Podcasts about Neuroscience

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scientific study of the nervous system

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    Best podcasts about Neuroscience

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    Latest podcast episodes about Neuroscience

    StarTalk Radio
    Cosmic Queries – Pot Luck with Dr. Staci Gruber

    StarTalk Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 55:36


    Are we “wired for weed”? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O'Reilly weed out the myth from the science behind marijuana with neuroscientist at Harvard Medical School and director of the MIND Program, Dr. Staci Gruber.NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons Zero Chill, Matthew Rozak, Matej Michňák, and Gino Colauto for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Daniel Oberhaus, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
    Midtown Midweek | Peace, Neuroscience, and Personal Wiring

    Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022


    A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church staff, and the city we love.Follow us on our new IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)In Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” SpotlightTrenholm Little League - (trenholmll.com)Intro/Outro music by Levvy

    Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
    Brain Fact Friday ”Using Neuroscience to Explain Why Our Dreams Are So Weird, Highly Emotional, and Often Forgotten”

    Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 12:49


    “As long as we dare to dream and don't get in the way of ourselves, anything is possible—there's truly no end to where our dreams can take us.” Hilary Swank On the episode you will learn: The Neuroscience behind ✔ Why our dreams are so weird, highly emotional and often forgotten. ✔ With a BRAIN STRATEGY you can use to improve your waking life, with your brain and sleep in mind. For returning guests, welcome back, and for those who are new here, I'm Andrea Samadi, author, and educator, with a passion for learning, understanding difficult concepts, and breaking them down so that we can all use and apply the most current research to improve our productivity and results in our schools, sports environments, and modern workplaces. On today's EPISODE #226 and Brain Fact Friday, we are going to dive deeper into the research of Dr. Baland Jalal, who has studied the phenomenon of sleep paralysis and dreams for the past decade, and see what we can learn from our brain, while dreaming. To do this, we are going to review what's happening to the brain during sleep paralysis, and during our REM/dream state to see what we can learn from this understanding. I hope this will open up our level of awareness and help us to understand how our dream world can impact our everyday, waking world. What is Sleep Paralysis? Dr. Jalal and I discussed this terrifying experience in depth on our recent interview, episode #224[i] and most of us can relate to this experience, but wonder what it is, and why it happens, in addition to many other questions I had about dreams themselves. You can see Dr. Jalal's lectures on this topic, where he explains what happens to our brain when we sleep and that we even see things we might say were ghosts. Now that I have heard Dr. Jalal's explanation of what happens to our brains when we are dreaming, I definitely think of my brain now, when analyzing my dreams, with this new awareness. Which brings us to this week's Brain Fact Friday where I want to explore sleep paralysis, why dreams are so weird, and why are they highly emotional, and do this, with our brain in mind. SLEEP PARALYSIS DID YOU KNOW that during REM sleep (when we dream) there's a part of the brain in the brain stem that paralyzes the body to keep us (and our sleeping partner) safe[ii] and another part of our brain (the cortex) that's responsible for our perceptual awareness. Occasionally, we can wake up when we are still in REM sleep, and are perceptually aware, but unable to move as we are paralyzed. This is sleep paralysis, and can feel terrifying, if you have no idea what's going on. I learned from Dr. Jalal that in this state we can also see what we think is a ghost, or which he explains is “an illusion that your brain creates” in the Temporal Parietal Junction (that's close to our Occipital or Visual Lobe) that can project a sense of our self, outside of our body. Have you ever felt or seen something like this and thought it was a ghost? Seeing something like this, paired up with feeling paralyzed can be a terrifying experience as I told him in the interview, and he agreed, with his own sleep paralysis experience. Then, our brain doesn't like the feeling of incompleteness and it will make up a story of what you are seeing. Dr. Jalal explains that in all of the years he has done this work, he has found that our cultural background can influence what we think we are seeing. It took me some time to make the connection, but the ghost I saw, was not far off from an 18th Century Englishman, or even someone wearing the outfits of the guards at Buckingham Palace. I did grow up with a photo of the Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip in my house, and this made me think it could have been the reason why my ghost was of British decent when I was actually in a house in Vancouver, Canada. My brain created this image from a past, cultural memory. WHY ARE DREAMS SO WEIRD? DID YOU KNOW that there's a part of our brain called the Dorsolateral PFC[iii] (a region of the frontal lobes associated with executive functions like working memory and attention) (Curtis and D'Esposito, 2003) that put concepts together in a meaningful way in our life—and that during REM sleep, or when we are dreaming, this part of the brain “shuts off”[iv] so we aren't usually aware that we are dreaming? If you have ever thought “that dream felt so real” this is the reason why, and it also explains why everything in our dreams is messed up and backwards. One minute we are on a bus with friends we haven't seen in years, you grab one of your friends' hand, jump off the bus, and go to the movies, and the next minute, you are back in your childhood home, drinking tea. This is one of my bizarre dreams, and I'm sure you can relate with your dreams. Now that I understand Dr. Jalal's explanation of the part of my brain that puts concepts together in a meaningful way, shutting down during REM sleep, I can clearly see why everything in my dream is disjointed and doesn't make much linear sense. WHY ARE DREAMS FILLED WITH STRONG EMOTION, PAST MEMORIES AND PEOPLE? DID YOU KNOW that during the REM state, or while we are dreaming, that “four areas of the brain fire up: the visual spatial regions (that help people to find their way around the world), the motor cortex (creates movement in the body), the hippocampus (our memory center) and amygdala (that processes strong emotions like fear, pleasure or anger)” “Which is why dreams are often filled with movement, strong emotions, past memories, people, experiences and are irrational.” Mathew Walker[v] tells us on his podcast that's all about why we dream. If you can keep a dream log, over time you can see what's going on in your waking hours, and learn from your dreams. Usually our concerns, worries and fears will show up in our dreams in some way, and you can solve them once you are aware of what they are. To conclude this week's Brain Fact Friday, that came from our recent interview with the world's leading expert on sleep paralysis, Dr. Baland Jalal, we took a closer look at the neuroscience of our dream world, explaining why our dreams are so weird, often highly emotional and what we can learn from them. I have four brain tips to make what we have learned about our brain when we sleep, useful in our daily life. UNDERSTANDING SLEEP PARALYSIS: Once we know what sleep paralysis is, that our brain paralyzes our body to keep us safe, then we can understand what might happen if we become perceptually aware during our REM sleep, and stuck between our sleep and wake state. BRAIN TIP FOR THIS FACT: OUR BRAIN DOESN'T LIKE CONFLICT OR INCOMPLETENESS: So figure out what your story is, if you have had a sleep paralysis experience and it's left you feeling unsettled. I explained my British ghost that my brain created as an illusion to tell the story and fill in the blanks of the unknown. What was YOUR sleep paralysis experience, and how can YOU  make sense of it?   WHY ARE DREAMS SO WEIRD AND OFTEN FORGOTTEN: Since we now know the Dorsolateral PFC, the front part of our brain associated with memory, attention and putting things together in a meaningful way in our life, shuts down during REM sleep, we can now understand why dreams are so weird and events that happen are all over the place. If the part of our brain responsible for our memory is turned off, this explains why “95% of our dreams we don't remember” but we might remember the last few minutes, and last stage of our dreams if we are intentional about it. BRAIN TIP FOR THIS FACT: REPEAT TO REMEMBER: (which is John Medina's Brain Rule #5).[vi] If you want to improve this number see if you can remember your dreams when you wake up. Write them down before you do anything else, or they will be forgotten. Sometimes I'm not even awake yet, and I repeat the dream in my head while I'm brushing my teeth, to help me to remember and write it down when I can. Also, it will help if you are intentional about this practice and say “I will remember my dream” before you go to sleep at night. LEARN WHY DREAMS ARE HIGHLY EMOTIONAL: When we know what parts of the brain fire up during REM sleep, especially our amygdala that processes strong emotions, or past memories and experiences, we can now look for messages in our dreams, over time to see what common themes come up. If we can solve the problems that we find in our waking hours, it will help improve the other 1/3 of our life spent in sleep. BRAIN TIP FOR THIS FACT: SLEEP WELL, THINK WELL (John Medina's Brain Rule #7).[vii] Here's the im portance of sleep again. It keeps coming back on this podcast. John Medina writes in his Brain Rules book, that “people vary on how much sleep they need and when they prefer to get it, but the biological need for a nap is universal.” (Medina, Brain Rules)[viii] If there's something bothering you in your waking hours, it will show up in your dreams in some way, and will impact your sleep. To truly sleep well, leading to improved “attention, executive function, working memory, mood, quantitative skills, logical reasoning and even motor dexterity” (Medina) work out your problems, and add a nap to your day to keep your mind operating at its highest levels. While Dr. Jalal does put his neuroscientific mind first with every question I asked him, there were still some questions that he said science couldn't prove, that have a spiritual side. Instead of saying that some things are not possible, he leaves this up to us to keep an open mind, and perhaps in the future, new advancements in science could move us forward so that we could find answers to the spiritual questions of our dreams in a way to benefit our waking life. Until then, I plan to keep on dreaming, and learning as much as I can on this topic to share with you here. I hope you've enjoyed diving deep into sleep paralysis, why our dreams are so weird, and highly emotional with some tips we can all use to take our understanding and awareness to a new level. It really helped me to make sense of my sleep paralysis experience after interviewing Dr. Jalal, and thinking of ways that we can all use what we learned from his research. I do plan to keep an open mind moving forward to see what else I can learn from lucid dreaming, especially as it relates to improving our psychological well-being. See you next week and hope you have sweet dreams this weekend. REFERENCES: [i] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #224 with Dr. Baland Jalal on “Expanding our Awareness into the Mysteries of the Brain During Sleep” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/harvard-neuroscientist-drbaland-jalalexplainssleepparalysislucid-dreaming-andpremonitionsexpandingour-awareness-into-the-mysteries-ofourbrainduring-sl/ [ii] Sleep Paralysis https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/21974-sleep-paralysis#:~:text=Why%20does%20sleep%20paralysis%20happen,or%20coming%20out%20of%20REM. [iii] Dorsolateral PFC https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/dorsolateral-prefrontal-cortex#:~:text=The%20dorsolateral%20prefrontal%20cortex%20is,Pathways%20in%20Clinical%20Neuropsychiatry%2C%202016 [iv] Neuroscience of Dreams and Sleep Paralysis at Harvard University Published on YouTube Feb. 13, 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WBL-51kIkc&t=7s [v] Mathew Walker Podcast The Sleep Diplomat https://www.sleepdiplomat.com/podcast [vi] John Medina's Brain Rule #5 Repeat to Remember https://brainrules.net/short-term-memory/#:~:text=Rule%20%235%3A%20Repeat%20to%20remember.&text=Which%20means%2C%20your%20brain%20can,have%20to%20repeat%20to%20remember. [vii] John Medina's Brain Rule #7 Sleep well, think well.

    Do You F*****g Mind?
    152. The neuroscience of visualisation to get what you want

    Do You F*****g Mind?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 46:29


    This episode will go over 7 points as to why visualisation can help you achieve what you want, and I give 4 tips on how to start visualising no matter if you have never tried it before. Brain fact : acne mediation - isotretinon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Evolving Leader
    Improve your Visual Intelligence with Amy Herman

    The Evolving Leader

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 45:16


    This week on the Evolving Leader podcast, co-hosts Jean and Scott talk to Amy Herman. Amy is a lawyer, art historian, author and founder and president of The Art of Perception Inc. a New York-based organization that conducts professional development courses for leaders around the world, from Secret Service agents to prison wardens. By showing people how to look closely at paintings, sculpture, and photography, she helps them hone their visual intelligence to recognize the most pertinent and useful information as well as recognise biases that impede decision making. Fixed.: How to Perfect the Fine Art of Problem SolvingsmART, Use Your Eyes to Boost Your Brain 0.00 Introduction2.59 Tell us how you combined your skill as a lawyer with your passion for art to form what is a pretty unique job.5.21 Where does the term visual intelligence originate?8.59 What's the take away for people who attend your course? 10.56 Can you give us a deeper explanation as to what visual intelligence is? 13.18 So how do you learn to see what's not there? Can you talk us through your process?16.36 Many people coming on to your course will be out of their comfort zone. Can you tell us what they're going through?19.09 Tell us about their emotional response to this situation. 20.49 Can you give a bit more about distinguishing between objective and subjective conclusions?23.02 How do these experiences with art help to confront and maybe even resolve some biases?  26.05 You have the opportunity to be quite provocative with people in some of the things that you do. What does that create in people?29.36 How do you help people come to terms with making the distinction between thinking and seeing?32.23 Is important to also ask ‘what are we not seeing'?36.05 Towards the end of Fixed, you suggest that you may have reached the limits of what you could achieve using art and open ended questions. However, talking to you today it sounds like you've overcome that. 40.45 Tell us about your new book smART.42.45 As we draw to a close, what's the biggest take away here? Recommended listening from the Evolving Leader archive:Distinguishing Risk and Uncertainty with Sir John Kay Social: Instagram           @evolvingleader LinkedIn             The Evolving Leader Podcast Twitter               @Evolving_Leader The Evolving Leader is researched, written and presented by Jean Gomes and Scott Allender with production by Phil Kerby. It is an Outside production.

    Accidental Gods
    Designing Education fit for the 21st Century with Prof David John Helfand

    Accidental Gods

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 52:29


    Professor David J. Helfand, a faculty member at Columbia University for forty-five years, served nearly half of that time as Chair of the Department of Astronomy, a position he has again resumed. He also recently completed a four-year term as President of the American Astronomical Society, the professional society for astronomers, astrophysicists, planetary scientists and solar physicists in North America. He is the author of nearly 200 scientific publications and has mentored 22 PhD students, but most of his pedagogical efforts have been aimed at teaching science to non-science majors. He instituted the first change in Columbia's Core Curriculum in 50 years by introducing science to all first-year students. In 2005, he became involved with an effort to create Canada's first independent, non-profit, secular university, Quest University Canada. He served as a Visiting Tutor in the University's inaugural semester in the Fall of 2007 and was appointed President & Vice-Chancellor the following year to lead this innovative experiment in higher education. For six years in a row, Quest has been ranked #1 in North America in the National Survey of Student Engagement. ​He completed his term as President of Quest in the fall of 2015 and returned to Columbia where he now heads the Committee on Innovative Teaching and Learning. His first book, "A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age" appeared in February 2016 and came out in paperback Aug 10, 2017.In this episode, we explore the nature of higher education in a changing world and the models that could work as we move into a time when what matters is emotional literacy and resilience and the ability to garner ideas and synthesise them broadly rather than learning 'more and more about less and less until we know everything about nothing.' Prof Helfand TED Talk 'Designing an Education for the 21st Century' Quest University in British ColumbiaA Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age by David J Helfand Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal

    Town Hall Seattle Science Series
    184. Dr. Maria Carrillo with Denise Whitaker—Advancing the Science: The Latest in Alzheimer's and Dementia Research

    Town Hall Seattle Science Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 63:33


    Alzheimer's is a global health problem with more than 6 million people living with the disease in the U.S. alone. Tremendous gains have been made in the understanding of the science and basic biology underlying Alzheimer's and other dementias. These advances are leading to great strides in strategies for prevention, detection, diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. The Alzheimer's Association is a global leader in research, mobilizing the field to advance the vision of a world without Alzheimer's and all other dementia. Join Dr. Maria Carrillo to learn more about: ●      The landscape of Alzheimer's and dementia science ●      Risk factors for Alzheimer's and all other dementia ●      Highlights in early detection and diagnosis ●      Latest advances in clinical trials, treatments and lifestyle intervention Maria C. Carrillo, Ph.D., is the chief science officer for the Alzheimer's Association where she sets the strategic vision for their global research program. Under her leadership, the Association is the world's largest nonprofit funder of Alzheimer's research — currently investing $167 million — and an internationally recognized pioneer in convening the dementia science community. Dr. Carrillo uses her platform as a noted public speaker to play an instrumental role in the Association's efforts to lobby for increased funding for the disease. Dr. Carrillo earned her Ph.D. from Northwestern University's Institute for Neuroscience and completed a postdoctoral fellowship focused on Alzheimer's brain imaging and risk factors at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. KOMO's Denise Whitaker is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, seeking adventure in all areas of life.  She keeps viewers up to date on all aspects of news but is especially drawn to health topics. Off camera, Denise enjoys creating healthy recipes, cooking, and working out, especially running. Now in her 17th year with Fred Hutch's Climb to Fight Cancer, Denise has counted more than a dozen summits up Mounts Rainier, Baker, Adams, Hood, Shasta, Shuksan, and two volcanoes in Mexico.  She chooses volunteer opportunities that let her promote health and physical fitness. Presented by Town Hall Seattle and the Alzheimer's Association WA State Chapter.

    The FitMind Podcast: Mental Health, Neuroscience & Mindfulness Meditation
    #91: The Science of Creativity & Imagination - Anna Abraham, PhD

    The FitMind Podcast: Mental Health, Neuroscience & Mindfulness Meditation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 62:21


    Dr. Anna Abraham is a psychologist and neuroscientist who investigates creativity and how we can optimize this key trait. She's also a leading scholar on the study of human imagination. On this episode, we discuss the key ingredients of a creative mind, how to become more creative, and how the brain can tell the difference between real and imaginary worlds. FitMind Neuroscience-Based App: http://bit.ly/afitmind Website: www.fitmind.com SHOW NOTES 0:00 | Intro to Anna Abraham, PhD 1:44 | Imagination More Important Than Knowledge? 4:45 | Imagination Defined 7:53 | How We Experience Real vs. Imaginary Worlds 17:20 | Blurred Lines Real Life & Fiction 21:35 | Overlap of Memory & Imagination 29:28 | Ingredients of a Creative Mind 42:08 | Ways to Build Creativity 48:35 | Predictors of Creativity 58:12 | Rapid Fire Questions

    Chicago Psychology Podcast
    The Mysteries of Hypnosis, Meditation & the Self with Ian Wickeramaselera Psy.D.

    Chicago Psychology Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 77:50


    Dr. Ian Wickramasekera, Psy.D. is a clinical psychologist and professor at Naropa University in Boulder, CO. Dr. Ian has been involved in research and exploration of Neuroscience, Biofeedback, Bon-Buddhism, Empathy, Hypnosis, Lucid Dreaming, Mind/Body Medicine, and Transpersonal Psychology for most of this present lifetime. He is Science Editor for the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis. Dr. Ian joins us to enter into a deep dive into the world of hypnosis, meditation, exalted states of being, the creativity of being human and how to enhance it through hypnosis and mediation, and Tibetan Bon and Buddhist meditation and psychology.Dr. Ian's Work at Research Gate:https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ian-Wickramasekera-3The Psychology Talk Podcast is a unique conversation about psychology around the globe. Your host Dr. Scott Hoye discuss psychology with mental health practitioners and experts to keep you informed about issues and trends in the industry. https://psych-talk.comhttps://www.instagram.com/psychtalkpodcast/

    Science Salon
    282. Anil Seth on the Hard Problem of Consciousness, the Self, and the Essence of Volition

    Science Salon

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 129:22


    Shermer and Seth discuss: “mind” and “consciousness” in context of understanding how molecules and matter give rise to such nonmaterial processes • controlled hallucinations • the hard problem of consciousness • the self and other minds • consciousness and self-awareness as emergent properties • Where does consciousness go during general anaesthesia? After death? • Star Trek TNG episode 138 “Ship in a Bottle”: a VR inside a VR that is indistinguishable from reality • Are we living in a simulation that itself is inside a simulation? • Does Deep Blue know that it beat the great Gary Kasparov in chess? • Does Watson know that it beat the great Ken Jennings in Jeopardy!? • Is Data on Star Trek sentient, conscious, and with feelings? • Can AI systems be conscious? • free will, determinism, compatibilism, and panpsychism. Anil Seth is Professor of Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience at the University of Sussex, where he co-directs of the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science. He is also Co-Director of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) Program on Brain, Mind, and Consciousness, and of the Leverhulme Doctoral Scholarship Programme: From Sensation and Perception to Awareness. Dr. Seth is Editor-in-Chief of Neuroscience of Consciousness (Oxford University Press) and he sits on the Editorial Board of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B and on the Advisory Committee for 1907 Research and for Chile's Congreso Futuro. His new book is Being You: A New Science of Consciousness.

    Miss Behavior Journal Club
    What The Kids Are Listening To (Abrams et al., 2022)

    Miss Behavior Journal Club

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 55:30


    Tom Hage joins Amielle for an episode about self-regulation and adolescent attention. The erudite Tom discusses some serious Instagram research. Then the feature paper explores how children abandon their moms at the neuronal level. This is what happens when children stop being polite, and start being little &#$@s! Also, non-consensual cruises.

    UC Berkeley (Audio)
    Smart Money: Educational Investments in Adolescents Earn Higher Returns

    UC Berkeley (Audio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 117:29


    This program looks at education and how the brain of adolescents primes them for learning. Caroline Hoxby, professor of economics at Stanford University and one of the world's leading scholars in the field of education economics, says investing in education in early adolescents can have profound impacts on the continuation of learning through teenage years and beyond. She says that more education leads to social cohesion, advancing economic opportunity, reducing inequality and decreasing geographic and political polarization. This discussion includes commentary by Jan-Werner Müller, Erik Hurst, and Silvia Bunge. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Public Affairs] [Education] [Show ID: 37733]

    The Gary Null Show
    The Gary Null Show - 06.20.22

    The Gary Null Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 55:19


    Videos: 1.Tucker Carlson Tonight – Friday, June 17 (12:30) 2. America's wars: The invented reason and the real reason (2:12) 3. William Mandel Denounces HUAC: “This Collection of Judases” 4. NATO is a paper army (7:01) 5. What It's Like Living in California Now (8:37)    Pistachios may lower vascular response to stress in type 2 diabetes Penn State University, June 17, 2022 Among people with type 2 diabetes, eating pistachios may reduce the body's response to the stresses of everyday life, according to Penn State researchers. “In adults with diabetes, two servings of pistachios per day lowered vascular constriction during stress and improved neural control of the heart,” said Sheila G. West, professor of biobehavioral health and nutritional sciences. “Although nuts are high in fat, they contain good fats, fiber, potassium and antioxidants. Given the high risk of heart disease in people with diabetes, nuts are an important component of a heart healthy diet in this population.” West and her colleagues investigated the effects of pistachios on responses to standardized stress tasks in patients with well-controlled Type 2 diabetes who were otherwise healthy. They used a randomized, crossover study design in which all meals were provided. Each of the diets contained the same number of calories. After two weeks on the typical American diet — containing 36 percent fat and 12 percent saturated fats — participants were randomized to one of two test diets. During the four-week test diets, participants ate only food supplied by the study. The researchers reported the results of this study in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association. “We found that systolic blood pressure during sleep was particularly affected by pistachios,” she said. “Average sleep blood pressure was reduced by about 4 points and this would be expected to lower workload on the heart.” The researchers found that the pistachio diet lowered vascular constriction during stress. When arteries are dilated, the load on the heart is reduced. The physical challenge involved immersing one hand into icy water for two minutes. Study finds curcumin, the main polyphenol in turmeric, as effective as Prozac in treating depression Government Medical College (India), June 6, 2022 A recent study published in Phytotherapy Research shows that curcumin, the main polyphenol in turmeric, is as at least as effective as fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating depression. Not only can it help ease symptoms of depression, but it does so safely, without the potential to cause suicidal thoughts, weight gain and even changes in blood pressure and heart rate that can lead to shock and death — some of the many side effects which have been linked to Prozac.  The study, conducted by researchers from the Department of Pharmacology at the Government Medical College in Bhavnagar, India, assessed groups of people who took curcumin capsules and Prozac, either individually or combined.  Twenty people took 500 mg curcumin capsules twice daily, 20 took 20 mg of Prozac daily, and the remaining 20 people took a combination of the two.  The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, a questionnaire designed to gauge the severity of a person's depression level, was given to assess any changes in mood among the individuals who participated in this study. The findings showed that curcumin worked just as well as Prozac, acting as the “first clinical evidence that curcumin may be used as an effective and safe modality for treatment in patients with MDD without concurrent suicidal ideation or other psychotic disorders.” (1, 3) MDD stands for “Major Depressive Disorder.” Monkeys that eat omega-3 rich diet show more developed brain networks University of Oregon, June 13, 2022   Study gives new insight into similarity of complex brain networks in monkeys, humans Monkeys that ate a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids had brains with highly connected and well organized neural networks — in some ways akin to the neural networks in healthy humans — while monkeys that ate a diet deficient in the fatty acids had much more limited brain networking, according to an Oregon Health & Science University study. The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, provides further evidence for the importance of omega-3 fatty acids in healthy brain development. It also represents the first time scientists have been able to use functional brain imaging in live animals to see the large-scale interaction of multiple brain networks in a monkey. These patterns are remarkably similar to the networks found in humans using the same imaging techniques. The study measured a kind of omega-3 fatty acid called docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, which is a primary component of the human brain and important in development of the brain and vision.  The study found that the monkeys that had the high-DHA diet had strong connectivity of early visual pathways in their brains. It also found that monkeys with the high-DHA diet showed greater connections within various brain networks similar to the human brain — including networks for higher-level processing and cognition ‘Mini-strokes' lead to PTSD and other psychiatric disorder University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany  June 15, 2022  Transient ischemic attacks are commonly referred to as “mini-strokes,” but this does not make them any less serious than major strokes. In fact, a recent study has found that around 30% of patients who have transient ischemic attacks go on to develop the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) occur when the flow of blood to the brain is disrupted temporarily, often by blood clots or other debris. They differ from major strokes in that the flow of blood is only blocked for a relatively short time – usually no more than 5 minutes.  Despite only disrupting blood flow temporarily, TIAs serve as warning signs for future major strokes. They indicate that there is a partially blocked artery or a clot source in the heart. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that between 10-15% of people with TIA will experience a major stroke within 3 months.  “We found 1 in 3 TIA patients develop PTSD,” says study author Kathrin Utz from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. “PTSD, which is perhaps better known as a problem found in survivors of war zones and natural disasters, can develop when a person experiences a frightening event that poses a serious threat.” The researchers found that about 30% of the TIA patients reported symptoms of PTSD and 14% showed signs of a significantly reduced mental quality of life. Around 6.5% of the participants also had a reduced physical quality of life.  TIA patients who showed signs of PTSD were also more likely to show signs of depression, anxiety and a lower overall quality of life than those who did not.  Exercise linked to brain cell growth and improved memory University of Jyvaskyla (Finland), June 14, 2022 New research out of the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland has shown that exercise helps with preserving brain cells and preventing loss of memory, cognitive issues and general memory problems. In the Finnish study, aerobic activity in particular was found to support healthier brain cells and prevent memory problems better than other exercise types studied, including weight lifting and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). While weight lifting and HIIT have better fat burning properties, moderate aerobic exercise seems to cultivate healthier brain cells and protect against loss of memory. For the study, University of Jyvaskyla researchers put groups of rats on three different workout programs to determine their effects on memory and overall brain health. Weight lifting, running and high-intensity interval training were the three types studied. The training regimens created were made to model approximately what the typical human might do in a workout program. The running group used a treadmill much as humans do, and the weight lifting group climbed a ladder with little weights attached to their tails. The HIIT group alternated short durations of sprinting and jogging. By study's end, while all of the rats showed general fitness gains, the weight lifting group and the HIIT group showed no signs of neurogenesis, or new brain cell growth. By contrast, the running group demonstrated growth in brain cells as well as a reduction in the loss of memory and memory problems. Organic food consumers have a 21% lower risk of pre-eclampsia Norwegian Institute of Public Health, June 15, 2022  Pregnant women may be able to lower their risk of a potentially deadly complication known as pre-eclampsia by more than 20 percent simply by eating more organic vegetables, according to a study conducted by researchers from the National Institute for Consumer Research and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, and published in BMJ Open. “The result is intriguing and supports that diet during pregnancy can influence the risk of pre-eclampsia,” researcher Hanne Torjusen, PhD, said. Pre-eclampsia is a complication of late pregnancy characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine. The cause of the condition is not known, although it has been linked to a variety of risk factors including some of the same risk factors as cardiovascular disease. Mild cases may resolve without problems, but severe cases may progress into a life-threatening condition that can only be alleviated through premature delivery of the baby. The new study is the first to show a connection between organic food consumption and lower pre-eclampsia risk.

    Brain Inspired
    BI 139 Marc Howard: Compressed Time and Memory

    Brain Inspired

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 80:11


    Check out my short video series about what's missing in AI and Neuroscience. Support the show to get full episodes and join the Discord community. Marc Howard runs his Theoretical Cognitive Neuroscience Lab at Boston University, where he develops mathematical models of cognition, constrained by psychological and neural data. In this episode, we discuss the idea that a Laplace transform and its inverse may serve as a unified framework for memory. In short, our memories are compressed on a continuous log-scale: as memories get older, their representations "spread out" in time. It turns out this kind of representation seems ubiquitous in the brain and across cognitive functions, suggesting it is likely a canonical computation our brains use to represent a wide variety of cognitive functions. We also discuss some of the ways Marc is incorporating this mathematical operation in deep learning nets to improve their ability to handle information at different time scales. Theoretical Cognitive Neuroscience Lab. Related papers:Memory as perception of the past: Compressed time in mind and brain.Formal models of memory based on temporally-varying representations.Cognitive computation using neural representations of time and space in the Laplace domain.Time as a continuous dimension in natural and artificial networks.DeepSITH: Efficient learning via decomposition of what and when across time scales. 0:00 - Intro 4:57 - Main idea: Laplace transforms 12:00 - Time cells 20:08 - Laplace, compression, and time cells 25:34 - Everywhere in the brain 29:28 - Episodic memory 35:11 - Randy Gallistel's memory idea 40:37 - Adding Laplace to deep nets 48:04 - Reinforcement learning 1:00:52 - Brad Wyble Q: What gets filtered out? 1:05:38 - Replay and complementary learning systems 1:11:52 - Howard Goldowsky Q: Gyorgy Buzsaki 1:15:10 - Obstacles

    Wisdom From The Other Side Of Recovery from Fibromyalgia, ME, CFS, POTS & MCS
    E11: Neuroscientist Dr Delia McCabe reveals key diet strategies for brain health & illness recovery

    Wisdom From The Other Side Of Recovery from Fibromyalgia, ME, CFS, POTS & MCS

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 89:34


    Neuroscientist Dr. Delia McCabe shares her understanding and research into the impact of diet on brain health, mental health and recovery from chronic illness.How much of mental and neurological dysfunction is a physical and how much is a psychological issue?  What is the impact of adverse childhood events on stress resilience and what about eating vegan, vegetarian or other restrictive diets.Evidence-based information for anyone seeking recovery from chronic illness in this deep dive episode into brain function for stress resilience.

    Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone
    BS 197 (Encore) Neuroscience for Dummies with Frank Amthor

    Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 65:07


    This month's episode of Brain Science features an encore playing of my interview with Dr. Frank Amthor, author of Neuroscience for Dummies and Neurobiology for Dummies. It is a great episode for newbies and will be a good review for longtime listeners. This is a FREE sample of my Premium content and the episode transcript is also FREE. Links and References: Essentials of Modern Neuroscience by Franklin Amthor, W. Anne Burton Theibert, David Standaert, and Erik Roberson Neurobiology For Dummies by Frank Amthor Neuroscience For Dummies, 2nd Ed. by Frank Amthor Please visit http://brainsciencepodcast.com for additional references and episode transcripts.   Please Visit Our Sponsors: TextExpander at textexpander.com/podcast Announcements: Want to be part of BS 200? Just email me at brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com to learn more. Get free gift "5 Things You Need to Know about YOUR Brain when you sign up for the free Brain Science Newsletter to get show notes automatically every month. You can also text brainscience to 55444 to sign up. Check out the Brain Science podcast channel on YouTube for episode excerpts and summaries. Support Brain Science by buying Are You Sure? The Unconscious Origins of Certainty by Virginia "Ginger" Campbell, MD. (Autographed copies are available) Check out the free Brain Science Mobile app for iOS, Android, and Windows. (It's a great way to get both new episodes and premium content.) Learn more ways to support Brain Science at http://brainsciencepodcast.com/donations Connect on Social Media: Twitter: @docartemis Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/brainsciencepodcast Contact Dr. Campbell: Email: brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com

    Finding Genius Podcast
    Unraveling The Intricacies Of Human Memory With Dr. Rutishauser

    Finding Genius Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 28:59


    The complexities that exist within the human brain continue to stump scientists to this day. Among the most mysterious brain workings is the formation and storage of memories – and some researchers are unearthing fascinating discoveries about the inner workings of this phenomenon. In this episode, we discuss topics related to neuroscience and memories with Dr. Ueli Rutishauser. Dr. Rutishauser is a Professor and Chair of the Board of Governors in Neurosciences at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where he researches the characteristics of human memory. Join us now to explore: The brain and bodily states that make it difficult to access or form memories.  The research methods that Dr. Rutishauser uses in his lab to observe the brain's activity. What “cognitive boundaries” are, and how they influence memory. The key driver of forming new memories.  Offer: This episode is sponsored by Viome. Use the code GENIUS to get an extra $20 off on Health Intelligence Test. Check it out now: Viome To learn more about Dr. Rutishauser and his research, visit rutishauserlab.org. Episode also available on Apple Podcast: http://apple.co/30PvU9C

    The Aligned Success Show with Kelly Mosser
    022 Stepping into Energetic Leadership with Rachel Alyce

    The Aligned Success Show with Kelly Mosser

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 42:33


    Rachel Alyce is an author, mentor, and top-rated business coach who helps women across the globe achieve accelerated growth in their businesses. Her unique coaching style combines business strategy, psychology, science, and spirituality to help you achieve supercharged results.  Rachel is the first business coach I ever hired to support me with my business, and I literally would not be where I am today without her input. In today's episode, we talk about energetic leadership, how to create energetic content and why you need to set respectful boundaries with your clients.  What You'll Learn:  - How to step into energetic leadership - Why the cookie-cutter approach in business rarely yields intended results - How resting boosts your productivity - Is there room for intuition in business? - Escape “Bro Marketing” and the use of manipulative triggers in your business - The Little Girl Energy and why it's so transformational - Understand the energetics of business - How to set better set respectful boundaries with clients  - The power of energetic content  According to Rachel, energetic leadership is about so much more than just enthusiasm or motivation. The energetic leader makes it possible for others to operate at the highest possible level by unlocking their energy and self belief. Links and Resources: - Rachel Alyce's Energetic Content™ Kit https://www.rachelalyce.co/organic-traffic-your-energetic-content-kit   - Rachel Alyce Website  https://www.rachelalyce.co/coaching  - “The Quarter-Life Funk” by Rachel Alyce https://www.rachelalyce.co/book  - Rachel's Instagram  https://www.instagram.com/rachelalyce.co/  - Follow me on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/kelly.mosser/  - My website https://kellymosser.com/

    New Books in Economic and Business History
    Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in Economic and Business History

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


    Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    NBN Book of the Day
    Joshua Prager, "The Family Roe: An American Story" (W. W. Norton, 2021)

    NBN Book of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 60:28


    Despite her famous pseudonym, "Jane Roe," no one knows the truth about Norma McCorvey (1947-2017), whose unwanted pregnancy in 1969 opened a great fracture in American life. Journalist Joshua Prager spent hundreds of hours with Norma, discovered her personal papers--a previously unseen trove--and witnessed her final moments. The Family Roe: An American Story (W. W. Norton, 2021) presents her life in full. Propelled by the crosscurrents of sex and religion, gender and class, it is a life that tells the story of abortion in America. Prager begins that story on the banks of Louisiana's Atchafalaya River where Norma was born, and where unplanned pregnancies upended generations of her forebears. A pregnancy then upended Norma's life too, and the Dallas waitress became Jane Roe. Drawing on a decade of research, Prager reveals the woman behind the pseudonym, writing in novelistic detail of her unknown life from her time as a sex worker in Dallas, to her private thoughts on family and abortion, to her dealings with feminist and Christian leaders, to the three daughters she placed for adoption. Prager found those women, including the youngest--Baby Roe--now fifty years old. She shares her story in The Family Roe for the first time, from her tortured interactions with her birth mother, to her emotional first meeting with her sisters, to the burden that was uniquely hers from conception. The Family Roe abounds in such revelations--not only about Norma and her children but about the broader "family" connected to the case. Prager tells the stories of activists and bystanders alike whose lives intertwined with Roe. In particular, he introduces three figures as important as they are unknown: feminist lawyer Linda Coffee, who filed the original Texas lawsuit yet now lives in obscurity; Curtis Boyd, a former fundamentalist Christian, today a leading provider of third-trimester abortions; and Mildred Jefferson, the first black female Harvard Medical School graduate, who became a pro-life leader with great secrets. An epic work spanning fifty years of American history, The Family Roe will change the way you think about our enduring American divide: the right to choose or the right to life. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

    New Books in Medicine
    Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

    New Books in Medicine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


    Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

    Flourish.Mom Podcast
    Psychophysiological Methods in Neuroscience | Psych-100 | Chapter 18 | Flourish with Diane Planidin

    Flourish.Mom Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 27:27


    As a generally noninvasive subset of neuroscience methods, psychophysiological methods are used across a variety of disciplines in order to answer diverse questions about psychology, both mental events and behavior. Many different techniques are classified as psychophysiological. Each technique has its strengths and weaknesses, and knowing them allows researchers to decide what each offers for a particular question. Additionally, this knowledge allows research consumers to evaluate the meaning of the results in a particular experiment. Learning Objectives - Learn what qualifies as psychophysiology within the broader field of neuroscience. - Review and compare several examples of psychophysiological methods. - Understand advantages and disadvantages of different psychophysiological methods. Live an Inspired Life! #Psychology #QueensU #Brain Find out more about Flourish at the links below: ➡️ https://www.Flourish.Mom ➡️ Facebook https://www.Facebook.Com/Flourish.Mom ➡️ Twitter: https://www.Twitter.Com/FlourishMom ➡️ Instagram: https://www.Instagram.com/FlourishMom ➡️ Pinterest: https://www.Pinterest.ca/WowFlourishMom ➡️ Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/UpnXYl-c3aI   PSYC 100: Principles of Psychology F21 by PSYC100 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted. Note: I am a student and not a teacher - I am sharing my learning journey with you!

    Dementia Researcher
    Writing the BEST Fellowship Application

    Dementia Researcher

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 44:30


    In this podcast, Dr Stefania Forner, Director of Medical & Scientific Relations at Alzheimer's Association guest hosts a discussion with current and past awardees of the Association's Fellowships and international grant programs. They recap on the take-aways from a recent grant writing master glass and explore how grants are evaluated, what makes a successful application. Visit our YouTube Channel to watch the video version of this podcast - just look for dementia researcher. Meet our guests: Dr DeAnnah R. Byrd, Assistant Professor at Arizona State University. Studying the effects of chronic conditions & stressors in older Blacks and reducing dementia among minority populations. Dr Joe Abisambra, Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Associate Dean of Diversity and Health Equity at University of Florida. Focussing on tau biology in the context of Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injury. Dr Eduardo R. Zimmer, Assistant Professor at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Researching Glial Cells, neuroimaging and neurodegeneration at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The next Alzheimer's Association International funding round will open later this summer, keep an eye on the Dementia Researcher and Alzheimer's Association websites: https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk/funding-calls https://www.alz.org/research/for_researchers/grants/types-of-grants -- You can find out more about our panellists, and their work on our website. There you will also find a full transcript: https://www.dementiaresearcher.nihr.ac.uk -- Like what you hear? Please review, like, and share our podcast - and don't forget to subscribe to ensure you never miss an episode. This podcast is brought to you in association with Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's Research UK and Alzheimer's Society, who we thank for their ongoing support.

    Affirmation Babe
    NEW! Morning Gratitude Affirmations | Daily Happiness Boost | Repeat-After-Me Format

    Affirmation Babe

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 5:51


    Do you want to live a happier, more fulfilled and joyful life? Practicing gratitude is key! While the word “gratitude” may feel old-school or cliché.. put in practice, gratitude is an incredibly powerful brain training exercise. When you cultivate a positive mindset, develop an attitude of gratitude, and program your mind to focus on the good in your life, you set your mental + psychological health up for success. Neuroscience and positive psychology studies have listed out the following PROVEN benefits of practicing gratitude: Grateful people are more generous, less depressed, and all around happier. Gratitude helps people feel more positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships. Gratitude improves physical health. Grateful people report fewer aches and pains, they report feeling healthier than other people, and they are more likely to take care of their health. Gratitude improves psychological health and reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, ranging from envy to resentment to frustration and regret. Grateful people sleep better. With as little as 15 minutes of gratitude practice before bed, you may sleep deeper and longer. Practicing gratitude boosts our self-esteem. Practicing gratitude improves our friendships and romantic relationships. Gratitude improves empathy and reduces aggression. Gratitude increases mental strength and strengthens family relationships in times of stress. Gratitude reduces impatience and improves decision making capabilities. Gratitude is a skill and mindset we can cultivate with practice, and the benefits are BOTH immediate and long-term! Listen to this episode each morning to bring gratitude to the forefront of your awareness everyday. ---

    The Multidimensional Journey Podcast
    Registered Nurse, Medical Intuitive & Healer Abigail White

    The Multidimensional Journey Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 73:10


    Hey everyone welcome back to The Multidimensional Journey Podcast! This podcast is all about mental health, wellness, spirituality, and of course, Ayahuasca. Each week I bring information to assist in Ayahuasca Preparation & Integration. Today our guest is Abigail White. She is an RN and intuitive healer whose mission is to help elevate the human consciousness and teach our Souls how to evolve into our next phase. She holds two bachelor's degrees in Neuroscience and nursing and continues to expand her mind and her natural healing abilities daily while teaching others the holistic and intuitive arts. Abigail lives in Minnesota on land that feeds and grounds her daily with her plant babies and she is the owner and founder of Breath of Life; an intuitive guidance and wellness company that focuses on the Soul's healing journey through integration, trauma and medical intuitive work. We dove deep on non-ordinary states of consciousness, how to navigate upper and lower realms, how she assists others in healing themselves, and so much more! Book a healing session with Abigail and check out her diverse library of courses here: https://linktr.ee/Breathoflifellc --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ayahuascakaur/support

    Education Bookcast
    126. The Master and his Emissary by Iain McGillchrist

    Education Bookcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 70:40


    "Are you left-brained or right-brained?" Brain lateralisation has been known about in neuroscience since the early days, but it has been a taboo over the past few decades since pop science sources distorted the literature and made the topic disreputable. Neuroscientists could detect differences between the hemispheres in different activities, but they were having trouble understanding the big picture of why there was asymmetry at this fundamental level of brain structure. Iain McGillchrist used to be an academic of English literature at the University of Oxford, but after becoming frustrated with what he saw as the over-analysis of poetry so as to make it lose its implicit meaning, decided to change career entirely and pursue medicine. Since that time, he has taken ten years to research and write this book about brain lateralisation and its importance to life, culture, and our moment in history. For me personally, reading this book made me realise that my most commonly used approach to thinking about the mind - cognitive load theory, dividing long-term memory from working memory, and describing the structure and schemata of long-term memory in order to understand the nature of knowledge and learning - never included any reference to brain lateralisation, despite, as it turns out, enormous differences between the two sides. I also had some takeaways regarding my own philosophy and ways of thinking. In this episode, we will be focusing on McGillchrist's characterisation of the differences between the left and right hemispheres of the brain, with references to many findings from scientific papers, as well as overall themes that emerge from this synthesis. While I can see no real practical insights regarding what to do in a classroom, I believe that this book is a major contribution to our understanding of the mind, the brain, and humanity, and therefore it should interest many listeners. Enjoy the podcast.

    Flourish.Mom Podcast
    Brain, Behaviour & Neuroscience | Psych-100 | Chapter 17 | Flourish with Diane Planidin

    Flourish.Mom Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 25:24


    The human brain is responsible for all behaviors, thoughts, and experiences described in this textbook. This module provides an introductory overview of the brain, including some basic neuroanatomy, and brief descriptions of the neuroscience methods used to study it. Learning Objectives - Name and describe the basic function of the brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral hemispheres. - Name and describe the basic function of the four cerebral lobes: occipital, temporal, parietal, and frontal cortex. - Describe a split-brain patient and at least two important aspects of brain function that these patients reveal. - Distinguish between gray and white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. - Name and describe the most common approaches to studying the human brain. - Distinguish among four neuroimaging methods: PET, fMRI, EEG, and DOI. - Describe the difference between spatial and temporal resolution with regard to brain function. Live an Inspired Life! #Psychology #QueensU #Brain Find out more about Flourish at the links below: ➡️ https://www.Flourish.Mom ➡️ Facebook https://www.Facebook.Com/Flourish.Mom ➡️ Twitter: https://www.Twitter.Com/FlourishMom ➡️ Instagram: https://www.Instagram.com/FlourishMom ➡️ Pinterest: https://www.Pinterest.ca/WowFlourishMom ➡️ Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/HP40bj2j7Ks   PSYC 100: Principles of Psychology F21 by PSYC100 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted. Note:  I am a student and not a teacher.  This is my learning journey that I am sharing with you :)

    Neurocareers: How to be successful in STEM?
    Establishing a Neurobiology Program with Prof. Osvaldas Ruksenas, PhD

    Neurocareers: How to be successful in STEM?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 40:29


    Are you considering establishing a neuroscience program but don't know where to start? Considering working in the neuroscience field, but unsure where to specialize? Then take a peek into the origins of the successful neurobiology program shared with you by Prof. Osvaldas Ruksenas. This more than 20-years old with over 200 graduates program is based on the blueprint from Oxford University, UK. Prof. Ruksenas also shares tips on choosing your neuroscience specialization and persevering in achieving your goals even when it may seem impossible! In addition, you will learn about the beautiful country on the coast of the Baltic sea, about one of the oldest universities in Europe, and the most conservative language in the currently existing Indo-European language family! Stay tuned for our Neurocareers series, where we open windows of career possibilities in neuroscience and neurotechnologies! To find out more about the international graduate Neurobiology Program at the Department of Neurobiology and Biophysics at the Life Science Center, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania, visit: http://www.biofizika.gf.vu.lt/en/studies/msc-neurobiology#course-informationhttps://www.vu.lt/en/studies/master-studies/neurobiology To get in touch with the Head of the Department of Neurobiology and Biophysics, Prof. Osvaldas Ruksenas, contact him at: osvaldas.ruksenas@gf.vu.lt The podcast is brought to you by The Institute of Neuroapproaches and its founder - Milena Korostenskaja, PhD - a neuroscience educator, neuroscience research consultant, and career coach for people in neuroscience and neurotechnologies: https://www.neuroapproaches.org/    

    The Healthy Post Natal Body Podcast
    Let's talk migraine headaches and how to say goodbye to them...for good!

    The Healthy Post Natal Body Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 65:10


     In this weeks episode I have the pleasure of talking to Susannah Juteau Susannah Juteau, MSc, CLT, RD, is a registered dietitian who specializes in headache and migraine nutrition for women. She has a bachelor's degree in Neuroscience and a Master's in Nutrition and Dietetics from McGill so she definitely is the person to listen to!We are talking about many things;The difference between headaches and migraines.How a migraine is MUCH more than How common post-partum migraines really are (MUCH more common than you might think)Why "15 minutes sitting in the dark" really isn't the solution.The impact of diet on migraines.What to eat to help prevent migraines.And much, MUCH more.Check out Susannah's very handy 5-minute quiz to help you find YOUR Migraine Root Cause - and what you can do about it!https://bit.ly/MigraineRootCauseYou can also find her onHer websiteInstagramFacebook In the news this week; Does the time of day you exercise at really impact the results you get? And is that different for men and women? This BBC article, based on this study, claims it does. But just how seriously should you take this study when determining your training times?Remember to follow us on Instagram and Facebook for the competitions, wisdom and cute videos. And, of course, you can always find us on our YouTube channel if you like your podcast in video form with little pictures :) Visit healthypostnatalbody.com and get 3 months completely FREE access. No sales, no commitment, no BS. Email peter@healthypostnatalbody.com if you have any questions or comments Playing us out this week;  "Sinking" by Ramona Woolf

    Hellitalk
    Episode 35: Problem Solving مهارت حل مسئله

    Hellitalk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 38:33


    سلام سلام تو این اپیزود از پادکست هلی تاک رفتم سراغ مهارت حل مسئله! موضوعی که تک تک ما تو زندگی شخصی و حرفه ای باهاش روزانه سروکار داریم و از مهمترین مهارتهای نرم در  دنیای کار محسوب میشه. تو این اپیزود براتون از اهمیت حل مسئله میگم و با یه تکنیک  پنج مرحله ای برای حل مسئله آشنا میکنم . نهایتا هم بهتون میگم چطوری میشه مهارت حل مسئله رو در خودمون بپرورونیم. . ممنونم از حامی این اپیزود پادروشاپ و ازتون دعوت میکنم به وبسایتشون سربزنین و با سرویسشون بیشتر آشنا بشید. . در صورتی که مایلید از تولید مستمر پادکست هلی تاک حمایت کنید میتونین به این لینک سربزنین. https://patron.podbean.com/Hellitalk پیشاپیش از حمایتتون سپاسگزارم. . . :منابع استفاده شده در این اپیزود Top Soft Skills for 2022 WHAT IS PROBLEM SOLVING? Teaching The IDEAL Problem-Solving Method To Diverse Learners What Are Problem-Solving Skills? How to Become a Problem Solver | Brian Tracy 10 Ways to Improve Your Problem-Solving Skills Problem Solving: Perspectives from Cognition and Neuroscience          

    Ask a House Cleaner
    High Functioning Anxiety Tips for House Cleaners

    Ask a House Cleaner

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 9:09


    If you're looking for high functioning anxiety tips for house cleaners meet Tati Garcia. (https://becalmwithtati.com) She's here today to tell unpack the differences between stress as a cleaning business owner and the debilitating anxiety that comes with imposter syndrome and causes paralysis and procrastination. If your #CleaningBusiness is in growth mode but suffers from #anxiety learn what types of #copingskills may be available to you. Today's Ask a House Cleaner sponsor is #CalmlyCoping a self-improvement podcast and YouTube show for high achievers who struggle with high-functioning anxiety. https://youtube.com/c/CalmlyCoping And your host today is #AngelaBrown *** PROMISED LINKS AND GOOD KARMA RESOURCES *** High Functioning Anxiety Quiz - https://svy.tips/Tati-Garcia How to Be an Imperfectionist: The New Way to Self-Acceptance, Fearless Living, and Freedom from Perfectionism - https://amzn.to/3O1TyWc Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind - https://amzn.to/3QtAMbN Stop Overthinking: 23 Techniques to Relieve Stress, Stop Negative Spirals, Declutter Your Minhttps://amzn.to/3O5qZqHd, and Focus on the Present - https://amzn.to/3O5qZqH Rewire Your Anxious Brain: How to Use the Neuroscience of Fear to End Anxiety, Panic, and Worry - https://amzn.to/3mVkH19 These good karma links connect you to affiliated sites that offer products or services that relate to today's show. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Your support pays our production costs to bring you these free daily tips. THANK YOU. *** RATE THIS SHOW ***  https://sotellus.com/r/savvy-cleaner   *** RATE THIS PODCAST ***  https://ratethispodcast.com/askahousecleaner  *** TRAINING & CLEANING CERTIFICATION*** https://savvycleaner.com/join *** MOST REQUESTED LIST OF CLEANING STUFF I USE *** https://www.Amazon.com/shop/AngelaBrown  ***FUNNY CLEANING SHIRTS – THANK YOU GIFTS FOR MAIDS*** Daily Giveaway - https://funnycleaningshirts.com  *** CONNECT WITH ANGELA ON SOCIAL MEDIA *** YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/AngelaBrownCleaning Facebook: https://Facebook.com/thehousecleaningguru Twitter: https://Twitter.com/askangelabrown Instagram: https://Instagram.com/SavvyCleaner Pinterest: https://Pinterest.com/SavvyCleaner Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/askangelabrown TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@savvycleaner? *** GOT A QUESTION FOR A SHOW? *** Email it to Angela[at]AskaHouseCleaner.com Voice Mail: Click on the blue button at https://askahousecleaner.com  *** FREE EBOOK – HOW TO START YOUR OWN HOUSE CLEANING COMPANY *** https://amzn.to/3jHk4GL *** PROFESSIONAL HOUSE CLEANERS PRIVATE FACEBOOK GROUP *** https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProfessionalHouseCleaners/ *** VRBO AIRBNB CLEANING FACEBOOK GROUP *** https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRBO.Airbnb.Cleaning/ *** LOOKING FOR A WAY TO GET MORE CLEANING LEADS *** https://housecleaning360.com *** SPONSOR A CLEANER - SAVVY CLEANER SCHOLARSHIP FUND ***  Each year Savvy Cleaner gives away scholarships to the Savvy Cleaner Network which includes training for house cleaners and maids, group coaching, and 24/7 network support. This trains them in personal protective equipment, chemical safety, cleaning equipment between jobs, how to clean techniques, and more. If you find value from this show and you want to pay it forward you can sponsor a cleaner here:  Give: https://savvycleaner.com/scholarship-fund Apply - https://savvycleaner.com/scholarship-application *** SPONSORSHIPS & BRANDS ***  We do work with sponsors and brands. If you are interested in working with us and you have a product or service that makes sense for the cleaning industry here's how to work with us -https://savvycleaner.com/brand-deals *** THIS SHOW WAS SPONSORED BY *** SAVVY CLEANER - House Cleaner Training and Certification – https://savvycleaner.com MY CLEANING CONNECTION – Your hub for all things cleaning – https://mycleaningconnection.com SAVVY PERKS – Employee Pricing for Small Business Owners –  https://savvyperks.com  VRBO AIRBNB CLEANING – Cleaning tips and strategies for your short-term rental  https://TurnoverCleaningTips.com  FUNNY CLEANING SHIRTS – Incentive and thank you gifts for house cleaners and maids. https://FunnyCleaningShirts.com  *** VIDEO CREDITS *** VIDEO/AUDIO EDITING: Kristin O  https://savvycleaner.com/reviews/kristin-o HOST: Angela Brown  https://savvycleaner.com/reviews/angela-brown  PRODUCER: Savvy Cleaner https://savvycleaner.com

    The Gary Null Show
    The Gary Null Show - 06.17.22

    The Gary Null Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 60:21


    Videos: 1. Agenda 2030 and the World Economic Forum Plan to Remake the World: Alex Newman (26:00) 2. Pfizer Docs Reveal 800 People Never Finished Trial Due To Death Or Injury (4:39) 3. Vaccines, what are they good for? – Dr Sam Bailey (19:00)  4. Bodily Autonomy is Only Supported When Coupled With The Abortion Agenda (1:00)  5. New Rule: The Misinformation Age | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO) 6. George Carlin – It's A BIG Club & You Ain't In It!    Active Component of Grape Seed Extract Effective Against Cancer Cells University of Colorado Cancer Center, June 13 2022  A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online ahead of print in the journal Nutrition and Cancer describes the laboratory synthesis of the most active component of grape seed extract, B2G2, and shows this synthesized compound induces the cell death known as apoptosis in prostate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed. “We've shown similar anti-cancer activity in the past with grape seed extract (GSE), but now we know B2G2 is its most biologically active ingredient which can be synthesized in quantities that will allow us to study the detailed death mechanism in cancer cells,” says Alpna Tyagi, PhD, of the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. The group pinpointed B2G2 as the most active compound, but, “it's expensive and it takes a long time to isolate B2G2 from grape seed extract,” Tyagi says. This expense related to the isolation of B2G2 has limited the group's further exploration. So instead of purifying B2G2 from GSE, the group decided to synthesize it in the lab. The current study reports the success of this effort, including the ability to synthesize gram-quantity of B2G2 reasonably quickly and inexpensively. In the paper's second half, the group shows anti-cancer activity of synthesized B2G2 similar in mechanism and degree to overall GSE effectiveness. Improving Memory Naturally: Sage Contains Similar Compounds as Modern Alzheimer's Drugs Newcastle and Northumbria Universities, June 14 2022 Sage was named “Herb of the Year” in 2001 by the International Herb Association.  Some of the latest research shows how sage can boost memory and cognitive health. The leaves and stems of sage contain these antioxidant enzymes that protect against free radical oxidative cell damage as well as provide inflammatory relief from ailments such as arthritis and asthma. The Medicinal Plant Research Centre (MPRC) of England conducted studies at Newcastle and Northumbria Universities with sage oil herb pills against placebo pills. Those who took the sage performed much better with a word recall test than those who took the placebo.  In the long run, home-made tinctures are the most economical way to have and use highly effective tinctures for a long time.  Trade the chair for fresh air: Study explores link between sitting time and cardio health Simon Fraser University (Canada), June 15 2022 New research is adding further weight to the argument that prolonged sitting may be hazardous to your health. An international study surveying more than 100,000 individuals in 21 countries found that people who sat for six to eight hours a day had a 12–13 percent increased risk for early death and heart disease, while those who sat for more than eight hours daily increased that to a sobering 20 percent. Their research followed individuals over an average of 11 years and determined that high amounts of sitting time were associated with increased risk of early death and cardiovascular disease.  Not surprising, those who sat the most and were the least active had the highest risk—up to 50 percent—while those who sat the most but were also the most active had a substantially lower risk of about 17 percent. “For those sitting more than four hours a day, replacing a half hour of sitting with exercise reduced the risk by two percent,” Lear notes. “With only one in four Canadians meeting the activity guidelines there's a real opportunity here for people to increase their activity and reduce their chances of early death and heart disease.” Acupuncture Can Treat Alzheimer's Disease Hubei University of Chinese Medicine (China), June 5, 2022  An increasing number of clinical and animal studies have confirmed that acupuncture is effective for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Moxibustion is reported to be more effective than electro-acupuncture for improving space-recognizing memory ability in aged mice, suggesting that moxibustion is another alternative or complementary therapy used to treat Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Yanjun Du and team from Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, China only used suspended moxibustion (also named warming moxibustion, scarring moxibustion, or herb-partition moxibustion) on Baihui and Shenshu  acupoints to observe the action of pre-moxibustion on preventing apoptosis in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The pre-moxibustion group was treated with moxibustion for eight courses (each course lasting for 6 days) prior to the exposure and 14 days after Aβ1–42 exposure.  Moxibustion prior to Aβ1–42 exposure was more effective than moxibustion after Aβ1–42 exposure in protecting the neuronal structure and lowering the apoptosis rate. Their findings indicate that a combination of preventive and therapeutic moxibustion has a beneficial effect for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease development. Men and women with brain condition could be helped by vitamin E Cangzhou Central Hospital (China), June 15 2022.  Leukoaraiosis is an abnormality in the brain's white matter that appears on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as white matter hyperintensities. In an article published in the International Journal of Neuroscience, researchers at Cangzhou Central Hospital in Hebei, China reported improvements in factors related to leukoaraiosis among adults given supplements containing vitamin E. “Leukoaraiosis (LA) is a disease manifested by demyelination and gliosis in white matter, mainly caused by cerebrovascular diseases,” Yan Wang and colleagues wrote.  “Leukoaraiosis is closely related to the expression level of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and vascular endothelial dysfunction in patients. Vitamin E may play antioxidant and anti-inflammatory roles in various diseases.” Participants received 200 IU, 400 IU or 600 international units (IU) vitamin E or a placebo daily for 12 weeks. At the end of the treatment period, blood samples were evaluated for the inflammatory factors C-reactive protein, complement C3 and C4, and matrix metalloproteins 2 and 9, as well as for markers of oxidative stress and endothelial function (function of the lining of the arteries, which is impaired in cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease). Inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial function improved in all groups that received vitamin E in comparison with the placebo. Cognitive function scores also significantly improved in the vitamin E-treated groups. Improvement in all measured factors was correlated with higher doses of vitamin E. Chlorogenic acid plus chromium improves insulin resistance and lowers obesity in mice University of Toledo, June 10 2022 In an article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, University of Toledo researchers report that a combination of chromium and chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenol occurring in coffee, reversed the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mice caused by the intake of a high-fat diet. Sonia M. Najjar and her associates fed male BL6 mice a standard diet or a high-fat diet for seven weeks. During the last three weeks of the diet, the high-fat group received a daily oral supplement containing water, chlorogenic acid, or a combination of chlorogenic acid and chromium in a base that contained caffeine. Body weight was measured weekly, insulin tolerance was assessed at four and seven weeks, and glucose and glucose tolerance were assessed at the end of the treatment period. At four weeks, animals supplemented with chlorogenic acid and the combination of chlorogenic acid and chromium experienced weight loss within two weeks, and attained weights comparable to those of animals that received a standard diet. While insulin resistance after four weeks was greater among high-fat diet-fed mice compared to those fed a standard diet, supplementation with chlorogenic acid plus chromium reduced this effect, and restored it to a level comparable to that of standard-diet-fed mice. Glucose tolerance and glucose levels were similarly restored in animals that received the supplement combination. 

    60-Second Science
    The Kavli Prize Presents: Understanding Neurodevelopment and Neurodegeneration [Sponsored]

    60-Second Science

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 8:59


    Huda Zoghbi is a clinician-scientist who studies the molecular mechanisms of neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration. This year, she shared The Kavli Prize in Neuroscience for discovering the genetic pathways behind serious brain disorders.

    New Books in Psychology
    Marga Vicedo, "Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother" (Beacon Press, 2021)

    New Books in Psychology

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 57:08


    In the early 1960s, Massachusetts writer and homemaker Clara Park and her husband took their 3-year-old daughter, Jessy, to a specialist after noticing that she avoided connection with others. Following the conventional wisdom of the time, the psychiatrist diagnosed Jessy with autism and blamed Clara for Jessy's isolation. Experts claimed Clara was the prototypical "refrigerator mother," a cold, intellectual parent who starved her children of the natural affection they needed to develop properly. Refusing to accept this, Clara decided to document her daughter's behaviors and the family's engagement with her. In 1967, she published her groundbreaking memoir challenging the refrigerator mother theory and carefully documenting Jessy's development. Clara's insights and advocacy encouraged other parents to seek education and support for their autistic children. Meanwhile, Jessy would work hard to expand her mother's world, and ours. Drawing on previously unexamined archival sources and firsthand interviews, science historian Marga Vicedo illuminates the story of how Clara Park and other parents fought against medical and popular attitudes toward autism while presenting a rich account of major scientific developments in the history of autism in the US. Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother (Beacon Press, 2021) is a fierce defense of a mother's right to love intelligently, the value of parents' firsthand knowledge about their children, and an individual's right to be valued by society. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

    New Books Network
    Marga Vicedo, "Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother" (Beacon Press, 2021)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 57:08


    In the early 1960s, Massachusetts writer and homemaker Clara Park and her husband took their 3-year-old daughter, Jessy, to a specialist after noticing that she avoided connection with others. Following the conventional wisdom of the time, the psychiatrist diagnosed Jessy with autism and blamed Clara for Jessy's isolation. Experts claimed Clara was the prototypical "refrigerator mother," a cold, intellectual parent who starved her children of the natural affection they needed to develop properly. Refusing to accept this, Clara decided to document her daughter's behaviors and the family's engagement with her. In 1967, she published her groundbreaking memoir challenging the refrigerator mother theory and carefully documenting Jessy's development. Clara's insights and advocacy encouraged other parents to seek education and support for their autistic children. Meanwhile, Jessy would work hard to expand her mother's world, and ours. Drawing on previously unexamined archival sources and firsthand interviews, science historian Marga Vicedo illuminates the story of how Clara Park and other parents fought against medical and popular attitudes toward autism while presenting a rich account of major scientific developments in the history of autism in the US. Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother (Beacon Press, 2021) is a fierce defense of a mother's right to love intelligently, the value of parents' firsthand knowledge about their children, and an individual's right to be valued by society. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    New Books in American Studies
    Marga Vicedo, "Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother" (Beacon Press, 2021)

    New Books in American Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 57:08


    In the early 1960s, Massachusetts writer and homemaker Clara Park and her husband took their 3-year-old daughter, Jessy, to a specialist after noticing that she avoided connection with others. Following the conventional wisdom of the time, the psychiatrist diagnosed Jessy with autism and blamed Clara for Jessy's isolation. Experts claimed Clara was the prototypical "refrigerator mother," a cold, intellectual parent who starved her children of the natural affection they needed to develop properly. Refusing to accept this, Clara decided to document her daughter's behaviors and the family's engagement with her. In 1967, she published her groundbreaking memoir challenging the refrigerator mother theory and carefully documenting Jessy's development. Clara's insights and advocacy encouraged other parents to seek education and support for their autistic children. Meanwhile, Jessy would work hard to expand her mother's world, and ours. Drawing on previously unexamined archival sources and firsthand interviews, science historian Marga Vicedo illuminates the story of how Clara Park and other parents fought against medical and popular attitudes toward autism while presenting a rich account of major scientific developments in the history of autism in the US. Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother (Beacon Press, 2021) is a fierce defense of a mother's right to love intelligently, the value of parents' firsthand knowledge about their children, and an individual's right to be valued by society. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

    New Books in Medicine
    Marga Vicedo, "Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother" (Beacon Press, 2021)

    New Books in Medicine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 57:08


    In the early 1960s, Massachusetts writer and homemaker Clara Park and her husband took their 3-year-old daughter, Jessy, to a specialist after noticing that she avoided connection with others. Following the conventional wisdom of the time, the psychiatrist diagnosed Jessy with autism and blamed Clara for Jessy's isolation. Experts claimed Clara was the prototypical "refrigerator mother," a cold, intellectual parent who starved her children of the natural affection they needed to develop properly. Refusing to accept this, Clara decided to document her daughter's behaviors and the family's engagement with her. In 1967, she published her groundbreaking memoir challenging the refrigerator mother theory and carefully documenting Jessy's development. Clara's insights and advocacy encouraged other parents to seek education and support for their autistic children. Meanwhile, Jessy would work hard to expand her mother's world, and ours. Drawing on previously unexamined archival sources and firsthand interviews, science historian Marga Vicedo illuminates the story of how Clara Park and other parents fought against medical and popular attitudes toward autism while presenting a rich account of major scientific developments in the history of autism in the US. Intelligent Love: The Story of Clara Park, Her Autistic Daughter, and the Myth of the Refrigerator Mother (Beacon Press, 2021) is a fierce defense of a mother's right to love intelligently, the value of parents' firsthand knowledge about their children, and an individual's right to be valued by society. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine