Podcasts about Neuroscience

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

scientific study of the nervous system

  • 4,524PODCASTS
  • 13,634EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 6DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST
Neuroscience

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Neuroscience

Show all podcasts related to neuroscience

Latest podcast episodes about Neuroscience

That Music Podcast
54 | Music, Memories, and Neuroscience with Jen Rafferty

That Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:58


Music is so much more than notes and rhythms. Music is something that activates parts of our brains in truly unique ways. My first course I took in my master's program was a music psychology course. I was instantly hooked, and loved being able to dive further into how music affects our brains. For this episode, I brought the amazing Jen Rafferty as a guest to talk more about just how music and neuroscience intersect in a truly unique way. Presenter and author Jen Rafferty began her career as a middle school music teacher in Central New York. Jen brings her energy, humor, and expertise to all professional development workshops. She is known for her practical ideas and passion in her presentations while inspiring teachers to stay connected to their “why.” Jen currently serves as the Co-chair of the New York State School Music Association's (NYSSMA) Secondary Classroom Committee, member of the advocacy committee, and is the President of Cortland County Music Teachers Association. She earned a B.M. in music education and vocal performance, a M.M. in music education from Ithaca College and is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in educational psychology. Jen is frequently invited to conduct elementary and middle school choirs throughout New York State. Additionally, in 2020 she founded Sing Together, an international virtual singing community of singers of all ages and abilities. Her most recent publication is A Place in the Staff: Finding Your Way as a Music Teacher, available on Amazon and JW Pepper. Links and Resources: Grab your FREE copy of my guide on better serving the students with disabilities in your classroom! Follow Jen on Instagram Check out Jen's Podcast JenRafferty.com Neuroteach book

First Person Plural: EI & Beyond
Attention & Focus Pt 1 | Neuroscience with Amishi Jha

First Person Plural: EI & Beyond

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 49:29


What does it take to find and maintain focus in a world of distractions? Neuroscientist, Amishi Jha and Daniel Goleman discuss the Key Attention Systems and expands the key activities that individuals can do to strengthen their overall focus and attention. This episode was sponsored by Podcorn. Explore sponsorship opportunities and start monetizing your podcast by signing up here. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/firstpersonplural)

StarTalk Radio
BOO! The Science of Scary with Mathias Clasen & Heather Berlin

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 55:31


Why do we like being scared? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice explore the haunting effects of horror and recreational fear with horror scholar and author, Mathias Clasen, and neuroscientist, Heather Berlin, PhD. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free.Thanks to our Patrons Jessica Giancola, Jeff States, seth 06, Matthew Ritter, Kelvin Goliday, Kenny PK, and Kaya for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Esparta, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

New Books Network
Cyrus R. K. Patell, "Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:12


From A New Hope to The Rise of Skywalker and beyond, this book offers the first complete assessment and philosophical exploration of the Star Wars universe. Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe (Bloomsbury, 2021) examines the ways in which these iconic films were shaped by global cultural mythologies and world cinema, as well as philosophical ideas from the fields of aesthetics and political theory, and now serve as a platform for public philosophy. Cyrus R. K. Patell also looks at how this ever-expanding universe of cultural products and enterprises became a global brand and asks: can a corporate entity be considered a "filmmaker and philosopher"? More than any other film franchise, Lucasfilm's Star Wars has become part of the global cultural imagination. The new generation of Lucasfilm artists is full of passionate fans of the Star Wars universe, who have now been given the chance to build on George Lucas's oeuvre. Within these pages, Patell explores what it means for films and their creators to become part of cultural history in this unprecedented way. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Film
Cyrus R. K. Patell, "Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:12


From A New Hope to The Rise of Skywalker and beyond, this book offers the first complete assessment and philosophical exploration of the Star Wars universe. Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe (Bloomsbury, 2021) examines the ways in which these iconic films were shaped by global cultural mythologies and world cinema, as well as philosophical ideas from the fields of aesthetics and political theory, and now serve as a platform for public philosophy. Cyrus R. K. Patell also looks at how this ever-expanding universe of cultural products and enterprises became a global brand and asks: can a corporate entity be considered a "filmmaker and philosopher"? More than any other film franchise, Lucasfilm's Star Wars has become part of the global cultural imagination. The new generation of Lucasfilm artists is full of passionate fans of the Star Wars universe, who have now been given the chance to build on George Lucas's oeuvre. Within these pages, Patell explores what it means for films and their creators to become part of cultural history in this unprecedented way. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in World Affairs
Cyrus R. K. Patell, "Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:12


From A New Hope to The Rise of Skywalker and beyond, this book offers the first complete assessment and philosophical exploration of the Star Wars universe. Lucasfilm: Filmmaking, Philosophy, and the Star Wars Universe (Bloomsbury, 2021) examines the ways in which these iconic films were shaped by global cultural mythologies and world cinema, as well as philosophical ideas from the fields of aesthetics and political theory, and now serve as a platform for public philosophy. Cyrus R. K. Patell also looks at how this ever-expanding universe of cultural products and enterprises became a global brand and asks: can a corporate entity be considered a "filmmaker and philosopher"? More than any other film franchise, Lucasfilm's Star Wars has become part of the global cultural imagination. The new generation of Lucasfilm artists is full of passionate fans of the Star Wars universe, who have now been given the chance to build on George Lucas's oeuvre. Within these pages, Patell explores what it means for films and their creators to become part of cultural history in this unprecedented way. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

The Nexus Podcast
Holding Yourself Accountable (Being the Authority) | Ep. 127

The Nexus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 15:46


Reflecting back on one of the most profound statements I've heard from my pastor here in Orange County, I couldn't help but share this episode with you.Inside we talk about how you can only hold other people accountable to the level that you hold yourself accountable.  Dive in to learn more about how to set yourself up for super success in life and how to get yourself under authority so you can become THE authority.Dive in now!!Connect with Dr. Daniel:Instagram | @danielkimbleydcFacebook | https://www.facebook.com/daniel.kimbley.5Medium | https://medium.com/@danielkimbleyConnect with Nexus Family Chiropractic:Instagram | @nexusfamilychiropracticFacebook | https://www.facebook.com/nexusfamilychiropractic/YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbUzsA22gT7UseaFy-rzkVg?view_as=subscriberWeb | https://www.nexusfamilychiropractic.com/

Reading With Your Kids Podcast
Reading With Your Kids - The Magnificent Makers

Reading With Your Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 26:57


Neuroscientist & children's author Dr Theanner Griffith is on the #ReadingWithYourKids #Podcast to celebrate her fun #MiddleGrade series The Magnificent Makers. Dr Theanne tells us this series is filled with science, adventure & characters you will love. She also let's us know about some ground breaker neuroscience discoveries she is involved with. Click here to visit Dr Theanne's website - https://www.theannegriffith.com/ Click here to visit our website - www.readingwithyourkids.com

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
212 - Synaptic Transmission in Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 24:21


Want to know more about about how the brain's different neurotransmitter systems aren't functioning properly in Alzheimer's disease and how hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment contributes to Alzheimer's pathology? Join Glory for the latest updates on research about the mechanisms of synaptic transmission and plasticity that contribute to the Alzheimer's disease pathology. With this month's new papers, August 2021 gives us 12 publications that try to answer all of your questions on the synaptic aspects of AD! You're sure to get your own synapses firing by listening to this episode! Sections in this episode: Neurotransmitters and neuropeptides (3:01) Electrophysiological changes (10:08) Synaptic plasticity (12:28) New AD models (14:24) Cognition and memory (18:58)  -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/193a8sYAFrnvz6buueDNvoY2YSmDgV2n1/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted and hosted by Glory Nasseri, edited by Ellen Koch, and reviewed by Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was made by Lara Onbasi and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, and Dana Clausen. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Get Fit with Jodelle
EMF, EHS, The Science behind Cell Phone Danger

Get Fit with Jodelle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 72:30


PROF Olle Johansson is here with again for a third podcast, so thrilled Olle Johansson, who I have now coined my Swedish father, because my maiden name used to be the same as his, and I really look up to him for his research on something I am extremely passionate in, which we will be jumping into in just a moment but for those of you who don't know much about Prof Johansson, I highly recommend listening to the two previous podcasts we did which will blow you HAIR BACK, due to the knowledge he brings on the dangers of the internet of things, 5G, the coming 6G, 7G and more. Olle Johansson is a professor, and head of Experimental dermatology in the department of Neuroscience at the prestigious Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Olle is a world-leading authority in the field of EMF radiation and health effects. He has published more than 500 original articles, reviews, book chapters and conference reports within the field of basic and applied neuroscience and is more recently researching something I am so interested to talk with him today on which is electro hyper sensitivity (EHS) is an officially fully recognized functional impairment. We discuss: Smartphones and weight gain How EMF affects your gut bacteria!!!! New Research! Smartphones, EMF and sleep health Smartphones and cancer Smartphones and children's health Internet of things and health implications What's happened to the bees Dangers of too much time on social media And much more! PROF Olle Johansson is doing some incredible work and would greatly benefit from our help. Please consider donating to his fundamental work here: https://honeywire.org/research (Always remember that no gift is too small, and Dr. Johansson's work needs this economic support so he would be able to continue quality research work regarding the adverse health and biological effects of artificial electromagnetic fields from cell phones, satellites, smart meters, WiFi, baby alarms, powerlines, and many more installations.) Resources mentioned: Johansson O, "To bee, or not to bee, that is the five “G” question", Newsvoice.se 28/5, 2019 https://newsvoice.se/2019/05/5g-question-olle-johansson/ But perhaps you also can use some of these, with their web links? Johansson O, "Bacteria, mobile phones & WiFi - a deadly combination?", Nya Dagbladet 31/5, 2017 https://nyadagbladet.se/debatt/bacteria-mobile-phones-wifi-deadly-combination/ Johansson O, "Associate professor: Wireless radiation – the biggest full-scale biomedical experiment ever done on Earth", Newsvoice.se 5/8, 2018 https://newsvoice.se/2018/08/wireless-radiation-biomedical-experiment/ Johansson O, “Is the ‘electrosmog' finally clearing?”, Newsvoice.se 4/2, 2019 https://newsvoice.se/2019/02/electrosmog-clearing/ Johansson O, Ferm R, " “Yes, Prime Minister” Stefan Löfven, but no! This is not good enough!",Newsvoice.se 3/5, 2020 https://newsvoice.se/2020/05/stefan-lofven-5g-microwave-radiation/ Santini R, Johansson O, "If 5G is not deemed safe in the USA, and nowhere in the rest of the world, by the insurance industry … why is it by the Danish government?", Newsvoice.se 8/7, 2020 https://newsvoice.se/2020/07/5g-not-safe-usa/ Johansson O, Rebel TK, McGavin B, "Global 5G protest warns of health and ecological costs", Newsvoice.se 5/9, 2020 https://newsvoice.se/2020/09/global-5g-protest-warns-of-health-and-ecological-costs/ Johansson O, "Fuck your telephone?", Newsvoice.se 17/3, 2021a https://newsvoice.se/2021/03/olle-johansson-fuck-your-telephone/ Johansson O, "Cars, humans, laws, artificial electromagnetic fields … but what about the future?”, Newsvoice.se 9/8, 2021b https://newsvoice.se/2021/08/associate-professor-olle-johansson-artificial-electromagnetic-fields-future/ Thank you to our show sponsors: Swanwick Sleep Blue-light Blocking glasses: https://www.bn10strk.com/GETFIT/ and use code: FITFOR10 MOS Shielding Equipment https://mosequipment.com/?ref=cGFWJ1 COUPON CODE: JODELLE FOR 5% OFF Microbe Formulas - Mimosa Pudica is the best supplement I have found to help eliminate gut pathogens and enhance your EMF-resisting gut bacteria https://bit.ly/3lqn3oH

Sales vs. Marketing
Miko Matsumura, General Partner with Gumi Ventures | How De-Fi is Changing the World

Sales vs. Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 63:05


➡️ Like The Show? Leave A Rating: https://ratethispodcast.com/successstory ➡️ About The Guest Miko is a General Partner with Gumi Ventures, a US $30M investment fund focused early stage blockchain startups and a cofounder of crypto exchange Evercoin, Miko fell in love with open source software 25 years ago as chief Evangelist for the Java Language and Platform at Sun Microsystems.  Since then he has been building open source software startups in Silicon Valley including raising over $50 million in venture capital for developer platform companies such as Gradle and financial infrastructure companies like Hazelcast and has participated in multiple exits including INFRAVIO, webMethods, and Db4O.  He is an advisor in successful startups like Celsius (CeFi Lending), Idle Finance (DeFi Yield Aggregator), Pundi X (Payments), and KEYLESS (ID infrastructure). He has been an investor with Focus Ventures, a firm with over $800M under management, 9 IPOs and 44 exits and blockchain firm Pantera Capital. He holds a Master's degree in Neuroscience from Yale University where he worked on abstract computational neural networks. ➡️ Talking Points 00:00 - Intro. 08:02 - Blockchain.. breaking away from institutional systems. 15:42 - Crypto hacking. 20:21 - Questioning people's motives. 26:09 - What is De-Fi? 32:10 - Blockchain & Crypto adoption. 46:11 - How De-Fi is changing lives. ➡️ Show Links https://twitter.com/mikojava https://miko.com/ ➡️ Podcast Sponsors 1. Canva — Create Content & Design Anything (No Skill Required) https://canva.me/successstory — Free 45 Day Canva Pro Trial 2. Better Help —Virtual Therapy & Mental Wellness  https://betterhelp.com/scottclary — 10% Off First Month 3. Postie—Direct mail for digital marketers. https://postie.com/successstory (Free Demo)

InsideTheBoards for the USMLE, COMLEX & Medical School
Addiction 101: Where We're Going | Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse

InsideTheBoards for the USMLE, COMLEX & Medical School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:27


Sections from today's episode Encourage your patients to be open and honest about addiction  How to ask about addiction without judgement and how to intervene  "By not intervening, we're condoning" Addiction is a disease of free will and treating addiction is not replacing one drug with another Today's guest Nora D. Volkow, M.D., is Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health. NIDA is the world's largest funder of research on the health aspects of drug use and addiction. Dr. Volkow's work has been instrumental in demonstrating that drug addiction is a disease of the human brain. As a research psychiatrist and scientist, Dr. Volkow pioneered the use of brain imaging to investigate the toxic and addictive properties of abusable drugs. Her studies have documented changes in the dopamine system affecting, among others, the functions of frontal brain regions involved with motivation and self-regulation in addiction. She has also made important contributions to the neurobiology of obesity, ADHD, and aging and to the imaging field. Dr. Volkow has published more than 780 peer-reviewed articles, written more than 100 book chapters and non-peer-reviewed manuscripts, and co-edited the Neuroscience for the 21th Century Encyclopedia and edited four books on neuroimaging for mental and addictive disorders. Read her full bio on the National Institute on Drug Abuse website. If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, there is help available. SAMHSA National Helpline Confidential free help, from public health agencies, to find substance use treatment and information. www.samhsa.gov 1-800-662-4357 Shatterproof Browse addiction resources from treatment finders to recovery groups to grief support. www.shatterproof.org/ National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255 Further Learning National Institute on Drug Abuse The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) supports and conducts research across a broad range of disciplines and leads the nation in scientific research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction. www.drugabuse.gov Health Management Associates Helping Communities Improve Care for People with Complex Health and Social Needs www.HMAedu.com Study on the go with the ITB Audio QBank app Download for free on iOS or Android. If you want to upgrade, you can save money on a premium subscription by customizing your plan until your test date on our website! Our other podcasts: Crush Step 1 Step 2 Secrets Physiology by Physeo Step 1 Success Stories The InsideTheBoards Study Smarter Podcast The InsideTheBoards Podcast Beyond the Pearls Produced by Ars Longa Media To learn more about us and this podcast, visit arslonga.media. You can leave feedback or suggestions at arslonga.media/contact or by emailing info@arslonga.media. Produced by: Christopher Breitigan Executive Producer: Patrick C. Beeman, MD Legal Stuff InsideTheBoards is not affiliated with the NBME, USMLE, COMLEX, or any professional licensing body. InsideTheBoards and its partners fully adhere to the policies on irregular conduct outlined by the aforementioned credentialing bodies. The information presented in this podcast is intended for educational purposes only and should not be construed as professional or medical advice. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sex and Psychology Podcast
Episode 56: Where Do Sexual Fetishes Come From?

Sex and Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:28


People can develop sexual fetishes for virtually anything. In fact, it's not a stretch to say that if you can think of it, somebody probably has a fetish for it. So why is that? How do fetishes develop in the first place? Are some people more likely to develop them than others? And what role does porn play in all of this? For the answers to these questions, I spoke with Dr. Jim Pfaus, a researcher in behavioral neuroscience in the Department of Psychology and Life Sciences at Charles University in Prague and with the Czech National Institute of Mental Health. Jim has conducted some fascinating research on animals that sheds important light on how fetishes might develop in humans. His studies show that rats can learn to associate sex with everything from articles of clothing to specific odors (including very aversive smells). Some of the topics we explore in this episode include: What does it mean to have a sexual fetish? How can learning theory help to explain the development of fetishes? How do people's early sexual experiences affect their sexual turn-ons? Are some people more predisposed to developing fetishes than others? In what ways does pornography shape our sexual interests? How has porn (and what kind of porn people find to be arousing) changed over time? This podcast was made on Zencastr. Join Zencastr today and receive 40% off of their professional plan for 3 months with my exclusive discount code: sexandpsych *** Want to learn more about Sex and Psychology? Click here for previous articles or follow the blog on Facebook, Twitter, or Reddit to receive updates. You can also follow Dr. Lehmiller on YouTube and Instagram. Listen and stream all episodes on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Amazon. Subscribe to automatically receive new episodes and please rate and review the podcast! Credits: LEGIT Audio (Podcast editing) and Shutterstock/Florian (Music). Image created with Canva; photos used with permission of guest.

InnovaBuzz
Felix Cao, The Role of Neuroscience in Marketing - InnovaBuzz 464

InnovaBuzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 65:47


In this episode, I'm really excited to have as my guest, Felix Cao. a neuromarketing expert and business growth strategist with over 15 years of sales and marketing experience. He has been featured on major media outlets, such as The Huffington Post, Adweek, and Authority Magazine. Felix has appeared as a special guest on a major Canadian radio show where he talked about neuromarketing and the 2019 Canadian election. He also makes frequent appearances on the top business podcasts in the world and contributes to popular publications where he shares the most-up-date insights on how businesses can take their sales and marketing to the next stratosphere by implementing neuromarketing strategies that will give companies the game-changing edge that separates them from the rest of their competitors. Felix's business is Happy Buying Brain, where he works with businesses on their marketing strategy and how to apply neuromarketing to create a clear separation in their brand perception from their competitors and expand their customer base by better understanding what truly makes consumers tick during the customer journey process. In our discussion, Felix talked to me about: Some of the future trends of Ai The role of neuroscience in our buying behaviour and implications for marketing The importance of empathy and relationships in marketing https://innovabiz.co/felixcao (Show Notes and Blog) https://innovabiz.com.au/innovabuzz/ (The Podcasts)

The Recovering Reality Podcast
“Bouncing Back from Rejection” -with Staci Danford

The Recovering Reality Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:15


Educator of Neuroscience, Staci Danford is back on the show for the third time. If you've struggled with rejection, or can't seem to find a happy rhythm then this episode is for you. Find out how to activate your brains “happy chemicals” and some simple habits that will change your life.

PT Profit Podcast
The Neuroscience of Dance with Sophia Martins

PT Profit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 47:40


Coaches, today we have Sophia Martins, a neuroscientist and dancer, joining us to talk all about neuroscience and how it can help athletes, dancers and our clients. In this episode, Sophia shared her detailed knowledge on what happens to a performer's brain when experiencing memory lapses. She also discussed how she as a neuroscientist helps performers and dancers in fixing their performance anxiety in a very simple and fun way, a tool that could be used for anyone nervous about going to the gym. You'll hear:- How neuroscience can help the dancing community.- Neurological impairment.- What happens to a brain when experiencing memory laps. Don't forget to leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. About Today's Guest Sophia Martins is an international neuroscientist, dancer, performer, and dance teacher. Through her postgraduate studies in neuroscience, she joined her passions by doing her research thesis on the brain mechanisms beyond dance, having worked with one of the most influential researchers in the field. Her research has been published in the "Dance Data, Cognition, and Multimodal Communication" Routledge volume and presented at various international conferences/summits. She trained in dance therapy, butoh and somatic practices, has a double degree in Psychology and Forensic Psychology and did her postgraduate studies in Brain Sciences. Apart from her experience in fraud prevention and crime prevention at Lloyds and the Scottish Government, she is a certified suicide first aider and worked as a mental health practitioner for 4 years. During those 4 years, she counseled adults (including dancers) with anxiety, depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, eating disorders, OCD, PTSD, personality disorders among others. Her passion and skills in mental health are intertwined with her being. Through her Neuroscience of Dance project and Dance Integrated Healing Method, Sophia provides neurocognitive and dance healing tools. She has been helping dancers and dance teachers all over the world for the past two years through 1-1 sessions and various workshops with the following key aspects: dealing with injuries, neurological recovery, overcoming struggles (memory, equilibrium, learning difficulties), improving dance environments and teaching techniques, improving mental well-being, improving dance skills, and using dance for healing purposes. Seeing people improving, recovering, falling in love with dance fuels her drive to do more for others.

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
#1403 - Preseason Takeaways and Regular Season Expectations w/ Joshua Howe - Raptors Weekly Podcast

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 95:49


Host Samson Folk brings on his good pal and terrific writer, Joshua Howe, to discuss the many different ongoings of the Raptors preseason. 1:24 - Handsome Boban 2:43 - Thoughts on the Pre-season, and the Raptors new playstyle 6:00 - The Raptors as a type of music 9:40 - Scottie Barnes' Pre-season 20:15 - There is no platonic-ideal, only the players on your roster 21:10 - Precious Achiuwa idolized Allen Iverson, not Tim Duncan + Scottie Barnes at the elbow, and in DHO keeper plays 22:33 - Dalano Banton, with the big club or the 905? 26:00 - OG Anunoby's pre-season + a teaser for my big OG piece to come 30:55 - Needless caveats 35:00 - OG's playmaking + Reactive/Proactive playmaking + the Neuroscience behind it 38:30 - Fred VanVleet, a great player 49:00 - Is Khem Birch the starter? 56:55 - Gary Trent Jr. & Svi Mykhailiuk 1:08:15 - Ish Wainwright, the Vibes King 1:11:00 - What is the Malachi Flynn situation? 1:19:20 - Predictions? PREDICTIONS?! 1:20:10 - A Goran Dragic trade and winning mentalities 1:24:15 - Expectations 1:32:00 - Goodbyes and co-signs Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Learning from Smart People
147 Jen Thornton: How to Leverage the Neuroscience of the Brain

Learning from Smart People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:45


Today we learn about how to leverage the neuroscience of the brain with consultant and speaker Jen Thornton. She is the owner of 304 Coaching which helps leaders build strategies that lead to exponential growth. Based in Texas, she shares an interesting viewpoint and some practical guidelines for dealing with the neuroscience of fear during her interview with Rob Oliver on this episode of the Learning from Smart People Podcast. Here are several of the points that emerged during the conversation between Jen Thornton and Rob Oliver on the Learning from Smart People Podcast: · The back story of how Jen got to be where she is today · Approaching leadership by looking at how do we lead to ensure that we are delivering business results · Leadership training is expensive but it pays off if it's done correctly · Measuring the ROI on leadership training · Exploring the feelings of launching your entrepreneurial journey · Defining the neuroscience of fear · Our brain is built to protect us, to keep us alive · Fear is just a chemical reaction · That chemical reaction impacts our ability to reason · Conceptualizing the Fear Cycle · We are the ones who decide how we feel about a situation · Interpreting things through a fear mindset · Your brain uses all of its experiences to predict what is going to happen · The connection between the psychological and the physical · Asking yourself, “What else could be true?” · Understanding how your brain affects your quality of life · Our understanding of the brain has truly grown in the last 25 years · Everyone has a unique mind map · The functions of the brain are similar between humans · Changing your mindset to, “What can go right?” (What is the best case scenario?) · Considering a trickle down fear mindset · Handling the fallout when things don't go as you would like You can learn more about Jen Thornton through her website or on LinkedIn: Website: https://304coaching.com/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenniferrthornton/ Thanks for listening to the Learning from Smart People Podcast! Please Subscribe, leave a comment and follow us on social media: Twitter: http://twitter.com/LFSPPodcast Instagram: http://instagram.com/LFSPPodcast Facebook: http://facebook.com/LFSPPodcast LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/lfsppodcast/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/imroboliver/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbWV_LuUad7ZWuE9j5D9v-w You can also use the “Contact” page on the “Learning from Smart People” website: https://www.learningfromsmartpeople.com

Good Morning, HR
Using Science to Create a Thriving Culture

Good Morning, HR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 37:06


More than ever, employers are struggling with employee engagement. Some businesses claim that remote employees are harder to manage and many surveys indicate that remote employees feel disengaged from their peers and their companies.But when they've tried to return to in-person workplaces, they've received pushback.Since the beginning of the pandemic, I've argued that organizations with effective leadership and truly-engaged employees will be successful whether they are remote or not. But sadly, most organizations are lacking in both leadership and employee engagement.Today's guest says that creating a thriving company culture requires a unique understanding of what motivates employees.About our Guest:Randal Weidenaar is a researcher, author and national speaker. His passion was born out of the pain of broken workplaces, and leaders that wounded rather than served. Randal set out to discover a method that leads to life giving leadership and culture. Randal created VP Culture a leadership system based on attachment science that inspires a powerful relational culture foundation. His research reveals that our neurobiology engages when our relationships are healthy and connected. This leads to actual health, vitality and productivity on all levels. Rather than just tips and tricks, VPCulture focuses on a profoundly relational way of leading and living. Randal has studied Business Processes Development at MIT Sloan School of Management; The Fundamentals of Neuroscience at Harvard-x, Quantitative Social Research Methods at University of Amsterdam, and Culture-Driven Team Development at University of Pennsylvania. He has helped corporations, government, and non-profit organizations unpack the art and science of leadership and culture creation. He wrote The VPCulture Workbook to help leaders develop this team culture. Randal has worked with diverse teams from over 42 countries and consulted countless organizations in marketing and culture development. Additionally, he is the founder of Notionfront, a marketing firm that has clients across the United States. He is also the director of Grace Encounter, a self-development organization. Randal lives with his wife on a sustainable farm in central Missouri.https://www.vpculture.com/Good Morning, HR is brought to you by Imperative—premium background checks with fast and friendly service. For more information about our commitment to quality and excellent customer service, visit us at imperativeinfo.com.If you are an HRCI or SHRM-certified professional, this episode of Good Morning, HR has been pre-approved for half a recertification credit. To obtain the recertification information for this episode, visit goodmorninghr.com.

Mind & Matter
Christian Luscher: Drug Addiction, Cocaine, Caffeine, Nicotine, THC, Opioids & the Brain | #40

Mind & Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 68:02


Christian Luscher, MD, PhD is a neuroscientist and neurologist who runs a research lab at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. Dr. Lusher's lab studies the mechanisms that underlie drug reinforcement and addiction in the brain and he is an expert in the neuroscience of drug addiction. Christian talks to Nick about: what is addiction is and what some key parts of the brain and neurotransmitter systems are involved in drug addiction; differences in the addictive potential of different types of drugs, ranging from stimulants (e.g. cocaine, nicotine, caffeine) to cannabinoids (e.g. THC), opioids, and psychedelics. Dr. Luscher describes the difference between addiction vs. dependency, habitual vs. goal-directed behavior, as well as some of his latest research on how dopamine and serotonin systems in the brain are both involved in drug-seeking behavior.USEFUL LINKS:Download the podcast & follow Nick at his website[www.nickjikomes.com]Support the show on Patreon & get early access to episodes[https://www.patreon.com/nickjikomes]Sign up for the weekly Mind & Matter newsletter[https://mindandmatter.substack.com/]Athletic Greens, comprehensive daily nutrition (Free 1-year supply of Vitamin D w/ purchase)[https://www.athleticgreens.com/mindandmatter]Try MUD/WTR, a mushroom-based coffee alternative[https://www.mudwtr.com/mindmatter]Discount Code ($5 off) = MINDMATTEROrganize your digital highlights & notes w/ Readwise (2 months free w/ subscription)[https://readwise.io/nickjikomes/]Start your own podcast (get $20 Amazon gift card after signup)[https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1507198]Buy Mind & Matter T-Shirts[https://www.etsy.com/shop/OURMIND?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=1036758072§ion_id=34648633]Connect with Nick Jikomes on Twitter[https://twitter.com/trikomes]​​​Learn more about our podcast sponsor, Dosist[https://dosist.com/]ABOUT Nick Jikomes:Nick is a neuroscientist and podcast host. He is currently Director of Science & Innovation at Leafly, a technology startup in the legal cannabis industry. He received a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Harvard University and a B.S. in Genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/nickjikomes)

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
211 - Changes to Gene Expression in Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 17:24


“Changes to the expression of genes may influence the delicate balance between disease and health”. If you want to learn about how that is relevant to Alzheimer's disease, you've come to the right place! Join Marcia for this short episode, as she discusses how & why gene expression, its epigenetic regulation and integrative studies are important in Alzheimer's disease! Sections in this episode: Transcriptome (2:35) Multiomics (8:19) Epigenetics (12:03)  -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gMKftjOPDgw4W3acJIR8gTPHZmAfin8u/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted and hosted by Marcia Jude, edited by Michelle Grover, and reviewed by Glory Nasseri and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendrani and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, and Dana Clausen. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Absolute Trust Talk
074: Art Therapy and Dementia

Absolute Trust Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:12


Do you have a spouse or loved one who has dementia? Hearing them say “I love you” or share a memory is something that every caregiver hopes for. And in those rare instances, it truly gives a renewed sense of purpose in life. Unfortunately, often, after being diagnosed with dementia, patients are prescribed drugs that, in some cases, cause depression or suppress who they are. But what if there was a way to reduce the medications and boost the mental well-being of the person with dementia and the spouse or caregiver? Interestingly enough, evidence shows that art plays a role in improving neural health. Art therapy is being taught as an alternative approach to dementia cases, providing an opportunity for patients to boost their mood and change their behavior without diminishing their quality of life. In this episode, Kirsten sits down with the incredible Angel Duncan. Angel is a mental health, art therapist, and research clinician specializing in therapeutic program developments for people with mental health, developmental, intellectual, cognitive, and memory disorders. Angel has an extensive background in counseling psychology, life development, and Alzheimer's disease phase 1b, 2, and 3 clinical research trials. She works globally with leading organizations on brain health initiatives and is a widely published author and speaker. During their discussion, Kirsten and Angel dive into the science behind art therapy, explaining how and why it works. Duncan also shares countless examples of patients who practice art therapy demonstrating the behavioral changes and how they reconnect with their spouses again or learn to engage with their caregivers. If dementia or mental health issues have impacted your life or the life of someone you know, this episode is for you. Tune in now for more on the benefits of art therapy and why Angel Duncan has spent her career advocating for this life-changing form of treatment. Big Three from Episode #074: Research shows that by engaging in art, which taps into certain regions of the brain, those with dementia are also getting neural activation and productivity. Ultimately, this leads to a shift in mood and behavior. Art Therapy is found to be helpful for all forms of dementia and, really, all types of mental health issues. Just because someone has dementia or another cognitive issue, doesn't mean their creativity goes away. Case studies and research demonstrate exactly how art therapy brings those with dementia out of their box, helping them reconnect with the outside world. Time-stamped Show Notes: 3:08 Long-term memory is returning for dementia patients through the process of Art Therapy. Listen now to hear Angel Duncan share the benefits of staying artistically creative for those suffering from neurological diseases.  5:43 Studies prove that art truly does work for people who have dementia. Start listening now for more on how art is helping neurological disease.  8:05 Relationships between caregivers, whether family or professional, and dementia-infected patients are becoming nurtured with empathy because of art therapy.  10:13 More often than not, psychotropic drugs are the go-to fix for dementia patients, causing diminished behavior. Angel answers how art could be used as an alternative to psychotropic drugs.  14:21 Angel Duncan has advocated for art therapy for almost 20 years. Listen to her journey and the life-changing work that has come from working with like-minded physicians.  17:43 Press play here to learn what different creative mediums are included in art therapy treatments. 21:11 Ask Kirsten Segment: Kirsten answers an email from Maria in Danville looking for advice on how to encourage her mother, who has dementia, to do an estate plan. If you have a question that you'd like to have answered by Kirsten, send an email to info@absolutetrustcounsel.com. 23:56 Listen to how Angel helped co-create Art in Mind for dementia patients at the Yale Art Gallery.  28:08 Angel Duncan's Art Therapy Workshop is not just for dementia patients but also for spouses and caregivers. Listen in as Angel shares stories and feedback from those who have participated in the workshop. 30:06 Interested in learning more about art therapy? You don't want to miss out on this special event -The 12th annual Expressive Therapy Summit is hosting Neurosciences and Aging Symposium and Track Series for aging populations. Listen here for more details on the event.  32:18 Live Q&A: Do you find art therapy to be helpful in all forms of dementia? Resources/Links in this Episode: Cognitive Dynamics Lorenzo's House About Angel Duncan – How to get in touch about programs Expressive Therapy Summit [Ad] Do you need help planning for things like incapacity? The Absolute Trust Counsel team is here to help. If you become incapacitated without a plan, you don't have time to wait for court rulings, nor do you want to waste your money on that. You need support right away. At Absolute Trust Counsel, we can help put a plan in place, so you and your family are covered – no matter what the situation.  Visit our calendar to pick a date and time that works best for you, and let's get started!

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast
Shugen Roshi with Dr. Philip Ninan

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 82:07


A live conversation between Shugen Arnold, Roshi, abbot of Zen Mountain Monastery, and Buddhist neuroscientist Dr. Phillip Ninan. The two tackle a number of tricky questions where the findings of science, the teachings of the Buddha, and the practice of meditation all intersect to better illuminate one another.

RNZ: Our Changing World
The New Zealand genetic frontotemporal dementia study

RNZ: Our Changing World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:38


Claire Concannon hears from Dr. Brigid Ryan of the University of Auckland about the New Zealand genetic frontotemporal dementia study and speaks to some of the family members involved in this unique research study.

Woke Wellness with Kelly Collins
89. Find Greater Alignment & Calm Through The Chaos With AstroNidras Creatrix Jana Roemer

Woke Wellness with Kelly Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 76:33


89: Have you been searching for a way to reconnect with yourself and find more calm and inner peace? Jana Roemer - the Creatrix of Astro Nidras - joins us this week to explain how Yoga Nidra is the medicine of our time. With 20 years of study & 13 years of teaching under her belt, Jana synthesized her two great loves: Astrology + Yoga Nidra to create Astro Nidras, a process of meditation where the body relaxes to a sleep state while the mind stays awake. In her own words, it's a practice that is a cure for an overly critical and busy mind. In this conversation, you can expect to learn: + How Astro Nidras can help you connect with the stars and yourself + Jana's journey to discovering and facilitating Yoga Nidra + astrology and the impact they've had on her life + What Yoga Nidra is & how it really is the medicine of our time + How Yoga Nidra can help you to quiet your mind and find inner peace  + The science - the physical, psychological, electrochemical, and spiritual benefits of the practice + the upcoming astrological events that will affect you and the collective   Watch the recording on YouTube HERE! Learn more and apply for the Soul Spark Academy HERE!   To connect with Jana on IG click HERE.   Check out Mindful Mamas on IG HERE.    To view Jana's website and offerings click HERE.  use code SOULSPARK to get the Expander Pass for 50% off or $11 / month!   Virtual Yoga Nidra Training starting this November click HERE - for those who want to dive DEEP into more of everything we spoke about in this podcast    Jana's Insight Timer 10-day course on Overcoming Obsessive Thinking - click HERE     To connect with Kelly Collins click HERE. To view Kelly's website and offerings click HERE.    **Other (LINKS) Mentioned in this episode:** Sign up for my Master Class: Magnetic Manifestation on October 27, 2021   Sign up for my Idyllwild Forest Goddess Retreat   Wave Breath practice on IGTV   SUBSCRIBE to Kelly's monthly newsletter and get her free 7 Mantras To Heal Your Chakras PDF

Healthier Together
How To Use Neuroscience To Eliminate Anxiety, Become More Optimistic, and Overcome Childhood Trauma with Dr. Wendy Suzuki

Healthier Together

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


How To Use Neuroscience To Eliminate Anxiety, Become More Optimistic, & Overcome Trauma with Dr. Wendy Suzuki

Leadership Live
EP 52 - Conversation with Erin Kendall Braun- All about leadership habits and our brain - a neuroscience perspective

Leadership Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 42:34


Our brain automates all behaviors so that we can live easier. This means that our behaviors are turned into habits so that we don't need to spend so much energy on actions that we take regularly. So how can you create habits that benefit you in the long term? In today's episode of Leadership Live, Daphna has a conversation with Dr. Erin Kendall Braun who focuses on working with large companies and analyzing human behavior to solve greater problems in the business climate. Tune in to hear Kendall explain the three-step process for creating habits that serve us and more great tips on how to work with leadership habits. Timestamps: 0:50 Patterns and habits 2:00 Keeping it going through tough times 5:02 What happened with Kendall? 7:04 Selfcare habits that our body relies on  9:05 Habits- the journey into neuroscience 13:25 Seeding a habit 16:34 Cue-action-outcome 19:59 Thinking about the barriers & goal-setting 25:22 Reward yourself with something real 29:45 Begin with a cue 32:10 Perfectionism and realism  34:39 We don't want to be thinking about everything all the time 38:40 When we're stressed out, we go in default mode 40:40 Value of habits - even the ones that hold us back   Resources: PODCAST WEBPAGE: www.daphnahorowitz.com/podcastlive   BOOK a coaching session with Daphna Horowitz HERE: https://daphnahorowitz.com/services/#leadership-coaching    Purchase the book on AMAZON:  https://www.amazon.com/Weekly-Habits-Extraordinary-Leaders-Horowitz/dp/B08JDTRK9H/ref=sr_1_1?crid=24SK3E4DFMJMQ&dchild=1&keywords=daphna+horowitz&qid=1605772332&sprefix=daphna+ho%2Cstripbooks-intl-ship%2C379&sr=8-1    Listen to all the previous episodes HERE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/leadership-live/id1524072573    Get access to your FREE Leadership Toolkit here: https://daphnahorowitz.com/leadershiptoolkit   For more information about the CEO Habits Bootcamp: https://daphnahorowitz.com/ceobootcamp Connect with Kendall: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/erin-kendall-braun/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/erinkendallb  Connect with Daphna: Official website: www.daphnahorowitz.com  LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/daphnahorowitz/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/daphna1231 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PEACSolutions/  

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
210 - Tau Protein Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:13


Today, Kate will be focusing on everything tau-related in 12 papers published in August 2021, including aspects of tau pathology and exploring potential therapeutics targeting tau in Alzheimer's disease! Sections in this episode:Tau Aggregation & Post-Translational Modifications (PTMs) (3.16)Tau Pathology & Seeding (13.30)Targeting Tau for Treatment (20.10)-------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1IIilzUhWAF_WuBM4trkcW12daiB52sT2/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted and hosted by Kate Van Pelt, edited by Sarah Louadi, and reviewed by Ellen Koch. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, Dana Clausen, Kira Tosefsky, and Eden Dubchak.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

NeuroRadio
#27 A ‘Rosetta Stone' for neuroscience

NeuroRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 159:47


BICCNのNature誌ジャックに触発され、多くの論文に関わってるThe Allen Instituteのこと、BICCNプロジェクトの全容、今回の17報の論文がそれぞれどういう位置づけにあるのか、などについて話しました(10/10収録) Shownotes: 10/20 に出る実験医学 Mesoscale Connectomeの仕事 Allen Institute for Brain Science Allen Institute for Neural Dynamics Tasic 2016 Tasic 2018 BICCNのサイトに載っている分かり易い対応図(このページの下の方) BICCNやってる人たち一覧 17報の論文:並びはNature Portfolioのを参考にちょっと改変 Flagship paper:Motor cortexの論文群をまとめたやつ。 Allen の Hongkui と UCSD の Mukamel の仕事。マウスのトランスクリプームとエピゲノムをそれぞれ50万以上の細胞から取ってきて、SCFまたはLIGERっていう手法で対応付け AllenのEd Leinの論文ではマウスだけじゃなくてマーモセットとヒトに対してもやっている SalkのEckerのとこからは、マウスのDNAメチレーションについて。モーターコルテックスに限らず海馬、線条体、基底核、嗅球から。 UCSDのBing Renのところから↑と同じサンプルでsnATAC-seq シャオウェイのところから、マウスMotor cortexのMERFISH BaylorのToliasとTubingenのBerensのマウス運動野のpatch-seq Leinのところではヒトからもpatch-seq。患者さん由来の90個のサンプル(主に側頭葉の一部) CSHL総出のCellular anatomy of the mouse primary motor cortex。マウス MOp-ulについて、細胞種特異的なCreマウスを用いつつ、バルクで順行性-逆行性ラベル、fMOSTで全脳スケールでのトレーシング。 バルクじゃなくてスパースラベリングも。 HongkuiのところからSparse labellingとfMOSTを用いたsingle cell tracing. これはMotor cortexだけじゃなくてcortex, claustrum, thalamus, striatumから。 SalkのCallawayとEckerのコラボで、逆行性トレーシング&メチローム:Epi-retro-seq CSHLのJosh Huang 皮質の興奮性ニューロンをgenetic dissectionするための新しいCre/Flpマウスラインを作ったよというお話 カルテクのPachterがSMART-seqでフルレングスのmRNAを読んで細胞種ごとのIsoformを見ようと。 UCLAのHong-Wei Dong、The mouse cortico–basal ganglia–thalamic network:大脳皮質ー基底核ループについてメゾスケールでのトレーシング。皮質-視床のループが6つのサブネットワークに分かれる UCSFのKriegsteinが胎生期のヒト脳scRNA-seqとISHで皮質の色んな領域の比較 UCSFのNowakowskiは胎生期のヒトの脳からscATAC-seq BroadのMacoskoのラボがアダルトマウスとヒト死後脳の小脳のsnRNA-seqを合わせてきた Editorial note: 10年後には神経科学はどうなってるんだろうなあ、と考えさせられるいい機会だったように思います。(萩原) Cell-typeとはなんぞやといったことやvivo生理記録との対応について扱った第4回、Spatial Transcriptomeについて扱った第5回も聴いて頂けると嬉しいです。今回は上っ面をさらっただけですが、精読した上での輪読会が10/31 13-18時で行われるみたいですね。(宮脇)

Big Picture Science
Fuhgeddaboudit

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 50:31


A thousand years ago, most people didn't own a single book. The only way to access knowledge was to consult their memory.  But technology – from paper to hard drives – has permitted us to free our brains from remembering countless facts. Alphabetization and the simple filing cabinet have helped to systematize and save information we might need someday. But now that we can Google just about any subject, have we lost the ability to memorize information? Does this make our brains better or worse? Guests: Judith Flanders – Historian and author, most recently of A Place for Everything: The Curious History of Alphabetical Order Craig Robertson – Professor of Media Studies, Northeastern University and author of The Filing Cabinet: A Vertical History of Information David Eagleman – Neuroscientist and author, Stanford University  

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
168 | Anil Seth on Emergence, Information, and Consciousness

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 85:00


Those of us who think that that the laws of physics underlying everyday life are completely known tend to also think that consciousness is an emergent phenomenon that must be compatible with those laws. To hold such a position in a principled way, it's important to have a clear understanding of “emergence” and when it happens. Anil Seth is a leading researcher in the neuroscience of consciousness, who has also done foundational work (often in collaboration with Lionel Barnett) on what emergence means. We talk about information theory, entropy, and what they have to do with how things emerge.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Anil Seth received his D.Phil in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence from the University of Sussex. He is currently a professor of cognitive and computational neuroscience at Sussex, as well as co-director of the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science. He has served as the president of the Psychology Section of the British Science Association, and is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Neuroscience of Consciousness. His new book is Being You: A New Science of Consciousness.Web siteGoogle Scholar publicationsWikipediaAmazon author pageTwitterBarnett and Seth, “Dynamical independence: discovering emergent macroscopic processes in complex dynamical systems” (2021)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Corporate Dropout Podcast
19. Mindset Monday: Why Pursuing the Dream IS the Dream

The Corporate Dropout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 5:46


On today's episode, we explore why Kobe Bryant's Mamba Mentality was spot on - and how neuroscience confirms it.Time Stamps: [0:30] Kobe's Mamba Mentality and the quote that can change everything for you [1:25] Neuroscience behind the pursuit of a goal [2:10] “The journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single step” and why to stick with it [2:30] What Chinese bamboo and your goals have in common [3:30] Jim Rohn and who you become in pursuit of a goal Link: Neuroscience Lessons To Foster A Growth Mindset--Let's connect!Connect with Alessia: follow @corporatedropoutofficial and @alessiacitro__Show Support:If you enjoy this podcast please Rate, Review, Subscribe and SHARE this out at Apple Podcasts at The Corporate Dropout PodcastBig shout out to our team that makes this show possible!If you are looking to start your own podcast or join the network, hit up @upstarterpods on instagram! 

The Nexus Podcast
Your Symptoms Come From Somewhere | Ep. 126

The Nexus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 22:08


In this week's episode I share where all of someones symptoms come from and why that's the case.  If you're not addressing the cause, then you're missing the boat. This episode is SIMPLE science-backed conversation about neurophysiology that you can find in any medical textbook.You may never listen again after you hear this episode, OR it will radically transform your life or someone that you know.Connect with Dr. Daniel:Instagram | @danielkimbleydcFacebook | https://www.facebook.com/daniel.kimbley.5Medium | https://medium.com/@danielkimbleyConnect with Nexus Family Chiropractic:Instagram | @nexusfamilychiropracticFacebook | https://www.facebook.com/nexusfamilychiropractic/YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbUzsA22gT7UseaFy-rzkVg?view_as=subscriberWeb | https://www.nexusfamilychiropractic.com/

Love & Guts
Daniele Piomelli | Cannabis And Chronic Pain

Love & Guts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 62:30


#226 Daniele Piomelli is Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry and Louise Turner Arnold Chair in Neurosciences at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). In addition, he is the director of the UCI Institute for the Study of Cannabis, a multidisciplinary research institute led by the UCI's Schools of Medicine and Law. Daniele studied pharmacology and neuroscience with James H. Schwartz and Eric Kandel at Columbia University, and with Paul Greengard at Rockefeller University. Daniele is an author of more than 400 peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Nature, Science, Nature Medicine, PNAS and Nature Neuroscience, three full-length books, and 34 patents. He co-founded the unit of drug discovery and development (D3) at the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa (Italy) which he directed from 2007 to 2016, and the biopharmaceutical start-ups Kadmus Pharmaceuticals, NeoKera Therapeutics and Aspire Biosciences, all based on discoveries made in his lab.  He is Editor-in-Chief of Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, the only peer-reviewed journal entirely dedicated to the study of cannabis, its derivatives, and their endogenous counterparts in the human body.   In this episode we cover History of human use of cannabis Why we have an endocannabinoid system and cannabinoid receptors? How cannabis works, especially in relation to chronic pain Current research on its use in chronic pain The duration of time someone should use cannabis for pain Why opioids shouldnt be used as the first line of therapy for pain Cannabis dependency Cannabis toxicity Withdrawal symptoms  And so much more

Saturn Returns with Caggie
4.4 Neuroscience and Manifestation with Dr Tara Swart

Saturn Returns with Caggie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 47:32


Tara is a doctor and neuroscientist who studied at Oxford University and King's College London, and specialised in psychiatry before leaving medicine to set up her own business coaching executives. Her work sits at the intersection between science and spirituality, and her book The Source: Open Your Mind, Change Your Life became a bestseller when it was published in 2019. Caggie and Tara discuss manifestation and the laws of attraction, why it is important to cultivate our values before chasing material goals, the importance of vision boards, and how to rewire the brain to create new neural pathways. To book tickets for the Saturn Returns live tour, head to: gigst.rs/SaturnReturns

Talking To Teens
Ep 159: Breaking Down Anxiety

Talking To Teens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 24:11


Anxiety is a pretty common feeling–you likely know how it feels to have your heart suddenly race in your chest, your palms go sweaty and your words turn to gibberish before a big presentation or confrontation. Having these anxious feelings is bad enough when it's an isolated incident, but many of us–and our kids–might be feeling anxiety every day! This could be caused by anything, from eating to driving to social situations! For kids handling school, sports, clubs, college apps and friendship drama, anxiety may be a frequent presence keeping them from living their best life.It seems like this anxiety is simply an unavoidable, biological force, but our guest this week is encouraging us to think about anxious behaviors a little differently. Instead of viewing them as something we have little control over, he's telling us how anxiety may actually just be a force of habit, and therefore something we can change! Anxious responses follow the same patterns as habits, are often caused by similar triggers, and, as we're discussing this week, can be treated in similar ways.If you're looking to heal you or your teen's anxious patterns, this is the episode for you! Our guest is Judson Brewer, author of Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind. Judson is not only an internationally renowned psychiatrist and neuroscientist, but also the director of research and innovation at Brown's mindfulness center. His 2016 Ted Talk, tilted “A Simple Way to Break a Bad Habit, has over 16 million views on YouTube!In our interview, we're diving into how anxious tendencies act just like habits–with triggers, behavior and rewards. Plus, we're getting into how you can understand and reflect on your own behaviors, if you just have the courage to be curious.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
209 - Treatments targeting Neurotransmission in Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 24:21


This is an episode that explores the creation and testing of drugs that aim to restore neurotransmitter balance in Alzheimer's disease. It covers 14 papers that were all published in August of 2021, and Anusha will guide you through papers on targets including cholinesterases, serotonin, and glutamate receptors. Hit that play button if you'd like to hear more.  Sections in this episode:  Targeting acetylcholine with novel compounds (2.29)  Other targets with novel compounds (13.23)  Testing for or improving upon existing ACE inhibitors (17.28)   -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1IIilzUhWAF_WuBM4trkcW12daiB52sT2/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted, hosted and edited by Anusha Kamesh, and reviewed by Naila Kuhlmann and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was made by Lara Onbasi and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, and Dana Clausen. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Middays with Susie Larson
Dr. Curt Thompson on the science of our deepest longings

Middays with Susie Larson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 49:17


*Originally aired September 2, 2021*  Psychiatrist, speaker and author Dr. Curt Thompson talks about his new book “The Soul of Desire: Discovering the Neuroscience of Longing, Beauty, and Community“. It's a powerful conversation about the impact encountering beauty has not only on our body, but also on our soul. 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:38


Raspberries, ellagic acid reveal benefits in two studies Oregon State University, October 1, 2021.    Articles that appeared recently in the Journal of Berry Research report that raspberries and compounds present in the fruit could help support healthy body mass and motor function, including balance, coordination and strength.   In one study, Neil Shay and colleagues at Oregon State University fed mice a high fat, high sugar diet plus one of the following: raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, ellagic acid (a polyphenol that occurs in a relatively high amount in raspberries), raspberry ketone, or a combination of raspberry ketone and ellagic acid. Additional groups of animals received a high fat, high sugar diet alone or a low fat diet.   While mice that received the high fat and sugar diet alone experienced a significant increase in body mass, the addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate or ellagic acid plus raspberry ketone helped prevent this effect. Of note, mice that received raspberry juice concentrate experienced gains similar to those of animals given a low fat diet. "We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," Dr Shay stated.   In another study, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, and her associates at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging gave 19 month old rats a control diet or a diet enhanced with raspberry extract for 11 weeks. Psychomotor behavior was assessed during week 7 and cognitive testing was conducted during weeks 9-10.   Animals that received raspberry performed better on psychomotor coordination and balance, and had better muscle tone, strength and stamina than those that received a control diet. "These results may have important implications for healthy aging," stated Dr Shukitt-Hale. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."       Massage doesn't just make muscles feel better, it makes them heal faster and stronger Harvard University, October 6, 2021 Massage has been used to treat sore, injured muscles for more than 3,000 years, and today many athletes swear by massage guns to rehabilitate their bodies. But other than making people feel good, do these "mechanotherapies" actually improve healing after severe injury? According to a new study from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the answer is "yes." Using a custom-designed robotic system to deliver consistent and tunable compressive forces to mice's leg muscles, the team found that this mechanical loading (ML) rapidly clears immune cells called neutrophils out of severely injured muscle tissue. This process also removed inflammatory cytokinesreleased by neutrophils from the muscles, enhancing the process of muscle fiber regeneration. The research is published in Science Translational Medicine. "Lots of people have been trying to study the beneficial effects of massage and other mechanotherapies on the body, but up to this point it hadn't been done in a systematic, reproducible way. Our work shows a very clear connection between mechanical stimulation and immune function. This has promise for regenerating a wide variety of tissues including bone, tendon, hair, and skin, and can also be used in patients with diseases that prevent the use of drug-based interventions," said first author Bo Ri Seo, Ph.D., who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Core Faculty member Dave Mooney, Ph.D. at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. Seo and her coauthors started exploring the effects of mechanotherapy on injured tissues in mice several years ago, and found that it doubled the rate of muscle regeneration and reduced tissue scarring over the course of two weeks. Excited by the idea that mechanical stimulation alone can foster regeneration and enhance muscle function, the team decided to probe more deeply into exactly how that process worked in the body, and to figure out what parameters would maximize healing. They teamed up with soft robotics experts in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Conor Walsh, Ph.D., to create a small device that used sensors and actuators to monitor and control the force applied to the limb of a mouse. " The device we created allows us to precisely control parameters like the amount and frequency of force applied, enabling a much more systematic approach to understanding tissue healing than would be possible with a manual approach," said co-second author Christopher Payne, Ph.D., a former Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard Biodesign Lab who is now a Robotics Engineer at Viam, Inc.  Once the device was ready, the team experimented with applying force to mice's leg muscles via a soft silicone tip and used ultrasound to get a look at what happened to the tissue in response. They observed that the muscles experienced a strain of between 10-40%, confirming that the tissues were experiencing mechanical force. They also used those ultrasound imaging data to develop and validate a computational model that could predict the amount of tissue strain under different loading forces. They then applied consistent, repeated force to injured muscles for 14 days. While both treated and untreated muscles displayed a reduction in the amount of damaged muscle fibers, the reduction was more pronounced and the cross-sectional area of the fibers was larger in the treated muscle, indicating that treatment had led to greater repair and strength recovery. The greater the force applied during treatment, the stronger the injured muscles became, confirming that mechanotherapy improves muscle recovery after injury. But how? Evicting neutrophils to enhance regeneration To answer that question, the scientists performed a detailed biological assessment, analyzing a wide range of inflammation-related factors called cytokines and chemokines in untreated vs. treated muscles. A subset of cytokines was dramatically lower in treated muscles after three days of mechanotherapy, and these cytokines are associated with the movement of immune cells called neutrophils, which play many roles in the inflammation process. Treated muscles also had fewer neutrophils in their tissue than untreated muscles, suggesting that the reduction in cytokines that attract them had caused the decrease in neutrophil infiltration. The team had a hunch that the force applied to the muscle by the mechanotherapy effectively squeezed the neutrophils and cytokines out of the injured tissue. They confirmed this theory by injecting fluorescent molecules into the muscles and observing that the movement of the molecules was more significant with force application, supporting the idea that it helped to flush out the muscle tissue. To pick apart what effect the neutrophils and their associated cytokines have on regenerating muscle fibers, the scientists performed in vitro studies in which they grew muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) in a medium in which neutrophils had previously been grown. They found that the number of MPCs increased, but the rate at which they differentiated (developed into other cell types) decreased, suggesting that neutrophil-secreted factors stimulate the growth of muscle cells, but the prolonged presence of those factors impairs the production of new muscle fibers. "Neutrophils are known to kill and clear out pathogens and damaged tissue, but in this study we identified their direct impacts on muscle progenitor cell behaviors," said co-second author Stephanie McNamara, a former Post-Graduate Fellow at the Wyss Institute who is now an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "While the inflammatory response is important for regeneration in the initial stages of healing, it is equally important that inflammation is quickly resolved to enable the regenerative processes to run its full course." Seo and her colleagues then turned back to their in vivo model and analyzed the types of muscle fibers in the treated vs. untreated mice 14 days after injury. They found that type IIX fibers were prevalent in healthy muscle and treated muscle, but untreated injured muscle contained smaller numbers of type IIX fibers and increased numbers of type IIA fibers. This difference explained the enlarged fiber size and greater force production of treated muscles, as IIX fibers produce more force than IIA fibers. Finally, the team homed in on the optimal amount of time for neutrophil presence in injured muscle by depleting neutrophils in the mice on the third day after injury. The treated mice's muscles showed larger fiber size and greater strength recovery than those in untreated mice, confirming that while neutrophils are necessary in the earliest stages of injury recovery, getting them out of the injury site early leads to improved muscle regeneration. "These findings are remarkable because they indicate that we can influence the function of the body's immune system in a drug-free, non-invasive way," said Walsh, who is also the Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and whose group is experienced in developing wearable technology for diagnosing and treating disease. "This provides great motivation for the development of external, mechanical interventions to help accelerate and improve muscle and tissue healing that have the potential to be rapidly translated to the clinic." The team is continuing to investigate this line of research with multiple projects in the lab. They plan to validate this mechanotherpeutic approach in larger animals, with the goal of being able to test its efficacy on humans. They also hope to test it on different types of injuries, age-related muscle loss, and muscle performance enhancement. "The fields of mechanotherapy and immunotherapy rarely interact with each other, but this work is a testament to how crucial it is to consider both physical and biological elements when studying and working to improve human health," said Mooney, who is the corresponding author of the paper and the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. "The idea that mechanics influence cell and tissue function was ridiculed until the last few decades, and while scientists have made great strides in establishing acceptance of this fact, we still know very little about how that process actually works at the organ level. This research has revealed a previously unknown type of interplay between mechanobiology and immunology that is critical for muscle tissue healing, in addition to describing a new form of mechanotherapy that potentially could be as potent as chemical or gene therapies, but much simpler and less invasive," said Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.   Vitamin E could help protect older men from pneumonia University of Helsinki (Finland), October 7 2021.    An article that appeared in Clinical Interventions in Aging reported a protective role for vitamin E against pneumonia in older men.   For the current investigation, Dr Harri Hemilä of the University of Helsinki, Finland analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study conducted in Finland. The trial included 29,133 men between the ages of 50 to 69 years who smoked at least five cigarettes daily upon enrollment. Participants received alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), beta carotene, both supplements, or a placebo for five to eight years.   The current study was limited to 7,469 ATBC participants who started smoking at age 21 or older. Among this group, supplementation with vitamin E was associated with a 35% lower risk of developing pneumonia in comparison with those who did not receive the vitamin.  Light smokers who engaged in leisure time exercise had a 69% lower risk compared with unsupplemented members of this subgroup. The risk in this subgroup of developing pneumonia by age 74 was 12.9%.   Among the one-third of the current study's population who quit smoking for a median period of two years, there was a 72% lower risk of pneumonia in association with vitamin E supplementation. In this group, exercisers who received vitamin E experienced an 81% lower pneumonia risk.   Dr Hemilä observed that the benefit for vitamin E in this study was strongest for older subjects—a group at higher risk of pneumonia.   "The current analysis of individual-level data suggests that trials on vitamin E and pneumonia on nonsmoking elderly males are warranted," he concluded.       Toxic fatty acids to blame for brain cell death after injury New York University, October 7, 2021 Cells that normally nourish healthy brain cells called neurons release toxic fatty acids after neurons are damaged, a new study in rodents shows. This phenomenon is likely the driving factor behind most, if not all, diseases that affect brain function, as well as the natural breakdown of brain cells seen in aging, researchers say. Previous research has pointed to astrocytes—a star-shaped glial cell of the central nervous system—as the culprits behind cell death seen in Parkinson's disease and dementia, among other neurodegenerative diseases. While many experts believed that these cells released a neuron-killing molecule to "clear away" damaged brain cells, the identity of this toxin has until now remained a mystery. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation provides what they say is the first evidence that tissue damage prompts astrocytes to produce two kinds of fats, long-chain saturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines. These fats then trigger cell death in damaged neurons, the electrically active cells that send messages throughout nerve tissue. Publishing Oct. 6 in the journal Nature, the study also showed that when researchers blocked fatty acid formation in mice, 75 percent of neurons survived compared with 10 percent when the fatty acids were allowed to form. The researchers' earlier work showed that brain cells continued to function when shielded from astrocyte attacks.  "Our findings show that the toxic fatty acids produced by astrocytes play a critical role in brain cell death and provide a promising new target for treating, and perhaps even preventing, many neurodegenerative diseases," says study co-senior author Shane Liddelow, Ph.D. Liddelow, an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Health, adds that targeting these fats instead of the cells that produce them may be a safer approach to treating neurodegenerative diseasesbecause astrocytes feed nerve cells and clear away their waste. Stopping them from working altogether could interfere with healthy brain function. Although it remains unclear why astrocytes produce these toxins, it is possible they evolved to destroy damaged cells before they can harm their neighbors, says Liddelow. He notes that while healthy cells are not harmed by the toxins, neurons become susceptible to the damaging effects when they are injured, mutated, or infected by prions, the contagious, misfolded proteins that play a major role in mad cow disease and similar illnesses. Perhaps in chronic diseases like dementia, this otherwise helpful process goes off track and becomes a problem, the study authors say. For the investigation, researchers analyzed the molecules released by astrocytes collected from rodents. They also genetically engineered some groups of mice to prevent the normal production of the toxic fats and looked to see whether neuron death occurred after an acute injury. "Our results provide what is likely the most detailed molecular map to date of how tissue damage leads to brain cell death, enabling researchers to better understand why neurons die in all kinds of diseases," says Liddelow, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Langone. Liddelow cautions that while the findings are promising, the genetic techniques used to block the enzyme that produces toxic fatty acids in mice are not ready for use in humans. As a result, the researchers next plan is to explore safe and effective ways to interfere with the release of the toxins in human patients. Liddelow and his colleagues had previously shown these neurotoxic astrocytes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis, among other diseases.   Clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside: Vitamin safely boosts levels of important cell metabolite linked to multiple health benefits University of Iowa Health Care, October 3, 2021   In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of Vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage.   Studies in mice have shown that boosting the levels of this cell metabolite -- known as NAD+ -- can produce multiple health benefits, including resistance to weight gain, improved control of blood sugar and cholesterol, reduced nerve damage, and longer lifespan. Levels of NAD+ diminish with age, and it has been suggested that loss of this metabolite may play a role in age-related health decline.   These findings in animal studies have spurred people to take commercially available NR supplements designed to boost NAD+. However, these over-the-counter supplements have not undergone clinical trials to see if they work in people.   The new research, reported in the journal Nature Communications, was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), which supplied the NR used in the trial. Brenner is a consultant for ChromaDex. He also is co-founder and Chief Scientific Adviser of ProHealthspan, which sells NR supplements under the trade name Tru NIAGEN®.   The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner's lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics. The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.   "This trial shows that oral NR safely boosts human NAD+ metabolism," Brenner says. "We are excited because everything we are learning from animal systems indicates that the effectiveness of NR depends on preserving and/or boosting NAD+ and related compounds in the face of metabolic stresses. Because the levels of supplementation in mice that produce beneficial effects are achievable in people, it appears than health benefits of NR will be translatable to humans safely."   The next step will be to study the effect of longer duration NR supplementation on NAD+ metabolism in healthy adults, but Brenner also has plans to test the effects of NR in people with diseases and health conditions, including elevated cholesterol, obesity and diabetes, and people at risk for chemotherapeutic peripheral neuropathy.   Prior to the formal clinical trial, Brenner conducted a pilot human study -- on himself. In 2004, he had discovered that NR is a natural product found in milk and that there is pathway to convert NR to NAD+ in people. More than a decade of research on NR metabolic pathways and health effects in mice and rats had convinced him that NR supplementation had real promise to improve human health and wellness. After consulting with UI's institutional review board, he conducted an experiment in which he took 1 gram of NR once a day for seven days, and his team analyzed blood and urine samples using mass spectrometry. The experiment showed that Brenner's blood NAD+ increased by about 2.7 times. In addition, though he reported immediate sensitivity to flushing with the related compound niacin, he did not experience any side effects taking NR.   The biggest surprise from his metabolomic analysis was an increase in a metabolite called NAAD, which was multiplied by 45 times, from trace levels to amounts in the micromolar range that were easily detectable.   "While this was unexpected, I thought it might be useful," Brenner says. "NAD+ is an abundant metabolite and it is sometimes hard to see the needle move on levels of abundant metabolites. But when you can look at a low-abundance metabolite that goes from undetectable to easily detectable, there is a great signal to noise ratio, meaning that NAAD levels could be a useful biomarker for tracking increases in NAD+ in human trials."   Brenner notes this was a case of bidirectional translational science; having learned something from the initial human experiment, his team was able to return to laboratory mice to explore the unexpected NAAD finding in more detail.   Brenner's mouse study showed that NAAD is formed from NR and confirmed that NAAD levels are a strong biomarker for increased NAD+ metabolism. The experiments also revealed more detail about NAD+ metabolic pathways.   In particular, the researchers compared the ability of all three NAD+ precursor vitamins -- NR, niacin, and nicotinamide -- to boost NAD+ metabolism and stimulate the activity of certain enzymes, which have been linked to longevity and healthbenefits. The study showed for the first time that oral NR is superior to nicotinamide, which is better than niacin in terms of the total amount of NAD+ produced at an equivalent dose. NR was also the best of the three in stimulating the activity of sirtuin enzymes. However, in this case, NR was the best at stimulating sirtuin-like activities, followed by niacin, followed by nicotinamide.   The information from the mouse study subsequently helped Brenner's team design the formal clinical trial. In addition to showing that NR boosts NAD+ in humans without adverse effects, the trial confirmed that NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of NAD+ supplementation in people.   "Now that we have demonstrated safety in this small clinical trial, we are in a position to find out if the health benefits that we have seen in animals can be reproduced in people," says Brenner, who also is co-director of the Obesity Research and Education Initiative, professor of internal medicine, and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI.   Protecting the ozone layer is delivering vast health benefits Montreal Protocol will spare Americans from 443 million skin cancer cases National Center for Atmospheric Research, October 7, 2021 An international agreement to protect the ozone layer is expected to prevent 443 million cases of skin cancer and 63 million cataract cases for people born in the United States through the end of this century, according to new research. The research team, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), ICF Consulting, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focused on the far-reaching impacts of a landmark 1987 treaty known as the Montreal Protocol and later amendments that substantially strengthened it. The agreement phased out the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Stratospheric ozone shields the planet from harmful levels of the Sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting life on Earth. To measure the long-term effects of the Montreal Protocol, the scientists developed a computer modeling approach that enabled them to look to both the past and the future by simulating the treaty's impact on Americans born between 1890 and 2100. The modeling revealed the treaty's effect on stratospheric ozone, the associated reductions in ultraviolet radiation, and the resulting health benefits.  In addition to the number of skin cancer and cataract cases that were avoided, the study also showed that the treaty, as most recently amended, will prevent approximately 2.3 million skin cancer deaths in the U.S. “It's very encouraging,” said NCAR scientist Julia Lee-Taylor, a co-author of the study. “It shows that, given the will, the nations of the world can come together to solve global environmental problems.” The study, funded by the EPA, was published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Mounting concerns over the ozone layer Scientists in the 1970s began highlighting the threat to the ozone layer when they found that CFCs, used as refrigerants and in other applications, release chlorine atoms in the stratosphere that set off chemical reactions that destroy ozone. Concerns mounted the following decade with the discovery of an Antarctic ozone hole. The loss of stratospheric ozone would be catastrophic, as high levels of UV radiation have been linked to certain types of skin cancer, cataracts, and immunological disorders. The ozone layer also protects terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as agriculture. Policy makers responded to the threat with the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, in which nations agreed to curtail the use of certain ozone-destroying substances. Subsequent amendments strengthened the treaty by expanding the list of ozone-destroying substances (such as halons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs) and accelerating the timeline for phasing out their use. The amendments were based on Input from the scientific community, including a number of NCAR scientists, that were summarized in quadrennial Ozone Assessment reports. To quantify the impacts of the treaty, the research team built a model known as the Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework. This model, which draws on various data sources about ozone, public health, and population demographics, consists of five computational steps. These simulate past and future emissions of ozone-destroying substances, the impacts of those substances on stratospheric ozone, the resulting changes in ground-level UV radiation, the U.S. population's exposure to UV radiation, and the incidence and mortality of health effects resulting from the exposure. The results showed UV radiation levels returning to 1980 levels by the mid-2040s under the amended treaty. In contrast, UV levels would have continued to increase throughout this century if the treaty had not been amended, and they would have soared far higher without any treaty at all.  Even with the amendments, the simulations show excess cases of cataracts and various types of skin cancer beginning to occur with the onset of ozone depletion and peaking decades later as the population exposed to the highest UV levels ages. Those born between 1900 and 2040 experience heightened cases of skin cancer and cataracts, with the worst health outcomes affecting those born between about 1950 and 2000. However, the health impacts would have been far more severe without the treaty, with cases of skin cancer and cataracts rising at an increasingly rapid rate through the century.  “We peeled away from disaster,” Lee-Taylor said. “What is eye popping is what would have happened by the end of this century if not for the Montreal Protocol. By 2080, the amount of UV has tripled. After that, our calculations for the health impacts start to break down because we're getting so far into conditions that have never been seen before.” The research team also found that more than half the treaty's health benefits could be traced to the later amendments rather than the original 1987 Montreal Protocol. Overall, the treaty prevented more than 99% of potential health impacts that would have otherwise occurred from ozone destruction. This showed the importance of the treaty's flexibility in adjusting to evolving scientific knowledge, the authors said. The researchers focused on the U.S. because of ready access to health data and population projections. Lee-Taylor said that the specific health outcomes in other countries may vary, but the overall trends would be similar. “The treaty had broad global benefits,” she said.     What is Boron? The trace mineral boron provides profound anti-cancer effects, in addition to maintaining stronger bones. Life Extension, September 2021 Boron is a trace mineral found in the earth's crust and in water. Its importance in human health has been underestimated. Boron has been shown to have actions against specific types of malignancies, such as: Cervical cancer: The country Turkey has an extremely low incidence of cervical cancer, and scientists partially attribute this to its boron-rich soil.1 When comparing women who live in boron-rich regions versus boron-poor regions of Turkey, not a single woman living in the boron-rich regions had any indication of cervical cancer.2(The mean dietary intake of boron for women in this group was 8.41 mg/day.)  Boron interferes with the life cycle of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a contributing factor in approximately 95% of all cervical cancers.1  Considering that HPV viruses are increasingly implicated in head and neck cancers,3,4 supplementation with this ultra-low-cost mineral could have significant benefits in protecting against this malignancy that is increasing in prevalence. Lung cancer: A study conducted at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2005 found that increased boron intake was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy. Prostate cancer: Studies point to boron's ability to inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells.  In one study, when mice were exposed to boric acid, their tumors shrank by as much as 38%.6 One analysis found that increased dietary boron intake was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.7 Several human and animal studies have confirmed the important connection between boron and bone health. Boron prevents calcium loss,8 while also alleviating the bone problems associated with magnesium and vitamin D deficiency.9 All of these nutrients help maintain bone density. A study in female rats revealed the harmful effects a deficiency in boron has on bones, including:10 Decreased bone volume fraction, a measure of bone strength, Decreased thickness of the bone's spongy inner layer, and Decreased maximum force needed to break the femur. And in a study of post-menopausal women, supplementation with3 mg of boron per day prevented calcium loss and bone demineralization by reducing urinary excretion of both calcium and magnesium.8 In addition to its bone and anti-cancer benefits, there are nine additional reasons boron is an important trace mineral vital for health and longevity. It has been shown to:1 Greatly improve wound healing, Beneficially impact the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D, Boost magnesium absorption, Reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Raise levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, Protect against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity, Improve the brain's electrical activity, which may explain its benefits for cognitive performance, and short-term memory in the elderly, Influence the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and Potentially help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Because the amount of boron varies in the soil, based on geographical location, obtaining enough boron through diet alone can be difficult. Supplementing with low-cost boron is an effective way to maintain adequate levels of this overlooked micronutrient.

The Brain and Brand Show
The Neuroscience of Designing Happiness

The Brain and Brand Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:19


Timothy shares 3 behavioural design ideas, as well as conversations and research with strangers, about what makes them happy.

New Books Network
Caitlin Donohue Wylie, "Preparing Dinosaurs: The Work Behind the Scenes" (MIT Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 55:55


Those awe-inspiring dinosaur skeletons on display in museums do not spring fully assembled from the earth. Technicians known as preparators have painstakingly removed the fossils from rock, repaired broken bones, and reconstructed missing pieces to create them. These specimens are foundational evidence for paleontologists, and yet the work and workers in fossil preparation labs go largely unacknowledged in publications and specimen records. In Preparing Dinosaurs: The Work Behind the Scenes (MIT Press, 2021), Caitlin Wylie investigates the skilled labor of fossil preparators and argues for a new model of science that includes all research work and workers. Drawing on ethnographic observations and interviews, Wylie shows that the everyday work of fossil preparation requires creativity, problem-solving, and craft. She finds that preparators privilege their own skills over technology and that scientists prefer to rely on these trusted technicians rather than new technologies. Wylie examines how fossil preparators decide what fossils, and therefore dinosaurs, look like; how labor relations between interdependent yet hierarchically unequal collaborators influence scientific practice; how some museums display preparators at work behind glass, as if they were another exhibit; and how these workers learn their skills without formal training or scientific credentials. The work of preparing specimens is a crucial component of scientific research, although it leaves few written traces. Wylie argues that the paleontology research community's social structure demonstrates how other sciences might incorporate non-scientists into research work, empowering and educating both scientists and nonscientists. The open access edition of this book was made possible by generous funding from Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

To Your Good Health Radio
End of Mental Illness: How Neuroscience Is Transforming Psychiatry

To Your Good Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Over half of the U.S. population will struggle with a mental health issue at some point in their lives.Mental illness is at an all-time high.Conditions like depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, addictions, PTSD, and ADHD are skyrocketing. Every 14 minutes somebody commits suicide in the United States. Every eight minutes someone dies of a drug overdose.And, according to a recent study, over half of the U.S. population will struggle with a mental health issue at some point in their lives.World renown brain expert, Dr. Daniel Amen, joins Dr. Friedman to discuss his new book, The End of Mental Illness.Dr. Amen shares in this encore episode from February 2020, why standard treatment isn't working and what you can do to successfully transform your mind so it's functioning at an optimal level.

Lifefulness: Live Life Fully
'The Neuroscience of Pandemic Grief' w/ Dean Burnett - #Ep 65

Lifefulness: Live Life Fully

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:38


We love Dean Burnett: neuroscientist, comedian, author, journalist and general spreader of wisdom. On the pod we talk to him about the neuroscience of grief, which became a major focus when he lost his father to CovidHearing how he had to say goodbye over the phone to his unconscious Dad will leave you in bits (or at least it got to me). What makes Dean such a great guest is that he can switching between exploring the deep pain, to discussing a key academic finding, and then he'll throw in a joke.We discuss:Socially distant funeralsThe importance of funerals in grievingThe power of grief journals The death of Robin WilliamsSeparating science writing from politicsMore about Dean:Dean Burnett is a Welsh neuroscientist and author. He is best known for writing the book ‘The Idiot Brain', which was shortlisted for the 2016 Goodreads Best Science & Technology Book Award. His books have been translated into more than twenty languages. He began his writing career as a result of his satirical science column ‘Brain Flapping‘ at the Guardian, which ran from 2012 to 2018 which was the most read on the Guardian science network, with over 15 million views since 2012. The blog now runs at the Cosmic Shambles network.Lifefulness CommunityWe always talk about the Lifefulness Community because that is what we're all about. The next intake of Lifefulness Small Groups is open now.Thanks so much for listening!Lifefulness Small Groups See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
208 - Prevention & Intervention Strategies in Alzheimer's Disease: August 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 17:36


In this short and sweet episode, Naila covers 7 new papers on prevention and intervention of Alzheimer's disease. You'll hear about upcoming clinical trials of behavioural and cognitive interventions, a little bit about the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of exercise, and about non-invasive stimulation techniques for treating AD.   Sections in this episode:  Cognitive / Physical Training (1:57)  Neuromodulatory Techniques (9:27)  -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below:https://drive.google.com/file/d/1W9coBE5hJ7I8NpQFLSd_scL5nggs0g7m/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works together to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. In particular, this episode was scripted and hosted by Naila Kuhlmann, edited by Chihiro Abe, and reviewed by Marcia Jude and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was made by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for sorting all the papers published in August 2021 into themes for our episodes: Jacques Ferreira, Ellen Koch, Nicole Corso, Kate Van Pelt, Christy Yu, and Dana Clausen. Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, and Jacques Ferreira, for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Pretty Pretty Podcast
Why You're Tired AF + How To Get Your Energy Back

Pretty Pretty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 23:04


Manage your energy in a whole new way so no matter what's happening in your life, nothing dulls your sparkle. The 4 sources of energy you must have to operate at your best and how you can identify energy leaks in your life that need resolving.PRIVATE COACHING:Want personalized support for your own transformation? I invite you to book an Awaken Session to discuss one-on-one private coaching, where we take all the things I talk about here and apply them to you and your life. Schedule your own personal Awaken Session here: awakensession.comWHAT'S

New Books Network
Paul Thagard, "Bots and Beasts: What Makes Machines, Animals, and People Smart?" (MIT Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 61:54


Octopuses can open jars to get food, and chimpanzees can plan for the future. An IBM computer named Watson won on Jeopardy! and Alexa knows our favorite songs. But do animals and smart machines really have intelligence comparable to that of humans? In Bots and Beasts: What Makes Machines, Animals, and People Smart? (MIT Press, 2021), Paul Thagard looks at how computers (“bots”) and animals measure up to the minds of people, offering the first systematic comparison of intelligence across machines, animals, and humans. Thagard explains that human intelligence is more than IQ and encompasses such features as problem solving, decision making, and creativity. He uses a checklist of twenty characteristics of human intelligence to evaluate the smartest machines—including Watson, AlphaZero, virtual assistants, and self-driving cars—and the most intelligent animals—including octopuses, dogs, dolphins, bees, and chimpanzees. Neither a romantic enthusiast for nonhuman intelligence nor a skeptical killjoy, Thagard offers a clear assessment. He discusses hotly debated issues about animal intelligence concerning bacterial consciousness, fish pain, and dog jealousy. He evaluates the plausibility of achieving human-level artificial intelligence and considers ethical and policy issues. A full appreciation of human minds reveals that current bots and beasts fall far short of human capabilities. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:41


Red onion effective at killing cancer cells, study says University of Guelph (Ontario)  If you're looking for a flavorful way to help fight and prevent cancer, add red onion to your shopping list.  It will be worth the effort … as you will soon see why. In the first study of its kind, University of Guelph researchers looked at how the Ontario-grown red onion and several others affected the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Their findings indicate that all onions are not created equal. The Canadian researchers looked at five different kinds of onion in total from the province of Ontario. They assessed the onions in terms of their effects against cancer cells and their ability to prevent cancer. Of the five species tested, the Ruby Ring red onion was the most effective. Few people are aware that onions are somewhat of a superfood. Hopefully, studies like these will help to change that. Onions in general have very high concentrations of the flavonoid quercetin. However, the Ruby Ring Ontario red onion has particularly high levels of these compounds as compared with other species. In the study, colon cancer cells were placed in direct contact with quercetin that was extracted from the five onion varieties studied. It was found that all of the onion types created an unfavorable environment for cancer cells and initiated cancer cell death, or apoptosis. Communication between the cancer cells seems to be disrupted by the compounds in the onions, and this can help to fight and prevent cancer. The study also showed that the Ruby Ring red onion was high in anthocyanin, a compound that helps to enrich the scavenging properties of quercetin. This in turn supports quercetin in fighting cancer cells and helping to prevent cancer. Anthocyanin is the molecule that gives vegetables like red onions their rich, deep color. This is in keeping with the general increased healthbenefits that can be gained from other dark or brightly colored vegetables and fruits. The recent onion study results were published in the journal Food Research International. While all of the onions studied showed the ability to inhibit cancer cells, red onions were particularly effective. Their beneficial compounds blocked the production of both colon cancer cells and breast cancer cells within the controlled conditions of the study. The next step is to complete human trials to further explore the cancer fighting effects of onions. Researchers are also working on an extraction technique to isolate the quercetin in onions so that it can be administered as a cancer therapy. In the meantime, finding ways to include more of this cancer-fighting superfood into your diet can allow you to experience many health benefits. Enjoy red onions in salads, on sandwiches and cooked into soups, stews and stir-fry dishes.     Age and aging have critical effects on the gut microbiome   Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, October 4, 2021 Researchers at Cedars-Sinai have found that aging produces significant changes in the microbiome of the human small intestine distinct from those caused by medications or illness burden. The findings have been published in the journal Cell Reports. "By teasing out the microbial changes that occur in the small bowel with age, medication use and diseases, we hope to identify unique components of the microbial community to target for therapeutics and interventions that could promote healthy aging," said Ruchi Mathur, MD, the study's principal investigator. Research exploring the gut microbiome, and its impact on health, has relied predominantly on fecal samples, which do not represent the entire gut, according to Mathur. In their study, investigators from Cedars-Sinai's Medically Associated Science and Technology (MAST) Program analyzed samples from the small intestine–which is over 20 feet in length and has the surface area of a tennis court–for examination of the microbiome and its relationship with aging. "This study is the first of its kind to examine the microbial composition of the small intestine of subjects 18 years of age to 80. We now know that certain microbial populations are influenced more by medications, while others are more affected by certain diseases. We have identified specific microbes that appear to be only influenced by the chronological age of the person," said Mathur, an endocrinologist and director of the Diabetes Outpatient Treatment & Education Center. The 21st century has been referred to as the "era of the gut microbiome" as scientists turn considerable attention to the role trillions of gut bacteria, fungi and viruses may play in human health and disease. The microbiome is the name given to the genes that live in these cells. Studies have suggested that disturbances in the constellations of the microbial universe may lead to critical illnesses, including gastroenterological diseases, diabetes, obesity, and some neurological disorders. While researchers know that microbial diversity in stool decreases with age, Cedars-Sinai investigators identified bacteria in the small bowel they refer to as "disruptors" that increase and could be troublesome. "Coliforms are normal residents of the intestine. We found that when these rod-shaped microbes become too abundant in the small bowel–as they do as we get older–they exert a negative influence on the rest of the microbial population. They are like weeds in a garden," said study co-author Gabriela Leite, Ph.D. Investigators also found that as people age, the bacteria in the small intestine change from microbes that prefer oxygen to those that can survive with less oxygen, something they hope to understand as the research continues. "Our goal is to identify and fingerprint the small intestinal microbial patterns of human health and disease. Given the important role the small bowel plays in absorption of nutrients, changes in the microbiome in this location of the gut may have a greater impact on human health, and warrants further study," said Mark Pimentel, MD, director of the MAST program and a co-author of the study. This research is part of Cedars-Sinai's ongoing REIMAGINE study: Revealing the Entire Intestinal Microbiota and its Associations with the Genetic, Immunologic, and Neuroendocrine Ecosystem.   Study finds no association between caffeine intake and invasive breast cancer risk University of Buffalo, September 28, 2021 Researchers from the University at Buffalo conducted a study of nearly 80,000 postmenopausal women in the U.S. to determine whether caffeine consumption from coffee and tea has any association with invasive breast cancer. The average age when U.S. women reach menopause, 51, also happens to coincide with the age group—50- to 64-year-olds—that has the highest reported caffeine consumption. In addition to that, the average age of breast cancer diagnosis in the U.S. is 62. This overlap of age at menopause, age at diagnosis of breast cancer and age with high caffeine consumption gave greater weight to the importance of clarifying whether caffeine intake impacts breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. It does not, according to the UB researchers' findings, published in August in the International Journal of Cancer. "From our literature review, many studies have found significant associations between coffee and/or tea consumption and reduced breast cancer incidence whereas a few studies have reported elevated risk. Our study, however, found no association," said study first author Christina KH Zheng, who worked on the study while completing her master's in epidemiology at UB. She is now a surgical resident in the MedStar Baltimore general surgery program. "About 85% of Americans drink at least one caffeinated beverage a day. It is important for the public to know whether consumption of caffeinated beverages has beneficial or harmful effects on breast cancer, the most common type of cancer and second-leading cause of cancer death for U.S. women," said Lina Mu, MD, Ph.D., the study's senior author, who is an associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health at UB. "The overlap of age at diagnosis of breast cancer and age with high consumption of caffeine, and the inconsistent findings from previous studies motivated us to study whether this lifestyle factor could affect breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women," said Kexin Zhu, a study co-first author and epidemiology Ph.D. student in UB's School of Public Health and Health Professions. Researchers looked at a sample of 79,871 participants in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Participants have for decades now completed yearly health questionnaires that help researchers learn more about diet and exercise habits, as well as disease, and any possible linkages. After a median follow-up of 16 years, there were 4,719 cases of invasive breast cancer identified. At first glance, women who reported drinking two to three cups of caffeinated coffee per day had a 12% higher risk of invasive breast cancer compared to non-drinkers. But that association was not statistically significant after adjusting for lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. "Seeing null results after adjusting for lifestyle, demographic and reproductive factors informs us of the complexity that is the relationship between caffeine intake and invasive breast cancer risk," Zheng said. "Some lifestyle factors, like drinking alcohol and physical activity, might be associated with both coffee intake and breast cancer risk," Zhu explained. "Therefore, they might confound the initial positive associations. After we took the lifestyle factors into account, the results suggested that regular coffee drinking might not have an impact on invasive breast cancer risk." The risk of invasive breast cancer was even higher—22%—for women who reported drinking two to three cups of decaffeinated coffee each day. It was slightly lower when adjusted for lifestyle variables (smoking history, alcohol consumption, physical activity, etc.), and the association was not statistically significant when further accounting for reproductive variables such as family history of breast cancer and number of children The researchers were unable to determine if the elevated risk is due to the decaffeinated nature of the coffee, the amount consumed, or another factor unique to this population that was not accounted for in the study. The researchers did not observe a significant association between overall tea consumption and invasive breast cancer. Additional research needs to be done in order to understand whether different types of teas have different effects on breast cancer risk, Zhu said.   Liver function improves with the consumption of Broccoli sprout extract Tokai University Tokyo Hospital (Japan), October 5, 2021 A Japanese study of broccoli sprouts and liver function has found the sulforaphane-rich food to be highly beneficial. An extract from broccoli sprouts given to male participants was shown to improve hepatic abnormalities and overall liver function significantly. For the study, the researchers conducted a double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial of males with fatty liver disease. The subjects received either extract of broccoli sprouts in capsule form, or a placebo. The capsules contained glucoraphanin, a precursor for the sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts. A number of key liver function markers were measured before and after the trial. It was determined that dietary supplementation with extract of broccoli improved liver functioning by decreasing alkali phosphatase activity and oxidative stress markers. Broccoli sprout extract was also found to prevent NDMA-induced chronic liver failure in rats. The researchers believe the antioxidants in broccoli sprouts are effective in suppressing the mechanisms of liver failure at a cellular level. The reduction of oxidative stress is crucial in protecting the liver and improving its health, and broccoli is loaded with health-supporting antioxidants. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is also reaching epidemic proportions, with nearly 30 percent of Americans (90 million people) having some level of the disease. Like hep C, NAFLD can result in liver failure and cancer of the liver in the most severe cases. Exposure to environmental toxins exacerbates liver conditions as well, with the glyphosate found in weed killers, like Roundup, particularly harmful. The good news is that liver conditions are preventable by embracing a healthy lifestyle. Eating plenty of organic fruits and vegetables, exercising regularly and avoiding alcohol and cigarettes can do wonders for liver health. As evidenced by the recent research out of Japan, sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprouts can be a key component in supporting healthy liver function. Milk thistle, vitamin E, black seed oil and dandelion root have also shown effectiveness in supporting and detoxifying the liver.       How cannabis-like substances keep the brain in balance   Utrecht University (Netherlands), October 4, 2021 Whenever we learn, remember or forget something, a surprisingly active role is played by cannabis-like substances in the brain. Researchers at Utrecht University found that the substances actively balance connections in the brain that allow cells to either activate or inhibit each other. The discovery reveals how brain cells influence each other, and how psychiatric disorders can arise when this process goes wrong. Although wisdom comes with age, our brain does not store every single experience or lesson learned. In addition to learning and remembering, our brains are also equipped to forget irrelevant things or drop unused skills. In order to find a balance in this, brain cellsconstantly communicate with each other through connections that activate or inhibit the cells. Researchers from Utrecht University discovered that brain cells can form new, inhibitory connections via so-called endocannabinoids. They reported their discovery in Journal of Neuroscience. Counterbalance Endocannabinoids derive their name from the cannabis plant, which contains similar substances. The researchers discovered the role of endocannabinoids when they induced brain cells of mice to strengthen activating connections. In response, the brain cells also started making new inhibitory connections. The researchers found that endocannabinoids kickstarted the new connections. Surprisingly active role The researchers were surprised to find that these substances play such an active role. "Nobody expected this from endocannabinoids," says research leader Dr. Corette Wierenga, neurobiologist at Utrecht University. It was already known that endocannabinoids can influence the functioning of our brains. But until now researchers assumed that the substances were merely involved in adjusting existing connections. "Now it appears that the system of endocannabinoids can actively push the production of new inhibitory connections, with which brain cells actively regulate the balance." Psychiatric disorders caused by imbalance The discovery could help scientists to better understand how psychiatric disordersand other abnormalities in the brain develop. In many of these disorders, the balance between inhibitory and activating connections is disturbed. During an epileptic seizure, for example, this balance is seriously disturbed. Although in many other disorders the disturbance is more subtle, for example in schizophrenia, the impact can still be equally profound. Cannabis-related unbalance The balance between activating and inhibiting connections in our brain is constantly being adjusted in response to our experiences. Whenever we experience something, the connections change, and the brain must restore the balance. Cannabis use can disrupt that balance. "Occasional cannabis use will not seriously disturb the balance," says Wierenga. "But if the balance is disturbed for a longer period, it can cause problems. For example, children of mothers who smoked marijuana during pregnancy can experience problems with neurological development." Early stages of life The balance is especially important in early stages of life, Wierenga says. "During our development, brain connections are constantly changing. Especially during that period, it is important that inhibitory and activating connections remain coordinated. If the coordination is malfunctioning or disturbed, you can imagine that the system becomes disrupted. And unfortunately, disruptions that occur so early cannot be easily repaired later in life." According to Wierenga, such disruptions can lead not only to loss of memory, but also initiate more serious consequences. For example, the brain might grow out to less adaptive to stressful situations. "When this happens, things get out of hand more easily in the brain, because inhibition and activation are out of balance. That could lead to learning and behavioral problems." Predicting and preventing disorders Creating a deeper understanding of the role endocannabinoids play in the brain, could lead to psychiatric disorders being more predictable or even prevented in the future. The publication in Journal of Neuroscience now sets out a new direction in which more knowledge can be built up. Wierenga: "Ultimately, as a researcher, we want to understand how brain cells coordinate the balance and what happens when that balance is disturbed.   Glycerin is safe, effective in psoriasis model Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, October 4, 2021 Patients with psoriasis have reported that glycerin, an inexpensive, harmless, slightly sweet liquid high on the list of ingredients in many skin lotions, is effective at combatting their psoriasis and now scientists have objective evidence to support their reports. They found that whether applied topically or ingested in drinking water, glycerin, or glycerol, helps calm the classic scaly, red, raised and itchy patches in their psoriasismodel, Dr. Wendy Bollag, cell physiologist and skin researcher at the Medical College of Georgia and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center and her colleagues report in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences. The studies also provide more evidence of the different ways glycerin enables the healthy maturation of skin cells through four stages that result in a smooth, protective skin layer. Psoriasis is an immune-mediated problem that typically surfaces in young adults in which skin cells instead multiply rapidly, piling up into inflamed patches. "We have experimental data now to show what these patients with psoriasis are reporting," says Bollag, who nearly 20 years ago first reported in The Journal of Investigative Dermatology that glycerin, a natural alcohol and water attractor known to help the skin look better, also safely helped it function better by helping skin cells mature properly. Bollag's early report led to many anecdotal reports from individuals and their reports ultimately led to the newly published study. Topically, glycerin is known to have a soothing, emollient effect. But another key part of its magic, which Dr. Bollag has helped delineate, is its conversion to the lipid, or fat, phosphatidylglycerol, which ultimately regulates the function of keratinocytes, our major skin cell type, and suppresses inflammation in the skin. Glycerin gets into the skin through avenues like aquaporin-3, a channel expressed in skin cells, and the MCG scientists have shown that once inside, aquaporin 3 funnels glycerin to phospholipase-D-2, an enzyme that converts fats in the external cell membrane into cell signals, ultimately converting glycerin to phosphatidylglycerol. In 2018, Bollag and team reported that topical application of phosphatidylglycerol reduced inflammation and the characteristic raised skin patches in a mouse model of psoriasis. This time they decided to look at the impact of its widely available precursor glycerin. For the new studies, they used imiquimod, which is known to produce psoriasis-like plaques on humans using it for problems like genital warts and some skin cancers, to produce an animal model. The mice either drank the sweet natural alcohol or the scientists applied it topically. Either way, glycerin helped reduce development of the characteristic skin lesions, the scientists report, a finding which helps underline that glycerin works in more than one way to improve the skin condition. Externally, glycerin showed its action as an emollient because even in mice missing phospholipase-D-2, it was beneficial. Additionally, topically it appears to compete with hydrogen peroxide for space inside the aquaporin 3 channel. Hydrogen peroxide is commonly known as a mild antiseptic but we produce it as well and at low levels it's a cell signaling molecule. But at high levels, hydrogen peroxide produces destructive oxidative stress, which can actually cause psoriasis. The scientists found that topical glycerin reduced the levels of hydrogen peroxide entering skin cells. When they added glycerin and hydrogen peroxide at the same time directly to skin cells, they found that glycerin protected against the oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide. "Glycerol is basically outcompeting the hydrogen peroxide in getting in there and preventing it from being able to enter and increase oxidative stress," Bollag says. Oil and water don't mix, so yet another way glycerin may be helpful is by supporting the skin's major role as a water permeability barrier so that, as an extreme, when we sit in a bathtub the bath water doesn't pass through our skin so we blow up like a balloon, she says. On the other hand, when glycerin was ingested by the mice missing the phospholipase- D-2, which converts fats or lipids in a cell's membrane to signals, it simply did not work, Bollag says, which confirmed their earlier findings that internally anyway, glycerin pairs with the enzyme to produce the signal essential to skin cell maturation. Some of their other most recent work is detailing more about how phosphatidylglycerol decreases inflammation.  Bollag would like next steps to also include clinical trials with dermatologists and patients and is working to find a formulation scientist who can make what she thinks will be the optimal combination: glycerin and phosphatidylglycerol in the same topical cream. The addition of phosphatidylglyerol itself, rather than just the glycerin that makes it, is essentially a backup since there is some evidence that in psoriasis the essential conversion of glycerin to phosphatidylglycerol is not optimal. Bollag's lab and others have shown reduced levels of aquaporin 3 in psoriasis, which likely means less phosphatidylgycerol, so making more glycerin available may help, albeit not as efficiently, raise the availability of this lipid essential to normal skin cell proliferation. Moving quickly into clinical trials should be comparatively easy since, as with glycerin, there already is experience with the use of phosphatidylglycerol in humans. For example, it's a component of some high-end cosmetics, Bollag says.  She suspects that this sort of two-punch combination, could help keep early signs of psoriasis at bay and, with more advanced disease, use existing psoriasis treatments to get the skin condition under control then start applying glycerin to help keep it that way. Bollag and her colleagues reported in 2018 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology that in a mouse model of psoriasis, phosphtidylglycerol reduced inflammation and the characteristic raised skin lesions of psoriasis.  While its exact cause is unclear, psoriasis is an immune-mediated condition and patients have higher levels of inflammation, as well as too many skin cells being produced then maturing abnormally. The heightened inflammation also puts them at increased risk for problems like heart disease. Biologics used to treat psoriasis work different ways to stem this overactive immune response but in addition to their high cost, can put the patient at risk for problems like serious infections and cancer. The only side effect she has seen in about 20 years of working with glycerin and the clinical and cosmetic use already out there, is it can leave the skin feeling slightly sticky. Our bodies can make glycerol from the carbohydrates, proteins and fats that we eat or already have in our body.    

Smart Art Business
Mindset And Psychology With Dr Gigi Arnaud

Smart Art Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 31:34


In this episode, our host Rachel Wilkins speaks with life coach, Dr Gigi Arnaud on changing conditioned mindsets, negative and limiting beliefs in relation to neuroscience and psychology. They discuss comparison paralysis, ways to get aligned with the authentic you and practical ways to apply mindset principles and reprogram your own behaviour to create your version of success.

The Dr CK Bray Show
EPISODE 397 Neuroscience in the News

The Dr CK Bray Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 18:16


In today's episode of the Dr. CK Bray Show, Dr. Bray shares the latest and greatest research to come out in the last month. Dr. Bray discusses the topics of what foods you should be eating to ensure better cognitive performance, how to change your perception of stress, romantic passion related to how tan you are, and finally, how exercise lowers your risk of developing anxiety. (And we always wondered why Dr. Bray was so tan! Riddle solved.) QUOTES BY DR. BRAY “I'm a 10 out of 10!” “If your love life is suffering, it's time to go out and get some sunlight!” “We create our own reality.”

THE ED MYLETT SHOW
The Motivational Power Of A High Five w/ Mel Robbins

THE ED MYLETT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 89:10


Some people you meet, you instantly CONNECT with them. MEL ROBBINS is one of those people for me. Ask anybody who knows me, and they will tell you that she is simply one of my favorite human beings I've ever met. When you listen to this week's episode, you'll see why one of Mel's superpowers is to connect with people wherever she goes. In a smart, earthy, funny, and candid talk, Mel is a LIVE WIRE who's going to win you over from the start. A former criminal defense attorney, she is now one of the most sought-after motivational speakers in America. You may know her from her appearances on CNN as a legal analyst, or as the host Cox Media Group's _The Mel Robbins Show, A&E's Monster In-Laws, and Fox's Someone's Gotta Go._ You may think that something as simple as giving a HIGH FIVE doesn't amount to much, but as Mel explains, one HIGH FIVE can make all the difference in the world. Think about it. You have a lifetime of positive programming from giving others high fives. It's impossible to say something negative a then give someone a high five. The two actions are INCONGRUENT. You've never given it any thought, have you? But Mel has. She's figured it out and applied the NEUROSCIENCE to back it up. Like many great actions, it's the simple ones like HIGH FIVES that carry the most weight for me and you. That includes the importance of learning how to properly HIGH FIVE YOURSELF to start your day. Yes…it's important to HIGH FIVE other people but it's ESSENTIAL that you validate your self-worth by generously giving yourself HIGH FIVES. It's even more CRITICAL when you haven't accomplished anything big than when you do. Mind-blowing, isn't it? But when Mel goes into the physiological details, it makes perfect sense. If that isn't enough, Mel shares some eye-opening insights on how to cope with gossip and jealously. Here's a hint. Learn to EMBRACE JEALOUSY. And if you'd like to know how 5 SECONDS can change your life several times a day, Mel gives an awesome tutorial about the power of a 5-4-3-2-1 countdown. There's so much to impact behind the psychology of a HIGH FIVE. BOTTOM LINE… A HIGH FIVE is an amazing gift you can give others. More important, a HIGH FIVE is an AMAZING gift you can give YOURSELF.