Podcasts about Buddhism

World religion founded by the Buddha

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Buddhism

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    Latest podcast episodes about Buddhism

    Way to Go
    Buddhism in Today's World

    Way to Go

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 23:07


    Listen as Pastors Bill McMinn and Adam Page discuss Buddhism in today's world.

    Alan Watts Podcast
    Democracy in The Kingdom 2 of 4

    Alan Watts Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 14:03


    You are listening to a sample of The Essential Lecture‪s of Alan Watts.

    Creativity, Spirituality & Making a Buck with David Nichtern
    David's View: Creativity & Compassion with David Nichtern & Michael Kammers

    Creativity, Spirituality & Making a Buck with David Nichtern

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 36:30


    Michael Kammers and David Nichtern discuss the connection between creativity and compassion, offering insight into balancing artistry with wellbeing.Discover more at Dharma Moon – David's mindfulness-based education platform offering Workshops/Courses, Teacher Trainings, Mentoring & more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    In the Flow with Lauri Albert
    Coming Out Of The Psychic Closet

    In the Flow with Lauri Albert

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 16:01


    I understand the stigma of knowing you are psychic but being very nervous to pursue the gift. Let's discuss the JOYS and concerns of understanding that you might be psychic. My dear friend, Pierre Bensusan, has permitted me to use his track called ‘Sentimentales Pyromaniaques' from the album 'Altiplanos'. “I Am With You” composed by Music Of Wisdom - Licensed from Meditation Music Library

    The Hellenistic Age Podcast
    078: The Indo-Greeks - Heracles, Menander, and the Buddha

    The Hellenistic Age Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 58:59


    In antiquity, Gandhara was one of the most deeply-rooted hubs of Buddhism, and scholars have attempted to search for any possible encounters between Buddhists and the Greeks who settled in Central Asia and India. Fascinating pieces of evidence hint at these connections: the Pali text known as the Milindapañha ("The Questions of King Milinda") portrays the Indo-Greek king Menander I Soter as a Buddhist convert and saint swayed by the wisdom of the Sage Nagasena, while Emperor Ashoka dispatched missionaries to the Hellenistic kingdoms and ordered his beliefs to be inscribed in Greek on the rocks outside of Kandahar. Centuries later, the sculptors of Gandhara would adapt Greco-Roman mythology and designs to create beautiful works of art, resulting in the first known depictions of the Buddha in human form, and transforming the demigod Heracles into Heracles-Vajrapani, protector of the Buddha. Episode Notes: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.wordpress.com/2022/08/12/078-the-indo-greeks-heracles-menander-and-the-buddha/) Episode 078 Transcript: (https://hellenisticagepodcast.files.wordpress.com/2022/08/078-indo-greeks-heracles-menander-and-the-buddha-transcript.pdf) Social Media: Twitter (https://twitter.com/HellenisticPod) Facebook (www.facebook.com/hellenisticagepodcast/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/hellenistic_age_podcast/) Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/hellenisticagepodcast) Show Merchandise: Etsy (https://www.etsy.com/shop/HellenisticAgePod) Redbubble (https://www.redbubble.com/people/HellenisticPod/shop?asc=u) Donations: Ko-Fi (https://ko-fi.com/hellenisticagepodcast) Amazon Book Wish List (https://tinyurl.com/vfw6ask)

    Pariyatti
    A Lifetime Doing Nothing (Story 33 excerpt)

    Pariyatti

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


    Story 33 from 'A Lifetime Doing Nothing' by Ian McCrorie. A healthy component of the practice is to stay awake to encroaching spiritual materialism. This danger begins to raise its head after you think of yourself as an experienced practitioner. You may judge your practice as quite advanced. You pat yourself on the back. You start acquiring compliments. Thoughts that you might teach someday may flutter through your consciousness. Don't indulge in these meanderings. Keep an eye on them as you would a spot of crabgrass on an otherwise pristine lawn. narrated by Ian McCrorie 2022 3 minutes 15 seconds Listen to Streaming Audio Your browser does not support the audio element. Download Audio (2MB) Audio copyright, 2022 Pariyatti 'A Lifetime Doing Nothing' as a book and eBook can be found at https://store.pariyatti.org/a-lifetime-doing-nothing. More by Ian McCrorie. View more books and audio resources available in the Pariyatti bookstore.

    Letters to a Dead Friend About Zen
    Women and Misogyny in Zen Buddhism

    Letters to a Dead Friend About Zen

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 47:40


    On a recent YouTube video I talked about misogyny in Buddhism and the pro-female ideas Dogen expressed in Shobogenzo. In this talk from March 16, 2016, I go into greater depth about both subjects in front of an audience at a retreat at Mount Baldy Zen Center. 

    The Way Out Is In
    Free from Views in a Polarized World (Episode #36)

    The Way Out Is In

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 93:31 Very Popular


    Welcome to episode 36 of The Way Out Is In: The Zen Art of Living, a podcast series mirroring Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh's deep teachings of Buddhist philosophy: a simple yet profound methodology for dealing with our suffering, and for creating more happiness and joy in our lives. This time, the presenters, Zen Buddhist monk Brother Phap Huu and journalist Jo Confino, discuss views and perceptions, and how to move beyond them to find deeper meaning and truth in life. Together, they provide the context for the Buddhist concept of right view, deconstruct ‘view' and perceptions, including giving examples. They also share zen stories and practices (such as the Five Mindfulness Trainings – with a special focus on the first three) which can help us let go of views that bring suffering, while embracing the ones that can bring happiness. Brother Phap Huu explains the Buddhist perception of view and the updated Fourteen Mindfulness Trainings for monastic and lay practitioners. He further discusses fanaticism; “seeing the world beyond our world”; the practice of compassionate listening and deep looking; true communication; freedom of thought and openness to learning; and collective awakening. And what is it about aligning with a particular viewpoint that makes people feel safe and secure?Jo delves into the “terror of nothingness”; the sacred nature of things, and the fear of the sacred; the importance of connecting with and understanding our roots; holding more than one truth; and the accumulation of intellectual knowledge. The episode ends with a short meditation guided by Brother Phap Huu. Co-produced by the Plum Village App:https://plumvillage.app/ And Global Optimism:https://globaloptimism.com/ With support from the Thich Nhat Hanh Foundation:https://thichnhathanhfoundation.org/ List of resourcesDharma Talks: ‘The Noble Eightfold Path'https://plumvillage.org/library/dharma-talks/the-noble-eightfold-path/Dharma Talks: ‘The Ground of Right View'https://plumvillage.org/library/dharma-talks/the-ground-of-right-view/ Sister Chan Khonghttps://plumvillage.org/about/sister-chan-khong/ The Beginner's Mindhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin The Fourteen Mindfulness Trainingshttps://plumvillage.org/mindfulness/the-14-mindfulness-trainings/ Mahāyānahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahayana Buddhahoodhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhahood Leaders' Questhttps://leadersquest.org/ Lindsay Levinhttps://leadersquest.org/who-we-are/people/lindsay-levin/ Dharma Talks: ‘The Three Doors of Liberation or the Three Dharma Seals'https://plumvillage.org/library/dharma-talks/the-three-doors-of-liberation-or-the-three-dharma-seals-sr-chan-duc-italian-retreat-2018-05-04/ Old Path White Cloudshttps://plumvillage.org/books/old-path-white-clouds-2/ Dharma Talks: ‘The Four Immeasurable Minds – The Four Elements of True Love'https://plumvillage.org/library/dharma-talks/the-four-immeasurable-minds-the-four-elements-of-true-love-sr-dieu-nghiem-sr-jina-2018-07-26/ Quotes “The Buddha once said that 95% of our perceptions are wrong; we are so quick in our judgment that we see things as we want to, but not as they are.” “Thay said, ‘I would never want to bring my students, my children, to a place where there is no suffering. In such a place, my children would never have an opportunity to grow, because they will not learn from suffering. And we know that life has a lot of teachings, and suffering is one of the teachings.’” “Thay had told us a mantra should be, ‘You are partially right.'” “We have to experience everything in life, not in concept.” “Freedom of thought: aware of the suffering brought about when we impose our views on others, we are determined not to force others – even our children – by any means whatsoever, such as authority, threat, money, propaganda, or indoctrination to adopt our views. We are committed to respecting the rights of others to be different, to choose what to believe and how to decide. We will, however, learn to help others let go and transform fanaticism and narrowness, through loving speech and compassionate dialog.” “Embrace your view, give it space, allow it to be, but don’t feed it. Don’t feed it and give it extra food, but question it and challenge it.” “I always remember the Dalai Lama saying, ‘If you have a spiritual epiphany, let it go, because a spiritual epiphany can be an imprisonment that you spend your life going back to. And that’s where you get stuck.’” “I wish everybody had the conditions to see the world beyond their world. When we are so attached to our views, it is because we haven’t yet allowed ourselves to be open.” “One time, someone asked Thay, ‘What would you choose, Buddhism or peace?’ And he said, ‘Of course, peace. Because the essence of Buddhism is to have inner peace and outer peace. I’m ready to let go of Buddhism. If peace is there, then Buddhism is not needed, because Buddhism is also just a view.’” “Thay was very, very clear that if you come to Plum Village and you become interested in Buddhist teachings and practices, do not let go of your own religious or spiritual traditions. Buddhism doesn't [need to] take over from that; it can add something. But he has constantly talked about the importance of connecting to your own roots, of being aware of your own roots, of not distancing yourself. Because our roots are important and they help us to understand ourselves, they help us to understand what our views are. Even if they are views that we want to let go of, we can only understand them in the context of our past.” “There is no one truth; there are many truths.” “Aware of the suffering created by attachment to views and wrong perceptions, we are determined to avoid being narrow-minded and bound to present views. We are committed to learning and practicing non-attachment to views and being open to others’ experiences and insights, in order to benefit from collective wisdom. We are aware that the knowledge we presently possess is not changeless, absolute truth. Insight is revealed through the practice of compassionate listening, deep looking, and letting go of notions, rather than through the accumulation of intellectual knowledge. Truth is found in life, and we will observe life within and around us in every moment, ready to learn throughout our lives.” “Life is always changing. Are we the same as we were yesterday, or different? The answer is, we are neither the same nor different, because we are always changing. We are the present moment, but we are also of the past, because everything that we have experienced is here. But we are not just that past, because we’re living in this moment, which we are organically changing.” “The raft is not the shore. When you arrive at the shore, the shore which resembles liberation, we have to let go of the raft.” “If people are not deeply listening to each other, not incorporating ideas, not seeing a constellation or system of change, then actually people are just defending themselves.” “When we want to teach something, we have to learn to walk the talk.”

    Buddhist Society of Western Australia
    Pioneering a dhamma community in a regional town with Bhikkhu Mudu - Spirit Stories

    Buddhist Society of Western Australia

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 55:25 Very Popular


    In this episode of Spirit Stories our guest is Venerable Mudu who is leading an effort to establish a community of practice in the Great Southern region of Western Australia. Venerable Mudu first became interested in Buddhism when a chance invitation by a Thai friend to join her in offering food to the Buddhist monks at Serpentine's Forest Monastery. He became inspired by the monastic way of life. Several years later after developing an understanding the importance of meditation and renunciation, he decided to take up the training to become a Buddhist monk. In 2014, after completing the two year trial and preliminary training, Venerable Mudu received the higher ordination as a fully ordained Bhikkhu under his teacher and preceptor, Ajahn Brahm at Bodhinyana Buddhist Monastery. In 2018 he went to Albany at the request of community members there, and has since established Bodhinyana Great Southern Hermitage and he teaches regularly in Albany, as well as frequent visit to Denmark, Walpole and Mt Barker, all in the Great Southern region in the far south of Western Australia. Links mentioned in the show: About Bodhinyana Great Southern  Bodhinyana Great Southern Facebook Group The Basic Method of Meditation by Ajahn Brahm  Link to BAMBI  To donate to Bodhinyana Great Southern use the link or QR code below: Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean.

    Alan Watts Being in the Way
    Ep. 16 – A Coincidence of Opposites

    Alan Watts Being in the Way

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 41:26 Very Popular


    Contemplating the coincidence of opposites within the 'human game,' Alan ponders the simple yet thought-provoking question: is existence serious?Today's podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/alanIn this episode of Being in the Way, Mark introduces a lecture from his father Alan Watts called 'Coincidence of Opposites' – the first talk in a seminar called 'Learning the Human Game,' given in 1965 at the University of Michigan to a small group of psychology and philosophy grad students."One has to get used fundamentally to the notion that different things can be inseparable—that what is explicitly two, can at the same time be implicitly one." – Alan WattsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    the 12-Step Buddhist Podcast
    Episode 057 - The 12-Step Buddhist Podcast: Our Stress Response, Practices of a Bodhisattva #15

    the 12-Step Buddhist Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 23:54 Very Popular


    How our nervous system can be retrained to contain our toxic stress by continuing with Practices of a Bodhisattva #15.  Reading from Treasures from Juniper Ridge Compassionate Recovery: Mindful Healing for Trauma and Addictions Available in Kindle, Trade Paperback, Hardcover. The Audiobook is available free with a 3-month Audible trial. Also on Amazon Music and iTunes. Credit always to Clay Giberson for the amazing show intro over ten years running. Sounds better than ever. Reach out to Clay for sessions. 

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
    0725 - TALKS: Apollonius of Tyana & the Sage, I

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


    Episode 0725 - Apollonius of Tyana & the Sage, I (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Extended commentary on the life & times of Apollonius of Tyana -- reading F.C. Conybeare's introduction to his translation, and Maria Dzielska's discussion of historicity. A true sage as the peoples' defender & healer, speaking against the evils of 3D-human STS authority. Additional references

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
    0726 - TALKS: Webu Sayadaw & Buddhist Practice, XVI

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


    Episode 0726 - Webu Sayadaw & Buddhist Practice, XVI (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Introduction to the life & Dhamma discourses of the Webu Sayadaw, translated by Roger Bischoff (The Essential Practice, BPS; 1995). From Sila through Samadhi to Prajna, with core guidance on Anapanasati meditation. Continued reading of Part II, chapter 3: A Happiness that Ever Grows. Date: 8/4/22

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
    0727 - TALKS: Apollonius of Tyana & the Sage, II

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


    Episode 0727 - Apollonius of Tyana & the Sage, II (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Extended commentary on the life & times of Apollonius of Tyana, reading the F.C. Conybeare introduction to his translation, and Maria Dzielska's discussion of historicity. Apollonius as an "alternate/Eastern/yogic Jesus" -- and the true sage as peoples' defender & healer, threat to authority,

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
    0724 - TALKS: Webu Sayadaw & Buddhist Practice, XV

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


    Episode 0724 - Webu Sayadaw & Buddhist Practice, XV (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Introduction to the life & Dhamma discourses of the Webu Sayadaw, translated by Roger Bischoff (The Essential Practice, BPS; 1995). From Sila through Samadhi to Prajna, with core guidance on Anapanasati meditation. First reading of Part II, chapter 3: A Happiness that Ever Grows. Additional

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
    0728 - TALKS: Webu Sayadaw & Buddhist Practice, XVII [FINAL]

    Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022


    Episode 0728 - Webu Sayadaw & Buddhist Practice, XVII [FINAL] (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Introduction to the life & Dhamma discourses of the Webu Sayadaw, translated by Roger Bischoff (The Essential Practice, BPS; 1995). From Sila through Samadhi to Prajna, with core guidance on Anapanasati meditation. Final reading of Part II, chapter 3: A Happiness that Ever Grows, and

    Tenaciously Human
    Spirituality and Meditation with Linda Modaro

    Tenaciously Human

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 45:27


    In this episode of Tenaciously Human Podcast, we have Linda Modaro. Linda Modaro is the founder and lead teacher at Sati Sangha, a vibrant online meditation community that offers daily virtual meditation sittings, online retreats, and in-person retreats throughout the year. She teaches meditation and she's here with us to guide and teach us about meditation.Sneak Peek: 03:56 How intertwined is Buddhism and meditation? 05:00 The practice I teach “reflective meditation” is really our anchor for somebody to just sit quietly with their mind and with their life. And then when they come out of meditation to reflect upon that and then to talk about it with somebody. 07:00 Just focus on. Forget about everything else. I'd say our path emerged from the understanding that the mind is also the mind and your life and the way you feel about your life is also an object of meditation and that when you sit down and you're open or more receptive or more gentle to what your mind is saying to what you are thinking about, you're being kind and you're being actually caring to your mind and body. 24:00 If someone doesn't feel like they have a spiritual friend or they'd like another spiritual friend in their life. How would you encourage them to find that individual?32:12 Defining what success looks like in meditation39:11 Acknowledge those feelings, acknowledge those thoughts, those emotions, and release them through meditation, as opposed to just bearing them down deep and hoping that they don't resurface at some point down the road. Follow her on her IG: instagram.com/sati.sangha/Learn more about her: https://satisangha.org/ Want to be on the show? Send us an email at patricia@tenaciouslyhuman.comBe part of the Tenaciously Human movement! Crush your career, compromise nothing. Learn more here at tenaciouslyhuman.com

    Rebel Buddhist
    Greatest Hits Vol. 7 - Psychedelics and Spiritual Practice

    Rebel Buddhist

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 39:45


    Hey hey, wild and whacky humans! It's my birthday week, and I'm up at the yurt relaxing and celebrating with my family and dear friends. This means I've got something else for you - and it's juicy. If you haven't seen it yet, Netflix just released a new series “How to Change Your Mind,” exploring psychedelics and their effects on the mind. For those of you who have been around for a bit (or who follow me on social), you know this subject is very important to me and my specialty. I've been talking about it for year, but especially with the release of Michael Pollan's series. So, I had to revisit this topic on the podcast with one of my greatest hits: “Psychedelics & Spiritual Practice.” To a lot of people, the words psychedelic and spiritual are paradoxical. But the use of psychoactive substances in shamanic, religious, and spiritual practices is found throughout history, with evidence from thousands of years ago. In this episode, we will be talking about psychedelics and spiritual practice and if there is a helpful role for them…and the potential harm.  Let's start with some definitions:  Psychedelics are a class of psychoactive substances that produce changes in perception, mood and cognitive processes. They affect all the senses, altering a person's thinking, sense of time and emotions.   There are also entheogens, which are typically of plant origin, that are ingested to produce a non-ordinary state of consciousness for religious or spiritual purposes. Some examples of both are psilocybin mushrooms, ayahuasca, ketamine, 5-MeO-DMT, cannabis,, LSD, MDMA… and many more.   I've used psychedelics in clinical settings and have found them to have a unique place in the treatment of mental health disorders. But I'm personally very interested in their use for spiritual purposes. Especially because, in my own clinical experience, many mental health issues have a strong root in spiritual and existential challenges.  So when we really look at the intention for spiritual practice or use of psychedelics, Buddhism and psychedelics share something in common: finding that which frees the mind. There are probably a good amount of Buddhists who would say it's a gateway to a spiritual path, which I certainly agree with (and there's also many who would disagree).  At my alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, there has been decades of research in the use of psychedelics for a variety of purposes, showing promising results in many areas. They've done studies with long-time meditators as well as those who didn't have a previous spiritual practice.   One study by Rolland Griffit's et al. in 2018 wanted to see if the changes noted after receiving psilocybin in personality and other traits were enduring for people without a previous spiritual practice…and not just the short-term result of a great trip.  The results were impressive. I got into more details about the study in the pod, but after 6 months, the groups who received high-dose psilocybin and support for spiritual practice showed large significant positive changes long–term when compared to a placebo group (low dose psilocybin) that also received spiritual practice support. The areas of improvement include interpersonal closeness, life meaning/purpose, forgiveness, daily spiritual experiences, and community observer ratings (how others rated them, not just how they saw themselves…to make sure the changes weren't just perceived by the participant but that others could tell there was a shift as well).  So this – and other studies – show that psilocybin can influence long-lasting /enduring increases in positive social attitudes/behaviors and in healthy psychological functioning.  Isn't that so fascinating?  I want to mention here that there's a big difference between recreational use of psychedelics and intentional use of psychedelics.  I had my own first experience with LSD when I was 15 years old and experimented with it a lot over the course of a few years. That first experience forever changed the way I saw the world – it helped me see that my beliefs and the way I perceived the world was through many filters and that the ideas I had about separation of myself and others were false, and there was a mystical unity to our existence.  I also had – at a later experience – a mystical near-death experience that changed the way I perceived death (and was a lot less fearful of it).   And my difficult experiences (aka “bad trips”) gave me insight into the way my brain could loop and perseverate on things…and how important my mindset was in how I experienced the world.  I had done so many psychedelics by my late teens that I went another 20 years before using them again (I spent that time integrating my insights with many life-changing experiences). When I decided to bring them back into my life again, it was with much more intention, and for entheogenic purposes.  So, while there were some enduring effects for me with recreational use, in my own experience and in my subsequent guiding of altered states experiences, intentional use is a very different experience.  There are several factors we take into account and implement when we intentionally use psychedelics. The mindset of the participant and the guide, the setting, which substance to use and the dosing, the skillset of the guide itself.. and post-experience situation/support as well.  When we skillfully put these things together, I do believe there can be a great benefit.  It's not just about having a great experience, but also support in integrating what arose during the experience and integrating that into our day-to-day lives.  There's a high risk of using psychedelics as a way to escape the challenges of life. We can see this with almost anything that helps us feel better than sitting with a difficult emotion or experience – it happens with meditation, too. I like to remind myself and others to not chase after that meditative bliss experience, because it will be elusive, and that it's a good practice to let go of the attachment and craving.  So…what are psychedelics and spiritual practice (particularly Buddhist practices) contradictory? What often comes up in this discussion are the Buddhist precepts.  These precepts are 5 ethical guidelines are considered the foundation for successful practice because they help to calm the mind and have it be in the est state for meditation and spiritual practice (not lying, not stealing, not killing, no harm from sexual misconduct). The fifth precept is often discussed here: I undertake the precept to abstain from liquor that causes intoxication and indolence.  So here it specifically says alcohol and not other substances. And some people take it literally and others say well, it's more complicated in modern times and it probably was meant to include all mind-altering substances.  Is this…wise? Compassionate?   Some people take precepts very literally, especially in early Buddhism and in many Theravedan schools. Like literally not lying under any circumstance. But other traditions – like Mahayana or Vajrayana – look at it slightly differently, with prioritizing the concept of skillful means and compassion for others as the primary intention. A common example is not lying. If you're hiding an innocent person in your house, and someone comes to kill them and asks if they're in there, is it OK to lie? The Bodhisattva vow would say you break the precept to help the person.   Thinking this way, when we are asking this question about psychedelics and spiritual practice, we can consider is it beneficial – ultimately – to our compassion and ability to help others? At this point, do we have the wisdom to inform this? How does a perspective impact our ability to show up in the world and make it a better place as we walk in it?  What is our intention?  This is why I feel strongly about the intention of spiritual growth.  And of course, we have to have wisdom along with the compassionate intention, because us silly humans can fool ourselves. We can convince ourselves something is beneficial when we don't have the wisdom to make that call yet…but we really want it to be beneficial;) So we have to tread with integrity over these waters.  You know, I used to wonder if after a psychedelic experience, people would later feel, “Oh it was just the medicine, the drug”… but what I've found – at least with guided journeys – is that it's more an affirmation of truth, and experience of truth. The veil has been lifted.  And my hope is that it does encourage more spiritual practice and more dedication to the practice. The science is supporting this.  It's like taking a helicopter ride up to summit instead of a slow climb –  to see the view to see if it's worth it, what's possible. To help one commit to the slow climb that is to come.  After the glimpse or the affirmation, we then continue with the traditional practices instead of trying to grasp at that initial insight again – striving for the meditative bliss experience or having another psychedelic journey.  So do I think there's a role for psychedelics in spiritual practice? Absolutely. AND psychedelics are not for everyone.   I believe in appropriate screening and assessment because there are medical and psychiatric contraindications and situations where they just won't be as beneficial.  AND I strongly believe in the importance of integration – with a coach or therapist who is trained specifically in psychedelic integration (there are also communities that have this support built in, like the Burner community or the Santo Daime church.  It's not just about the journey if you want a higher chance of success at enduring benefit for you and those you come into contact with.  Lastly – and this is important – you don't “need” psychedelics for spiritual growth. What you need is 100% within you. Right now. But they can be a safe, helpful tool along the way in the right context.  Until next week, rebels… Free your mind! In this episode you'll learn:// Are psychedelics and entheogens the same thing?   // The difference between recreational and intentional use  // How science support that intentional use of psychedelics can create long-term positive changes in mindset, personality, social behavior, and spiritual practice  // How psychedelics can be used to benefit spiritual practice  // How to avoid using psychedelics as an escape or a temporary high  // Whether Buddhism and psychedelics are actually contradictory in nature  // Why integration is key in seeing positive long-term effects of psychedelic use Resources:// Buddhism and Psychedelics 3-part YouTube Series: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 // Zig, Zag, Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics edited by Alex Grey & Allan Badiner  // The Secret Drugs of Buddhism by Michael Crowley  // If you want to finally get clear about your unique Soul purpose and how to create a life that supports it during this one precious life we have, apply for the Adventure Mastermind. It's deep work. Important, necessary, and essential to what the world needs right now. Be a part of it.  Head over to AdventureMastermind.com and apply for the next cohort. We have 2 altered states retreats, weekly coaching, virtual retreats, and more. I've got you! // If you're new to the squad, grab the Rebel Buddhist Toolkit I created at RebelBuddhist.com. It has all you need to start creating a life of more freedom, adventure, and purpose. You'll also get access to the Rebel Buddhist FB group, and tune in weekly when I go live on new topics. // Want to dive into this work on a deeper level on your own time? To study it and practice it together with a group of people with the same goals of freedom, adventure and purpose? Check out Freedom School – the community for ALL things related to freedom, inside and out. 

    The Busy Mom
    Christianity and Yoga: Do They Mix? with Jessica Smith

    The Busy Mom

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 34:41


    Should Christianity mix with yoga? Are yoga poses benign if we do them but don't engage in the spiritual practice behind them? This is the question I'm asking my guest, Jessica Smith, who taught yoga for many years. Jessica has a unique perspective and a solid biblical stance on this modern controversy. Yoga is one of the six orthodox schools of Hindu philosophical traditions, yet many Christians today are practicing yoga with the belief that yoga's deep ties to Hinduism and Buddhism can be avoided. I will confess, I thought the same thing—but not any longer. Jessica challenged me and opened my eyes to the truth about this topic. Listen in. I pray your heart is blessed and encouraged as you strive to know God in a deeper way and bring Him honor in everything you do. SHOW NOTES --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/heidistjohn/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/heidistjohn/support

    Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein
    Ep. 131 – A Map of Wisdom Part 1: Everything Changes

    Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 65:30 Very Popular


    Joseph is back with a brand new Dharma talk series piecing together essential teachings of the Buddha into an accessible map of wisdom.This podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/insighthourIn this Dharma talk from the Spirit Rock Meditation Center July Insight Meditation Retreat on 7/17/2022, Joseph Goldstein relays pertinent teachings of the Buddha, exploring how they relate to each other and our lives. Illuminating the always-changing ephemeral nature of the universe, he outlines how we can disengage from suffering, clinging, and attachment so we can free the mind and live a more easeful life.This dharma talk from Joseph was originally published on Dharma Seed "When we pay attention in any of these realms—from the very individual to the global—we will see it's completely obvious that everything changes." – Joseph GoldsteinSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Heart Wisdom with Jack Kornfield
    Ep. 157 – Mindful Respect

    Heart Wisdom with Jack Kornfield

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 55:16 Very Popular


    In the wake of the Supreme Court's recent ruling on abortion, Jack Kornfield explores the theme of mindful respect and how we can all listen to each other with loving awareness.Today's podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/heartwisdom This dharma talk was originally live-streamed by Spirit Rock on June 27, 2022.“When we embody respect, graciousness, loving awareness for all, when we listen deeply, we are changing the world person by person, piece by piece. And this is the only way that it happens. We add our voice, we add our love, we add our courage, and we do so with the power of loving awareness and the freedom that it offers.” – Jack KornfieldSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery
    Produce The Vow - 08-10-22 by Sokuzan - sokukoji.org/donate

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 53:50


    UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
    103. Design & Zen Summary III

    UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 13:56


    Not unnatural,Suffering is only change.It's not personal.* * *Continuing where we left off last time, in this segment we will look at the intersection of the Natural sphere with Buddhism's Origin of suffering. The graphic illustrating correlations between the Four Spheres — Universal, Natural, Social, and Personal; and the Existence, Origin, Cessation, and Eightfold Path to cessation of suffering — is included again for your convenience and reference.In the Repentance verse of Soto Zen liturgy we chant:All my past and harmful karma Born of beginningless greed, hate and delusion Through body mouth and mind I now fully avow“Avow” does not commonly appear in our daily vernacular, but it simply means to admit openly, or to confess. Monastics apparently had a more rigorous routine for confessing and repenting specific transgressions they may have committed, violations of what were known in India as Vinaya, in Japan as Shingi, basically the rules and regulations of conduct in the monastic setting. We have Master Dogen's version, as well as Master Keizan's from a few generations later, the two being known respectively as the “father and mother” of Soto Zen in Japan. One factoid that people like to point out is that there were hundreds more rules for nuns than there were for monks. Interpret that however you like. Or do your research. Usually the Three Treasure Refuges verse follows on the heels of Repentance:I take refuge in BuddhaI take refuge in DharmaI take refute in SanghaI take refuge in Buddha the fully awakened oneI take refuge in Dharma the compassionate teachingsI take refuge in Sangha the harmonious communityI have completely taken refuge in BuddhaI have completely taken refuge in DharmaI have completely taken refuge in SanghaThe condensation of repentance into a catchall phrase represents not just our usual laziness, I think, but a recognition that we may be engaging in karmic actions without knowing it. So just in case, we fess up to whatever we may have done, and “accept all consequence with equanimity,” as another version has it. And then we take refuge in the Three Treasures, just for good measure.The line that indicates the connection between Origin and Natural is that bit about karmic consequences stemming from our very body, mouth and mind, the “Three Actions” of Buddhism. Another version has “born of body, mouth and mind,” which I think captures the meaning more precisely. That is, most of our desires, attachments and aversions, some of which get us into trouble, come with the territory of being born as a human being. As such, they are not exactly our fault. But what we do about it is our fault, or may be to our credit. There is the implication that we can “pay off” our accumulated karma, like a bad debt. The good news is that if we recognize that we did not create, or design, this situation in which we find ourselves, we can perhaps redesign our approach to it, embracing its seeming contradictions. Its “Designer” may not be so “Intelligent” as some would have us believe.When you take an unbiased look at the Natural conditions of our birth and growth as part of a species, certain obvious limitations and undesirable aspects emerge. Does it really have to be so messy? Buddha identified these causes and conditions of circumstance, the matrix of existence, variously, such as: the reification of self emerging through the process of individuation as a child; the conventional wisdom of the social milieu into which we are born; and the predations of aging, sickness and death to which we are all subject. The necessity for survival of the species is not a personal goal, but one of the species itself, as Schopenhauer points out in “The World as Will,” his treatise on how we usually get it all wrong. That we are fulfilling our heart's desire in pursuing the loves of our life is a kind of category error, based on a primordial ignorance of how this existence thing really works. Very Zen.That the Origin of our suffering may thus be regarded as Natural should precipitate a sigh of relief. But these biological facts do not relieve us of the necessity of now dealing with the actual experience of our desires, and the onset of angst, regret, hope, and disappointed expectations, that ensue. The rollercoaster of Social life inserts itself into the mix with little regard to our opinion. Once we have experienced all the highs and lows, however, they average out when we slow to a stop, and step off of the train.One of the unfortunate dimensions of life in modern society, vis-à-vis these known issues of Buddhism, is that they are not widely recognized as such, nor are they ordinarily part of the early curriculum in Western countries. We do not expose our youngsters to practicing meditation. Usually a young person begins hearing about Eastern wisdom when they are in their late teens or early twenties, when the onslaught of hormones has long since had its sometimes deleterious, and even disastrous, effects. Especially with the advent of widespread online accessibility to what we call “pornography.” As one of the Supremes famously intoned, I don't know how to define it, but I recognize it when I see it.It is ironic that the most natural of functions in the Natural sphere — that of reproduction of the species — becomes so distorted in its intersection with the Social realm of human behavior. But that discussion may be better left to the next segment, on the conflation of the Noble Eightfold Path with the Social sphere. For now let us just shake our heads at the willful blindness built into our concept of childhood, and our feckless efforts to control the process of maturation into an adult. It is a compelling example of the Social sphere interfering with the Natural sphere — the biological facts of existence — thereby exacerbating the Origin of suffering, our ignorance-fueled craving. What's the matter with kids today?One could argue that the Origin of our suffering is Universal, as is its existence. The role of Nature in the Universal scheme of things is intricately intertwined with the origin of life on this planet, and the possibility of life on others, in the “Goldilocks Zone” near — in astronomical units — to another star. Speculations as to the arrival of intergalactic spermatozoa in the form of ancient comets or meteors, delivering the foundational chemistry of organisms to our waiting, fertile planet, like sperm to egg, model the entire cosmos as analogous to a kind of organism, giving birth to stars, as in the famous “pillars of creation” image from NASA's Hubble telescope, to the spark of life itself. These analogies are examples of our proclivity to find familiar patterns in the strangest of new information, now flooding in as images from the far reaches of science, thanks to the Hubble, and now the Webb, telescopes. Another is the familiar trope about developing fins at one stage of the fetus in the womb:More than just a catchy phrase, “ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny” is the foundation of recapitulation theory. Recapitulation theory posits that the development of individual organisms (ontogeny) follows (recapitulates) the same phases of the evolution of larger ancestral groups of related organisms (phylogeny).These cultural memes also indicate the comprehensive nature of the Ignorance, capital I, into which we are born, rather than into sin, according to Buddhism. Not the kind of willful ignorance that we have to learn, which can be considered a kind of sin, I suppose, if not against God, then against our original buddha-nature. Willfully ignoring the “compassionate teachings,” for example, as the Buddha's legacy is characterized. They are compassionate in that they consist of descriptions of the suffering innate in existence, as well as our tendency to make it worse; as well as prescriptions for what to do about it, such as the Noble Eightfold Path. Which will be the subject of our next segment, in its relationship to the Social sphere.Meanwhile, wrapping up our meditation on the Natural Origin of suffering, it is, or should be, transparent that there is no Existence without change, and so “change” is interchangeable with “suffering.” Everything that we see, hear, smell, taste, feel — and yes, everything we think — is the effect of change. We are literally hearing the sound of suffering, like Avalokiteshvara. And we are seeing it as well as feeling it at all times, in every moment. If nothing were changing, we could not perceive it. We never breathe the same breath twice, and we can never have the same thought, twice, though it may seem that we do. This is natural, and this inexorable, instantaneous change, is the true source of our suffering. Get used to it.The fact that some forms of change provide welcome relief in our lives, while others seem to deliver more stress, should make it clear that dukkha is neutral. Suffering is not being inflicted upon us as a kind of punishment, though it may be considered a kind of test. Zen recommends embracing what life brings us as a natural consequence of our existence as a sentient being, even though we may not enjoy it at the time. Don't worry, it will change. This does not mean, however, that we should not do anything about it, to improve our circumstances. This and other dimensions of behavior in the Social realm will be one focus of the next segment, reviewing the Path in its eight dimensions. Stay tuned.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

    Bob Thurman Podcast
    My Early Years: Dreams, Psychedelics & The Teachings of Tsongkhapa – Ep. 301

    Bob Thurman Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 41:50


    In this episode Robert Thurman discusses his early years studying Buddhism with the Kalmyk-Mongolian lama Geshe Ngawang Wangyal at the Tibetan Buddhist Learning Center Labsum Shedrub Ling in central New Jersey, meeting his wife Nena von Schlebrügge at Millbrook, and his encounters with psychedelic psychonauts Timothy Leary and Ram Dass in the 1960s. Using his classic book The Life and Teachings of Tsongkhapa (now available in a new edition by Wisdom Publications), Thurman discusses emptiness, non-duality, the myth of the Kali Yuga and coming of Shambhala, reincarnation and the Buddhist perspective on the soul. This episode is excerpted from Thurman's “Meditation and Psychedelics Series” interview with Dr. Philip Wolfson, MD. To learn more about the work of Dr. Wolfson and to watch the full talk, please visit: www.philwolfsonmd.com & www.youtube.com.

    Buddhability
    Anxiety, Self-Trust and Psychology

    Buddhability

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 72:06


    Today's episode is a conversation with psychologist Elizabeth Merrick about anxiety, therapy, Buddhism, and how they all connect. Sometimes it helps to examine what Buddhability looks like from different perspectives, identifying  parallels between the work of experts in different fields and how Buddhism views the potential of human beings.  Elizabeth's insights are unique because she has experience counseling young adults, training mental health professionals and being in therapy herself, all while practicing Buddhism.CHEAT SHEET1:27 How Elizabeth started practicing Buddhism5:23 Context about her professional background as a psychologist8:34 The most common mental health challenges she sees young adults struggle with today11:22 Natural questions during different developmental stages14:21 When you think something is wrong with you21:16 Connections between Buddhism and psychology on our potential for change27:58 What anxiety is and why we experience it32:47 Overcoming anxiety38:52 Why the core elements of Buddhist practice are effective44:16 Chanting vs. mindfulness47:00 The biggest change she's experienced through chanting54:49 The value of having a community1:00 A favorite Buddhist quote1:03:20 The difference between human revolution and self-improvement1:08:01 Advice for anyone who is struggling with anxietyReferences Discussions on Youth, p. 5 “Letter to Niike,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. 1027

    Against The Stream
    What parts of Buddhism are challenging for you - Q&A with Noah Levine

    Against The Stream

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 85:25


    ➣ ZOOM DHARMA TALKS: Sign up and participate with the sangha on Against The Stream Zoom Dharma talks HERE.➢ ABOUT Against The Stream is a 501(c)3 non profit American Buddhist lineage founded by Noah Levine, author of Dharma Punx, Against the Stream, Heart of the Revolution and Refuge Recovery.➢DONATE If you feel moved to donate, your donations are welcome.➣ PayPal $5 Donation > $10 Donation > Other > Monthly Recurring➣ Venmo @againstthestreammeditation

    A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment
    Am I More Important Than Everyone Else in the Universe?

    A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 38:31 Very Popular


    Do each of us believe deep down that we're just a little bit more important than everyone else? My happiness, my goals, my relationships? The root cause of our suffering from the Buddhist perspective is this belief, a delusion called ignorance, seen as the true source of all our suffering: from disappointment in the face of life's setbacks, to the dissatisfaction we can feel even when we get exactly what we want. It's a retelling of the Buddha's very first teaching, The Four Noble Truths: on suffering, its causes and antidotes, with a modern twist.Episode 15. Am I More Important Than Everyone Else in the Universe?Two years ago, we created A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment to share the rich tradition of Tibetan Buddhist analytical meditation in a form that requires no belief beyond what science currently accepts. The first 40 episodes of the podcast gradually go through all of these topics, in order, beginning with appreciating the gift of our life and our place in the universe, and gradually moving up to cultivating boundless compassion for all beings and understanding the ultimate nature of our inner and outer realities. Over the next year, interspersed with new interviews, we are re-releasing updated versions of these topics.Support the show

    Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast
    Adam Frank: On Doing Physics and Being a Subject: Varela International Symposium 2022 (5 of 8)

    Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 57:10 Very Popular


    Physicist and Zen practitioner Adam Frank gives a characteristically energetic, humorous, and enlightening overview of the state of physics in the West and how Buddhism may and may not be able to contribute to its understanding of the universe. He contrasts what he calls the “blind spots” of certain forms of physics, which include objective […]

    Metta Hour with Sharon Salzberg
    Ep. 190 - Simran Jeet Singh

    Metta Hour with Sharon Salzberg

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 62:39 Very Popular


    For episode 189, Sharon welcomes Dr. Simran Jeet Singh to the Metta Hour to speak about the Sikh philosophy of love and service. Today's podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/mettaSimran is the Executive Director of the Inclusive America Project at the Aspen Institute. Recognized among TIME Magazine's “sixteen people fighting for a more equal America, ” he is an Equality Fellow with the Open Society Foundations. Simran is a regular contributor to The Washington Post, CNN, and TIME Magazine and writes a monthly column for Religion News Service. In July of 2022, Simran released his first book, The Light We Give: How Sikh Wisdom Can Transform Your Life, from Riverhead books. In this conversation, Simran and Sharon speak about:• Growing up as an outsider• Identity as a refuge• The foremost teaching of Sikh philosophy of interconnection• The natural expression of love is action• Inspiration for his book“The Light We Give”• De-centralizing the Ego• Understanding our deeper values• The impact of Lovingkindness on our enemies• What does it mean to be a warrior of the heart?• What is lost in hyper-masculinity • Building a healthy sense of self when living in the margins• Honor the dignity of all the feelings that arise in us• The motivation of anger vs. loveThe episode ends with Simran leading a Sikh meditation to close the conversation. To learn more about Simran's work visit www.simranjeetsingh.org or get a copy of his book, The Light We Give.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Seeking With Robyn
    The Not-So-Woo Woo Real Estate Agent That Will Get You Meditating - Episode 27

    Seeking With Robyn

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 43:34


    Karen and I had just been talking about wanting to find someone who could speak to using mindfulness in real estate, and that very next morning Karen stumbled upon an article in New York Magazine aptly named "The Woo-Woo Agents of Real Estate: Can Unblocking Your Chakras Get You a House? Maybe!"In it we were introduced to New York City real estate agent Cary Tamura with the Corcoran Group. Cary is ranked within the top 1% out of 50,000 of real estate agents nationwide within the NRT group which includes companies such as Corcoran, Sothebys, Coldwell Banker, Century 21, ERA and others. In addition to his work as a real estate agent in New York City, Cary has been a meditator for over 17 years and a teacher of meditation for a good portion of those years. He has been credited by Corcoran VP, Ida Fields as being responsible for bringing meditation to the company. He trains Corcoran real estate agents in mindfulness-awareness meditation as well as teaching at other meditation centers, schools and businesses in and around New York. Cary says “The benefits of that in your business, be it dealing with difficult clients or a negotiation, are being keyed into the stuff in between the words." We know our connection with Cary is divine. He brings a grounding and helpful perspective to the fiercely demanding real estate market and to the importance of mindfulness in our everyday lives.If you're interested in meditating, Cary shares an easy way to begin – and inspiring resources for you. If you're buying, renting or selling a house, Cary shares mindful ways of approaching the real estate market.For more from Cary Tamura visit:  carytamura.comthesittingproject.orgBooks mentioned in today's podcast: Buddhism, Plain and Simple by Steve HagenThe Places That Scare Us by Pema Chödrön 

    5 live's World Football Phone-in
    Classified Results and Buddhism

    5 live's World Football Phone-in

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 137:55


    Dotun Adebayo is joined by Tim Vickery and Mark Machado. They discuss the BBC decision to axe the classified football results on 5 live. As well as the 5 sub rule and the origins of Buddhism.

    Undefended Dharma with Mary Stancavage

    The Buddha talked about the nature of existence - how there is birth, death, illness - the human condition in other words. In this talk Mary takes a very personal look at how the teachings of the Buddha as well as examples from neuroscience and even baseball, allow her to experience the human condition with equanimity and joy.Recorded August 4, 2022 in the virtual world

    3 Pagans and a Cat
    Episode 197: Buddhism

    3 Pagans and a Cat

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 50:49


    Gwyn and Ode discuss Buddhism, from their limited perspective as non-Buddhists.

    Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox
    Episode 148 - Mindfulness for a Happy Life

    Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 34:37 Very Popular


    Mindfulness can be used to train the mind: to make the mind more peaceful and see your world differently. Mindfulness, in this way, is used to remember things we've learned and intend to put into practice. For example, we may have heard the teaching to gather all blame into one--our mental afflictions. We might agree that there are no external problems or enemies; our problems come from our mental afflictions, such as anger, attachment, ignorance, pride, or greed. To practice mindfulness, we could then determine to recall this wisdom when we start to get angry or upset. Mindfulness is used to remember our determination to practice this wisdom and not blame another person or situation for our unpleasant feelings. This practice helps us let the unpleasant feelings pass without clinging to them and blaming others.  Mindfulness is a powerful tool for creating a happy mind.  Always Rely on a Happy Mind (One of Atisha's 59 slogans of training the mind.)    The Story of the Elephant Called Paveyyaka   While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (327) of this book, with reference to the elephant, called Paveyyaka.   Paveyyaka when young was very strong; in due course, he became old and decrepit. One day, as old Paveyyaka went into a pond he was stuck in the mire and could not get on to the shore. When King Pasenadi of Kosala was told about it, he sent an elephant trainer to help the elephant get out of the mire. The elephant trainer went to the site where the elephant was. There, he made the musicians strike up a martial tune. Hearing the military airs, the elephant felt as if he were in a battlefield; his spirits rose, he pulled himself with all his might, and was soon out of the mire.   When the bhikkhus told the Buddha about this he said, "Bhikkhus! Just as that elephant pulled itself out of the mire, so also, must you all pull yourselves out of the mire of moral defilements."   Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:   Take delight in mindfulness,  guard your mind well.  As an elephant stuck in mire pulls itself out,  so also, pull yourself out of the mire of moral defilements. —Buddha, Dhammapada, Verse 327:    “If in battle your sword were to fall from your hand, you would without hesitation immediately retrieve it out of fear for your life. Likewise, when you battle the afflictions and lose the weapon of mindfulness (which does not forget the subjective and objective aspects of engaging in what is to be adopted and rejecting what is to be cast aside), you must immediately reapply mindfulness.” —Je Tsongkapa,    Take delight in mindfulness,  guard your mind well.  As an elephant stuck in the mire pulls itself out,  so also pull yourself out of the mire of moral defilements. —Buddha, The Dhammapada   References and Links   Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. (Kindle). Shambala, Boston and London, 2011. (Link)   Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. (Kindle.)Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 187-197.   Buddha (1986).The Dhammapada: Verses and Stories. Translated by Daw Mya Tin, M.A. (Website). Edited by Editorial Committee, Burma Tipitaka Association Rangoon. Courtesy of Nibbana.com. For free distribution only, as a gift of dhamma. https://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/verseload.php?verse=327   Find us at the links below:  https://www.facebook.com/Buddhismforeveryone Join our private group at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sanghatalk/ https://www.instagram.com/buddhism.with.joann.fox

    Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
    Relating to Death, and Living a Better Life

    Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 59:21 Very Popular


    The median life expectancy for a man living in the United States is roughly 80 years. That works out to 960 months, 4,160 weeks, or about 29,000 days. Rick is sneaking up on 70 years old, which means, on average, he's got about 10 years – or 520 weeks – left. Putting the time we have left into simple numbers can be both a bit daunting and remarkably clarifying. When you're in the middle of them, the days can blur together. But the truth is that our time's limited, and how we use it is up to us. On today's episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson talk about what's helped them come to terms with mortality, the reality of our limited time, and how we can use that knowledge to refine our focus and live a more fulfilling life.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:30: Five reflections from Tibetan Buddhism4:45: How Rick's relationship with death has changed over time11:05: Appreciating life as a comfort in accepting death14:00: Dukkah, Tanha, and contentment16:30: Distinguishing the ocean (reality) from the wave (ego)21:20: Acceptance, contraction, and expansion25:35: Finite experiences, and undelivered communications31:30: “Life is for the living”33:10: Giving, contribution, contentment, and fulfillment40:05: What to do about regret?47:40: Serenity in old age49:00: Practical ways to hold awareness of death55:05: Recap Grief and Loss Workshop: We all face losses in life, from separation and disappointment to shocking, even traumatic events. Join me August 13 and 14 for 7 hours of LIVE, online teaching focused on learning simple, powerful practices that help us come to terms with loss, heal, and find happiness again. Use coupon code BEINGWELL25 at checkout for an additional 25% off the registration price.Support the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link. Sponsors:Bombas designed their socks, shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can't wait to put on every day. Visit bombas.com/beingwell and use code beingwell for 20% off. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world's largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Ready to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website

    A Buddhist Podcast
    A Buddhist Podcast

    A Buddhist Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 89:07


    Welcome to the show, thank you for taking the time to download and listen to this podcast about Nichiren Buddhism. Tonight we have the second in a series of dialogues about the Gohonzon. I'm delighted to have as my guests, Peter Morris from the Philippines and Luigi Finocchiaro from Japan. Please send any questions you have for us to @jasonjarrett on twitter.com and we will do our best to answer them on the show.  Have a fabulous week You can find books by Luigi Finocchiaro at Lulu.com - Search for Nichiren Mandala Study Workshop. Some are also available in Italian.

    In the Flow with Lauri Albert
    Lions Gate...The Portal Is Open

    In the Flow with Lauri Albert

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 15:30


    Do you feel it? The veil is thin, friends. The energy of the Lion's Gate Portal is upon us. Feel it! Are you ready to tap into your own personal Spirituality and see what unfolds for you? Let's meditate and invite in the POWER! My dear friend, Pierre Bensusan, has permitted me to use his track called ‘Sentimentales Pyromaniaques' from the album 'Altiplanos'. “The Ancient Angels” composed by Music Of Wisdom - Licensed from Meditation Music Library

    Noble Mind
    66: Kate and Alex on the First Noble Truth and Facing Unavoidable Challenges

    Noble Mind

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 40:28


    In this episode, hosts Kate and Alex take a deep dive into the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism, with particular emphasis on the First Noble Truth commonly translated as “life is characterized by suffering.” They unpack some of the linguistic and cultural misunderstandings that can get in the way of the deeper message of this teaching. They connect the four existential givens of death, meaning, isolation, and freedom, to Buddhism and discuss ways of working with these unavoidable challenges in everyday life. Alex Gokce, MSW has a master's degree in social work from Salem State University and an undergraduate degree in Comparative Government from Harvard University. He has led psychotherapy groups on topics including mindfulness, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and mind-body approaches to pain management. He has co-led programs at the Boston Shambhala Center on the topics of trauma and self-compassion. His personal and professional interests center around the individual, societal and intergenerational impacts of trauma, as well as the sociocultural roots of interpersonal harm. Katherine (Kate) King, PsyD is a clinical psychologist and assistant professor of psychology at William James College. She has a private psychotherapy practice where she works primarily with older adults and individuals experiencing trauma, anxiety, and chronic medical conditions. She also has a special interest in supporting the well-being of helping professionals. She is involved in research exploring topics such as death anxiety, narrative medicine, and clinical training. Kate is a longtime vajrayana student of Tibetan Buddhism, and has practiced meditation for over 20 years. Learn more at www.drkateking.com. Join our free Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/noblemind. For past episodes, show details, and to join our email list, visit www.noblemindpodcast.com.

    Diggin' the Dharma
    Bhikkhu Bodhi and the War in Ukraine: Lessons for Buddhists?

    Diggin' the Dharma

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 27:57


    How do we deal with war If we are practicing the precept of non-harming (non-killing)? What are we supposed to do, and how are we supposed to feel about the situation in Ukraine? Eminent monastic scholar and practitioner Bhikkhu Bodhi has a recent article where he discusses this issue, with particular emphasis on the war in Ukraine. We discuss the article and the idea of warfare in Buddhism.Link to the article:https://www.lionsroar.com/buddhism-nonviolence-and-the-moral-quandary-of-ukraine/Support the show

    Reality Hacking and Meditation
    Episode 32: How To Unlock Buddhist Superpowers

    Reality Hacking and Meditation

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 29:42


    Here, we dive deep into Buddhist psychic powers, such as future foreseeing, lucid dreaming, and astral projecting. We dive into the neuroscience behind these processes, the mental model on which Buddhism bases its teachings, and the proper technique to develop the mental power to host these abilities. You'll learn the very same methods we use with our clients to enhance their productivity, their focus, and their creativity! Find us at @zenmindhacker @queensophiema https://theprysm.org

    Genuine Chit-Chat
    #169 – What Can Buddhism Teach Us? Personal Enlightenment & The Perception Of Life With Radhika Rao

    Genuine Chit-Chat

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 59:11


    Radhika Rao is this week's guest, she speaks with Mike about Buddhism, her life's journey, theatre acting and more! Mike & Radhika's conversation begins with Radhika explaining what Buddhism is to her and how it has become such an integral part of her life. Radhika then talks about how theatrical and improvisational performance has helped her in both her Buddhist journey and in life, she then explains her personal definition of enlightenment, how she perceives the world and spiritual/philosophical topics are discussed! Radhika's Site: http://radhikarao.org  – Her Instagram is @ radhikarao77 – LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/radhika-rao-2764598 - IMDb: https://imdb.com/name/nm9895468 - The Organisation Soka Gakkai International: https://sokaglobal.org  Radhika mentioned the movie Monsoon Wedding, recommends the Buddhability podcast and notes that the Dalai Lama resides in McLeod Ganj, in the Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh in northern India. Thanks to Tonya Todd for connecting Mike & Radhika! http://mstonyatodd.com The promo for this episode is from Pubtime Podcast: https://podpage.com/pubtime-podcast To listen to a completely free Patreon episode, check out the first in Mike & Megan's Tom Hanks rewatch here: https://bit.ly/TomHanks1   In the last episode of GCC (168), Mike spoke with Mandy Wong; illustrator, art director, showrunner and many other things! She talks about how & why she started the show Millie And Lou with her husband Rory, what inspires her and where her passion for illustration came from, she talks about moving from Hong Kong to England and “found family”, how she uses her art to communicate with others (especially when she first moved to England), her process of creating paintings and many other topics are discussed! If you enjoyed this episode, please check out Mike's Patreon, where he releases at least 1 episode of his & Megan's “Afterthoughts” a week, plus there's early access to episodes of GCC and more, so if you want to support the show and get more content, check it out at http://patreon.com/genuinechitchat   Outro read by BZ The Voice: http://www.bzthevoice.com      Find Mike's other show; Star Wars: Comics In Canon on Spotify & the other podcast apps on the feed of Comics In Motion or on GCC's YouTube channel. Episodes are out every Saturday; episodes 0-103 are out now, in ep 103 Mike delved into 5 more Star Wars horror stories in Return To Vader's Castle, in ep 102 Mike embarked on the first volume of the Crimson Reign crossover event, while in ep 101 Mike tackled the final volume of Poe Dameron comics! Previous episodes include the War Of The Bounty Hunters crossover (all 34 tie-in issues), every other canon Star Wars comic by Marvel, the Journals of Old Ben Kenobi, full High Republic coverage (book reviews & comics) & much more – https://podfollow.com/comicsinmotion   Mike's guest spots: Mike appeared on Spider-Dan & The Secret Bores to talk about Maximum & Absolute Carnage: https://pod.fo/e/13304a Mike appeared on Indie Comics Spotlight, discussing Cavan Scott's Shadow Service with Tony, listen on the feed of Comics In Motion! https://pod.fo/e/1259e4   Mike returned to Star Wars Timeline to talk about Villains in each of the SW trilogies here: https://youtu.be/V7382WWkSP0 – they also discuss accents in the Star Wars universe; the original trilogy here: https://youtu.be/1X0PyXkQZGg & the prequel trilogy here: https://youtu.be/3L4qWeYOzhw   Instagram – Twitter – Facebook – YouTube – Stitcher – Podbean – Spotify You can also email Mike at GenuineChitChat@outlook.com with any reviews, comments or suggestions.

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery
    Don't Believe Disbelieve Ignore - 08-07-22 by Sokuzan - sokukoji.org/donate

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 50:01


    Notice how when something shows up you go to belief, disbelief or distraction. It's very difficult to use relative concepts to see over time what that's pointing to beyond the words. It's not logical or reasonable. The ego mind will use that to turn you around because it wants you in that carnival. It's terrified of the open space, of not knowing. With each person this will have its own kind of chemistry or texture. It will be very personal to you. Notice the way you believe or attach to something before you've even investigated it. Of course, it's about being aware of that. https://youtu.be/edtHLuvjEr4

    Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast
    Evan Thompson: The Enactive View: Looking Back, Looking Forward: Varela International Symposium 2022 (3 of 8)

    Upaya Zen Center's Dharma Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 60:11 Very Popular


    “Living is sense-making in precarious conditions.” Professor Evan Thompson, co-author with Francisco Varela and Eleanor Rosch of The Embodied Mind, offers thoughts on the origins of the enactive view as well as how he sees enaction moving forward. Evan focuses especially on the role that Buddhism played, namely the ideas of no-self, emptiness, and meditation, in […]

    LET IT OUT
    Don't Snooze with Megan Tan

    LET IT OUT

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 76:21


    This week I have a conversation with award-winning storyteller and audio producer Megan Tan. You may know Megan (like I do) from her first audio series from 2014—a wildly successful documentary/memoir show with Radiotopia called Millennial. I've always admired her unique style of storytelling, and since Millennial she has gone on to produce shows and episodes for Gimlet Media's The Habitat, TED, WNYC's Radiolab,All Things Considered, Pineapple Street Media, and more. In 2020, Megan was named Producer of the Year by Adweek. An episode she made of the podcast WILD (which featured Megan's personal story about love during the pandemic) is my favorite of her recent work, so we began this conversation talking about love and dating in the pandemic.  Then, we get into how her career has transitioned and talk about her most recent podcast, Snooze, a documentary-style show about tackling the things people put off – including something big that Megan's been snoozing on herself. I love it—I listened to it all in one day getting ready for this conversation with Megan. I felt particularly inspired after our conversation and learned a lot from Megan's bits of wisdom from her experience and her Buddhist faith. I hope it has that uplifting quality for you, too, whenever you listen. Show Notes:- Find Megan on the Web | Instagram- Listen to Snooze podcast | Milennial podcast- Listen to Megan's award-winning episode about dating in the pandemic, WILD: How Do I Love Someone- Creative Underdogs/In Process is starting up again! Learn more about it here | sign up for the waitlist- Email me at katie@letitouttt.com if you have any questions about it - Subscribe to our newsletter to get show notes + essays, etc. sent to your inbox- Follow @letitouttt on Instagram. I'm @katiedalebout Sponsors:Ora Organic: try Trust Your Gut and all other organic, plant-powered supplements. Get 30% off your first subscription when you text OUT to 64-000 If you liked this episode, try out:Episode 395: Lost & Found: Brendan Francis Newnam on 'Not Lost', Travel, Intimacy, Connection & More