a user manual for your own body, understand what food you should have, what types of exercise you'll benefit mostly from, your mood and behaviour, your hormones, what predispositions you have, all this fantastic information that you'll get about yourself when you go through this program.  Then, we can help you actually put it into place so how do you actually... Because it's great to get information and reports. A lot of the DNA reports that you get, you basically get 'Oh, that's nice' and it's a report and you stick it in your top drawer because you don't know what to do with it. But that's what we help you with. It's really powerful information that can really change your life. It certainly changed mine and changed my approach to different areas in what I do, what I eat, what times I do things, the way I set up my entire day, all of these things are affected. Head on over to lisatamati.com, hit the 'Work with Us' button and you'll see our Peak Epigenetics Program there.  We've also got BOOSTCAMP coming up on the first of September. You'll be listening to this after that so this round will have already started but we will be running this eight-week live webinar program again. We'd love you to come and check it out if you want to upgrade your life in all areas, understand how your biology works, understand everything that can help you achieve high performance, help you with health journeys, a really intimate small group of people who are wanting to upgrade their lives. Make sure you check that out. You can go to peakwellness.co.nz. I'll say that again, peakwellness.co.nz/boostcamp.  Lastly, before we head to the show, don't forget our NMN supplements. nmnbio.nz is where you'll find out all the information about this longevity and anti-aging supplement by Dr Elena Seranova, a molecular biologist, really powerful supplement that has been doing some amazing things for me, and my life, and my family's health, and turning back the clock, basically. It's up-regulating your sirtuin genes, which are your longevity genes, helping with the NAD levels in your cells which are... Every single cell needs NAD and these deplete as we get older, so check out the science behind it, check out the information. There's two podcast episodes that I've done with Dr Elena also on Pushing the Limits, go and check those out if you want to do a deep dive into it. Head on over to nmnbio.nz.  Right. Now, just before we head over to the show, I want you also to maybe follow us on Twitter, on Instagram, on YouTube. Especially our YouTube channel. If you can go and subscribe to our YouTube channel, that really supports the show. All of the shows are actually put up on YouTube. Just, if you search for Lisa Tamati when you go to YouTube, you'll come up with my channel and make sure you subscribe. There's a ton of videos on there. We've got about 600, I think, including all my documentaries as well. Make sure you check that out and we'll head on over to the show with Trevor and Angie.  Hi, everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits. This week, I have Trevor and Angie from the Marathon Training Academy. It's super exciting to have you guys. Welcome to the show.  Angie: Thanks so much, Lisa. It's great to be here.  Trevor: Yeah, we're excited about this.  Lisa: Yeah, well, I found you actually through a mutual friend, Dean Karnazes, who I know you've had on the show a couple of times. Dean's been a huge influence in my life as you can possibly imagine. I owe him so much both as a role model and as a friend. He's done lots of things for us. He's a wonderful guy, so shout out to Dean, who I think has just got out of lockdown in Australia. He was intending to run around Australia and that's been curtailed because of the bloody COVID thing. Yeah, shout out to Dean. Thanks for introducing us. I just loved your show so I thought, 'Well, I got to have you guys on.'  You guys are running coaches, and you have three kids. Let's start there. Tell us a little bit about your training academy, and what you do, and your podcast, and all that sort of good stuff. Trevor: Yeah, awesome. Well, thanks for the opportunity to be on the podcast here. I'll introduce myself. This is Trevor. I am America's most okay-est runner.  Angie: I thought you were gonna say laziest.  Trevor: Laziest? No.  Lisa: That's me.  Trevor: Angie is my better half. She's actually the running coach. I'm more like the business guy behind the scenes. We started in 2010. We launched the Marathon Training Academy podcast because we figured, 'Hey, maybe Angie had some knowledge and experience running a couple marathons, maybe people would benefit from learning how to do it.' We launched it and have been pretty much releasing content consistently for the last 11 years. It is not easy, as you know.  Lisa: No it is not. It is so, so impressive to keep going for that long. We've been going five and a half years, and I thought I was ancient and the podcast basically. So amazing. You've got a huge following and a huge... You're telling me some of your download stats and I'm like, 'I'm embarrassed.' You guys are rock stars.  Trevor: I guess we've been fortunate in the beginning when we've launched. I don't think there was a lot of competition for what we were talking about there. At least in the US, on iTunes, there was podcasts where people would carry a recorder out when they ran and they would just dictate breathing really heavy into the mic and stuff. There wasn't a whole lot of prescriptive training advice, which is what we tried to do. When we tell stories and we do race recaps and take people with us as we go racing around the country. But we try to be prescriptive: sharing lots of tips and strategies and principles.  Angie's also a registered nurse as well as being a running coach, so that appealed to people. It just took off in the beginning. We got lucky. I guess it was dumb luck. I don't know, but we started connecting with people right away. Folks would email us from all over the world. We just had a great audience ever since. I just checked the numbers today. Our show's been downloaded 10.8 million times since we started.  Lisa: That is insane. I got a long way to go to catch up to you guys. You guys are rock stars. Angie, you are a legend in the running space. You've already done 50 marathons in 50 states, for one thing. Tell us a bit about your career.  Angie: Well, I definitely don't feel like a legend. I guess that's when you are the person who is doing it all you always kind of feel like, 'Wow.' I kind of feel there's still so much that could be accomplished. There's always that comparison trap we can fit ourselves into. There's always someone who can run faster unless you're Eliud Kipchoge. There's always somebody who's done more crazy challenges. I think that's a dangerous field to start comparing yourself to other people, but I will say that I started running off and on when I was a teenager. I didn't have a great motivation. It was more about trying to lose weight. When I didn't see instant results, then I would kind of give it up and be like, 'Oh, this isn't working.'  But I do feel I really finally became a runner in my late 20s. We'd moved across the country. It was a move that I really didn't want to make. It was for work, and I had two little kids at home. I just felt I was stuck, and I needed a new challenge. Kind of on a whim, I signed up for a 5k race and they say the 5k is the gateway drug to long-distance running. In my case, it was. It was a completely miserable race. It was hot and humid and I'm not a good hot weather runner, but I felt there was a spark inside me. This is something that really fired me up. It wasn't about beating other people. In fact, I had a very, very average time but I just kind of felt like, 'Wow, I bet you I can get better at this.'  I'd never considered myself an athlete before. I never played any sports, so running was something, it was just kind of me against me. I decided I need a bigger challenge, so I signed up for my first marathon. At the time, I didn't have any friends who are runners. They probably would have advised me against it, actually. I don't know anyone who had ever done a marathon before. In fact, at the time, we were so poor that I could either afford the race registration or a new pair of shoes. My mom actually paid for my race registration, so I consider her my first official sponsor.  I'm training for this marathon on my own. Long story short, I do everything wrong. I just run. I don't do any kind of recovery or cross-training or strength training. I'm getting injured, dealing with back pain, and IT band pain, and all the things, but I was stubborn enough that I kept going and was able to finish the marathon. Although it felt completely gruelling at times, just when I crossed the finish line, it really... I was like, 'Wow, I know I'm going to do this again.' That kind of just started my journey. I actually, after that first marathon, had to take three months off of running because my IT band was so bad. Had knee pain. The whole nine yards.  That's when I started doing yoga and kind of discovered like, 'Wow, I can really start to learn more about my body, not ignore these signals that it's sending me.' There are some areas that need to be strengthened and I think that kind of sowed the seeds for what became Marathon Training Academy. Because I wanted to help people have a better experience than I did the first time: have the knowledge, have the information to not get injured and not have to do things the hard way.  I went on to run my second marathon training much smarter and was able to break four hours for the first time, which was a huge goal of mine. I think that's kind of when Trevor mentioned wanting to start a podcast about marathon training. I was like, 'I don't feel like I know enough. Who's going to listen to us? We're just sitting in our living room recording this thing.' I had very low aspirations for where it was going to go, but he had the vision. We stuck with it and just have had a very wonderful, gracious audience. We've just been able to meet so many amazing people throughout the years. I think that's been the most rewarding part of it.  Lisa: That's amazing. Trevor, your wife's bit of a superstar, from what it sounds, but she's very humble.  Trevor: She's amazing. She puts me to shame. She does everything that you're supposed to do, that your coach tells you, that you see on your training plan, doesn't miss a day, doesn't miss a workout. I do 25% of my training plan. Lisa: That's brilliant though. But I love the fact that you... Like me, when I started running, I had no idea what the hell I was doing. I just put one foot in front of the other. I was hopeless, and I was slow. I'm still slow 25 years later. Genetically speaking, not the most gifted person in the world but very, very stubborn. That's all you need with running. I love that you are all about the everyday runner. We have a running coaching arm of our company as well,  and we are very much into that holistic approach to running too, with the strengths, and the immobility, and the mindset, and the nutrition, and all of that sort of stuff.  I had no idea about that back in the day and I just bumbled along, running long because that's what you did, isn't it? If you're going to run long, you run long. What the hell is strength training? What do I need that for? I think we know we've both bumbled into the space and this is the key thing, I think, from your story. That when you just keep going, and keep going, and keep going, you suddenly find yourself looking back on, 'Holy heck, I've done a lot. I've done some pretty amazing things.'  It's just like running is putting one step in front of the other and then being open to learning, getting good coaching so that you... because I like what you said, Angie, about making mistakes and then not wanting other people to make them. That is just the motivation for what we do too because I reinvented the entire wheel, and you don't need to. Do you find a lot of runners come and they don't think they need a coach for starters? Most people only come to you when they're injured. Is that happens to you guys as well?  Angie: Yeah, I think often, there is part of human nature, and I think certain personality types who are more driven to like, 'I'm going to do this myself and I'm stubborn. I'm going to see this through.' Yeah, maybe they've tried a few times to hit a specific time goal that they have, and they realise, 'Wow, it's not going in the direction that I thought it should be going or the injury issues.'  I think people's knowledge and information, it's better now. There's so much more out there that a lot of people who are probably smarter than I was are like, 'Hey, I can probably cut out the injury part, and I can get good advice and good help in the beginning and make this so much a better journey.' I think also for me, I went alone for the first few years. Just being part of the community makes it so much more special, and I think the running community is just amazing. You meet the best people and have conversations with people like you. I think doing things in community makes it so much richer.  Lisa: Oh, man. I could learn so much from you guys. I think you've got a really good approach to it. Trevor, looking back into podcast space, because you say you're the businessman behind the amazing lady, got any tips for a podcaster? Because obviously you guys are doing something right. You started off in this space like... You've grown this massively. I know what goes into it. When you come to it a bit later, it's been a bit harder, for sure. What have you learned on that journey from a community-building point of view? Because I feel we've still got work to do in that space, and I'm always keen to learn from people who are so successful.  Trevor: Well, one thing, when Angie was talking and she was telling the story of when I pitched the podcast idea to her, one thing she didn't tell you was her first response was, because this was 2010, actually '09 when I pitched the idea. Her first response was, 'What's a podcast?'  Angie: Totally ignorant.  Lisa: Yeah, we still get people not knowing what the hell a podcast is.  Trevor: Yeah, so I think getting in early, obviously, was a big help to us. Kind of to be on the front end of a trend. We actually started in what was called the second wave of podcasting. Podcasting got going in earnest around '06, so they say that was the first wave. And then around 2010 was the second wave. There's a lot more shows starting and now, we might be in the fourth wave of podcasting now where almost every major company has a podcast, every news agency and every late-night TV show host.  It's definitely a more crowded space. But on the other hand, there are still people, like you said, who'd never heard of a podcast. More and more people are coming to the medium, downloading shows. Podcasts is becoming more mainstream. I know here, at least in the US, it's not unusual to hear people on TV talking about podcasts, just in anywhere you look, you can see subscribe to my podcast. It's cool to see the cultural awareness rise since we've started.  But I think in terms of tips on growing the show and community, one thing that helped us in the beginning, and still helps us, is hearing from listeners, featuring their stories. At the top of our show, every episode, we do shout outs where kind of like a virtual high five. People are, like all of us, people like to hear their name in a podcast. It just makes them feel... Yeah, lights them up. It puts a smile on their face, and we try to do that a lot where we engage the audience that way. Then, the off-podcast stuff too is also important like our social media stuff and all that. Yeah, building community. Angie: We also kind of try to keep in top of mind like, 'What's in it for the listener?' Because at the end of the day, people only have so much brain space and time. They're going to keep listening to shows that they feel you're giving them good value and that they connect to you in some way. I think just keeping that listener focus and stuff. No one wants to hear about a dissertation of what we've been doing for the last week in-depth. They want to get to know us a little bit, but they also want to know that we care about their needs and everything and what's top of mind. I think that's been helpful as well.  Trevor: Yeah, I edit our show judiciously. Oh, yeah. I spend way too much time. I'm just a perfectionist with it. I haven't been able to outsource that yet, so I edit our show and I'm like, I don't know what the word is, I'm just a stickler when it comes to audio quality. Also like Angie said, I know people's time is important, so if we go down a certain path in the conversation that I think is not pertinent enough, I'll just cut it. I'll take that one-hour episode then maybe sometimes cut it down to 40 minutes.  Angie: He has to edit out all my ‘likes' and ‘you knows', all my verbal clutter. It takes about half of the content away. Lisa: It's so much work. It's just so much work but I love that you do that, and you're a perfectionist. I'm technically completely disabled. I have a team of people behind me doing a lot of stuff, but we can still improve and get better. I love the meandering type of conversations that we have. Let's go and talk a little bit about... For start, Angie, I do have to ask you about your 50 marathons in 50 states, like our friend Dean. How did that come about and when did this become a challenge?  Angie: Well, sometimes things just kind of sneak up on you. I think it was my fourth marathon and it was before the race. I was sitting around talking to a couple ladies and they had these shirts on that said: 'Marathon Maniacs.' I was like, 'What do those shirts mean? What's a marathon maniac?' They're like, 'Oh, it's a club where you have to run a certain number of marathons to be able to get in.' I was like, 'Oh, how many?' They said, 'Well, you have to do two in two weeks or three in ninety days.' I was like, 'What?' That's crazy. That's a maniac.' I was like, 'I could never do that.' I said that I could never do that, and they're like, 'Oh, you could if you really wanted to.'  That just kind of stuck with me. I was like, a lot of times we make excuses why we can't do something, and sometimes, it seems very valid at the moment. But it's all a matter of priorities. That stuck with me. I'm like, 'Could I do that?' Later that fall, I did end up doing three marathons in that 90-day space, and I became a marathon maniac. When you surround yourself with people who are doing all these big challenges... I would joke that I was like a baby maniac because there was people who had done three, four, five hundred marathons in the club that you would see at these races.  Then, of course, I heard about the 50 state club. People who run a marathon in each of the 50 states. I thought, 'Wow, that would be cool. I already have a few states under my belt. Why not?' It doesn't have to be anything like Dean Karnazes doing it in 50 days. No one cares how long it takes and everything. Both Trevor and I love to travel. It seemed like a really great way to be able to explore our very diverse country and see all these amazing places, get to run. It just kind of started that way, and it took me 12 years to finish all 50 states. But it's about the journey and not the destination.  Lisa: Absolutely and that is a really... It rolls off the tongue really beautifully. Yeah. I've done a marathon in every state, 50 states.  Trevor: Here's what's cool, Lisa. I don't know if Angie is going to tell you this but she actually ran her last marathon fastest. That was her fastest marathon. That's what's so cool about our sport: that even though you get older, you can still improve in so many ways. Her very 50th state was in Hawaii. She ran 319, qualified for Boston by 20 minutes and that was at age 41. She was 10 years older but ran an hour faster than when she started.  Lisa: I love it. Go, the oldie. I'm way older than you, so I can say that. I totally agree. Endurance is one of those things. I read a statistic once said a 19-year-old and a 64-year-old are on the same level of endurance or something. You peak around 48 as far as endurance goes and I'm like, 'Yeah, amen to that.' I have similar stories. I did my best performances in my 42, 43, around that age were my peak performances. I'm way after that now, so things have slid off a little bit. Of course, it's what's going on in your life. I've had a few other dramas in my life. There's reasons for things slipping off, but I love that. 319 is an incredible time. That's just amazing. Angie: I still can't believe I did that. Was that me? I don't know. It was just one of those days where everything comes together, and you can never predict that.  Trevor: In Hawaii to boot.  Lisa: Yeah, isn't it really hot in Hawaii? Isn't that really difficult to do?  Angie: It was January so it was cooler, but it was hot compared to what I was used to. Lisa: Amazing. Trevor, how many did you do of those states? You did a few of them?  Trevor: I have. I think I'm up to 17 marathons. I'm actually doing my 18th in about 10 days from now.  Angie: But he's done a lot of half marathons. A lot of the time where I'd be doing a marathon, he would do the half marathon so he's probably run in most of those states as well.  Lisa: I study genetics, right? We have a epigenetics and functional genomics arm to our business. Everybody is genetically different. When people listen to you and go, 'My god. She's amazing. She's run 50 marathons in 50 states.' I want people to not take away from that that they should be doing back-to-back marathons because even though yeah, that's really cool to have these challenges, we're not all genetically set up for that. We need to respect that sometimes. It's been fascinating, this journey of learning about genetics.  When I did my genetics, it came back... Actually, I'm really not suited to the super long-distance running. I was like, 'What? Is that why I've got all these health problems?' Actually, my body is more set up... That doesn't mean I can't ever do an ultramarathon again, but it does mean if that if I want to have longevity and health for a long time which I do now, because I'm 50 so I want to make sure that I stay on top of things, then I shouldn't be doing back to back ultras.  That my body is much more suited to doing shorter and high-intensity sort of workouts and lots of yoga and Pilates and things as well.  I just want people to take away from there, everybody is different. For some people like my husband, he can run super super long, and it's genetically good for him to do that. For me, not so much. One of the other things that I've found within our running coaching, and we get a lot of ladies, we're probably about 70% ladies in our run coaching community. A lot of them are in their 30s, 40s, 50s. It's not the best weight loss thing, is it?  Angie: I could gain weight while running marathons and even watching what I'm eating so yeah, it is definitely. It's tricky.  Lisa: Yeah, it's not. For people to understand, if you're wanting to do a weight loss program, that would be a completely different program that I'd set you than if you're wanting to do marathons for the challenge of doing a marathon. Because there is this misconception that yeah, 'I run a marathon and I get really thin and slim.' No. I got fatter doing marathons. When I ran through New Zealand, I put on weight, and I was running 70-odd kilometres a day. Then, I put on my... I'm like, 'The hell is this about?' Everybody is different. Respect your genes. Respect your body. And as Angie said at the beginning of this podcast, compare yourself only to yourself. Unless you're in the Olympics, then, you probably compare yourself to the others. But for most of us, it is about you versus you. I think that's the beautiful thing about this sport. That we can all do this together but it's actually each of our journeys.  Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody, and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us.  Lisa: Trevor, what was your favourite race that you've done?  Trevor: Oh, thanks for asking. There's this marathon I love to talk about. You've probably heard of it. It's the Jungfrau Marathon in Switzerland. That's such a beautiful place. It's almost unreal. Otherworldly how beautiful it is.  Angie: Probably like New Zealand actually. Really beautiful.  Trevor: I've heard it's nice there too. Well, I haven't been in New Zealand yet, unfortunately. As of right now, Switzerland is my favourite place that I've run. They say that when, for those Lord of the Rings nerds who might be listening, when Tolkien, after World War I, was marching through the Lauterbrunnen Valley in Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland. He sees this amazing place and that was the inspiration for Rivendale in the book, in the movies.  Lisa: They did it there first. Trevor: Yep, exactly. Lisa: Then, we came to New Zealand to film it ‘cause it was even better.  Trevor: What's cool about that marathon is it's just pretty much all up this mountain until you get to this 7,000 feet elevation. It's pretty much a lot of power hiking. Yeah, exactly. It's pretty much a thousand... It's pretty much a lot of power hiking after the second half, which is fine because I felt like I was still making progress. But people were throwing up on the side of the trail, and I was fine because I was just I'm just power hiking. I was kind of used to it. That's been my favourite marathon thus far. Plus I had the Alps horns, Swiss Alps horns and stuff. Very transcendent.  Lisa: It was so special. I lived in Austria for 13 years and would go over to Switzerland regularly. Austria and Switzerland are very similar. And just absolutely beautiful. I really miss the beauty of the place, and the culture, and the traditions, and the cool boating. All of those sorts of things. Yeah, it's pretty special. What about you Angie? What's your favourite race?  Angie: I don't know. It's hard to hard to pick one. I would say my favourite international race was the Loch Ness marathon in Scotland. Just going around Loch Ness the lake and just incredibly beautiful. Just the chance to be able to be there and be in the country and see so many amazing things. But I don't know. There's a lot of races that I love here in the US as well. Boston is a very iconic special race. The Marine Corps marathon is really moving. Yeah, Washington, DC. Then, my home state is Montana. I've gotten to do a couple marathons there. Of course, I'm a little biased, but I love the mountains there. Lisa: Absolutely. For both of you, what was your toughest race? Have you ever not made the finish line?  Trevor: Thankfully, no.  Angie: Actually that one race that they closed the finish line. Trevor: Oh, yeah. I remember the marathon in... That was an Austria fact in 2019. They had to shut the course down because of the weather. I think that for me, the toughest race was 50k in Montana. I was probably undertrained because I'm so lazy, and I ended up taking lots of breaks. Angie: Like laying on the ground. Trevor: But I finished before the cut off and I wasn't dead last. Lisa: You take whatever you can get when you go to the bottom of the barrel. That's not much... If you get across the finish line... Trevor: Exactly. It was on the Continental Divide Trail so there's a lot of elevation. How about you, Angie? Angie: There have been a lot of marathons where I finished feeling, or even ultras, that was dragging a body part behind me but I was too stubborn to quit kind of thing. But I think, probably the most difficult one was the Leadville Trail Marathon in Leadville, Colorado because it starts at 10,000 feet and it just goes up from there. There was a section, a one-mile section to get up to Hope Pass, which was the highest point, and it took me 30 minutes to go a mile. I would just walk a few feet, just breathe, gasp for air, pretend like you're taking a picture because you're embarrassed at your pace. That was very challenging because I was not... We were living in sea level basically. To go and do that not being acclimated, it was challenging. Then, to look to the side of the trail and like, 'If I make a misstep, I'm going to fall off this mountain and die.' One of those where I finished and I was just like, 'So thankful to be alive.'  Lisa: Sounds pretty damn scary. What do you think are the biggest learnings from all of these races in this journey that you've been on for however long you've been running for? What what are some of the biggest takeaways? Do you think this crosses over into daily life, and to your businesses, and to the work you do, and stuff like that, and challenges in your home life, and stuff?  Angie: Yeah, I would say the marathon and any long-distance running is a great metaphor for life because you have to look at the long picture. Like you were saying earlier, we're always changing and evolving as people, and we have to keep that in mind. I've kind of through the years, through some trial and error, my goal is to be a strong healthy runner for life. Being healthy through that lifespan is way more important than any one race for me. I think that it's very important like we see people who are taking on these challenges.  It is important to have goals and everything but I think it's also important to just look at your overall health. Is your sleep, is your nutrition, is your overall strength, are your relationships good? How is your mental, and your emotional, your spiritual life? All those things go hand in hand. I think that at some point, running accomplishments are only going to be so satisfying if those other things aren't in place. That's been a big thing for me. I tend to be really goal-oriented person. Always looking to the future like, 'When this happens, I'm going to be happy and be satisfied.'  I finally came to the realisation that if I can't be happy right now, in the imperfect, the way life is if I can't be happy now, that I'm not going to be happy in the future. If I accomplish these goals, there's always going to be something else to chase. That's been something that I've been thinking about lately of just how to really appreciate the present. I think that really goes into running or whatever people's goals are because there's going to be a lot of the present that is challenging and that we don't want to go through. I think it's important to do hard things, take on hard challenges. But there's going to be a lot of hard things that find us that we don't want to have to deal with, that we're going to be forced to wrestle with. I think that having that long-term goal and having done hard things in the past prepares you for those challenges that you never wanted to take on in the first place.  Lisa: Yeah, when you've been struggling, going back to the genetics, you probably got a dopamine thing where you have to be chasing dopamine all the time. I know I've got that gene called the DRD2 gene where I don't have a heck of a lot of receptors for dopamine, so I'm always chasing a mission. Just coming to understand that about yourself, it's like, 'Aha. That's why I tend to...' Like my brother said to me once, 'Why are you always on a mission? Why can't you just sit on a beach and enjoy the day?' ‘It's like asking a table not to be flat. That's who I am. I get up and I'm missioning all day, every day.' And I'm like you, Angie. I'm trying to change the talk in my head to being present.  Sometimes, when you are going through challenges and life keeps chucking them at us at the moment, you don't want to be in the now. One of the big things that I really miss because I'm not doing ultras anymore, is having that single focus, one goal. Life was purely about being a selfish athlete who's just got on a mission. I don't have the luxury of that now with things in life. I miss it. I miss it terribly. That simplicity of life where you've got just one big huge goal and you're doing your work and stuff. But this is the one thing, and then when you're actually in the race, that's what I found beautiful about racing, you're not thinking about the mortgage and the what's going on in the family or anything else because you're just like, [imitates heavy breathing], ‘Got to get up this hill.'  Angie: To the next aid station.  Lisa: Right in the moment. For so much of my life, I know that I'm in the future or the past and that's really learning to be in the now without having that single singular focus. Really wise words, Angie, I think. Trevor, what would you say that running has bought to your mental resilience and toughness and ability to cope with things?  Trevor: Well, I know running marathons makes a lot of other stuff seem easier. Yeah. I remember how tough my first half marathon was, and I thought I was going to die because I was pretty much a non-runner previous to meeting Angie. After I did my first full marathon, then a half seemed a walk in the park. It seemed so easy even though they're still challenging, especially if you're trying to race a half marathon. We've had Joe de Sena on our podcast a couple of times. He's the founder of the Spartan Race. Lisa: Yeah, I've been on his show. Awesome.  Trevor: Oh, Cool. Yeah. He's a scary guy. I always remember something he talks about in his book, Spartan Up and that's obstacle immunity. When you make yourself do hard things, you become immune to obstacles in life. You can just push through them, hurdle over them. But it's when you're playing it safe, when you're afraid to get out of your comfort zone, sign up for that challenge, that marathon, or whatever your challenges is, it's this when you get more timid and hard things seem harder than they really are. It's all in our heads.  Lisa: Ah, that's gold. Obstacle immunity. That's going on my Instagram today. Thanks, Joe. Because it is. When somebody or when someone tells you can't do something, that's just for me like, 'Oh, we'll see. I don't agree with you. We'll find out.' That's really served me well. The more that you realise when people tell you can't do something, and then you go and do it, that's just other people's limiting beliefs. This is an all areas, certainly in the medical space and with story with my mum that my listeners know about. If I'd listened to everybody telling me I can't do something, we would never be where we are now. I think you have this mentality. You have, 'Oh, obstacle? How do I get around that? What else can I do?' Rather than, 'Oh, obstacle. I have to stop and sit down and cry and that's it.' I think that mentality is brilliant. Obstacle immunity. Hear, hear. I love it. Angie: It doesn't mean that you don't feel those hard feelings as you get over the obstacle. I think it's important to acknowledge that it's hard and take time to feel that frustration or that sadness or that disappointment. But I think also acknowledging those emotions helps you get over the obstacle too because you're not fighting your emotions then. You're using those and using that to fuel your fire or to just do what needs to be done. Lisa: What I think is beautiful too is when you look back and you've overcome challenges that makes you stronger for the next challenge. You lift your horizon up every time. You get to the end of your first half marathon. For five minutes, you go, 'I never ever want to do that again because that hurts so much.' Then the next day, you're on the internet, 'What is the next one? Where's the next challenge?' You can see runners do this over and over again. I just laugh now when they say 'I'm never doing that again.' Because it's usually until the pain wears off and they're off on the next mission.  It is like lifting your horizon every time. It's not something that stays out there permanently either, by the way. You build yourself up to marathon, ultramarathon, whatever your goal is. Then if you don't do it for a while, I can tell you as someone who's not doing ultras now, your world starts to shrink back in as to what you are capable of doing. For me, I'm thinking, 'Can I do a half marathon?' That's what I would like at the moment with a load that I've got on, which is a lot, 'Can I get back to that stage?' My focus has been on CrossFit and other things.  My body's changed considerably, for the better I'd say, but when it comes to going back long, whoa. I've got to push that horizon back out again. It doesn't stay permanent. In other words, it's a constant work battle really to keep it. When you're getting older, you've also got that aspect coming into it too, trying to keep things at bay. I had Dean on the podcast last week and we were talking about that because we're both somewhat north of 40. It's like, 'Yeah, things aren't quite working like they used to do. I'm like, 'Yeah, I'm working on that. I've got all these things for you, Dean.' 'Some great longevity stuff. Come try this and do that.'  That's sort of an interesting path to go down to because you start to think, 'Well, I can keep my fitness to the best that I can by keeping up with the current research, and the knowledge, and stuff, and doing the best things, and prioritising things like sleep.' You can have a massive impact on your body, and it's not just about the training I think is what I'm... Yeah. Guys, you've also got three kids. Three kids, busy life, running marathons. Most people can't, I can't do that. How do you find the time?  Angie: Well, we are very fortunate that now we are self-employed. We kind of can design our own schedules, and I think that's a big advantage to the training because some days, it happens at a certain time. Some days, it has to be pushed around a bit because of appointments, kids, things that we've got going on and everything. We've also tried to include our kids in the journey. Especially when they were young, they would travel with us a lot and they got to go to so many of the states that we travelled to. We tried to expand their horizons as well.  Now that they're older and everything, sometimes, he travels, he's going to Italy next week. I'll stay home with the kids, and then I'll go somewhere in September. It's just about making it work and making sure the family is supportive. It's not like your family has to be your biggest fans because there's only a certain level that your family is going to get it. Like our kids could pretty much care less that we do marathons. They're like, 'So what?'  Lisa: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I know. I hear you.  Angie: 'What are you making for dinner, Mom? I don't care that you just ran a race.' You know that kind of thing? Lisa: They're very good at bringing you back down to earth, family. I've got brothers and yeah. 'You ran across the Sahara? Oh, yeah. Whatever.' 'Oh, you wrote a book? Oh, that's cool. I'll never read it.'  Angie: 'What's it about?' 'Okay.'  Trevor: That's cruel.  Lisa: But that's family, that keeps you keeps you grounded. 'Oh, would've been nice to get a pat on the back.' They're not like that at all. Very supportive actually, but when we were younger, that was definitely the case. Probably vice versa because my brother does surfing and I'm always like, 'Oh, yeah, are you just riding 20-foot waves? That's cool.' Now, I'm sort of like, 'Oh, Wow. That's pretty awesome. Go guys.'  You guys have been epic today. Thank you so much for being on the show. I really appreciate it. I thank your podcast. And tell everybody where they can find you: Where's the best home to find you on the internet and Instagram and all those sort of good places and how to connect? Trevor: No problem. Yeah, thank you so much for the opportunity to be on the podcast, and if anybody wants to find this, you can just go to marathontrainingacademy.com. If you are looking for our podcast, if you just type in marathon training, we usually just come up as the first result, but it's called The Marathon Training Academy podcast. We're on Instagram, @MarathonAcademy.  Lisa: Wonderful. I will put all those in the show notes. Thank you very much guys for your time today. It's been absolutely wonderful chatting with you.  Angie: Thank you so much. Trevor: Likewise. Thank you.  That's it this week for Pushing the Limits. Be sure to rate, review, and share with your friends, and head over and visit Lisa and her team at lisatamati.com   

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The Inflation Gut Punch that the Biden Administration seems unwilling or incapable of addressing

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— GOP disappointment in New Hampshire—where the very popular Governor—Chris Sununu—who is leading in all polls for a Senate run—says he is not going to—   TWO— Down under—the Pfizer vaccine is the focus of much scrutiny—and the Moderna vaccine is being withdrawn for people under 30 in parts of Europe—hmmmm—   THREE— The Inflation Gut Punch—that the Biden Administration seems unwilling or incapable of addressing—is eating up families spending money—and eating away at any support for the President—as his approval numbers are collapsing faster that the Afghan army—when they were abandoned by the U-S President—  

Region 5 Gymnastics Insider Podcast
College Salute: Alumni Conversation- Fierce, Sassy, Piercing the Soul from Sooner Anastasia Webb

Region 5 Gymnastics Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:29


We had the pleasure of sitting down with the 2022 NCAA All Around Champion and soul piercing performer Oklahoma Senior, now grad student Anastasia Webb. We have a great conversation about her memories in Region 5, her experiences at Oklahoma, the origin of her gymnastics style that is not short of adjectives, the NCAA Championships and more. Anastasia was one of the most underrated gymnasts during her career even though she was one of the best in the NCAA. This athlete was a champion in club, champion in college and on the road to be a champion in life. Listen in and find out more about Anastasia. 

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, It‘s all about the economy and it is not doing well.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— A U-S metallurgist has lied about the strength of steel in U-S submarines since 1985—the entire fleet could be at rish because of just one traitor—   TWO— Build back better is a damned joke—when you realize it would result in the highest taxes of any western nation—that's right Joe Bidens plan would make America a desert of economic activity—   THREE— Its all about the economy—and it is not doing well—  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, This all leads the Democrats into a black hole of political failure, the culture wars are not going their way and that's why two thirds of Americans do not want Joe Biden to run again

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Columbia University will now fire employees they determine—have used the wrong pronouns in referring to others—not a joke folks—you get fired for saying he instead of she—or whatever—   TWO— This all leads the Democrats into a black hole of political failure—the culture wars are not going their way—and that's why two thirds of Americans do not want Joe Biden to run again—   THREE— Or maybe they don't want Joe Biden to run again—because he has been an abject failure by just about any measure—   The economy is the biggest issue and it is sluggish to say the least—12 million Americans remain on the sidelines—NOT working—either by choice or because they cannot find a job they want—   For 72,000 truck drivers—they are out of the game and the supply chain is jammed up—because they cannot pass a drug test to get behind the wheel anymore— this is what happens when you legalize weed and other drugs across the board—it means people cannot pass the simple drug test it requires to operate big equipment—   Now the cost of everything is exploding—including basics like meat and milk—going into places we have not seen in decades—or maybe ever—   Couple that with Energy Secretary and former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm laughing about the cost of gas—and saying there just isn't anything President Biden or anyone else can do about it—of course that is simply not true—letting pipelines flow and giving new leases on Federal Lands for oil and gas exploration—would certainly change things—   But the Democrats are beholden to the Green New Deal Nazi's—and therefore they are kneeling at their feet—and sacrificing the rest of us along the way— in pursuit of some central planner Utopian visionquest to hell—but I digress—   Lets start with a refresher course—  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, It really is all about the economy and how much everything costs, how many people are still not working, how the supply chain is like a chain reaction pile-up on the freeway

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— One of the world's largest investment firms—will now have to get permission to hire a white guy—no— you heard me right—I am the declared enemy of the socialist left— OK—I accept!   TWO— Where is Governor Gavin Newsome? He has not been seen in public since getting a covid booster shot way back on October 27th—he has cancelled all public appearances too—hmmmm—   THREE— It really is all about the economy—and how much everything costs—how many people are still not working—how the supply chain is like a chain reaction pile-up on the freeway—   This is happening while President Biden is talking about paying illegal aliens hundreds of thousands of dollars—by falsely claiming—the U-S somehow lost their kids—yeah—lost their kids—after they came across the border illegally—   But after the crushing defeats handed to the Democrats all over the country last week—you'd think they would be on track to solve some problems for average Americans—But it is not seeming that way at all—   Not in the least in fact—it seems more like they are ready to rub your faces in it—even as the Presidents approval ratings fall to their lowest level yet—   You would think—the economy might be really important—to make sure—they survive the mid-term elections next year—well—you'd be wrong—  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Democrats are struggling to hear the voters of America that have sent a clear message rejecting the far left Agenda

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Senator Rand Paul says the NIH lied about funding gain of function research—and Anthony Fauci's role in it all—and now he says they are still lying about all of it   TWO— The Osha Mandates are coming for larger employers beginning on January 4th—and failure to comply could mean big money out the door for the companies—   THREE— Democrats are struggling to hear the voters of America—that have sent a clear message—rejecting the far left Agenda—its so bad out there that Democrat Senator Joe Manchin is saying out loud America is a center Right country—he is right about that—   Tulsi Gabbard the former Congresswoman and Presidential Candidate—is openly applauding the win by Republican Gelnn Youngkin in Virginia—along with Winsome Sears and Jason Miyares—the GOP Trifecta is a big deal to the formerly dark blue state—   In New Jersey—Governor Phil Murphy is claiming victory—but Republicans are saying not so fast—   And Americans are saying—Stop what you are doing—BUT Nancy and her band of Thieves are still trying to steal your hard earned money to buy votes—but they should take a closer look at the results in Virginia—and they would realize—the biggest loss besides parents and suburban voters—was the massive loss of support from Hispanics—55% of Hispanic voters went with Youngkin and the GOP ticket—   Yet—those on the far left are saying—the real problem is they didn't go far enough into the Marxist abyss—well I am here to tell you—the wheels will be falling off that wagon—if they haven't already—   AND its coming from several directions  

Cast of Many Things
[HTP] Season 2 Episode 4: She is Fierce

Cast of Many Things

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 80:01


The Princess Council is faced with not one but two impending apocalypses. Can they bring to bear the combined forces of radical stunts, rubber duckies, teatime, and an army of the living dead to save their world, topple the forces of colonialism, and make a new friend? Find out in the epic finale! Starring: Princess Bubbles: Nicole Princess Iridium Corsair: Ulfrigg Princess Lenore: Anna | @Nymeria941 Princess Sparklepuff: Michelle Weaver: Nathan | @natescottjones Waltz (Tschikovsky Op. 40) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4605-waltz-tschikovsky-op-40- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Grand Dark Waltz Moderato by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/7923-grand-dark-waltz-moderato License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Burn The World Waltz by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/7912-burn-the-world-waltz License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Sunflower Dance Party by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5006-sunflower-dance-party License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Spy Glass by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4410-spy-glass License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Unnatural Situation by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4567-unnatural-situation License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Graveyard Shift by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3823-graveyard-shift License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Raving Energy (faster) by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5030-raving-energy-faster- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

POSITIVELY JOY
Fierce and joyful, Doris Swift says every woman of God has a calling

POSITIVELY JOY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 41:20


Doris Swift has long felt a calling from God. Even when life was hard, she knew He was there -- From an unplanned teen pregnancy to difficult life choices to people trying to discourage her. Even when detractors told her no, she knew her message would be called Fierce Calling, which turned into a podcast. Doris tells women how to forgive themselves of past mistakes.  Her podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/fierce-calling/id1486667407 Her website: https://dorisswift.com/

Pushing The Limits
Handling Pressured Situations and Making Career Transitions with Conrad Smith

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 63:55


In our fast-paced world, everyone feels pressured to be the best and to do their best. It's easy to succumb to worry and anxiety during this time. This week, a superstar athlete encourages us to reframe pressure as an opportunity. You may not be involved in the sports world, but you can still learn from it. For our guest, overcoming high-pressure situations boils down to two things: trusting in the preparation you've done and taking things one step at a time.  Retired All Blacks player Conrad Smith joins us in this episode to talk about his experiences in the sporting world. He gives us a glimpse into his childhood and how he transitioned in and out of professional rugby. It's easy to make sports your whole identity if you're not careful, and Conrad details how athletes can avoid this trap. He also shares how we can equip ourselves to handle high-pressure situations. If you want to hear about Conrad's tales with the All Blacks and know how to be better at dealing with being pressured, this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Gain insights on the dangers of being too immersed in a sports bubble.  Learn how you can deal with feeling pressured. Understand the importance of adaptability in our fast-changing world. Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness! All Blacks  International Rugby Players    Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. 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Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [02:59] Conrad's Childhood Conrad's family used to move around until they settled at New Plymouth when he was six. His family was very close, as his parents always made time for him and his siblings.  They were also supportive of both his academics and sports. Conrad spent most of his childhood playing sports and helping out on their family farm.  [09:03] Conrad as a Young Sportsman  Conrad wasn't initially an overachiever when it comes to sports.  During his time at school, rugby didn't take up a huge portion of his life. Conrad didn't feel pressured to play, unlike most kids involved in sports today.  He's very grateful that he was able to finish his law degree before he started playing professionally.  [11:44] The Dangers of the Sports System Nowadays, there's an obsession with finding talent and training them hard from a young age.  The rationale behind this is to give these kids the best chances of success. However, Conrad is sceptical about this approach. He believes that balancing life and sports is crucial, especially because sports is a short-term career. Many athletes end up going bankrupt or developing depression because they don't have a life outside of playing sports. [16:26] Staying Grounded When you're in a sports bubble, it's easy to lose touch with reality. If you're handling a high-paying sports career, you can forget how real people live. Athletes need to stay grounded and not tie their identity with their sports. This way, they can land on their feet after the bubble bursts.  The challenge is to find other things that you enjoy and avoid the trap of coaching after your playing career ends.  [29:39] On Career Transitions With the rapid changes in the world, we need to adapt to stay relevant.  It takes courage to change your career.  However, you can always find support when you open up to the people around you.   [33:06] Mental Health in Sports  All athletes feel pressured with their sports—what's important is how they deal with it.  When you look at being pressured differently, you can see it as an opportunity.   There's no quick fix for handling high-pressure situations. It's essential to find what works for you. [36:38] How to Deal with Feeling Pressured  Preparation is critical to help overcome feeling pressured.  If you have done the prep work, all that's left for you to do is execute.  Don't get overwhelmed by the bigger picture. Instead, focus on the minute details. You need to be at the top of your game if you're playing in the Rugby World Cup. Listen to the full episode to hear how Conrad overcomes being pressured! [45:21] Conrad's Experiences with the All Blacks Conrad was playing for the Wellingtons when he was picked to play for the All Blacks. His fellow players and coaches told him not to feel pressured and encouraged him to have fun.  For Conrad, being an All Black never lost its glow. He acknowledges what the team means for the country.  He believes that the All Blacks continues to perform well because the players uphold the team's legacy. In particular, their jersey means so much to Conrad. Find out why when you tune in to the full episode!  [52:51] The Future of Rugby Now working as a lawyer in the player association, Conrad speculates that women's rugby will see tremendous growth in the coming years.  The women's rugby players are more motivated by the sport. They want to reach more women and girls through it.  Since this women's rugby is still a relatively small industry, there's not much effort to commercialise yet.  This can be an advantage. It's similar to how small but nimble companies can overtake big industries. [59:56] Conrad's Advice to Parents and Children It is much more harmful to shelter your children from sports. As you get serious about sports, remember to stay grounded and balanced. Connect with the real world as much as you can.  Lastly, be open to opportunities and changes.    7 Powerful Quotes ‘I think it's fine to keep a balance, and to play other sports, and to experience, just live a normal life. I think you can still excel.' ‘You have a crazy number of bankruptcy, crazy number of rates of depression because they haven't learned to live outside of their sport.' ‘You have a lot of retired players that feel like they have to coach because they think it's all they know. The challenge, I suppose is, then of being careful not to fall into that trap.' ‘Whatever you decide that you want to be, you can become.' ‘The bigger the moments and the bigger the pressure, it's the funny thing, it's the more important that you focus on the smaller, minute detail.' ‘If you break it down into one more step, just one more, and then you just keep going and keep going. Then, invariably, that mindset or that thing that's in your head passes and then you're back in the game.' ‘If it's a conversation you're just having in your own mind, you will never get anywhere. You just need to open up about it.'   About Conrad Conrad Smith was a long-time player of New Zealand's All Blacks and helped lead the team to the 2011 and 2015 Rugby World Cups. He is widely known as “The Snake” for his ability to slip through tackles. At 38, he captained the Wellington-based Hurricanes in the Southern Hemisphere's Rugby league, then retired after the 2015 World Cup.  He now serves as legal counsel and project manager for International Rugby Players, the global representative body for the sport. He is also the high-performance manager for Pau, a French club that competes in the Top 14, the highest in the country's domestic league.  Find out more about Conrad and his work at International Rugby Players.    Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends, so they can learn what to do when they feel pressured.  Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa     Transcript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com.  Lisa Tamati: Lisa Tamati speaking. Welcome back to Pushing the Limits. This week, I have Conrad Smith, the famous, famous All Black, who many of you Kiwis at least will know, a superstar athlete. And we share information about his career, and what it's like to be in the World Cup, and lots of exciting stuff. Also, what it's like to be post-career now, retiring, some of the issues that he sees around young athletes. Really lovely and interesting conversation with the amazing Conrad Smith who's also a lawyer as well as an All Black. Talk about an overachiever.  Before we get on to the show, just want to remind you, we have our epigenetics flagship program that we're running constantly. So if anybody wants to find out what the genes are all about, and how to optimise your food, your exercise, your lifestyle, your chronobiology, your mood and behaviour, all these things to your specific genes, and get the blueprint and the user manual for your body, then please come and check out what we do. Head on over to lisatamati.com, hit the ‘Work with Us' button, and then you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program. That will take you over to our site where you can find out all about that. Or you can always reach out to me, and I can send you a little bit of a video, and maybe jump on a call to explain how it all works. It's a really powerful and awesome program. We've taken hundreds and hundreds of people through this program, and it's really been life-changing for so many, including myself and my family. So if you're wanting to find out about that, just head on over to lisatamati.com and hit the work with us button.  Also, just wanted to let you know that I do a lot of motivational speaking, corporate speaking. I would love if anyone knows, or organising a conference, or team workshop, or anything like that, please reach out to me: lisa@lisatamati.com if you're interested in finding out about my speaking programs. Also, we do corporate wellness programs on that front as well. How can you upgrade your life and be the best version of you can be at work and at home? That's what we're all about. So thanks for that letting me do that little plug.  Now, we're going to be going over to Conrad Smith who's just been moved back to New Plymouth. I've had the privilege of meeting him a number of times and working on a couple of things. So I hope you enjoy this conversation. Now, over to Conrad.  Well, hi everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits this week with Lisa Tamati. I am really excited for today's conversation. I've teamed up with another amazing superstar, a top athlete for you guys to enjoy learning from today. I have Conrad Smith. Conrad, welcome to the show.  Conrad Smith: Thank you, Lisa. Thank you for the introduction.  Lisa: You hardly need an introduction especially to people living in New Zealand. A legendary All Black. You played for how many years? I think it's 2004? Conrad: 15 years. Lisa: 15 as an All Black, as a winger. You've been a captain of the Hurricanes. You've been, I don't know, Player of the Year and Sportsman of the Year in Wellington. Your accolades are such a huge list, Conrad. You're blushing already, I can see. But really, an incredible athletic career and you were also talented as a cricketer, I understand. Conrad: When I was a little fella, when I was little fella. I was too little for rugby so I played more cricket, but yeah.  Lisa: And then you grew. Conrad: I was a New Zealander. New Zealand kid back then. Yeah, then I grew up. That's right.  Lisa: Yeah. Then you grew up and you were big enough to take on the big boys. Say, Conrad, give us a little bit of a feel like where you grew up. And how much of an influence did your childhood have on what you ended up doing with your rugby career? Conrad: Yeah. So I was actually born down Hawera. My father was a policeman so we moved around with him a little bit in the early years, and then moved to New Plymouth when I was about six. We're a very, very close family. He gave a lot of time. My mom and dad would always make time for the kids: a couple older brothers, younger sister. Yeah, it was a great childhood. A lot of sport was played but we all did pretty well academically, which my parents laughed at because both of them never made it. They did poorly in school. Really, really supportive parents in terms of... It's funny, I probably took it for granted then, but I don't ever remember my parents either not being there or having to work.  Everything we did, we always were supported. And they were there, whether it was just drive us there, or coach our teams, or try and help us with our homework. I think that was what I've, like I said, took for granted but now, being older, I realise how important that was and why we're still such a close family, and my brothers are my best mates, and my sister is. We still meet. Yeah we still, obviously. We're all sort of have moved around the world but we're sort of pretty close together again. I suppose I try to be now with my own family like my dad was to me. Yeah, so those were the luckiest break in my head, I suppose. I always say people talk about luck, especially in sport but for me, it was just the family I was born into and the sport I had as a young fella.  Lisa: Yeah. Now, that's brilliant. And you had a couple of kids yourself?  Conrad: Yeah, yeah. Now, we've got two of them, just about to go off to school. Luca is my seven, and we had him in New Zealand, and then our daughter was actually born over in France while I was over there for four or five years. She's come back with us. Lisa: Growing up in the... You grew up in the 80s, I grew up in the 70s. Showing my age, yeah. But I think in the 80s, it was still very much like an outdoorsy lifestyle, like that good Kiwi kid upbringing, especially in Taranaki because we both come from here. Having that being outdoors in nature all day, as kids, we never came home before dark, sort of thing. Was it the same in your household?  Conrad: Yeah, for sure and like I say to all the brothers, they were pretty influential in what I did. I just sort of hung around, tail off them but very much, we were always out. I just think of my childhood, it was all about playing sport, finding areas to play sport. You'd sort of get pushed out, and as we try and play inside, then we'd get pushed out to the garden and we'd ruin the garden or ruin the lawn. We're just constantly finding places to do what guys do with a ball and you can do anything. Then, the wider family were farming so my dad was on the farm. He sort of got kicked off by his older brother, but that was a family farm.  So we would eat out that way and that's that Douglas from Stratford on the way there with my mom in there. That's been in the family for three or four generations and that would be where we're kids. We'd help with haymaking, we'd help with carving, we'd help all sorts. That was pretty much my favourite holiday, and the same as all of us kids would be to go spend some time there and help on the farm. That was just a childhood, yeah. You just know what friends to do and always outside, didn't matter if it was raining and cold as it often is at most parts. We just put a coat on and carry on.  Lisa: Oh, man that just takes me back to my childhood, and I often think, 'Man, I want to go back.' What happened to that simple life that we had when we were kids? You're very lucky to have such wonderful parents, obviously. It's such a cool family. You also went off into university and became a lawyer, as you do, as an All Black. A slight overachiever there, Conrad. Did you always want to be a lawyer apart from wanting to be an All Black?  Conrad: As I sort of said before, I wasn't a huge overachiever on the sport front. Well, I went to Francis Douglas; it's not a huge sporting school. We had sporting teams, but that wasn't very much. Part of it, you were there to study, you were there to get an education, and I enjoyed it. I enjoyed school. I think it is a great school, and a lot of my mates now are still from the mates I made in my school years, and yeah. So I didn't mind class and I never had a... I suppose leaving high school as it was when I was going to go to university, my brothers had both done that. That was sort of a thing to do.  Law was, yeah. It was something. I enjoyed English history. Those sort of subjects at school in Wellington wasn't too far. I sort of wanted to go down to meet my brothers down there and that was the scarfie life was. But he sort of talked me out of it just because he... I think he'd done about four years by that stage, and flying down, and getting himself back and forth was pretty tough. They sort of said, 'Well, if you have to, go closer to home.' and that was when I ended up in Wellington and I really enjoyed law and rugby.  Yeah like I say, sport was great, but it was two nights a week. It wasn't taking over my life as I know it does to a lot of kids nowadays. They make academies, and whatnot, and maybe talk about whether that's a good thing or a bad thing. But yeah, I was able to finish a full law degree and luckily, that sort of perfectly dovetailed into when I started playing professionally. Yeah, it was just sort of fortunate for me in terms of the way it all worked out and the timing. That's something I was very grateful for, obviously. Lisa: Yeah, yeah. Because right now, like your career, your playing career at least is over, you've got something to do. You've got a qualification. If we dive into that subject a little bit, so a lot of the young guys now are coming through and they're sort of getting picked out early along the way. What sort of dangers do you see with that system?  Conrad: Yeah, I do worry about it,  and I've spoken about it before. Because it's not just in rugby. It's in all sports. There's sort of a real obsession towards identifying talent young. Then the excuses, are you giving them the best chance of success? So we're gonna do all the work with them, and specialise them, and make them concentrate on the sport. But firstly, I don't know if that actually helps them with their sport a whole lot. I think it's fine to keep a balance, and to play other sports, and to experience, just live a normal life. I think you can still excel. But the other thing is that if it doesn't work out or even if it works out, sports are short term industry. You know, I know that that's not forever, and when you get to the back end of that, if you're purely invested in one sport when the time runs out, you got to rebuild a lot of the... Yeah and that's a real problem.  And you don't need to look far to find a lot of evidence about that. We've been afoot and looking at American sports because they've been professional a lot longer than we have. Some of the statistics is just shocking. And people would think that they paid so much money, the athletes in those sports in America that they should be able to live literally after... They could do whatever they want. Theoretically, they have enough money just to retire but the statistics are not that at all. You have a crazy number of bankruptcy, crazy number of rates of depression because they haven't learned to live outside of their sport. That's sort of been taken away from them because they're placed into their sport so young, and then just cut, and there's no real assistance around that.  So yeah, that's an extreme example and we're nowhere near at that stage here with the way the academies and that are set up. I know most of the people involved are very mindful of the things I've just talked about. Lisa: That's pretty...just open that conversation now. Conrad: Yeah. I just think there's a lot to be said around leading young people. I look at myself and from that period of development where maybe nowadays, I'd been in an academy, I was lead to play multiple... I played cricket, I played basketball, I ran, I did, God knows, all these things, and who's to say what lessons I learned from those other sports that I actually used in rugby? Because there's so much that you can pick up and also being able to study.  For me to have a degree, the benefits that gave me to deal with injuries, to deal with all the downsides of sport because I had a background and the education. It's really helpful. You relax a lot more. You get a perspective on the sorts of things that if you're just wrapped up in a sport and you get an injury, man that's tough. You can't do what you would like to do. Where do you turn? But I think if you've had a bit of an education, and it doesn't have to be a law degree, but if you've got some other life or other opportunities and options that you can turn to in those times, and it gives you perspective and a sense of reality, and you don't get so caught up in that, so yeah. I know it is appreciated. I just think it may be still underrated by a lot of the people that are setting up these academies and things for the young sportsmen.  Lisa: Yeah, and that's a good conversation to have and just be open about. Because you're one injury away from ending your career at any time. And then, to build... that's like building a sort of a house on a foundation of saying if you haven't got something else and you haven't got the life skills, if I just look at the opposite extreme with my sport where you have... When I started, just a bunch of weirdos doing crazy stuff, right? There's no structure, and there was no support. There was no knowledge, but it taught me that I had to go and market myself. I had to go and push everything that... Even when I represented New Zealand, I had to buy my own singlet to wear at the thing. Get a little... I'm getting here and do all of the things. So you had to market yourself, present yourself, become a speaker, do all of this sort of stuff in order to... So through that, you learn a lot of life skills anyway and then it was never a professional sport, in a sense. I managed to live off my sport for a number of years, but that was an exceptionally... That just because I found ways to do that but it wasn't a pathway that anybody could follow. But it taught me to fight. I remember having this conversation with my brother, Dawson, who I know was one of your heroes when you were a little feller. My brother, Dawson, was a Hurricanes player and Super Rugby in Taranaki and international as well. When I came back from Australia, and I came back to New Zealand, and I was raising money to go to Death Valley, which was a big race for me, he was like, 'Why are you in the media? Where you want to be? I used to hide from the damn media.' And I'm like, 'Yeah, but you got everything given to you, mate. You got all your clothes, all your gear, you got stuff gifted to you left, right, and centre. You've actually got no idea what another sport is.' That structure, that framework is not there. And that's good and it's bad.  When you have everything laid on for you, but you haven't had to fight in society for your things... Because I've talked to a lot of rugby clubs actually around the country to all the younger guys. Everything is laid out for them. They have to fight. They've got a lot of pressure as far as performance and all that sort of stuff goes, but the rest of life is sort of taken care of. So it's something to be wary of. I think you got young ones and going up through this system is to just think about, 'What is the fallback option here? What else are they going to do when their career is over?' Because it can be very short, and not everybody reaches the stardom that you did. Not everyone gets to play for the All Blacks' 94 games or... Conrad: We talked about the bubble. They use that term a lot within sports. So you come into this bubble. When you stay in that bubble, you lose touch with reality. You're actually... I know because I've seen it, and I'd use that same terminology and say, 'Come on and talk to the guys. I've got to get out of the bubble.' It was always a thing of because people would... And you'd see it with people that get drawn into a sporting career and if they're doing really well. And you're right. It's only in New Zealand that it's probably only really rugby. There are other sports now that get paid really well, but they have to head overseas so... You're thrown into a lifestyle where everything is laid on and you don't actually... You forget how the real people live and the real life is, and that the bubble bursts, and it all comes about, and this is what I'm saying: The more time you spend in that bubble, when it bursts, the harder it is. The fall can really take a lot of getting used to it and some people don't.  Unfortunately, even the guys I have played with, I've got as many stories of guys who are struggling, still struggling as the guys who fell on their feet. I don't think anyone does straight away, even myself. People will say ‘You handled it well.' I've been retired just over three years and I knew. Everyone seemed to me it's at least two years before you even... There's still things you struggle with it. And that was spot on. It just takes a lot of time to understand that you're never going to get up in the morning and have that same drive. You're very lucky that when you're as a sportsman or woman to have that drive. Just do the same thing. But you got to find something else, and it will never replace that and it's not meant to, but it's a challenge for everyone. Those life experiences during that sporting career are so important so that when the bubble bursts, when you come out of it, it's just a little bit easier to find your feet. Because otherwise, that is tough, and it's a bit of a worry.  Lisa: Yeah yeah exactly. Just on even from that identity of being this athlete and you had a singular purpose. Pretty much every day when you got up, it was to train and it was to be the best for the next game or the next whatever. And that gets taken away and then the complexity of life comes in. Yeah? I retired from doing ultramarathons at 48. It's a sport where you can go a lot longer, and I've got mates that are still in their 60s and 70s doing it. But what I do see often in the ultra running community is they don't know anything else so, 'I'm going to stick with what I know and I'm just going to beat the crap out of my body until it falls into the ground.' Rather than going, 'Hang on a minute. This is no longer conducive to what I really want for me.' And reassessing. With rugby, you're forced to because physically, at 48, you wouldn't be able to keep up with a 20-year-old.  There's that whole, have you struggled? I know I've struggled with that whole identity. Like, 'Who the hell am I if I'm not that hardass athlete and I'm not able to do what I used to do?' Because I still get it in the running scene, 'Oh, a marathon must be... you must do that before breakfast.' I'm like, 'Yeah, no. That's not...' Now, a 5K's quite long. You know what I mean? So your horizon comes back in. So I've spent decades pushing my horizon out to be able to go longer, longer, longer, bigger. Then, life happens. In my case it was mum and that was the end of the career. It was high time; it was overdue. But that whole, you just had the rug pulled out from under you, and your identity is tied up in that performance. Have you found that a struggle?  Conrad: Yeah. Yeah, I think. Like I say, everyone does. You're lying if you say people do it easy. Again, I think a lot of the work, hopefully, athletes that handle it better have thought about that work during their career and they don't... We were given some great support while I was playing, particularly, within the All Blacks, guys like Gilbert Enoka with the background. And the whole mental side of not just the game, but of life, in terms of keeping...being grounded, keeping perspective. Part of that was your identity and not letting rugby define you. We used to say that you're a person that plays rugby, you're not a rugby player. It has this other life. You're actually... I play rugby because I like playing. Maybe that's not who I am. That's what the public sees, and I think if you get a handle on that while you're playing, then you understand that when rugby is taken away but that's not part of... ‘That's what I used to do. Now, I'm not doing it anymore but I'm still the person I've been this whole way. Now, my journey carries on.'  Like I say, that's easier said than done. There's people that become the rugby player. That's all they are, and so that's the real challenge. For me, it was about just finding other challenges. And I think anyone in terms of rugby or any sport yourself, you find other challenges, it gives you... You realise your own identity and you find other things to do that give you fulfilment. I think aligned with that is the whole... When I think of rugby players, a lot of them who find the identity in rugby, they then just go on to coaching, and this is a real problem, and it might... I don't think that's just with the sport of rugby, but you have a lot of retired players that feel like they have to coach because they think it's all they know.  The challenge, I suppose is, then of being careful not to fall into that trap. It was easier for me. I studied. I used to be a lawyer. I'm sure I could go back and do that. Maybe not as a lawyer, but there are other skills that I have. That's a really hard message, but it's a really important message to give all sportsmen. To rugby players, I'm always telling them, 'You don't have to stay in rugby, you know. You played, you finished, you don't have to coach.' There's going to be hundreds and thousands of players finishing career and they think they have to coach. But their skills are transferable to hundreds of different professions and things that will pay them well. You can keep being yourself.  Even for me, I've stayed within rugby but it's not coaching. I'm working with the Players Association, International Players Association and that suits me. That's my skill set: a bit of the law, the analytical side of me that I've always had. And I think that was important. It's sort of my process of moving away from that identity as just 'Conrad Smith, the rugby player.' It's important to find other things that challenge me and that I enjoy. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do.There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us.  Lisa: That's awesome and thanks for sharing that because I think that's... Being able to openly have these conversations because there are a lot of athletes in lots of different sports struggling with this whole process of... Your career is so short, and you're not a has-been. I asked myself these conversations, and most especially in the beginning is, 'You're nothing now. You're a has-been now. You can't do it.' And being embarrassed about that, instead of going, 'Hang on a minute. I'm still pretty fricking epic and I do other stuff.' Now, that's freed up a huge piece of my brain and my daily power and energy to then go and attack other massive projects.  There's so many things in the world that you can take on. It's all up to you to develop a certain passion. And I think it's not even just in the sports realm. I see people who are in careers that got friends and careers, they don't want to be there anymore but they studied it, they became it, they did it. whatever it was. Now, they're like, 'Is that it?' It doesn't have to be it, no. We live in a day and age where we can actually go and retrain. In fact, we have to be adaptable and flexible in this day and age if we want to keep up because the world is changing so fast. So many jobs are going to be gone and whole industries.  As a jeweller in a previous life, that industry got destroyed, really. If you weren't in the big game with big brands and Chinese mass production and stuff like that and you're an artisan, a person who made one-off pieces, you're struggling now unless you really got the top massive diamonds and God knows what. Everyone else is struggling, so you have to go, 'Okay, that industry's change. I'm going to have to adapt, change, go with it, overcome it, improvise, and keep developing.' I think that's the message that we're getting here is you don't box yourself in. don't just be that one-trick pony. That's not, and Conrad is now an advocate, he's a father, he's a speaker.  Whatever you decide that you want to be, you can become. And you're not just Conrad, the All Black. I think that's a really important transition for everybody to go through. Even if you're a policeman or a teacher and you don't want to do that anymore or whatever the case is. Conrad: Yeah, and it takes a bit of courage. Like I said before, it's easier said than done a lot of the time. And that's what people just need that encouragement. Especially with finances and people suddenly are, 'I've got a mortgage on a house. I don't want to change career because there might be a layer where I'm not earning money.' But yeah, I just think that's... You come back to some questions about who you are, who you want to be, and you've got to be... You'll be happy doing what you're doing. So I just think all the help you can get from people around you, that's where you'll draw the energy, I think. If it's a conversation you're just having in your own mind, you will never get anywhere. You just need to open up about it, speak to people close to you, and I think that's generally where the answers come from.  Lisa: Yeah. I think that's gold. On that point, how big is mental health in your work? Do you do a lot around supporting mental health, and that sort of thing, and helping people transition, and all that sort of jazz?  Conrad: Yeah, absolutely. More and more, it's a complex field. When you talk about players in the game, in the sport of rugby, it's really difficult. We were starting to appreciate the pressures I think that sportsmen and women are under in these fields. It's a lot of… it draws that back on what we were talking about before. You're in a bubble and you do lose perspective and so not as the... The challenge is to help these young, these kids that are in these bubbles to speak different, and keep living, and look at sport as this amazing opportunity, and not feel the pressure. Well, maybe saying not feeling the pressure is the wrong way to put it because it's natural, but to feel the pressure and find a way to deal with that, a healthy way to deal with it. Again, I look back on my career and you're playing for the All Blacks, you're playing World Cups, it's easy to talk about pressure. There was never times that I didn't know how to deal with it, and that was from the sport I had, and maybe the background, and my upbringing. But it was easily... You just channel that and see and look at it differently and decide. Look at the opportunity that every time you feel pressure, you get it, it's as simple as just changing the perspective of things rather than the pressure of, ‘You have to win'. ‘I'm an All Black, I want to win because…' Whatever. ‘I've got a country behind me,' and suddenly, it's a burden that's lifted and yeah, you flipped it and you're puffing out your chest, and you want to do it. If it doesn't come off, it's a game. There's more important things, absolutely, around. But yeah, like I keep saying, it's not easy for everyone and there's people that understand that better. The challenge is getting through to people of different backgrounds, and different cultures, and different ages.  Lisa: Yeah with different problems.  Conrad: Yeah. I'm saying that because I know what works for me, but I know a 17-year-old young Samoan boy who's playing rugby, I don't know for the Highlanders, I might not be able to connect with him. The things that worked for me won't work for him. That's what I'm trying to say. Or the female swimmer who's doing, training for an Olympics. We're all different, and the challenge is finding a way for everyone to deal with that pressure and to be mentally healthy through a sports career. Lisa: I love that approach and just coming off the back of the Olympics. It was just wonderful to watch our amazing athletes doing amazing things. Lisa Carrington just blows me away. She's mentally just insane. But I love that thing of the challenge versus threat. I think this is a really important thing to do. When you're feeling overwhelmed and overburdened and like the whole world of pressure is on me, you going out and something the World Cup, were you able, even in those extreme pressure moments, to turn that into an opportunity and not a threat? Because that does change the physiology. Like when you're running on the paddock on those days, those couple of times in your life where it's just been horrifically big pressure, how did you physically and mentally cope there?  Conrad: Yeah, I think we've spent a lot of time, and everyone did, preparing for that World Cup. Again, as All Blacks, you have to spend a lot of time because you know the pressure that comes with and the expectation that comes with being an All Black in New Zealand. But even more so a World Cup, a home World Cup, when we hadn't won, I think 2011. A lot of our preparation time wasn't just being on the field with how we're going to play but was how to deal with that pressure. For me, it was just constantly turning it around so that it was never a moment I even... I can look back and think of times in the game where the team was under pressure and it would be perceived as... Even in that final hour, the team struggled a bit with the pressure, but if I'm being honest, our preparation never let us feel that way. We were dealing with that all the time.  We just were focused on doing our job. We talked so much about whatever comes our way, we were going to adapt and deal with it and that's what you just had to keep doing. You never sort of stop, and you'll notice yourself, you just don't let yourself stop and think about that. I think if you've got to that stage, it's too late. If you're having to go through a process of. 'How do I deal with this?' It's probably too late. You've already, hopefully, got a process in place where you're just, it's just instinctively, you're just channelling that, focusing on little details. Because you know whatever the pressure, that's not going to influence you unless you need it. You just focus on the small tasks and you get through 80 minutes of rugby like that, keep a smile on your face. Lisa: Pull your focus into the job at hand instead of the: 'Oh my god. Everyone's watching me. Everyone's pressuring. Hang on a minute I've just got to pass this ball right now.' You're breaking it down into little tiny... Conrad: We all have little trigger words and I know we've talked about this: ‘Be in the now.' Be in the now, which is like just what you're talking about. It's not thinking about the mistake you might have just made, the ball you drop, the tackle you missed, and it's not worrying, and you're not thinking about the World Cup, you're going to win at the end of this game. Because you can't do anything. Right now. ‘Right now. Right now, I'm going to catch this next ball.' Look up, keep looking, keep calling, whatever it is. It's as simple as a little thing like that that just keeps you in tune with the moment and not letting you get overwhelmed by the bigger picture. Yeah, massively important, obviously. The bigger the moments and the bigger the pressure, it's the funny thing, it's the more important that you focus on the smaller, minute detail.  Lisa: I love it. I said try to forget the consequences of what you're doing. You've done the preparation. You've done the work. You've done everything that you possibly can. You're standing on the start line, in my case, a race, then letting go of the outcome because you've done what you can do. And now, it's up to the whatever happens in the next few hours or days, in my case. So this was no longer just in your hands then. Because the gods have a thing to say about it as well. Sometimes, if you try and control the uncontrollable, then you'll drive yourself to madness, whereas if you can go, 'I've done the stuff that I was responsible for. I've put the work and I've done the preparation. I know my strategies. I know my pacing. I know whatever it is I'm doing. I got that right. Okay. I'm going to keep my eye on the ball here. But I'm going to let go of the outcome now.' Because when you let go of the outcome, then that pressure goes and you're in that...  Being in that now is a really powerful message to people. Because when you're in the past or the future, you're either worrying about the future, or you're regretting what's happened in the past, or it's a load for you to carry. In the moment, when you're under pressure, all you can cope with is that second right now. The next minute. That's it. When I was running long distances, I would break it down into: 'What's the next power pole? I just got to get to the next power pole. If I can't even get that far, I'm just gonna take one more step.' You can always take one more step, right? If you break it down into one more step, just one more, and then you just keep going and keep going. Then, invariably, that mindset or that thing that's in your head passes, and then you're back in the game.  Conrad: That's funny, you sound... because someone I remember that came and spoke to the team when we were outside joined the team in 2004, and we had Amish Carter came and spoke with the team. It was before the 2007 World Cup and obviously, that World Cup didn't end well, but some of what he said, I still remember it. He was talking about his Olympic performances, and he said, and I think one of the questions from the players was about we're talking: the nerves and the pressure. And I remember him saying that he wasn't nervous. He wasn't nervous when he got to the start line just for the reasons you said. He said: ‘Because then, I'd backed on my prep, I'd done everything I needed to do. Now, it was just a matter of going out and doing that. You can't do anymore.' It's funny that when I looked, especially towards into my career, the only times I would feel nervous normally, on the start of a week. So if we play the game on a Saturday, and that was because I'm nervous thinking of all the things I've got to do on the Monday, Tuesday. But by the Friday, I would have this real sense of calm. I'd have a smile and I'll be like, 'Right now, it's time to do it.' It's funny because people, it's the opposite. They're not thinking about a game on Monday, Tuesday, but they were getting nervous on before a game starts thinking, 'You must be even worse.' But yeah, that was the way I could explain it is that we're really... I was nervous thinking about the game but now, I've done all that. This is the path I've taken. This is the training I've done for this game. Now, I'm ready to... I'm going to go and do it and see if it works. Lisa: Yeah, this is the reward phase. This is actually what you've been preparing for all along, so this is the time when you actually should be enjoying it. It wasn't always that easy especially when you're doing a couple hundred K's somewhere because sometimes it's not that pleasant. But you've done the work to get to the start line and the times where I am being nervous is when I hadn't done the work.  Conrad: Exactly. I think of some... I don't like admitting it but normally, with All Blacks, you always have checked every box but there were games, I'd go back even the Hurricanes or Club Games and that's the ones where I'd be nervous because I'd be thinking... ‘I haven't really... now this week. I probably haven't done…' Then, you get nervous but actually the bigger the occasion, the preparation is normally good.  Lisa: You took it seriously and yeah, yeah. I've come stuck on some short races where I've had my ass handed to me because I went in with the... That's just the short race, and oh my god. Had my ass handed to me. So yeah, always respect every distance or every game. I think it's key. What's it actually like, Conrad, to be... The first time that you put on that All Blacks jersey? Because it's every little boy and now, little girl's dream too. What's it actually like to put on that sort of thing for the first time? Can you remember?  Conrad: Yeah for sure. It's pretty special. I do think I was really lucky the way it panned out for me in terms of... It happened really quickly. I'd play. I hadn't even played the Super Rugby game. I hadn't played for the Hurricanes. When it started, I had a really... I was playing for the Wellington Lions. We made the final, and then I was picked, fortunately. So the coaching staff that had come in wanted to pick some new younger players and I was one of those. That was very much sort of out of the blue. Then, I was starting the following week. So I played a final. The team was picked. We assembled the end of that following week. We flew to Italy, and then I was playing.  But that was great in hindsight because it didn't let me overthink that. It was sort of okay, and I just was like, 'Right.' Little bit like what I said before, 'I'm just going to enjoy it.' Admittedly there were people around me. Graham Henry, Ryan Smith, Steve Hansen, great coaches, and Gilbert Enoka that were giving me those messages. Just telling me, 'We're picking you in the first game. Just go and enjoy it. Just keep doing what you're doing. We love what you're doing.' So those messages for a young guy were perfect. I didn't actually question that. Yeah, I just took the jersey. I was still sort of pinching myself how quickly it happened. But yeah, then there I was playing and yeah, it was an amazing experience.  I'm glad to say it never really diminished. I was lucky to play for over a decade, and it was always special putting on the jersey. The team does a great job, I think, of respecting the jersey, acknowledging how important it is to their country, what we mean to everyone, and staying grounded, and all that good stuff about acknowledging the connection that you have with the young men and women who are dreaming to being All Black, wishing they were there, would give anything to be in your place. So you're always aware of that, and so it never loses its glow. Then I put my jersey on.  Brian Hoyer who was a big part of the team when I joined the team, he said ‘When you put the jersey on, you shouldn't be able to fit outside the doorway.' You grow that big. I'm not using the words and I always... For me, I was normally marking someone bigger than me or normally not the biggest in the room but I always felt that. That I have to turn sideways to get out the door but that was the sort of feeling and you hear that even today: The way you sort of, you grow in the jersey. Lisa: You're carrying the manner and the tradition of that, and the reputation of that, and the hopes of a nation, basically, on your shoulders, which can be either a load or it can be like, 'Wow, how lucky am I that I get to stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before?' Basically and like you said, 'Yeah, I can't fit through the door because I'm just filled with all that.'  Okay, just a very quick anecdote. I was running through in the Gobi Desert at one point and we were running through these slot canyons. These really crazy. It was hot. One guy died out there that day which was really terrible. I was running through there and I was chasing down this American woman who was in front of me and I was second. I'm like, 'I've got to plan something here if I want to beat this person in front of me that I was chasing down through these canyons.'  So I started singing the Maori Battalion song to myself and I started to... like my ancestors, and my tradition there, my heritage like, 'I'm going to bloody beat you, American. Yeah. I'm gonna chase you down, and I'm singing away to myself running along through this canyon.' I beat her, right. It was awesome. I just went dashing past her, and I beat her. But it was just like, 'Wow.' It's just like you're pulling out stuff that you... It's not just you. You're like your ancestors and your heritage, and they're powering you. So I imagine it's a bit the same with the All Blacks jersey.  Conrad: Yeah. It's powerful stuff. Like, and it's all about creating something bigger than you. There's no doubt the history of things or like you say, in individual sports. As soon as you can create that connection to a greater cause. Actually, in the All Blacks, it's actually easy. I say this when I talk to other sports teams around how they create the identity. But the All Blacks had it handed to them because they have 130 years of whatever it is of this amazing performance, of this history, this black jersey that this country that's mad obsessed with them, great air of success and also, this idea that we do unite. We're the flagship of New Zealand. Rightly or wrongly, that's the way we're saying and you got to embrace that.  The fact that every time an All Black teams practice, it's a culture we have in New Zealand. This great collection of men who are representing the country. You capture that in the right way, and it counts as something. The field is 00 but I always felt... Yeah, when we got it right, we're straight away. That's worth some points at least on the board. It's something special that the All Blacks do have, and to the credit of the team, the whole time, I was involved. I know that it's carrying on that the way they connect and acknowledge that, it's really well done. It's the reason that the team continues to perform well. Lisa: And it does it empower whole generations. Like I said to my brother Dawson, my dad wanted him to be an All Black, and he wanted him to meet all those milestones along the way. I remember like... We lost my dad last year, as people know, if they listened to my podcast. I said to my brother the other day, 'Dawson,' because he went to the game up at the park, at Pukekura Park and they had the 25-year anniversary for the Ranfurly Shield because he was on the Ranfurly Shield team. He was excited to go to the Ranfurly Shield thing, and I remember that being the proudest moment of my dad's life. Of all the things that my dad got to do and see, all of their kids, I said to Dawson, 'You gave him the highest point in his life was when you came home with that Ranfurly Shield, and you're a part of that Taranaki Team. That was, for him, the pinnacle.'  That's beautiful because that is just like... Especially when you've lost somebody... And Dawson's like, to be able to go and celebrate that Ranfurly Shield with his old mates and reminisce on those times. That stays with you to the end: those special moments that you get, and that camaraderie that comes with it, and all of that sort of stuff. He gave my dad a precious gift really by being a part of that team. Dad was just so proud.  Dawson said to me once, 'Lisa, you could run across every fricking desert in the world and it would still not mean as much as that Ranfurly Shield.' And I said, 'You're damn right, and that's okay.' Because he was right in that. It's okay because he loved rugby, and he loved rugby teams, and the rugby world. My dad played, what do you call that? Fifth-grade rugby until he was 45 and he only quit because people were telling him he was too old, and then he played touch for another 10 years. He was a legend. A legend.  You're carrying all that on your shoulders. There are five and six-year-old kids looking at you on screen like you did with Daws back then. Like, 'Oh, these big Taranaki players and stuff.' That's just beautiful. I had that just wanting to represent New Zealand in something because I couldn't be in All Blacks because back then, we didn't have women playing rugby, much to my dad's disappointment. Actually watching the girls at the sevens in the Olympics, oh, I just fell in love with that team. They were just epic. Ruby Tui is my new bloody hero. She's just amazing. I think she's just epic. But just to watch the camaraderie of those girls and the performance that they put on, I'm glad that women now have the chance to do that tough stuff too. Because that's pretty special as well: seeing girls going there and giving it everything, just going hard.  Conrad: You speak to the Black Ferns, the women's rugby, it's growing so much not just in New Zealand, but around the world and that's pretty exciting, especially for Fifteens and the opportunity it's giving so many young women. Yeah and so for myself, that's really refreshing now with international rugby and the Player Association and we deal with both men and women's. The joy I hear working in women's rugby, seriously, compared to men's, especially men's Fifteens, it's a lot of established... Careful with my words, but it's just so hard. To put it simply, it's so hard to get things done even if you agree there's so much.  Whereas in the women's game, it's so refreshing. There's just an openness and the enthusiasm. They just, 'Yep. Let's get that done and this.' You will see, women's rugby going to go great in the next few years, and it's because of... In the men's game, I don't like to say it, but it might not have anywhere near the same growth or evolution just because it's... Lisa: Stayed in the old ways. It obviously breaks everything, isn't it?  Conrad: The money, the money at that level is so big that there's so much at stake. That's just what grinds along, whereas the women's game, they're not... Obviously, they're trying to commercialise on the game, but it's crumbs compared to the men's for things at the moment. But they'll catch up at a huge rate because they're just open about... Like at the moment, they're motivated by having fun, being patient, at getting the product out, getting more and more women and girls playing the game.  Lisa: That's amazing and isn't that though that's a really good analogy for everything in the world? Like that the big old institutions or big bureaucracies are going to be struggling in the future, I think. Completely off-topic but from the governments, to the big corporations, to the big institutions are going to be struggling against these young, nimble, small, exponentially powered technology-based companies and the rate of change that's coming that these big state, old bureaucratic, not just talking about rugby here, but governments and things are actually going to be on the backfoot shortly.  I always think of that Kodak, the company Kodak that used to be the biggest player in the world and photography, right? They didn't go with digital evolution, then they went under. Because they were too busy trying to protect what they already had, they actually discovered digital photography. They started it, but they didn't pursue it because they thought, 'Oh, that's going to be a threat to our current existing business.' That mindset is when you get overtaken by the young upstarts that come along with enthusiasm and they can, on a company-wide level, they're smaller. They're nimble. They can make decisions quicker. They can move faster. I see this in all areas happening. Hopefully, in the right way it'll brush off as well, but the girls certainly are next level.  Conrad: They're great. And I've got to know a few of them, a few of the Black Ferns. Lisa: Can you help me out with Ruby? I want to get in with Ruby. Conrad: That is such great Kiwi so yeah, more than happy. She'd love to chat. Lisa: Woohoo. Okay. I know she's pretty busy right now. Everybody in the world wants to see her right now. And the other girls, they're just amazing. Conrad, as we wrap it up now in a minute because I know you got to go, but what is it that you want to get across? So if we highlighted a couple of points now, if you were talking to your children, you've got two kids, what do you want them to do in the future? Or what would you, if you were talking to some young kids out there that want to have a life in the sporting world? What's some last parting wisdom or for the parents of those kids?  Conrad: Yeah, I think if you're speaking to parents, the first thing is the value of sport, I think. I just worry a little bit. I know I'm working in rugby, and there's some crazy things being said about the potential harms of playing a contact sport. But honestly, I've had the benefit of seeing, digging a lot deeper into that and that is not at all as clear as it's conveyed because of the sensationalism of journalism. Kids are kids. They love playing. If I leave my boy and his next-door neighbour, they're gonna wrestle; they're gonna fight. There's no harm in playing.  But on the flip side, the harm of not playing sport, of sheltering them, of thinking, of sitting in a lounge with a Coke and a bag of lolly is better for a kid than going and playing rugby because he might knock his head. That's so far from the truth. That would be my wish for parents' young kids. Just play sport but... And then, I suppose, if it's to reflect on what we've talked about, when the kid means getting serious about a sport, it would be to keep you balanced, to not lose sight. If you're put in a bubble because it's a performance bubble, then that's all well and good but now, it's a bubble and you need to step out of that every chance you get and connect with the real world as much as you can.  Unfortunately, there are dangers and there are risks when you are totally invested into a sport. The crazy thing is sport is a great thing. It should be enjoyed and if you're even not enjoying it, it's not hard just to talk to someone and step outside your sport to reconnect with the people in the real world. Then, that should give you back your love of the game, and then you'll go well and be like Lisa and I and have a life where you've had a sport that you've loved, and it's given you amazing opportunities, and literally meet great people, and you still come out of it, and you're still happy, and still meet people but doing different things. Lisa: This is gold. Conrad, thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it. I'm looking forward to doing our speaking gig together shortly and that's going to be exciting. I'm just really glad to have made your acquaintance and I think that you have such a level approach, level-headed approach to this whole thing and gave us some great insights today on what it is to be an All Black, but also what it is to come out the other side and gave us some really good perspective. So thanks for your time today, Conrad. Conrad: Pleasure, Lisa.  That's it this week for Pushing the Limits. Be sure to rate, review, and share with your friends, and head over and visit Lisa and her team at lisatamati.com.   

The Veterinary Life Coach Podcast with Dr. Julie Cappel

Becoming a happy, mentally healthy veterinarian involves developing solid leadership habits.  Leading yourself and others requires that you work to better yourself.  It is a continuous process that involves focus on being humble without feeling inferior and fierce without acting superior.  If you can be humble and fierce you will develop yourself as a top tier leader for your clients and your team.  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, A guy spend $126 and blew out a Democrat power player from the New Jersey Senate—it's a remarkable true story that is icing on the cake

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Governor DeSantis—is setting up a new force to destroy election crimes in Florida and he is really serious—   TWO— A guy spend $126 and blew out a Democrat power player from the New Jersey Senate—it's a remarkable true story that is icing on the cake—   THREE— The Democrats are screaming—BUT they don't seem to be getting it—after getting crushed from sea to shining sea by Republicans in the 2021 Elections—   They are still trying to stick with their same talking points—including the most egregious ones—like ‘if you vote for Youngkin' youre a racist—   The lamest excuses came from President Joe Biden—that seemed to have little concern for the dismantling of the Democrat Party by voters on Tuesday—   But what has emerged on the other side for Republicans—is a true changing of the guard—black conservatives are getting more and more powerful positions and rejecting the Critical Race Theory Filth—and they are making Democrats squirm—because if they cannot keep the people of color—at heel as Hillary Clinton used to say—they have no chance of holding on to power and destroying this country—   And with that in mind—a new hero has emerged in America—and she is black—outspoken—and proud to be an American! Oh and she is ready to take on anyone who dares to challenge who she is and what she stands for—

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk #406 - 11.03.2021  ONE WORLD RITUAL: Flippy 2, Covid Crispr Cyborgs, Gaia, Genetic Era - CCNT 406 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel Podcast (Basil's other podcast) Facelikethesun Resurrection (Gonz' new YouTube channel) Truther Dating experiment   INTRO   FLIPPY UPDATE Flippy has evolved into Flippy 2!! Flippy 1 needed too much human assistance (Tech Crunch)   CYBORG Most people are ok with cyborg enhancements (PC Mag)   CRISPR Moderna moves into CRISPR deal with Metagenomi for “irresistible data” (Fierce Biotech)   COVID19/I AM WACCINE Clip: NZ PM ends press conference due to heckler DARPA responds to Dr. Carrie Madej claims about hydrogel and nanobots (Lead Stories) Researcher blows whistle on data integrity issues in Pfizer trials (BMJ)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   NEW WORLD ORDER Clip: Weird RCC video ritual Gaia might destroy the earth if we don't act on climate change (Guardian) If we're serious about Sustainability, we must have new era of global law (WEF)   POLYTICK Clip: Republican's outperformed in the suburbs, major boom for democrats Dems considering taking Biden off the 2024 ticket (NY Post) The “Covid Conspiracy Theorist” in the White House press corp (Wapo)   SPACE POPE REPTILIAN/DEBUNKER BUNKER Claims, Arrest warrant out for Pope Francis [everything is sus]   BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups   SPACE

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Election results are coming in from all the important races including the huge race for Governor in Virginia

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— In Chicago—the Mayor Lori Lightweight—is told her vaccine mandates cannot be enforced— and she is stomping mad—   TWO— President Biden—has released hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens into the interior of the United States over the past 9 months—it is shocking—   THREE—cElection results are coming in from all the important races—including the huge race for Governor in Virginia—  

The Poco a Poco Podcast with the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal

A series on King David: Part 2 of 4   David is tender to his sheep, and also willing to fight for them. And he'll be the same in his future vocation—the way that he was shepherd is the way he will be king. As he fights Goliath, he reveals something to us about the heart of God: God will go to battle against our giants.   Though David wasn't skilled or qualified like everybody else was, he was aggressive in his confidence before the Father. As if to say, “I am anointed, and now this anointing is bearing fruit.”   There's something about David going into battle without the armour. It's symbolic of his poverty and dependence. His attempt to wear Saul's armour and sword is our attempt to grasp at an identity that isn't ours. If I could just be like that person doesn't work.   David goes into it poor, and himself. So should we, in a way that allows the Lord to be powerful.   Coming up: we're going to prepare for Advent with Finding Your Place in the Advent Story from Ascension Press. Check it out here: https://ascensionpress.com/collections/rejoice-finding-your-place-in-the-advent-story   The Poco a Poco podcast happens because of generous donors like you. Monthly donations are particularly helpful for our future planning. You can give at https://spiritjuice.org/supportpoco. Thank you!

Damage Plan MMA Podcast
#217 | UFC 267 | Fierce Fighting Championship | Recap

Damage Plan MMA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 68:43


On this episode we recap UFC 276 and our local fight card, FIerce Fighting Championship. What a weekend of fights!   Sponsors…   Critical Fit CBD - www.criticalfitcbd.com Use the code “DamagePlan20” and receive 20% off your order   Damage Plan Athletics - Damageplanmma.com   Damage Plan Insurance - Zack Partridge - 385-243-2900   Follow us... Instagram - @damageplanathletics @ridge79 Twitter - @damageplan_mma @zack_partridge  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, President Joe Biden‘s poll numbers are sinking faster again today and the overwhelming majority of Americans do not believe he is competent to do the job

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Senator Lindsey Graham—apparently told Capital Police to ‘use their guns' during the crazy afternoon of January 6th—but what did he really mean—   TWO— President Joe Bidens poll numbers are sinking faster again today—and the overwhelming majority of Americans do not believe he is competent to do the job—   THREE— All eyes are on Virginia—where the state is now up and voting on Election Day 2021—and it appears that what I told you one week ago is about to happen—Republican Glenn Youngkin is likely going to pull off one of the biggest upsets in American political history—by beating Former Governor and current Democrat nominee—Terry McAuliffe—   McAuliffe stayed on message—a failed message yes—but he was disciplined to the bitter end—to alienate parents across the state—and most importantly in the suburbs—that Joe Biden carried in 2020—McAuliffe is sure to lose today—  

Madison / Savile Inspired Podcast
Protect Your Brain Through Your Gut - Avoid These Foods!

Madison / Savile Inspired Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 49:11


Did you know gluten effects your brain? Grains inflame. Protect your brain through your gut. My guest Tina McDermott, who is an Inspirational Chef, Speaker & Weight Loss Coach, will teach us how to be Unstoppable & Fierce in our lives through health and wellness, starting in the kitchen. Learn what to avoid for a better gut, better brain, better life!Do you know what clean eating means? "Eat foods as close to how mother nature provides it for us, the better it is for us. Eat foods that walk, fly, swim, grow, emphasis on GROW." (15:58) Drink WATER!"In order for your lymphatic system to do it's job think - How can you flush a toilet without water? Your body needs sufficient water to flush out toxins." (19:15)You don't have to eat EVERYTHING organic. "Check out Clean 15 Dirty Dozen"  (25:15)Top 3 Things to Avoid.  (29:00)Enjoy Tina's free Ebook, The Joyful Gut Reboot Guide and learn the four keys to a healthy, vibrant and free life. http://www.tinamcdermott.com/JGCheck out her YouTube Channel for recipes! YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGH0Y5KEI2eNvY9jyIlwHnwWebsite - https://www.tinamcdermott.com/More About Tina McDermott:TINA MCDERMOTT has been working in the health and wellness industry for almost 20 years. She was born to help people through health and wellness and exercise and there is nothing more than she would like to do with her life. Tina's goal is to reach out to as many people as humanly possible through health, wellness and exercise to help make this world a better place. She also specializes in helping people with their emotional issues of eating and an expert at helping you lose weight and also teaches exercise and nutrition on a one on one basis, in small groups as well as in corporations.What do you think?If you love what you are hearing, don't forget to SUBSCRIBE and LEAVE A REVIEW.  I would love to hear your thoughts! Share with me your thoughts, comments, feedback or suggestions on topics/stories you would want to hear about in the future. You can leave comments in the REVIEW section of the podcast if you are listening on iTunes or send us a message on our website HERE.Follow Madison / Savile on LinkedIn, FaceBook and Instagram or sign up on our website for exclusive offers and updates.Follow me Diana Nguyen on LinkedIn. 

goodsugar
Your Fears Make You Fierce - goodsugar #080

goodsugar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 35:15


Join Marcus Antebi and Ralph Sutton on their journey to better health! On this episode of goodsugar Ralph and Marcus are joined by Yoga instructor and fitness coach to the stars, Koya Webb! Koya is also the host of the Get Loved Up Podcast where they share valuable insights from celebrity guests, on how you can practice daily self-care, overcome difficult challenges in life, and thrive in the world, one breath at a time.

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad
My Message to Valerie Bertinelli and the Fierce Pronoun Keyboard Warriors (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_313)

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 14:58


The tweet thread that started it all: https://twitter.com/GadSaad/status/1453367468769095685?s=20 _______________________________________ If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This chat was posted earlier today (November 1, 2021) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1329: https://youtu.be/kds-w6KO-0E _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, All eyes are on Virginia where the state is poised for Election Day 2021

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Here is something that should come as no real surprise—there is a big rise in the number of fatal car accidents involving marijuana—yeah I know—it was never going to happen—   TWO— President Joe Bidens poll numbers are sinking faster than Michigan in the 4thquarter—in fact it is a complete collapse in just 9 months in office—   THREE— All eyes are on Virginia—where the state is poised for Election Day 2021—and it appears that what I told you one week ago is about to happen—Republican Glenn Youngkin is going to pull off one of the big upsets in American political history—by beating Former Governor and current Democrat nominee—Terry McAuliffe—   It seems McAuliffe has put all of his eggs in the basket that somehow Critical Race Theory—doesn't really exist and parents in Virginia—really should have little or no say in how their kids are raised—and by that—I mean what they are taught in public school classrooms—   McAuliffe spent a good part of the weekend talking about how his 5 kids were raised in Virginia—and how good the schools are—even though 4 out of 5—went to private schools—   Here we go into the deep dark areas of Democrat ideas—where you have no say in what happens with your own children—and mostly because if you disagree—you are a racist—   Which brings us to the most popular songs and dance moves in America today— and it should be screaming at Democrats—you are in serious trouble here—

Ditch The Binge
Ep 83: Fierce Fatty on Fatphobia- Interview with Victoria Welsby

Ditch The Binge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 48:59


Victoria Welsby (they/them) is a world-leading expert on dismantling fatphobia and diet-culture, TEDx speaker, and best-selling author. They went from being homeless, abused with self-esteem that was achingly low into the courageous fat activist and change maker they are today. Victoria helps people fall in love with themselves and is dedicated to shifting the way society views fat bodies.In this episode, Victoria talks about her own journey around food and body and also breaks down what exactly fatphobia is and why it is so harmful.Be sure to connect with Victoria on their website HERE.  Here you can watch their incredible TedX talk, check out their podcast, and find their social media links as well!And if you haven't already followed me on IG- What are you waiting for?Take a peek at my new website too! 

The Fit in Faith Podcast
Fierce Empathy with David Waldy

The Fit in Faith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 68:33


David Waldy is a personal growth junkie and he loves coffee and loves to read. There's a lot of parallel between us, which I absolutely love. The way that he shows up in the world uniquely as a life and business strategist, speaker, co-founder of Generation Impact Consulting, and how he shows up for entrepreneurs across the globe truly intrigued me. It was with this key phrase - showing up with fierce empathy. After my own quarter life breakdown. I understood empathy at a level that I could never have ever possibly understood before, but David gives us a new perspective.  You've got to listen to every single minute because it's such a rich conversation. He's a rich human being.  I value you, I treasure you, and I can't wait to see how you apply fierce empathy to your life, business relationships, and all other things.  

Big Fat Positive: A Pregnancy and Parenting Journey

Shanna gets an upsetting call from her daughter's school nurse, and Laura takes a roller coaster of a road trip with her eight-month-old baby. Also, in the special segment “Never Have I Ever: Parenting Edition,” Laura and Shanna reveal embarrassing and shocking situations they've never been in before having kids, including acting quickly in the face of danger and using a wine closet for something very unexpected. Finally, they share their BFPs and BFNs for the week. Shanna's kids are 2.5 and 5 years old, and Laura's kids are 2.5 years old and 8 months old.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Shares of Ford are on the rise but the company is warning that the shortage of computer chips could easily last into 2023

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Americans are lighting up more today than they have been—or are more illegals that are making their way in the country smoking more—either way—more cigarettes are being sold—   TWO— Shares of Ford are on the rise—but the company is warning that the shortage of computer chips could easily last into 2023—meaning it will be tough sledding until then—   THREE— A judge in New York denied the police union bid—to stop vax mandates—and it could usher in a severe and dangerous situation—as cops—firefighters—EMT's – ambulance drivers—doctors—nurses and teachers that are being told get the jab or lose your job—are saying see you later—   It is creating a huge issue—and it has people across the country concerned that when they call 911—nobody is going to answer—  

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Merrick Garland, who is now the Attorney General of the United States is admitting that his weaponization of the Department of Justice was based on NOTHING AT ALL

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— The Billionaire Tax—that is Bernie Sanders wet dream for remaking America—is dead on arrival—it is not even on life support any more—another blow for the radicals—   TWO— More leftists are being shouted down—and booed—like Chicago Mayor—Lori Lightweight—who was heckled at a fundraiser—   THREE— Merrick Garland—the guy once put forth for a seat on The United States Supreme Court—who is now the Attorney General of the United States—is admitting—that his weaponization of the Department of Justice—was based on—NOTHING AT ALL—in fact he never even reviewed the letter from the National School Boards Association—before turning the FBI loose on parents—   In front of the United States senate—the guy who falsely claimed he would not be political as A-G—was torn apart—for being the most political A-G since Eric Holder—the only difference is—Garland is far worse—  

Drop the Aspiring Act
From Royally Faithful to Royally Fierce with Carla E. Criswell 064

Drop the Aspiring Act

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 15:30


Sometimes we're faithful to a fault. Have you ever been there? When you're more faithful to the things outside of yourself, that you would continue to be unhappy just so that you can be loyal? What does it take for you to realize that you have to be faithful to who you are first? Listen to this week's guest, Carla E. Criswell as she shares her story and journey to her book, I'm Not Leaving You, I'm Loving Me. Check out the show notes for links to her current book and her new affirmations/journal that's available now. https://queenbaegoals.com/from-royally-faithful-to-royally-fierce-w-carla-e-criswell-dtaa-064/ For more information on this or other podcast episodes, please visit queenbaegoals.com. Connect with me on social. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/queenbaegoals/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/QueenBAEGoals/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/QueenBAEGoals Want video? Check out my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5K7vvoQtqkRmz7yL0-FGuA

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The cost of having the Thanksgiving feast will be more this year than at ANY time in American history

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— The investigation on the set in New Mexico continues where Alec Baldwin shot and killed one of the producers on the set of the movie Rust—   TWO— The Federal Government collected a record haul in taxes this year—blowing away all previous years—and yet the lefties want more—a lot more—   THREE— The cost of having the Thanksgiving feast will be more this year—than at ANY time in American history—yep you heard me right—with Joe Biden in the White House—Thanksgiving will be more expensive than it has ever been—and it looks like things could be getting even worse—because the inflation—the stagnant workforce and the supply chain issues are all piling up—with no end in sight—  

Literally Reading
Reporting Back

Literally Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 50:34


We are Traci and Ellie, two bookish friends who talk in any spare minute that we have.  This week we will be reporting back on books we mentioned in previous episodes!  To shop the books listed in this episode, visit our shop at bookshop.org.   Literally Reading: The Ex Hex by Erin Sterling (Ellie) Persuasion by Jane Austen (Traci)  Literally Listening:  As Good As Dead by Holly Jackson (Ellie) A Portrait of a Scotsman by Evie Dunmore (Traci) Crack the Book Open:  Life's Too Short by Abby Jimenez (Ellie) Firekeeper's Daughter by Angeline Boulley (Traci) Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir (Ellie) Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman (Traci) The Hunting Party by Lucy Foley (Ellie) The Lost Apothecary by Sarah Penner (Traci) Someone Else's Love Story by Joshilyn Jackson (Ellie) Kindred by Octavia Butler (Traci) The Tourist Attraction by Sarah Morgenthaler (Ellie) The Gifted School by Bruce Holsinger (Traci) What's Next: Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner A Heart so Fierce and Broken by Brigid Kemmerer 

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Virginia, one week to go. 3 polls in a row have the former Governor, Democrat Terry McAuliffe in a dead heat with Republican Glenn Youngkin, a first time politician

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— What if Joe Manchin switched parties and became a Republican—and became an honest voice for the bright red state of West Virginia? What does he say?   TWO— I will share with you—something far scarier than any pandemic—or any other health scare—I mean it—this might be the most frightening illness I have ever heard of—   THREE— Virginia—one week to go—its all about Virginia—3 polls in a row have the former Governor-- Democrat Terry McAuliffe in a dead heat with Republican Glenn Youngkin—a first time politician—and everything that is being considered in Virginia—is being considered at dinner tables—diners and beer halls all over this nation—   Today for the first time—I believe Glenn Youngkin is going to win—and for the first time—I believe we will have a clear rejection of the Bernie Sanders brand of Marxism being pushed upon on us—   The entire Biden Administration is imploding—and the attack on Virginia's parents—was the end of the line—  

The Courage to Change: A Recovery Podcast
How One Woman Found Her Voice & Power After Abuse & Anorexia

The Courage to Change: A Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 107:01


Reema Zaman is an award-winning writer and speaker. She is the author of the memoir, I Am Yours, and the forthcoming dystopian novel, Paramita. She is the creator and lead writer of the TV show Snap. Born in Bangladesh and raised in Thailand, she now lives in Portland, Oregon with her rescue chihuahua, Fia the Fierce. You can find her @reemazaman and www.reemazaman.com.Episode ResourcesS1 E2 of The Courage to Change: A Recovery Podcast | Bahan McDermott Connect with Reema ZamanInstagram | @reemazamanReema's Website | www.reemazaman.comI Am Yours  | Available on Amazon, Reema's Website, & Your Favorite BooksellerConnect with The Courage to ChangePodcast Website | lionrock.life/couragetochangepodcastPodcast Instagram | @couragetochange_podcastPodcast Facebook | @thecouragetochangepodcastPodcast Email | podcast@lionrock.lifeYouTube | The Courage to Change PlaylistLionrock ResourcesLionrock Life Mobile App | lionrock.life/mobile-appSupport Group Meeting Schedule | lionrock.life/meetings

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20VC: Deliveroo Founder Will Shu on The IPO This Year, The Rise of Quick Commerce and The Fierce Competition with Uber Eats

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 40:35


Will Shu is the Founder & CEO @ Deliveroo, the company that provides your favorite restaurants and takeaways, delivered to your door. Prior to their IPO earlier this year, Will raised over $1.7BN for the company from some of the best including Accel, Index, General Catalyst, Greenoaks, and more. Before Deliveroo, Will worked in finance as an analyst with SAC Capital, ESO Capital, and Morgan Stanley in New York and London. Fun fact, Will still enjoys regularly delivering food orders on his bike. In Today's Episode with Will Shu You Will Learn: 1.) How Will made his way from hedge funds and Morgan Stanley to changing the world of food and delivery with Deliveroo? Why did Deliveroo not work the first time Will started it? 2.) Restaurant + Customer Acquisition: How did Will acquire the first restaurants to the platform? What did that education process look like for them? What do the restaurants care about? How did Will acquire the first customers? How has that changed over time? What matters to customers; speed, selection or price? How does this change by geography and country? 3.) New Markets: How do Deliveroo select new markets to enter? What makes one more attractive than another? From a resource perspective, what does it take to open a new market? What have been some of the biggest lessons on zone maturity and time to breakeven? Why does Deliveroo not track driver efficiency on a number of drops basis? What is the right mechanism to measure driver efficiency? 4.) Competition: How did Deliveroo come late to markets like France and end up winning them? What was it like competing against Uber with Eats? How important is restaurant exclusivity to Deliveroo retaining its position? What would Will have done differently with regards to competition, with the benefit of hindsight? 5.) Quick commerce: What does Will make of the unprecedented rise of quick commerce? Will we see many winners on a per market basis or will this be a consolidatory environment? What do many of the new entrants mistake or not understand? Why is the vertical ownership of the supply chain such a superior model to working with grocery partners? Item's Mentioned In Today's Episode with Will Shu Will's Favourite Book: From Third World to First: Singapore and the Asian Economic Boom

The ONE Thing
Build Fierce Relationships ONE Conversation at a Time

The ONE Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 35:49


Do you know the questions you should ask to ensure a happy, fulfilling, and lasting relationship? More importantly, do you know who you ask them to? (Hint: sometimes, the correct answer is yourself). Conversations are the backbone of a relationship, but that doesn't mean we know how to have them. Whenever one stops working, it's a safe bet that it's because of a breakdown of communication, be it not ensuring each other knows what's expected of them, or simply allowing a disconnect to take hold. Friend of the show and New York Times bestselling author, Susan Scott, founded Fierce in 2001, after 13 years of leading CEO think tanks and over 10,000 hours conversing with senior executives led her to realize that, while no single conversation is guaranteed to change the trajectory of a career, business, or life, any conversation can. This led to her sharing her valuable knowledge in the form of the Fierce book series, starting with the award-winning Fierce Conversations: Achieving Success at Work and in Life, One Conversation at a Time. Now, she's turning her insights toward the world of romance with the upcoming Fierce Love: Creating a Love That Lasts, One Conversation at a Time, so she joins us to lay everything out there: where do we go wrong in our love lives and what can we do to align them with our ONE Thing?THE ONE THING TO IMPLEMENT FROM THIS EPISODESusan Scott's philosophy is to take things one conversation at a time, but to really maximize what we get out of each one. Those conversations require us to think and define the parameters of what we want to get out of them – and, sometimes, that'll mean that we have the conversation with ourselves. That's the best way to discover our relationship ONE Thing. To learn more, and for the complete show notes, visit: the1thing.com/pods.In this episode, you will learn...[02:30] What inspired Susan to venture away from business and toward romance[13:50] Some of the myths that derail relationships[21:30] The most important conversations you can have[28:20] Susan's best advice for people starting their search for answersLinks & Tools From This Episodesusan@fierceink.com - email Susan and she'll alert you when the book is available to orderRead Susan's first book: Fierce Conversations: Achieving Success at Work & in Life, One Conversation at a Time--Do you sometimes wish your home were smarter?Somfy is an organization that creates motorized solutions that automate and connect blinds, shades, blades, rolling shutters, and so much more. Controlling the light that enters your house should not be such a hassle. Create your ideal smart home through Somfy.You can learn more or connect with a dealer by visiting somfysystems.com/podcast.--Do you run a small business?Small business owners wear a lot of hats. Some of those hats feel incredible. However, filing taxes and running payroll... well, for most of us, they don't feel great. They're definitely not our ONE thing. That's where Gusto comes in to help you make payroll, taxes, and HR easy. So ask yourself: is it time to take off some of your hats?You can get three FREE months when you run your first payroll at Gusto.com/ONE.--When you're busy, it can be a challenge to get dinner on the table every night.Sovereignty creates game-changing supplements to help your focus and your sleep. Their focus blend uses CBG and adaptogens to deliver results you can feel almost instantly. And their sleep blend calms the mind and body while helping you fall asleep and stay asleep.Visit sov.live and use code “ONE” for 20% off your first purchase.

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 207 Fierce Self-Compassion (with Kristen Neff)

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 32:23


This is Your Anxiety Toolkit - Episode 207. Welcome to Your Anxiety Toolkit. I'm your host, Kimberley Quinlan. This podcast is fueled by three main goals. The first goal is to provide you with some extra tools to help you manage your anxiety. Second goal, to inspire you. Anxiety doesn't get to decide how you live your life. And number three, and I leave the best for last, is to provide you with one big, fat virtual hug, because experiencing anxiety ain't easy. If that sounds good to you, let's go. Welcome back, everybody. This is a really exciting podcast today. We have back on the show the amazing Kristin Neff. Now, as you all know, we're doing a 30-day Self-Compassion Challenge and it is the perfect time to bring on Kristin Neff, who has written a new book called Fierce Self-Compassion: How Women Can Harness Kindness to Speak Up, Claim Their Power, and Thrive. Now, while the book is directed towards women, it actually is for everybody. So, we're speaking today in this interview about fear self-compassion and it's for everybody. It's particularly valid to those of us who are struggling with anxiety and have to really work hard at facing fears every day. I am so grateful we got to have Kristin on. She had so many beautiful things to say. If you like the episode, please go over and purchase her book. She too has a book out and again, it's called Fierce Self-Compassion, and it might help you really deep dive into this practice of fierce self-compassion. Before we get over to the show, let's talk about the “I did a hard thing” segment. This one we have is from Eric, and he has said: “I've been working on my anxiety about the heat by spending every day I can in the sauna of my gym. I work up a good full-body sweat, and it feels so uncomfortable, but I stick with it knowing it will pay off.” Eric, this is so amazing. What an amazing way for you to stare your fear in the face, practice being uncomfortable. I love it. In addition to that, let's move right over to the review of the week. This one is from Emily. Emily says: “Kimberley consistently shares a genuine compassion across all of her podcast episodes. She's been a source of encouragement on my journey with OCD, anxiety, and depression because her message remains one of the consistent self-compassion while sharing a realistic perspective and the reality of mental health struggles.” Thank you so much. You're so welcome, Emily. I am just so honored to be on this amazing path with you all doing such amazing hard things and really doing the hard work. It's really an honor to hear these stories and hear the hard things you guys are doing. That being said, let's move over to the show again. Thank you so much, Kristin Neff, for coming on. I just found this episode to be so deeply helpful with some profound concepts and I can't wait to share them with you. Kimberley: Welcome. This is an honor to have with us again the amazing Kristin Neff. Welcome. Kristin: Thank you for having me. Happy to be here with you again. Kimberley: Yeah. You have a new book out, which is by far my favorite. I am so in love with this book—Fierce Compassion. Yes. I actually have mine on my Kindle, so I was holding it up, going, “Look, it's right here.” Kristin: Thank you. Kimberley: I loved this book. Thank you for writing it. This is so important for our community because you're talking about how to use compassion in I think ways that we haven't talked about before and is so important for those people who are suffering with anxiety or just any kind of severe mental illness or struggle. Can you tell me exactly what fierce compassion or fear self-compassion is? Kristin: Yeah. Well, self-compassion, in general, or compassion in general is concerned with the alleviation of suffering. It's a desire to help. It's the desire for well-being of others, and then self-compassion is of yourself. There are really two main faces that it has, the two main ways that it can express itself. There's tender self-compassion, which is really important, which is about self-acceptance. It's about being gentle, more nurturing, warm with yourself, soothing yourself when you're upset, really offering support, being with yourself and all your pain and all your imperfection, and really accepting a kind way. This is a hugely important aspect of self-compassion because most of us don't do this. Most of us think we aren't good enough or we criticize ourselves. We're really harsh with ourselves. This is huge. But it's actually not the only aspect of self-compassion. Sometimes compassion is more of a gentle, nurturing energy, almost like you might say a mother. Metaphorically, a mother or a father, but a parent. Fear self-compassion is more like mama bear, like fierce mama bear. In other words, sometimes in order to alleviate our suffering, we need to take action. Acceptance isn't always the right response when we're suffering. For instance, if you're in a situation that's harmful, maybe someone is crossing your boundaries, or someone is harming you in some way, threatening you in some way, whether it's society. Maybe it's racism, sexism, or some sort of injustice, or whether it's yourself. Maybe you're harming yourself in some way. Although we want to accept ourselves as worthy people, we don't necessarily want to accept our behavior. And so sometimes we need to take action to alleviate suffering. So, that could either be protection against harm. Sometimes it's providing for ourselves. This is especially for women, women who are told they should always self-sacrifice, they should always meet others' needs. Actually, sometimes for self-compassion, we have to say, “No, I'd really love to help you, but I've got something I need to tend to for myself.” So taking action to meet your own needs. And then also motivating change. It's not self-compassionate to let behaviors or situations slide that are not healthy. So, really taking the action needed to motivate healthy change. But it comes from encouragement, not because “I'm unacceptable unless I change.” The tender and the fear self-compassion, they go hand in hand. I like to say it's like yin and yang. We need both and we need them to be in balance. If they aren't in balance, it's a problem. Kimberley: Now this is so good because my first question was how to get it into balance, right? I love in your book, you have a little questionnaire. You fill it out, is there balance, and what side is that all? But can you share how people may get some balance if they're finding they're doing one of the other? Kristin: Yeah. It's a tricky question, right? Because sometimes we don't know, but we need to ask. Really the quintessential self-compassion question is, what do I need right now to be healthy, to be well? And just pausing to ask that question is huge. Usually, we're just doing our daily routine or we're striving to reach these goals that people tell us we need to reach. We don't even stop to say, “Actually, what do I really need to be healthy and well?” So asking that question is huge. And then you may not get it right at first. You may think, oh actually I thought I needed that, and I don't. Really self-compassion is a process. But it helps to know the different types of self-compassion. You might say, “Do I need a little tenderness right now? Do I need some acceptance? Do I need some softness and gentleness? Do I need to kick in the butt? Do I need to get going? Do I need to stand up? Do I need to speak up? Do I need to say no to people? Maybe I'm giving too much of myself in order to find balance.” You really just have to ask yourself the questions. It's really the process of being committed to yourself that you're going to do the work necessary to be healthy and well. Kimberley: Right. You've outlined so many pieces of this puzzle, right? Particularly, and this is why I was just-- I think I reached out to you months before your book came out because I just wanted to hear your opinion on this. For people who are struggling with the inner bully, whether that be the disorder they have, or they're just very self- critical, it can be really hard to stand up to that. Almost feeling like it's just impossible. I've heard people saying like, “This is just who I am. I'm just going to have this voice.” I'm wondering, you might maybe share where would somebody start with this practice? Kristin: Yeah. And then we also need to get in the different parts of ourselves, right? Because the inner bully, that's a part. We also have a part that's compassionate. We also have a part that feels bullied by the inner critic. So, we've got the person who's pointing their finger. We have the person that feels the shame. We've got all these different parts of ourselves. And really all of them need to be treated with compassion, but how that compassion manifests is going to be different. For instance, I have a compassionate motivation exercise in there, where sometimes what we need with an inner critic is we need to thank it. “Thank you for trying to help me.” This may be the only language it has to try to help us, and it needs to feel listened to and heard. “Thank you so much for trying to help me.” It's actually not been that helpful, but I appreciate your efforts. That's almost using more the tender self-compassion for the inner critic. But sometimes it needs the standing up. It's like the mama bear, like, “I'm sorry, I'm not going to listen to that anymore. You can't say that. It's not okay. I'm drawing a line in the sand.” So that's part of it. But then also, we don't want to forget having compassion for the part of ourselves that feels criticized. People who say the inner critic, that's just who I am. Well actually, who they are is, there's a part of them that hurts from the inner criticism. There's a part of them that feels compassion for the pain of that. There's a part of them that's trying to help, keep themselves safe through criticism. Inner critics don't operate really to try to harm. They operate to try to help to keep us safe. I've talked about a lot in my book, my son has very harsh self-criticism and I can see he really believes-- by the way, I'm just going to turn this off. Sorry. It's going to be cooking for me the whole time. Kimberley: No problem. Kristin: My son really believes that if he's hard with himself, somehow, it's going to allow him to get it right not make mistakes. So, usually, our inner critic, some part of it believes that if we're harsh enough with ourselves, we'll get it right not make mistakes. And that's the safety behavior. So, we need to have compassion for that safety behavior at the same time that we don't want to be railroaded by it. It is complex. The human psyche is complex. Pretty much the answer is always compassion. But what form that compassion takes just depends on what the situation is. There's no one-size-fits-all. Kimberley: And I think that it's so important that you're addressing both the yin and the yang side. Because there are times when, let's say somebody's struggling with incredibly painful intrusive thoughts related to their OCD or their disorder, where they need to really just go, “Wow, this is so hard for you. I'm so sorry you're going through this.” But there are other times where you have to be like, “Nope, we're not doing this today. We're not going to go down that road today.” So, I think it's beautiful that you're bringing that Together. Kristin: It's funny, I have to use both sides with my son. He has both autism and OCD, as I was telling you, and anxiety just to make things fun. But sometimes what he needs is he needs my warmth and compassion. Just that caring, that tenderness. He knows always the bottom line is unconditional acceptance. But sometimes they need to draw boundaries. He's learning to drive, for instance, and he started having an episode while he was driving and I'm like, “No, you cannot do this while you're driving. It's not safe.” Part of them doesn't have the ability to stop it, but part of them does. So, it is complex. Sometimes I need to appeal to that part of them that does have the ability, at least temporarily, to say, “I'm not going to go there. You need to choose. You need to stop up.” Sometimes I say it almost really firmly and it shocks him, and it actually helps him to stop. So, it's complicated. Kimberley: It really, really is. Now, it's interesting because you and I were talking before, and I want to touch in because the first part of the book-- the book is directed specifically to women, but it also is addressed to anybody, I think. Kristin: Yeah. All people live both yin and yang. The reason I do it for women is because women are so socialized not to be fierce. And that's partly patriarchy. Women have been kept in their place by not getting angry or not speaking up. So, that's why it's written for women. But a lot of my male friends have read it and they say they get a lot out of it because first of all, all the practices are human. They're for all people, not just women. Kimberley: Right. But the reason I loved it is you did speak directly to getting angry, right? Kristin: Yes. Kristin: There's a lot in the front about getting angry. Is it helpful? Is it not? Do you want to share? I mean, I think a lot of people who are anxious are afraid of their anger or are afraid of that. So, do you want to share a little bit about how people can use these practices for anger? Kimberley: Yeah. Well, because part of the whole messaging of the book is anger communicates expression of compassion. Again, think of fierce mama bear, that ferocity, and think of someone who tries to harm someone you loved. There would probably be this arising of anger that comes up to protect. Anger is a protective emotion. Now again, anger can be problematic for sure. It's very easy. What's the difference between helpful and unhelpful anger? It's dead simple. Helpful anger alleviates suffering, unhelpful anger causes suffering. We know it can do both. But anger should not be undervalued as an important source of protection and compassion. It energizes us, it focuses us, it gives us energy, it suppresses the fear response, especially with people with anxiety. It's funny, my son is afraid of dogs. It's one of his anxious things. I taught him very early on that when a dog is threatening him to rise up and yell at the dog and flop his arms, scare the dog. He does that. It's funny, it also helps suppress his fear response for the dog when he does that because he's basically getting angry and yelling at the dog to back off. I have to say sometimes he overuses it, like he's done that with poodles at the park. I'm like, “Poodle is not a threat. Poodle will survive.” In his mind, the poodle is a threat. So, being able to call on that fierce energy, one of the things it does is it does suppress the fear response. So, if you never allow yourself to be angry, it feeds into that fear response. That anger can actually be opposite to the fear response. Kimberley: Right. This is where this is so beautiful because actually, a lot of the work I do with my patients is, instead of being angry at the dog or expressing anger, is to talk to fear and set the limit with fear. You were talking in the book about the inner critic and the inner voice or it could be the inner fear. I often will have patients say, “No, fear, you can come with me to the dog park or you could come with me to this, but you are not winning,” and getting really strong with an angry back at fear, which I think is another approach. Kristin: Yes, that's right. Again, you can say, “Thank you for trying to help me.” In my son's script, “Thank you for trying to keep me safe, but you aren't helping.” It's both. It's the appreciation. Because we don't want to feel that any parts of ourselves are unacceptable. If we make our inner critic or if we make our anxiety or OCD, or any of those parts of ourselves feel unacceptable, then we're harming ourselves. Kimberley: That's the key point. Kristin: We can accept it with love, with tenderness. Just because my OCD is not helping me doesn't mean it's not acceptable, and act as a way in which it's a beautiful part of me trying to keep myself safe. So, it's differentiating between us as people and particular behavior. Behaviors can be helpful or harmful, but we're always okay exactly as we are. Kimberley: Right. And that's the point. You just dropped the mic on that one. That's so important. This is actually a question more than a statement—as we're navigating, standing up to fear or depression is that we're not disregarding it or criticizing the fear that's inside us either. Kristin: Yeah. Because it serves a purpose. All these emotions serve-- and usually, it comes down to safety or the sense of belonging or some sort of deep survival mechanism because these are all evolutionarily-- they came from our brains and our brains designed to survive. So, they have a negativity bias, say they tend to get really anxious. They tend to use the fight, flight, or freeze response. Fight is the self-criticism, flight is the fear response or shame response, freeze is when you get absolutely stuck over and over again, like rumination. Interesting, which may be related more to OCD. I've never thought about that. But it might be that that loopy might be the freeze response where you're just stuck. All of these evolved as safety mechanisms as a way to avoid, like the lion chasing you, and they still remain in our brains, even though nowadays, most of us, at least in the first world, don't have those types of threats to our physical being as often. Kimberley: Oh, I love it. Okay. You already touched on this slightly and I just want to go over it quickly is, how might people use fierce compassion as a motivator and as something that encourages them? Because I think the way I conceptualize it is, you conceptualize the basketball coach who's like, “Get up in there and just go harder.” It's motivating, but it's almost also very critical. Can you share a little on that? Kristin: Yeah. Self-criticism or harshness does work as a motivator. There are coaches like that who do get some results out of their players, but there's a lot of unintended consequences. Anxiety actually, believe it or not, is one of the poor byproducts of criticism because fear of failure, fear of not performing up to your ability, fear of making mistakes, that actually gets generated. When you know that you're going to beat yourself if you don't reach your goals, then that actually adds to your anxiety, and that makes it harder to reach your goals. Fear of failure, procrastination is a classic example. Self-handicapping, some people do that because they don't want to risk failure because they're too afraid of failing, because they know they're going to be so harsh on themselves if they do fail. But some people make the mistake of thinking that self-compassion is just about acceptance. Like, “Well, it's okay if you don't succeed. Well, everyone is imperfect.” Although it's true, it is okay if you don't succeed, it is true that everyone's imperfect, that doesn't mean that you don't want to succeed. But the reason you want to succeed is very different. Some people want to succeed because if they don't succeed their failure, they're going to hate themselves, they're going to shame themselves. Other people want to succeed because they want to be happy. They care about themselves. They don't want to suffer. It's a much healthier form of motivation. It comes from the desire for care and well-being as opposed to fear of failure or inadequacy. And then because of that, when the bottom line is, “Hey, I'm going to try my best. I'm going to do everything I can to succeed. But if I fail, that's okay too,” what that means is anxiety levels go down. There's less fear of failure. There's less procrastination. There's less performance anxiety. This is the key. When you do fail, you're able to learn from it. I mean, it's a truism that failure is our best teacher. If we shame ourselves when we fail, when we're full of shame, we can't actually learn. We're just hanging our heads. We can't really see clearly. We can't process. But when it's like, “Okay, wow, that hurts. Ouch. Well, everyone fails. What can I learn from this? It doesn't mean that I'm a failure just because I failed.” That ability to learn actually helps your motivation and helps sustain your motivation. It's just much more effective. We know this with our kids and a lot of coaches know it. Not all coaches know, but a lot of coaches know their players. They may be tough like mama bear tough. But the thing about mama bear is you also know mama bear loves you. She's doing it because she cares. When she's just snarling at you, you don't get that sense of being cared for. You get that sense of being inadequate. We know the difference, including with her own internal dialogues. We know the difference. Does this come from a place of care or a place of shame? Kimberley: You know what's interesting, and you probably know this, probably experienced this, but as I was writing my book, I was saying nice things, but I caught myself saying them in a tone that wasn't nice. I was going, “No, I haven't said anything.” I was saying like, “You could do it, keep going,” but the tone was so mean like, “Keep going!” Do you want to share a little bit about that? Kristin: Yeah. Well, tone is so huge. One of the main ways, the idea that the feeling of compassion is communicated, especially the infants before they get language, is through touch and through tone of voice. Universally, we know the certain types of touch that feel caring and supportive and others that feel either indifferent or threatening in some way. Also tone, there's a certain quality to the voice when it's caring versus when it's harsh. Most of that is communicated to infants before they know how to speak. It's not just what you say, it's how you say it, and it's also how you hold your body. There's physical touch. But even just like, is your body slammed or is upright, physical signals of care are really important. We teach both right. Kimberley: I'm asking this actually for myself because it didn't occur to me right now is how might I be fierce with the tone? How does the fierce tone sound? Kristin: Yeah. It's firm, but it's not harsh. It's like, “No, that's not okay,” instead of, “No, that's not okay!” It's not vicious. It's not, “No, that's not okay, you stupid idiot!” It's like, “No, that's not okay.” Kimberley: Yeah. That's the nuance that I think I have to work on. Kristin: “It's not really okay. Is it okay?” It's like waffling and wish-washy. By the way, I'm saying this, it's not easy to get it right, and I get it wrong all the time. Fierceness and tenderness have to be balanced. My problem is, even though I was raised as a woman and for most women, they aren't allowed to be fierce, I'm actually probably more yang than yin just by nature, just by my genes. My problem is I am too fierce without being tender enough. I'm always apologizing and saying, “I'm so sorry, please forgive me,” because I get out of balance the other way. Sometimes I just say it so bluntly and I forget to cushion it with some sort of niceness or reminder that I care. And that's not healthy either. It's a process. It's not like a destination, you get there and you're done. It's like, “Okay, I got it wrong this way, got it wrong that way.” You always have to be trying to recorrect. But as long as you allow yourself not to have to be perfect, then you can keep going. You keep trying. It is a process. It's a process of compassion. The goal isn't to get it right, it's just to open your heart. So, as long as we do all of this with an open heart, out of goodwill, the desire to help ourselves and others, then it's okay. But it is tricky, and I would be lying if I said that it wasn't. It is. Kimberley: Yeah. Here I am thinking that I'm really good at this stuff, and I was hearing my tone and going, “Wow, that's not cool. You're saying kind things, but not with a great tone.” I have two more questions or things I want to touch on really quickly. Will you talk about these two topics of fulfillment and equanimity? I know you touched on them in the book, but I loved what you are to say. Kristin: Yeah. Fulfillment is also an aspect of self-compassion. So, if we want to help ourselves and be well, we really need to value what's important to us. First of all, we need to know our values. Is it just what society says? You have to earn a certain amount of money. You've got to look a certain way. You've got to be popular. What's really important to us? Sometimes it's personal, like music or art or nature. Sometimes it's honesty or sometimes it's helping others. But we know our inner values. Part of compassion is asking ourselves what's really important to us and valuing ourselves enough to actually fulfill our own needs. Again, there's a gender difference. Men have raised feeling entitled to get their needs met. It's not really the question. Of course, I'm going to get my needs met. Isn't it to everyone? Well, actually, not necessarily. Class, and a lot of things go into this, but gender certainly does. Women are valued for being self-sacrificing. Women are valued, especially toward their kids, for denying their own needs and helping others. That's how people like us. That's how we get our sense of worth. So that sets us up in a situation that in order to feel worthy, we have to give up what's important to us, which actually undermines our own sense of self. Sometimes the term we use is “Give to others without losing yourself.” Part of that is knowing what you need to be happy and fulfilled and giving yourself permission to take the time, energy, effort to meet those needs. It's not instead of other people, it's in addition to. It's including yourself in the equation. My research shows that self-compassionate people, they don't subordinate their needs, but it's not like my way or the high way. They actually are more likely to compromise and say, “Well, how can we come to a solution that meets everyone's needs?” And that's really what we need to do to be balanced. Kimberley: Yeah. I loved that. I really did. Oh my goodness, this is so good. Before we finish up, would you tell us where people can hear about you and your book or your books? Tell us where we can get to you. Kristin: Yeah. Probably the easiest place to start is just my website, which is self-compassion.org. If you Google it, you'll find me. I got in early, so all the algorithms come to my website. Just type self-compassion, you'll find me. On that side, I've got, for instance, if you want to test your own self-compassion level, you can take the scale that I created to measure self-Compassion. I have guided meditations, I have practices, I have exercises. I have a new page on Fierce Self-Compassion that especially has fierce self-compassion exercises. I have research. If you're a research nerd, there's hundreds and hundreds of PDFs of research articles on there. There's also a link to the Center for Mindful Self-Compassion, which is really the nonprofit I started with Chris Germer that does self-compassion training. That's also a really good place. You could take courses online. You can get training really easily now. Kimberley: I've taken the training three times and in three different ways. One was a weekend. One was the eight-week course. One was a two-day. I think that can meet everybody. Online, I did one of them that was finished online because of COVID. Really, really great. So, thank you. Is there anything you feel like we've missed that you want to make sure we cover before we finish up? Kristin: I just like to encourage people just to try it out. I mean, the research is overwhelming in terms of the well-being and strength and resilient self-compassion can give you. Life is tough and it's getting tougher every day with this pandemic and global warming. I mean, everything is really, really tough. So, we have this resource available, this resource of friendliness, of kindness, of support, just available at any moment. You don't have to sit down and meditate. You don't have to even go to a class. You just have to think, what do I need to care for myself in this moment? You can actually do it. It's like a superpower that people don't even know they have. It's just like to tell people, “Hey, you've got this ability. It's right in your back pocket. You just need to remember to take it out.” Kimberley: I love that. Thank you. Thank you so much for your time. I'm so grateful. Kristin: You're welcome. Thanks for having me. ----- Please note that this podcast or any other resources from cbtschool.com should not replace professional mental health care. If you feel you would benefit, please reach out to a provider in your area. Have a wonderful day and thank you for supporting cbtschool.com. Links:  Kristen Neff's Website  https://self-compassion.org/ Fierce Self-Compassion  https://www.amazon.com/dp/006299106X/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_BT4GGYF8XFE1TJ7DPGBT?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

The Chop with Latrice Royale & Manila Luzon
Canada's Drag Race S2E1 "Lost and Fierce"

The Chop with Latrice Royale & Manila Luzon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 59:26


Are you ready for season 2 of Canada's Drag Race? Because, Latrice and Manila are! Get ready as they chop up all the best and worst moments of episode 1!Listen to The Chop Ad-Free AND One Day Early on Forever Dog PlusSend us an e-mail at latriceandmanila@gmail.com!FOLLOW MANILAhttps://twitter.com/manilaluzonhttps://www.instagram.com/manilaluzon/https://www.facebook.com/manilaluzonfanpage/https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uz1U1ZS_2wtII3hYiB-rQFOLLOW LATRICEhttps://twitter.com/LatriceRoyalehttps://www.instagram.com/latriceroyale/https://www.facebook.com/LatriceRoyaleInc/https://www.latriceroyale.com/THE CHOP IS A FOREVER DOG AND MOGULS OF MEDIA (M.O.M.) PODCASTSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.