Podcasts about Buddhism

World religion founded by the Buddha

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Latest podcast episodes about Buddhism

Dharmabytes from free buddhist audio
Reality Shines Through Us

Dharmabytes from free buddhist audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 7:39


Sangharakshita explores the ways in which we are all connected with Reality, directly and indirectly, in particular through our friendships with those just a little further along the path. From the talk entitled The Bodhisattva Hierarchy as part of the series Aspects of the Bodhisattva Ideal, 1969. *** Follow the Free Buddhist Audio podcast. High quality, full-length Dharma talks weekly since 2006! Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google  Subscribe to our Free Buddhist Audio podcast - a full Dharma talk every week:  Subscribe using these RSS feeds or search for Free Buddhist Audio or Dharmabytes in your favourite podcast service! FBA on Twitter FBA on Facebook FBA on Soundcloud

THIRD EYE DROPS
Claiming the Sword with Dr. Miles Neale and Phil Jacobs | Mind Meld 270

THIRD EYE DROPS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 109:26


*Crowd-sponsor us and get rewards on Patreon* Contemplative psychologist, Dr. Miles Neale and sound therapist, Phil Jacobs enter the mind meld to pull the psychic sword from the stone. In this one, we muse about the importance of internalizing mythological images, contemplative Buddhism, how to integrate through story, why the archetype of alchemical transformation reaches across cultures and more. Miles is a student and teacher of Tibetan Buddhism, having studied the path for over two decades. His book, Gradual Awakening: The Tibetan Buddhist Path of Becoming Fully Human is available now. Phil Jacobs is a sound therapist and Chinese Medicine practitioner with decades of experience in creating transformative containers through sound. Stay tuned at this end of this mind meld for a guided sound bath meditation by Miles and Phil. For more information on Miles' contemplative studies course, go here. Support Third Eye Drops! Crowd-sponsor us and get rewards on Patreon This mind meld is sponsored by Sheath. Get 20% off here Review and sub on Apple Podcasts Visit Thirdeyedrops.com

Hermit_Radio
Hermit Radio #71 Interview with Peter Bolland

Hermit_Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 54:03


Peter Bolland is a professor of Philosophy and Humanities. We talk about Jesus, who was he, what was his true message. We also talk about Buddhism and Zen and how eastern philosophies can parallel the teachings of Jesus. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Wild Heart Meditation Center
The Paramis - Equanimity

Wild Heart Meditation Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 35:43


Andrew concludes a series of talks on the 10 Paramis (only 5 are listed on the podcast), which are the spiritual principles that serve as the foundation for the Buddha's teaching. In this talk, Andrew speaks on the topic of "equanimity", which means even-mindedness, balance, and non-reactivity. Equanimity is all about finding peace amidst the worldly winds of life's 10,000 joys and sorrows.

New Books Network
Alastair Gornall, "Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270" (UCL Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 55:07


Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270 (UCL Press, 2020) is the first intellectual history of premodern Sri Lanka's most culturally productive period. This era of reform (1157–1270) shaped the nature of Theravada Buddhism both in Sri Lanka and also Southeast Asia and even today continues to define monastic intellectual life in the region. Alastair Gornall argues that the long century's literary productivity was not born of political stability, as is often thought, but rather of the social, economic and political chaos brought about by invasions and civil wars. Faced with unprecedented uncertainty, the monastic community sought greater political autonomy, styled itself as royal court, and undertook a series of reforms, most notably, a purification and unification in 1165 during the reign of Parakramabahu I. He describes how central to the process of reform was the production of new forms of Pali literature, which helped create a new conceptual and social coherence within the reformed community; one that served to preserve and protect their religious tradition while also expanding its reach among the more fragmented and localized elites of the period. Rewriting Buddhism is available for free open-access download at uclpress.com/buddhism. Bruno M. Shirley is a PhD candidate at Cornell University, working on Buddhism, kingship and gender in medieval Sri Lankan texts and landscapes. He is on Twitter at @brunomshirley. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Buddhist Studies
Alastair Gornall, "Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270" (UCL Press, 2020)

New Books in Buddhist Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 55:07


Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270 (UCL Press, 2020) is the first intellectual history of premodern Sri Lanka's most culturally productive period. This era of reform (1157–1270) shaped the nature of Theravada Buddhism both in Sri Lanka and also Southeast Asia and even today continues to define monastic intellectual life in the region. Alastair Gornall argues that the long century's literary productivity was not born of political stability, as is often thought, but rather of the social, economic and political chaos brought about by invasions and civil wars. Faced with unprecedented uncertainty, the monastic community sought greater political autonomy, styled itself as royal court, and undertook a series of reforms, most notably, a purification and unification in 1165 during the reign of Parakramabahu I. He describes how central to the process of reform was the production of new forms of Pali literature, which helped create a new conceptual and social coherence within the reformed community; one that served to preserve and protect their religious tradition while also expanding its reach among the more fragmented and localized elites of the period. Rewriting Buddhism is available for free open-access download at uclpress.com/buddhism. Bruno M. Shirley is a PhD candidate at Cornell University, working on Buddhism, kingship and gender in medieval Sri Lankan texts and landscapes. He is on Twitter at @brunomshirley. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/buddhist-studies

New Books in History
Alastair Gornall, "Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270" (UCL Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 55:07


Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270 (UCL Press, 2020) is the first intellectual history of premodern Sri Lanka's most culturally productive period. This era of reform (1157–1270) shaped the nature of Theravada Buddhism both in Sri Lanka and also Southeast Asia and even today continues to define monastic intellectual life in the region. Alastair Gornall argues that the long century's literary productivity was not born of political stability, as is often thought, but rather of the social, economic and political chaos brought about by invasions and civil wars. Faced with unprecedented uncertainty, the monastic community sought greater political autonomy, styled itself as royal court, and undertook a series of reforms, most notably, a purification and unification in 1165 during the reign of Parakramabahu I. He describes how central to the process of reform was the production of new forms of Pali literature, which helped create a new conceptual and social coherence within the reformed community; one that served to preserve and protect their religious tradition while also expanding its reach among the more fragmented and localized elites of the period. Rewriting Buddhism is available for free open-access download at uclpress.com/buddhism. Bruno M. Shirley is a PhD candidate at Cornell University, working on Buddhism, kingship and gender in medieval Sri Lankan texts and landscapes. He is on Twitter at @brunomshirley. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
Alastair Gornall, "Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270" (UCL Press, 2020)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 55:07


Rewriting Buddhism: Pali Literature and Monastic Reform in Sri Lanka, 1157–1270 (UCL Press, 2020) is the first intellectual history of premodern Sri Lanka's most culturally productive period. This era of reform (1157–1270) shaped the nature of Theravada Buddhism both in Sri Lanka and also Southeast Asia and even today continues to define monastic intellectual life in the region. Alastair Gornall argues that the long century's literary productivity was not born of political stability, as is often thought, but rather of the social, economic and political chaos brought about by invasions and civil wars. Faced with unprecedented uncertainty, the monastic community sought greater political autonomy, styled itself as royal court, and undertook a series of reforms, most notably, a purification and unification in 1165 during the reign of Parakramabahu I. He describes how central to the process of reform was the production of new forms of Pali literature, which helped create a new conceptual and social coherence within the reformed community; one that served to preserve and protect their religious tradition while also expanding its reach among the more fragmented and localized elites of the period. Rewriting Buddhism is available for free open-access download at uclpress.com/buddhism. Bruno M. Shirley is a PhD candidate at Cornell University, working on Buddhism, kingship and gender in medieval Sri Lankan texts and landscapes. He is on Twitter at @brunomshirley. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Deep South Dharma
Ep 135 ~ A "Just-Because" Kind of Love

Deep South Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 13:44


Christine Bates, a licensed professional counselor and ordained Buddhist lay minister in the Embracing Simplicity Contemplative Order, shares the three of five posts on Mindful Parenting, based on the work of Dave Richo. More information about Deep South Dharma can be found at www.deepsouthdharma.org Articles about various aspects of the practice of Buddhism can be found at https://medium.com/the-fifth-posture --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/deepsouthdharma/message

Intro to Zen Online
Ep. 100: Hybrid Class on 9-14-21

Intro to Zen Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 56:25


Purpose Highway™
S2 Episode 10 - The Conscience Code: Ethics for a New Era

Purpose Highway™

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 69:48


HIGHLIGHTS04:42 Secular institutions can reinforce values but not provide their structures 10:01 Integrating your authentic self into your professional role15:07 Inattention blindness: Distraction with business blinds to values20:48 Bringing self-awareness to work and becoming a person of conscience27:23 Leaders can transition from being to corrupt and not realize the transition33:19 Keep your humanity: Refuse complicity and believe in the power of 240:24 Living according to values and leading a meaningful life42:13 The Commitment Project: An attempt to impart values to students46:56 There is choice in a corrupt system and it starts with the right thoughts51:37 Corruption happens when you allow rationalization to become your thought58:27 Becoming a pacifist and committing to values to live by 1:02:03 Buddhism meditation and awareness of the impermanence of life1:05:09 Anchoring on your own conscience code on connection1:07:04 Connect with RichardQUOTES13:56 "There's a lack of integration between the personal and the professional realm over certain basic values that ought to be informing both sides of the life and these are values like compassion for suffering, honesty, and transparency."21:26 "One of the most important things people can do to bring this sense of self-awareness to their day-to-day life at work is to think of themselves as a person of conscience, someone who has values and they implement those values at home by duty and habit."34:39 "Never take this journey alone. The damage comes when you allow yourself to be isolated, when you allow yourself to be minimized and marginalized and you know what's going on is toxic. You know it's wrong but you don't speak because you think you're the only one."40:24 "I think a lot of why people respond when you speak up for values is it's healing for them within themselves. And people really crave that sense of integration which is a sense of meaning and purpose."53:42 "Aristotle teaches us that virtue, just like exercise, is a habit. And as soon as you allow yourself to behave in a way that violates your own conscience, you form the habit of being unvirtuous. So the power of two helps."56:03 "It's much easier to keep your principles a hundred percent of the time than it is to keep them 98% of the time."57:14 "What is the spiritual side of your life? It's the side that connects you to all the things greater than yourself."To find out more about Richard, please see the links below.LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/richard-shell-4baa15203Wharton Profile - https://lgst.wharton.upenn.edu/profile/shellric/Website - http://www.grichardshell.com/To hear more of Scott Mason and the Purpose Highway™ podcast, join our community at https://purposehighway.com and subscribe to get notified when new episodes go live.

The One You Feed
430: Maia Szalavitz on The Case For Harm Reduction

The One You Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 58:40


Maia Szalavitz is an American reporter and New York Times best-selling author who has focused much of her work on the topic of addiction. She has won awards from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Drug Policy Alliance, the American Psychological Association and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology for her 30 years of groundbreaking writing on addiction, drug policy and neuroscience.In this episode, Maia and Eric discuss her book, Undoing Drugs: The Untold Story of Harm Reduction and the Future of Addiction.But wait – there's more! The episode is not quite over!! We continue the conversation and you can access this exclusive content right in your podcast player feed. Head over to our Patreon page and pledge to donate just $10 a month. It's that simple and we'll give you good stuff as a thank you!In This Interview, Maia Szalavitz and I Discuss The Case for Harm Reduction and…Her book: Undoing Drugs: The Untold Story of Harm Reduction and the Future of AddictionWhat “harm reduction” means in the case of additionThe truth behind why we have the drug policies that we currently haveDifferentiating between the terms dependence and addictionThe real problem of addiction being the compulsive behavior that's ruining your lifeThe role of moderation in substance use in people in recoveryHow to know whether or not moderation or abstinence is right for youThe problem with a binary approach to drug useThe harm reduction recovery approach as any positive changeThe difficult but crucial role of being a beginner to learn what's right for youMaia Szalavitz Links:Maia's WebsiteTwitterFeals: Premium CBD delivered to your doorstep to help you manage stress, anxiety, pain, and sleeplessness. Feals CBD is food-grade and every batch is tested so you know you are getting a truly premium grade product. Get 50% off your first order with free shipping by becoming a member at www.feals.com/wolfIf you enjoyed this conversation with Maia Szalavitz, you might also enjoy these other episodes:Maia Szalavitz on a Different Lens of Addiction (2017)Judson Brewer on Addiction and the Craving MindSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 56: ABBA's Comeback, A Tired Irish Walrus, & The Angel of Notre Dame

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 84:45


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Natty Daddy Lemonade Seltzer, which she doesn't like because she enjoys a beer FAR more than seltzers ;-) She discusses the current state of her St. Louis Cardinals and Lewis Black's terrible Baltimore Orioles, and the sheer awesomeness of Tony LaRussa as a coach and GM. Kathleen then talks about her Fantasy Football league, and her repeat move to draft Tom Brady as her starting quarterback. TERMITE SHOUTOUTS: Kathleen gives thanks to the Termites who leave notes at shows and send mail to her PO Box. She begins by thanking Termite Cheryl from Oregon for the Baby Shoe Madigan Christmas ornament and “Calm Down Karen” t-shirt, and Termite sisters Steph & Jen from Edmonton who sent a box of Canadian fun that Kathleen samples as part of her junk food tasting session. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples a few Canadian treats from Termite sisters Steph & Jen, beginning with Hawkins Cheezies, which is one of her all-time favorite snacks. She then tastes President's Choice Cheesy Garlic Bread rippled chips, which are a little too “garlicky” for her preference. She finishes her tasting with Keg Steakhouse Ranch dressing, which she LOVES and rates in her top 3 of all Ranches tasted so far.UPDATE ON KATHLEEN'S QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen provides an update on the Queens, reporting that Queen Stevie Nicks has recorded a duet with Elton John called “Stolen Car” as part of his “Lockdown Sessions” album. Queen Tanya has canceled the remainder of her 2021 Tour dates, stating that she needs to concentrate on rehabilitating her hip after her recent surgery. ELIZABETH HOLMES JURY SELECTION UNDERWAY: In continuing with her updates on the Elizabeth Holmes' Theranos trial, Kathleen provides an update on how the jury selection process is going leading up to the commencement of the trial. QAnon SHAMAN PLEA DEAL: Kathleen laughs while reading an update on the infamous “QAnon Shaman” Jacob Chansley, who was originally charged with six federal crimes pertaining to the US Capitol insurrection. He plead guilty to one of the most serious charges and could face a maximum of 20 years in prison, though his lack of a criminal record means he'll likely receive much less. As part of the plea agreement, Chansley agreed to pay $2,000 in restitution for damage to the Capitol and could also face a fine of up to $250,000.BEYONCE'S BLOOD DIAMOND: Kathleen reads an article surrounding the controversy surrounding Beyoncé and Jay-Z after she made history posing alongside a rare art piece from the late, great artist Jean-Michel Basquiat as the first Black woman to wear an iconic Tiffany & Co. Yellow Diamond. After critics bashed the Beyonce for wearing a ‘blood diamond,' a source stated that “Beyonce is aware of the criticism and is disappointed and angry that she wasn't made aware of questions about its history.” In an effort to pivot the narrative, she appears to be focused on promoting the $2,064,600 that Tiffany has pledged toward internship and scholarship programs for historically Black colleges and universities.BRITNEY'S CONSERVATORSHIP ENDS: Kathleen is thrilled to read that after months of following the #FreeBritney movement, her conservatorship with her father has finally ended. Father Jamie Spears has served as conservator of his daughter's estate since it was established in 2009 and recently stated in a court filing that he intends to step down as conservator. Kathleen applauds the efforts of “the children” who have supported Britney, and encourages them to celebrate ☺ABBA'S GREATEST COMEBACK: As is the case with many music lovers, Kathleen LOVES ABBA's music and is absolutely thrilled to read an article announcing that nearly four decades after disbanding and vowing never to get back together, the Swedish superstars are making a musical comeback with a new album and a London show featuring their performances captured by digital avatars. The group, all in their seventies, described how they were photographed in leotards to create the avatars for a new show called “ABBA Voyage” which will play at a theatre being built close to the presentation venue in east London's Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. The show will feature 22 songs, mostly the group's classic hits, and last 90 mins. Kathleen CANNOT wait to buy tickets….WENDY'S UPGRADES FRENCH FRIES: Kathleen agrees that fast-food French fries need to be upgraded, and still hasn't gotten over McDonald's move to change its iconic fry recipe back in 1992. She's excited to hear that Wendy's has announced that the chain is upgrading its French fries in mid-September 2021, keeping more skin on the potato in order to “drive more flavor.” Stay tuned for a tasting from Mama T, Termites.WALLY THE WALRUS GETS HIS OWN BOAT: Kathleen laughs out loud reading an article out of Ireland where a massive Arctic walrus whom locals refer to as “Wally” was first spotted in March. Since then, he has traveled over 2,485 miles and has been spotted in France, Spain, and across the U.K. According to the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG), due to his colossal weight, Wally has been sinking one or two boats in every harbor he enters when he attempts to climb on watercraft anytime he gets tired from swimming. In an effort to offer assistance, the Irish have built Wally his own pontoon boat which will remain in a harbor in West Cork. NAZI ARTIFACTS FOUND STASHED IN GERMAN HOUSE: Kathleen reads an article detailing a cache of Nazi artifacts that have been found in the wall of a German house. Found by a schoolteacher, the trove was most likely hidden as U.S. troops took the city of Hagen in April 1945.STONEHENGE IS INDESTRUCTIBLE: Kathleen is fascinated with history and can't believe the results of a recent scientific analysis from a piece of England's Stonehenge monument. The core sample is helping experts better understand the makeup of the mysterious prehistoric structure, and how the stone's geochemical composition may have made it uniquely well-equipped to stand the test of time. The structure is made from 99.7 percent quartz crystals making the stones are practically indestructible, according to a new study published in the journal Plos One.100-YEAR-OLD NAZI ON TRIAL FOR HATE CRIMES: Kathleen believes in karma and consequence, and reiterates these sentiments when reading an article about a 100-year-old former guard at the Sachsenhausen Nazi concentration camp near Berlin. The guard will face trial this Fall, 76 years after the end of the Second World War.ITALIAN VILLAS FOR A EURO: Kathleen reads an article about Italy's ongoing clearance sale of €1 houses that have been historically centered around rural areas. However, a town in Rome's Latium region has joined the efforts with stricter parameters for those applying to purchase including timelines to complete any renovations and preference going to those who wish to reside in the area on a longer-term basis. THE RICHEST WOMEN IN THE WORLD: Kathleen is fascinated reading an article listing Forbes' richest women in the world, and by what means they attained their wealth. The group founded their wealth in everything from construction to technology, including the inventor of the Bumble dating app (which causes Kathleen to laugh when telling the story of her friend Ron White's “Bumble fumble.”) She is particularly excited to discuss the philanthropic endeavors of the women who currently holds the status of the world's wealthiest female: Françoise Bettencourt Meyers of the L'Oreal brand, who was raised as a strict Catholic and has pledged over €200M to restore Notre Dame cathedral in Paris after it was damaged in a horrible fire in 2019. Kathleen loves the city of Paris and tells listeners about her high school French exchange trip when she spent 6 weeks in the French countryside smoking cigarettes with her friend Marie Paul. THE LONGEST EMBRACE: Kathleen closes the Pubcast with a story of true love, reading an article from China where archaeologists have discovered two ancient skeletons holding each other with their arms wrapped around the other's waist and the woman pressed up against the man's shoulders. In studying the remains, historians feel that the remains likely belonged to a man and woman from the Northern Wei period – 1,500 years ago, when Buddhism was heightening. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching the ABBA documentary “When All Is Said And Done” “The White Lotus” with Connie Britton on HBO Max, and “The Defeated” on Netflix. Happy binge-watching, Termites! See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Simple Passive Cashflow
The Practice of Groundedness with Brad Stulberg

Simple Passive Cashflow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 26:57


THE PRACTICE OF GROUNDEDNESS:A Transformative Path to Success that Feeds—Not Crushes—Your SoulBy Brad StulbergA six-pillar program to combat burnout and realize a more lasting and fulfilling kind of success.Brad Stulberg is the coauthor of the bestselling Peak Performance and The Passion Paradox, and he also coaches Fortune 500 executives on performance and well-being.Stulberg shares a new model for success that defies the "never enough" culture of the twenty-first century. At the heart of this model is groundedness--a practice that values presence over productivity, accepts that progress is nonlinear, and prioritizes long-term values over short-term gain.Interweaving case studies, the latest science, and time honored lessons from ancient wisdom traditions, such as Buddhism, Stoicism, and Taoism, Stulberg teaches readers how to cultivate, through daily habits and activities, a grounded lifeA provocative and practical guide for overcoming the "always on" mentality and attaining a deeper and more authentic kind of success. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment
Guided Meditation on Four Levels of Happiness

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 28:42


A daily meditation on the four levels of happiness in Buddhism. Investigate the varying depths of happiness you get from sensory pleasures, positive states of mind, meditation, and the very nature of reality.Episode 73: Guided Meditation: Four Levels of Happiness in BuddhismEpisode 72: Four Kinds of Happiness with Sangye KhadroSupport the show (https://www.skepticspath.org/support/)

Audio Dharma
Happy Hour: Bringing the Heart's Beauty

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 42:45


This talk was given by Diana Clark on 2021.09.13 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Happy Hour: Loving Kindness Increases Feelings of Social Connectedness

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 52:04


This talk was given by Nikki Mirghafori on 2021.09.13 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/suy3opK531M. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein
Ep. 110 – Big Mind Game

Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 39:29


In this guided meditation from 1977, Joseph Goldstein plays the Big Mind Game, which is a practice of establishing a very still and deep balance of the mind. This Joseph Goldstein selection from April 14, 1977, at a two-week meditation retreat in Julian, California, was originally published on Dharma Seed. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Undefended Dharma with Mary Stancavage

The Dhammapada, part of the Pali Canon, is one of the most popular collections of Buddha's teachings. Mary looks at some of the verses and how the entire collection is an easy way to remind ourselves of the most important parts of the dharma. There is much richness to be explored.Recorded Sept. 11, 2021 in the virtual world

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0641 - TALKS: On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XIV

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


Episode 0641 - On Nisargadatta Maharaj, XIV (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Introduction to the life & teachings of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, based on 200 direct quotations. Passages 63-69. Comments on Nisargadatta's personal path, students & devotees, core Advaita Vedanta teaching & dialogues. Tatsat and inconceivable 'ultimate reality.' Additional references from Pali

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast
0640 - TALKS: Reading Chuang Tzu, XXVI

Talks With Scott Mandelker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


Episode 0640 - Reading Chuang Tzu, XXVI (Click on the above link, or here, for audio.) Concluding discussion of Chuang Tzu, chapters 5 ("The Sign of Virtue Complete") and 7 ("Fit for Emperors and Kings") translated by Burton Watson. Core Taoist teachings: wu-wei (non-interference) & the sage; essential life-values; conventional assumptions vs. non-dual reality; fate, destiny & making harmony with

Zen Commuter
1701: Tricycle Week - The Land of Many Dharmas

Zen Commuter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 19:03


Today is the final day of Tricycle week, and it concludes with a great article by Kenneth Tanaka.  In it he details so wonderfully how Buddhism has spread so widely in the United States.  Come listen

Buddhability
Episode 37: The Strokes' Nikolai Fraiture on Buddhism, music and collaboration

Buddhability

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 68:54


Today we're talking about music and creativity with special guest Nikolai Fraiture, who is best known for being the bassist of The Strokes.He also created a new theme song for Buddhability, which we're so excited for you to hear!Nikolai started chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, which is the core practice of SGI Nichiren Buddhism, just a few years ago. Today he shares how he has seen his Buddhist practice impact his life and his work.Plus, this year, which is the 20th anniversary of their breakout album, Is This It, The Strokes won the 2021 Grammy Award for Best Rock Album for their newest album titled The New Abnormal. Nikolai discusses his experience recording the album, as well as his journey with the band from the age of 19.CHEAT SHEET0:35 Buddhability's new theme song by Nikolai Fraiture2:13 How Nikolai started practicing Buddhism5:03 How chanting first felt to him6:49 The changes he noticed in himself10:33 How Nikolai got into music as a teenager15:02 The first two years of being The Strokes18:38 What the hardest part of the creative process is22:35 How he dealt with his health challenges30:03 How Buddhism helped him change preconceived notions and judgments 33:47 When his bandmates noticed he 37:21 The evolution of his creative process as a musician43:12 How Buddhism resonates with what he learned from one of his first bass teachers48:25 What went into recording The New Abnormal52:20 Key concepts from Buddhism and basketball56:36 Advice for aspiring young musicians59:30 How Nikolai's relationship with his brother changed due to Buddhism1:07:28 Where to check out Arts Elektra

Buddhist Temple of Toledo Podcast
Awakening is What We Do

Buddhist Temple of Toledo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 34:27


This is a Dharma Talk given by the Reverend Jay Rinsen Weik Roshi at the Buddhist Temple of Toledo. In this talk Rinsen Roshi explores the relationship of insight and experience to awakening. If you would like to learn more about the Buddhist Temple of Toledo or to make a donation in support of this podcast please visit buddhisttempleoftoledo.org.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
History of the Mongols SPECIAL: Religious Tolerance

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 22:54


One of the most enduring images of the Mongolian Empire is that it was a model of religious tolerance, one where each of the Khan's subjects were free to worship as they pleased. This is not a new belief;  in the 18th century, Edward Gibbon presented Chinggis Khan as a forerunner of the enlightenment, and for modern audiences the notion was repopularized with Jack Weatherford's book Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World. Some use the notion to counter the common presentations of Mongol brutality, usually accompanying blanket terms that all religious clergy were exempted from taxation, labour and were respected- or go as far as to present the Mongols as the inspiration for modern liberal religious toleration. While there is an element of truth to be had here, as with so much relating to the Mongols, describing the Chinggisid empire as a state of religious tolerance where all religions east and west lived in harmony fails to capture the reality of the period.       Even before the founding of the empire, Chinggis Khan interacted with a variety of religions. During his war to unify Mongolia, Chinggis Khan was supported by men of various religious backgrounds: Mongolian shamanist-animists, Nestorian Christians, Buddhists and Muslims, one of whom, Jafar Khoja, was supposedly a descendant of the Prophet Muhammad, and stood with him at the muddy waters of Lake Baljuna during one of his lowest moments. The most prominent tribes in the Mongolian steppe in the 12th century were Nestorian Christians such as the Kereyid and Naiman, and on the declaration of the Mongol Empire in 1206 Chinggis Khan's army and administration were quite mixed. Chinggis Khan himself was an animist: in Mongolian belief, all things in the world were inhabited by spirits which had to be consulted and placated. It was the job of shamans to intercede with these spirits on the Mongols' behalf. Generally, shamanism is not an exclusive religion; one can consult a shaman and still practice other faiths. The shaman was not like a Christian priest or Islamic imam, but a professional one could consult with regardless of other religious affiliation. The persuasion and power of religion in the Mongol steppe  came from the charisma of specific holy men -such as shamans- and their power to convene with spirits and Heaven on the Khan's behalf in order to secure his victory.        This seems to have been the guiding principle for how Chinggis Khan, and most of his successors, approached religion. Some Mongols viewed the major religions they encountered -Daoism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam- as all praying to the same God via different methods. This was more or less the statement that in the 1250s, Chinggis' grandson Mongke Khaan provided to the Franciscan friar William of Rubruck during an interview, stating that “We Mongols believe that there is only one God through whom we have life and through whom we die, and towards him we direct our hearts [...] But just as God has given the hand several fingers, so he has given mankind several paths.”       Usually for the Khans, it did not matter who was right, as basically all of the major religions were. What mattered was that these religions should pray to God on behalf of the Chinggisids to ensure divine favour for their rule. Heaven's will was manifested through victories and rulership, while it's displeasure manifested in defeats and anarchy. Much like the concept of the Chinese Mandate of Heaven, the right to rule provided by heaven could be rescinded, and thus the Mongols hoped to continually appease Heaven.       But the Mongols' views on religion were not static and took years to develop into their political theology- and nor were they inherently tolerant, and favours were allotted more on a personal basis. For example, in 1214 Chinggis Khan, or one of his sons, had an encounter with a Buddhist monk named Haiyun. Haiyun, with his head shaved bare in accordance with his role as a monk, was told by the Khan to grow his hair out and braid it in Mongolian fashion- for at that time, the Mongols were attempting to order the general population of north China to do so as a sign of their political subordination.  Religions in China dictated how one should maintain their hair; Buddhist monks had to shave their heads, Daoist monks could keep their hair long, while the general Chinese population, on Confucian teaching, could not cut their hair in adulthood, as it was a gift from the parents, and thus was kept in topknots. Demanding that the general population adopt the unique, partly shaved Mongolian hairstyle, was therefore a decree against all of China's major religions. The Mongols did not succeed in this policy and soon abandoned it's implementation on its sedentary subjects, though other sources indicate it was enforced on nomadic Turkic tribes who entered Mongol service, indicating their submission to the Great Khan. Notably the Manchu would successfully implement such a policy after their conquest of China 400 years later, forcing the population to adopt the long queues at the back of the head. When the Chinese revolted against Manchu rule, the cutting of the queue was one of the clearest signs of rejecting the Qing Dynasty.   Back to the Buddhist monk Haiyun, who Chinggis had ordered to grow out his hair in Mongol fashion. Haiyun told Chinggis that he could not adopt the Mongol hairstyle, as growing his hair out violated his duty as a monk. Learning this, Chinggis Khan allowed Haiyun to maintain his baldness, then in time extended this allowance to all Buddhist and Daoist clergy.  Even with this first privilege, Haiyun and his master did not receive coveted tax exempt status until 1219, and then on the recommendation of Chinggis' viceroy in North China, Mukhali. This is the earliest indication of Chinggis Khan granting of such a favour, followed soon by the extensive privileges granted to the Daoist master Qiu Chuji. The Daoist had made the journey from North China to meet Chinggis Khan in Afghanistan on the Khan's urging, ordered to bring Chinggis the secret to eternal life, as the Mongols had been told Qiu Chuji was 300 years old. Master Qiu Chuji told Chinggis that not only did he not have such power, but Chinggis should also abstain from hunting and sexual activity. Not surprisingly, Chinggis Khan did not take this advice, but he did grant the man extensive privileges, tax exempt status and authority over all Daoists in China. Importantly, Chinggis' edict was directed personally at Qiu Chuji and his disciples, rather than Daoism as a whole. The value Qiu Chuji had to Chinggis was on his individual religious charisma and ability to intercede with the heavens on the Khan's behalf, as well as his many followers who could be induced to accept Mongol rule. In Chinggis' view, the fact that Qiu Chuji was a Daoist leader did not entitle him to privileges. Neither did the Mongols initially differentiate between Buddhism and Daoism. In part due to the vaguely worded nature of Chinggis' edicts, Qiu Chuji's Daoist followers used these decrees to exert authority over Buddhists as well, seizing Buddhist temples and forcing Buddhist monks to become Daoists, beginning a Buddhist-Daoist conflict that lasted the rest of the 13th century.       The point of these anecdotes is to demonstrate that the conquests did not begin with a specific policy of general religious tolerance or support for local religious institutions. Governmental support and privilege was provided on an ad hoc basis, especially when a group or individual was seen as influential with the almighty. Toleration itself was also advertised as a tool; in the Qara-Khitai Empire, in what is now eastern Kazakhstan and northwestern China, an enemy of Chinggis Khan, prince Kuchlug of the Naiman tribe, had fled to Qara-Khitai and eventually usurped power. Originally an Eastern Christian, that is a Nestorian, in Qara-Khitai Kuchlug converted to a violent strang of Buddhism and began to force the Muslim clerics, particularly in the Tarim Basin, to convert to Chrisitanity or Buddhism on pain of death. When Chinggis Khan's forces under Jebe Noyan arrived in 1217 pursuing the prince, they recognized the general resentment against Kuchlug and, in order to undermine his support, declared that anyone who submitted to the Mongols would be free to practice their religion. The announcement worked well, as the empire was quickly and successfully turned over to the Mongols, and the renegade prince Kuchlug cornered and killed. Notably, this announcement did not come with statements of privileges or tax exemptions at large for the Islamic religious leaders. It was a decree spread to deliberately encourage the dissolution of the Qara-Khitai and ease the Mongol conquest- in this region, it was a comparatively peaceful conquest, by Mongol standards. But it was not coming from any specific high-mindedness for the treatment of religion, but an intention to expand into this territory and defeat the fleeing Kuchlug.       By the reign of Chinggis' son Ogedai in the early 1230s, the Mongol stance towards religions became more solidified. A major advancement, on the insistence of advisers like the Buddhist Khitan scholar Yelu Chucai, was that privileges were to be granted on religious communities and institutions rather than based on individual charisma, which made them easier to regulate and manage. Chucai also impressed upon the Mongols that Buddhism and Daoism were distinct beliefs, though the Mongols seem to have often continually erroneously thought both creeds worshipped a supreme deity a la Christianity and Islam. Buddhist and Daoism became, alongside Christianity and Islam, the four main “foreign religions” which the Mongols would issue edicts regarding privileges. It was not an evenly applied thing. With Islam, for instance, it can be said the Mongols often had the greatest difficulties. For one thing, the rapid annihilation of the Khwarezmian empire, the world's single most powerful islamic state at the time, resulted in the deaths of perhaps millions of Muslims as well as the belief that the Mongols were a punishment sent by God- a belief the Mongols encouraged. The reduction of Islam from “the state religion” to “just another religion of the Khan's subjects,” was a difficult one for many an imam and qadi to accept. For a universalist religion like Islam, subjugation to a pagan entity was a difficult pill to swallow, and the destruction of cities, mosques, agriculture and vast swathes of the population would not have been eased by statements of how tolerant the Mongols supposedly were.        Further, it is apparent that the Mongols' rule for the first decade or two of their interaction with the Islamic world was not tolerant. Part of this comes to an inherent conflict between the sharia law of Islam, and the yassa of Chinggis Khan. The yassa and yosun of Chinggis Khan were his laws and customs set out to provide a framework for Mongol life, which regulated interactions for the state, individuals, the environment, the spirits and the heavenly. As a part of this, it was decreed that animals had to be slaughtered in the Mongolian fashion; the animal usually knocked unconscious, turned onto its back, an incision made in the chest and its heart crushed. The intention was to prevent the spilling of the animals' blood needlessly upon the earth, which could beget misfortune. Contravening this was forbidden and punishable by death. The problem was that this is inherently conflicting with halal and kosher slaughter, which entailed slitting the throat and draining the blood. At various times over the thirteenth century, this was used as an excuse to punish and lead reprisals against Muslims. A number of Persian language sources assert that Ogedai Khaan's brother Chagatai was a harsh enforcer of the yassa on the empire's Muslim population. In the 1250s ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini asserted that Muslims in Central Asia were unable to make any halal killings due to Chagatai, and were forced to eat carrion from the side of the road. The Khwarezmian refugee Juzjani meanwhile said Chagatai planned a genocide of the Muslims. While these sources like to depict Chagatai as a foil to Ogedai's more ‘friendly to islam' image, it remains clear that for many Muslims, it was felt that the Mongol government had a particular hatred for them. But Chagatai was not the only one to enforce this. Ogedai himself briefly sought to enforce this rule, and the famous Khubilai Khan grew increasingly unfriendly to religion in his old age, and in the 1280s launched anti-muslim policies, banning halal slaughter and circumcision on pain of death. The incident which apparently set him off was a refusal of Muslim merchants in Khubilai's court to eat meat prepared in the Mongolian manner, though it may also have been an attempt to appease some of the Chinese elite by appearing to reduce Islamic and Central Asian influence in his government, particularly after the assassination of Khubilai's corrupt finance minister Ahmad Fanakati.        Even Daoism, favoured early by the Mongols thanks to the meeting of Qiu Chuji and Chinggis Khan, suffered stiff reprisals from the Mongol government. As the conflict between the Daoists and Buddhists escalated, in the 1250s on the behest of his brother Mongke Khaan, prince Khubilai headed a debate between representatives of the two orders. Khubilai, inclined to Buddhism on the influence of his wife and personal conversion, chose the Buddhists as the winners. Declaring a number of Daoist texts forgeries, Khubilai ordered many to be destroyed and banned from circulation, while also reducing their privileges. This failed to abate the tensions, and in the 1280s an older, less patient Khubilai responded with the destruction of all but one Daoist text, Lau Zi's Daodejing, and with murder, mutilation and exile for the offending Daoists.       Privileges only extended to religions the Mongols saw as useful, or offered evidence that they had support from heaven. Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Manicheism and Hinduism were usually totally ignored by the Mongols and did not receive the same privileges as the Christian, Buddhist, Daoist and Islamic clergy. Judaism may have received tax exemption status in the Ilkhanate for a brief period in the 1280s  and 90s due to the influence of a Jewish vizier, Sa'd al-Dawla, while in the Yuan Dynasty it took until 1330 for Judaism to earn such a status. As these religions lacked states which interacted with the Mongols, the Mongols saw these religions as having no power from heaven, and were therefore useless to them. Without any political clout, and of small representation within the Empire, these groups largely escaped the notice of the Khans.       The Mongols were also not above ordering the annihilation of a religion or religious groups when they defied them. The most well known case was a Shi'ite sect, the Nizari Ismailis, better known as the Assassins. Due to their resistance against the Mongol advance, the sect was singled out for destruction not just politically, but religiously, as Mongke Khaan had become convinced of this necessity by his more orthodox Islamic advisers. This task fell to his brother Hulegu, who enacted his brother's will thoroughly. Soon after the destruction of the Ismaili fortresses, which was lauded by Hulegu's Sunni Muslim biographer ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini,  Hulegu famously sacked Baghdad and killed the Caliph in 1258. Juvaini's chronicle, perhaps coincidentally, cuts off just before the siege of Baghdad. This attack on Baghdad was not religiously motivated; the Caliph had refused to accept Mongol authority. As a seemingly powerful head of a religion, his independence could not be abided. It was not a specifically anti-Islamic sentiment here, but a political one. Had the Mongols marched on Rome and the Pope also refused their mandate, such a fate would have awaited him as well. The presence of Christians in Hulegu's army, many from the Kingdom of Georgia and Cilician Armenia who partook with great enthusiasm in the slaughter of Muslims on Hulegu's request at Baghdad and in his campaign into Syria, as well as the fact that Hulegu's mother and chief wife were Chrisitans, would not have been lost on many Muslims, as well as the fact that Hulegu himself was a Buddhist.  Hulegu after the conquest of Baghdad ordered its rebuilding, but placed a Shi'ite Muslim in charge of this task and sponsored the restoration of Christian churches and monasteries, and other minority religions in his majority sunni-islam territories.     When the Mongols did convert to the local religions, they were not above carrying out with zeal assaults on other religious communities in their empire. Such was the case for Khans like Ozbeg in the Golden Horde or Ghazan in the Ilkhanate, who converted to Islam and struck against Christian, Buddhist and shamanic elements in their realms. These were as a rule very brief rounds of zealousness, as the economic usage of these groups and the uneven conversion of their followers to Islam made it politically and economically more useful to abandon these measures.        This is not to say of course, that there is no basis for the idea of Mongol religious tolerance, especially when compared to some contemporary states: just that when the favours, privileges and state support were granted, they were usually done to the four main religious groups the Mongols designated: again, Muslims, Christians, Daoists and Buddhists. So entrenched did these groups become as the “favoured religions” that in the Yuan Dynasty by the 14th century it was believed these four groups had been singled out by Chinggis Khan for their favours. This is despite the fact that Chinggis Khan had no recorded interactions with any Christian holymen.   But not idly should we dismiss the notion of there being a certain level of religious toleration among the Mongols. Not without reason was Ogedai Khaan portrayed as friendly in many Islamic sources, and he regularly gave the most powerful positions in the administration of North China to Muslims.  European travellers among the Mongols, such as John De Plano Carpini, Marco Polo and Simon of St. Quentin, along with Persian bureaucrats like ‘Ala al-Din Juvaini and the Syriac Churchman Bar Hebraeus, generally reported Mongol indifference to what religions were practiced by their subjects, as long as said subjects accepted Mongol command. Sorqaqtani Beki, the mother of Mongke and Khubilai, was a Nestorian Christian famous for patronizing and supporting mosques and madrassas. Mongke Khaan held feasts to mark the end of Ramadan where he would distribute alms and at least one such feast held in Qaraqorum, listened to a qadi deliver a sermon. He show respect to his Muslim cousin Berke, and for him had halal meat at one imperial banquet. If the yassa of Chinggis Khan was upheld thoroughly, then the Khans and all princes present would have been executed. In the four level racial hierarchy Khubilai Khan instituted in China, Muslims and Central Asians were second only to Mongols and nomads, and ranked above all Chinese peoples.    Religious men visiting the Khans usually left with the belief that the Khan was about to convert to their religion, so favourably had they been received. Khubilai Khan asked Marco Polo's father and uncle to bring him back  100 Catholic priests and holy oil from Jerusalem, and likely sent the Nestorian Rabban bar Sauma to Jerusalem for similar purposes. Marco Polo then goes on to present Khubilai as a good Christian monarch in all but name. Qaraqorum, the Mongol imperial capital, held Daoist and Buddhist temples across the street from Mosques and Churches. In Khubilai's capital of Dadu and the Ilkhanid capital of Sultaniyya were Catholic archbishoprics by the early 14th century. So there certainly was a level of toleration within the Mongol Empire that contemporaries, with wonder or frustration, could remark truthfully that it was quite different from their own homelands.    Such religious syncretism survived well into the century, when claimants to the fragmenting successor Khanates in western Asia, in order to define their legitimacy amongst the largely converted Mongol armies and stand out amongst the many Chinggisids, latched onto Islamic identities. Eager to prove their sincerity, they pushed back violently against even traditional Mongol shamanism. Despite it's early difficulties, in the end Islam largely won amongst the Mongols of the western half of the empire and their descendants, overcoming the brief revitalization Nestorian Christianity and Buddhism had enjoyed thanks to Mongol patronage. Such was the final outcome of the Mongols' religious toleration     Our series on the Mongols will continue, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this, and would like to help us keep bringing you great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or sharing this with your friends. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Dealing with PMDD with Elizabeth Ferreira

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 60:21


Premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD, is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome that includes severe anxiety, depression, and feelings of shame. It affects 5-10% of women, and most don't even know they have it. On today's episode, Forrest is joined by his partner Elizabeth Ferreira to explore what PMDD is, how to know if you might have it, effective practices for managing PMDD, and how to create a happy, healthy, fulfilling relationship alongside it. About Our Guest: Elizabeth is a graduate student studying somatic psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies. If you'd like to hear more from Elizabeth and learn about somatic psychology, she's just started a YouTube channel!Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You  can watch this episode on YouTube.Quick Guide to Dealing with PMDD: If you'd like to learn more, download our guide with 7  Key Practices for Managing PMDD.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:00: What's PMDD?4:45: Diagnostic criteria for PMDD. 8:20: Challenges of awareness around “invisible” problems.10:00: The experience of a PMDD episode. 15:15: Practices that help PMDD.27:05: Externalizing PMDD. 29:45: Therapy and PMDD.33:30: Accepting your needs. 39:30: Dealing with shame and isolation.44:45: Continuing to meet the challenge.49:00: Partnering someone with PMDD. 54:45: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world's largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month! Want to sleep better? Try the legendary Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website

Dharmabytes from free buddhist audio

Saddhanandi paints a picture of how radical and different it was to encounter Buddhism in the mid 1960s. She explores a verse of Zen poetry taking her lead from Sangharakshita's 1965 lectures on the Essence of Zen.  Excerpted from the talk entitled The Essence of Zen at Adhisthana, 2019. *** Follow the Free Buddhist Audio podcast. High quality, full-length Dharma talks weekly since 2006! Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google  Subscribe to our Free Buddhist Audio podcast - a full Dharma talk every week:  Subscribe using these RSS feeds or search for Free Buddhist Audio or Dharmabytes in your favourite podcast service! FBA on Twitter FBA on Facebook FBA on Soundcloud

Audio Dharma
Efforting

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 29:09


This talk was given by Diana Clark on 2021.09.12 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Guided Meditation: Setting an Intention

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 29:59


This talk was given by Diana Clark on 2021.09.12 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Buddhist Geeks
How to Find your People in an Unjust World, with Kate Johnson

Buddhist Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 70:51


In this conversation, Vince Fakhoury Horn is joined by Buddhist meditation teacher Kate Johnson, author of Radical Friendship, a newly released book which found its roots in a talk that Kate gave in 2013 at an in-person Buddhist Geeks Conference, entitled Waking Up to Power & Privilege in Our Communities. Vince & Kate speak about a variety of topics related to practicing dharma and living together in an unjust world.Episode Links:

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox
Episode 114 - Karma Bandits

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 37:31


This episode is dedicated to Right View, one part of The Noble Eightfold Path. Right View has two parts to it: a mundane right view and a superior right view (emptiness).Today we look at mundane right view which adopts the understanding and belief in karma. It is specifically, “right view of the ownership of action” (kammassakata sammaditthi). What does it mean to live mindfully in accordance with the of karma? “All created things are suffering.”  Seeing this with insight,  One becomes disenchanted with suffering.  This is the path to purity. (278)* —Buddha, The Dhammapada The eight parts of the Noble Eightfold Path: Eightfold Path are Right View Right Intention Right Speech Right Action Right Livelihood  Right Effort Right Mindfulness Right Concentration References and Links Bodhi, Bhikku. The Noble Eightfold Path. Buddhist Publication Society, 1999, pp 12-21.  BuddhaNet. http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/noble8path6.pdf Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. (Kindle). Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp. 72 (Link)

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks
The Kalama Sutta: Living an Ethical Life

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 25:39


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.12 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/8sy8pArb_qM?t=2196. ******* A machine generated transcript of this talk is available. It has not been edited by a human, so errors will exist. Closed Captioning: https://otter.ai/u/k0sZiP_AqIBcuZFZPK4p33Y5xSQ ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
The Kalama Sutta: Living an Ethical Life

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 25:39


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.12 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/8sy8pArb_qM?t=2196. ******* A machine generated transcript of this talk is available. It has not been edited by a human, so errors will exist. Closed Captioning: https://otter.ai/u/k0sZiP_AqIBcuZFZPK4p33Y5xSQ ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Guided Meditation: Meditating with Wholesomeness

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 35:52


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.12 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/8sy8pArb_qM. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks
Guided Meditation: Meditating with Wholesomeness

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 35:52


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.12 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/8sy8pArb_qM. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Muddy Water Zen
Your Face Before Your Mother Was Born | Su Gyo Bup Heng

Muddy Water Zen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 19:08


Thank you for listening. These Dharma talks were recorded at Muddy Water Zen Buddhist temple in Royal Oak, Michigan. Learn more about Buddhism, the Korean Taego order, or our Temple at www.muddywaterzen.org

Deep South Dharma
Ep ~ 134 You Belong Through Mindful Parenting

Deep South Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 12:06


Christine Bates, a licensed professional counselor and ordained Buddhist lay minister in the Embracing Simplicity Contemplative Order, shares the second of five posts on Mindful Parenting, based on the work of Dave Richo. More information about Deep South Dharma can be found at www.deepsouthdharma.org Articles about various aspects of the practice of Buddhism can be found at https://medium.com/the-fifth-posture --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/deepsouthdharma/message

The One You Feed
429: Bob Thurman on How to Find Bliss

The One You Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 52:42


Bob Thurman is a professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies in the Department of Religion at Columbia University. He's also the President of the Tibet House US, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Tibetan civilization. He's also the President of the American Institute of Buddhist Studies. In this episode, Bob and Eric discuss his book, Wisdom is Bliss: Four Friendly Fun Facts That Can Change Your LifeBut wait – there's more! The episode is not quite over!! We continue the conversation and you can access this exclusive content right in your podcast player feed. Head over to our Patreon page and pledge to donate just $10 a month. It's that simple and we'll give you good stuff as a thank you!In This Interview, Bob Thurman and I Discuss How to Find Bliss and …His book: Wisdom is Bliss: Four Friendly Fun Facts That Can Change Your LifeHow our civilization is based on fearThe wisdom in the bliss view is that reality is good and that you get back what you put into it.The Four Friendly Fun Facts he renamed from the four noble truthsHow altruism strengthens our sense of self-worthTo be noble means you become more “we” oriented than “me” orientedThe deepest level of reality is love, abundance, energyFirst Friendly Fact is to take responsibility to understand our ultimate reality or we will sufferSecond Friendly Fact is the diagnosis- to understand that we are not the center of everythingThird Friendly Fact is the prognosis or needing to unlearn and opening ourselves to what we really areFourth Friendly Fact is the “therapy” or the eightfold path of how we can open our own minds to find freedom and blissOur tendency to see things as absolute rather than relativeInvestigation is the real practice of Buddhism and meditation is a toolRealistic mindfulness is noticing what's going on in the real worldThe three types of wisdom are born of learning, unlearning, and freedomBob Thurman Links:Bob's WebsiteInstagramFacebookTwitterBest Fiends: Engage your brain and play a game of puzzles with Best Fiends. Download for free on the Apple App Store or Google Play. If you enjoyed this conversation with Bob Thurman, you might also enjoy these other episodes:Robert Thurman on Buddhism and The Dalai LamaPaul Hannam on The Wisdom of Groundhog DaySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Audio Dharma
Dharmette: Citta (5 of 5) Knowing the Mind

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 9:52


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.10 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* A machine generated transcript of this talk is available. It has not been edited by a human, so errors will exist. Closed Captioning: https://otter.ai/u/Kd20GnQBWUlFlQJJH6vy5bASJA4 ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks
Dharmette: Citta (5 of 5) Knowing the Mind

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 9:52


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.10 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* A machine generated transcript of this talk is available. It has not been edited by a human, so errors will exist. Closed Captioning: https://otter.ai/u/Kd20GnQBWUlFlQJJH6vy5bASJA4 ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Guided Meditation: Settled Mind; Liberated Mind

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 32:03


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.10 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks
Guided Meditation: Settled Mind; Liberated Mind

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 32:03


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.10 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Practicing with Transitions

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 31:43


This talk was given by Andrea Fella on 2021.09.09 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Guided Meditation: How we meet experience is more important than what we meet

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 9:52


This talk was given by Andrea Fella on 2021.09.09 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Happy Hour: Equanimity = Metta + Wisdom

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 52:07


This talk was given by Nikki Mirghafori on 2021.09.09 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* Video of this talk is available at: https://youtu.be/1qHkbNtbl1Q. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

법륜스님의 즉문즉설
제1938회 남녀 차별로 상처받으며 살아왔습니다

법륜스님의 즉문즉설

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 15:28


저는 아버지가 독자이신 집에서 1남 4녀 중 차녀로 태어나 자랐습니다. 아버지가 독자이시다 보니 남아선호사상이 심하셨고 저는 남녀 차별로 상처받으면서 살아왔습니다. 그런데 결혼을 하였는데 남편도 비슷한 상처가 있었습니다. 남편은 2남 1녀 중 차남인데 집에서 장남과 차남의 차별을 받고 살아와서 그런지 남편 또한 상처를 가지고 있었습니다. 지금은 시부모님이 며느리들까지 차별을 하시는 것 같아서 많이 서운하고 속상합니다. 어렸을 적 상처가 있어서 그런지 더 마음이 괴로운 것 같습니다. 어떻게 하면 시부모님에 대한 저의 마음을 풀 수 있을까요? 그리고 남편도 제가 어떻게 해야 부모님과 마음을 풀 수 있을까요?

Audio Dharma
Dharmette: Citta (4 of 5) Big Mind, Higher Mind

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 13:16


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.09 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* A machine generated transcript of this talk is available. It has not been edited by a human, so errors will exist. Closed Captioning: https://otter.ai/u/ZKvalLEYJuoAbl7gogjGEPb77oI ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks
Dharmette: Citta (4 of 5) Big Mind, Higher Mind

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 13:16


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.09 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* A machine generated transcript of this talk is available. It has not been edited by a human, so errors will exist. Closed Captioning: https://otter.ai/u/ZKvalLEYJuoAbl7gogjGEPb77oI ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma: Gil Fronsdal's most recent Dharma talks

This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.09 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License

Audio Dharma
Guided Meditation: Big Mind

Audio Dharma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 31:20


This talk was given by Gil Fronsdal on 2021.09.09 at the Insight Meditation Center in Redwood City, CA. ******* For more talks like this, visit AudioDharma.org ******* If you have enjoyed this talk, please consider supporting AudioDharma with a donation at https://www.audiodharma.org/donate/. ******* This talk is licensed by a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License