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Public research university in California, United States

  • 2,676PODCASTS
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  • Oct 17, 2021LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about uc berkeley

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1448 Pillars of Copaganda and the Lies We Are Told About Police

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 67:09


Air Date 10/16/2021 Today we take a look at some of the structures of "copaganda," from misreported stats and coverups to propagandistic opinion articles and police procedurals that flood the pop culture landscape. Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) BestOfTheLeft.com/Refer Sign up, share widely, get rewards. It's that easy! Check out the Refuse Fascism podcast! BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: Alec Karakatsanis on "Crime Surge" Copaganda - CounterSpin - Air Date 10-1-21 We hear from Alec Karakatsanis, executive director of Civil Rights Corps, and author of the book Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System. Ch. 2: US Police Killings Undercounted by More than Half, According to New Study - Serious Inquiries Only - Air Date 10-7-21 Today we break down a new study that shows police killings were undercounted by MORE THAN HALF. This confirms what many of us have suspected about the "official data" on police violence, and it's only the tip of the iceberg. Ch. 3: Downstream: Is Line of Duty 'Copaganda'? Part 1 - Novara Media - Air Date 5-5-21 From Paul Blart: Mall Cop to A Touch of Frost, ‘copaganda' has our pop culture bang to rights. What impact does the ubiquity of police dramas on our screens have on the real criminal justice system? Ch. 4: “Becoming Abolitionists”: Derecka Purnell on Why Police Reform Is Not Enough to Protect Black Lives - Democracy Now! - Air Date 10-8-21 Derecka Purnell draws from her experience as a human rights lawyer in her new book, “Becoming Abolitionists: Police, Protests, and the Pursuit of Freedom,” to argue that police reform is an inadequate compromise to calls for abolition. Ch. 5: The Summer of Anti-BLM Backlash and How Concepts of Crime Were Shaped By the Propertied Class - Citations Needed - Air Date 8-4-21 Democrats and Democratic Party-aligned media have allied with conservatives and right-wing media are rehashing the same tired responses: more police, longer sentences, and tougher laws. Guests Alec Karakatsanis and sociologist Tamara K. Nopper. Ch. 6: Downstream: Is Line of Duty 'Copaganda'? Part 2 - Novara Media - Air Date 5-5-21 MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 7: US Police Killings Undercounted by More than Half, According to New Study Part 2 - Serious Inquiries Only - Air Date 10-7-21 Ch. 8: What the Hell Happened to Police and Criminal Justice Reform - WhoWhatWhy - Air Date 10-8-21 The dean of UC Berkeley's Law School looks at how the courts have prioritized criminal control over civil rights for suspects and defendants. VOICEMAILS Ch. 9: Thank you for the quality of the show and to all medical workers - V from Central New York FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 10: Final comments on the comparison between police work and conspiracy cults MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Activism Music: This Fickle World by Theo Bard (https://theobard.bandcamp.com/track/this-fickle-world) Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com Listen Anywhere! BestOfTheLeft.com/Listen Listen Anywhere! Follow at Twitter.com/BestOfTheLeft Like at Facebook.com/BestOfTheLeft Contact me directly at Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com

Reimagining Black Relations
#50 Domination by Majority and Minority

Reimagining Black Relations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 65:18


Percy Hintzen Ph.D., Professor Emeritus at UC Berkeley and currently Professor of Global and Sociocultural Studies in the School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University shared his experiences and expertise of White and Black relations from the Caribbeans to Africa, Asia, Europe, and the rest of Americas. He highlighted the problems faced by indigenous Black countries, the advent of Europeanized Africans,  correlation between language and power, and the solution to the global colonized world."We consider them as foreigners, but at the same time, they were the ones who exercised control over every aspect of our lives. And it was very violent. They had the privilege of power and they exercised authority over us in a very violent way" - Percy Hintzen Ph.D.,

Fiat Vox
87: How Nobel winner David Card transformed economics

Fiat Vox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:14


The labor economist and UC Berkeley professor of economics, who won the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, talks about why his research on the economics of the minimum wage, immigration and education was so controversial — and how it continues to be today. Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. (UC Berkeley photo by Keegan Houser) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

John Riley Project
Roots of San Diego State’s Exclusion from PAC-12

John Riley Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:26


Why are UC Berkeley, Stanford, and UCLA so afraid of competing with San Diego State University? For the past 2-3 decades we have seen SDSU rise up both athletically and academically to create a national brand that is respected from coast to coast. SDSU regularly boasts some of the highest numbers of student applicants every year. At the same time, the Aztec men's basketball and football programs have a combined winning percentage ranked second in all of the United States in D1 sports. Yet UC Berkeley, Stanford, UCLA, and other universities have kept SDSU out of the Pac-12 conference. We break down the historical roots of the 2-tiered (actually 3-tiered) higher education system in California and how this battle between San Diego State and Cal/UCLA has been raging for over 6 decades. I also reflect on my own experiences as a graduate of UC San Diego, my rooting adoption of SDSU athletics, and UCSD's transition into D1 sports. We also get into research funding, the SDSU Mission Valley campus and SDSU's future goals for academic, research and athletic excellence. Special thanks to Paul Garrison for his research on this topic. His article in the East Village Times is the inspiration for this podcast episode. https://www.eastvillagetimes.com/the-roots-of-sdsus-exclusion-from-the-pac-12/ #SDSU #PAC12 #SanDiegoState #AztecforLife Get proven and easy-to-implement strategies to build your business and pursue your happiness. Sign up now. It's FREE! https://johnrileyproject.com/ Be sure to share this video with a friend! ☆☆    STAY CONNECTED    ☆☆ SUBSCRIBE for more reactions, upcoming shows and more! ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJJSzeIW2A-AeT7gwonglMA FACEBOOK ➡ https://www.facebook.com/johnrileyproject/ TWITTER ➡ https://twitter.com/JohnRileyPoway INSTAGRAM ➡  https://www.instagram.com/johnrileypoway/ Sponsorship Inquiries https://johnrileyproject.com/sponsorship/ Music https://www.purple-planet.com

Just Admit It!
Semester 3: Episode 7: How should medical school applicants prepare for interviews?

Just Admit It!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 41:28


Thinking about going to medical school? Typically, applicants will be invited to interviews any time between early fall and winter. Interviews can take place at any time once a secondary application is submitted, but most universities will wait until the fall semester begins so that applicants have the chance to interact with current med school students. In this episode, IvyWise Medical School Admissions Expert Juhn (Former MD Admissions Officer at Stanford University School of Medicine and Pre-Medical/Pre-Health Advisor at UC Berkeley) and IvyWise College Admissions Counselor Christine (Former Assistant Director of Admissions at Yale and Georgetown) share advice on how med school applicants can prepare for their interviews.

Shine
How to Calm Emotional Triggers At Work and In Life with Carley Hauck

Shine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 45:03


Welcome to season five of The Shine Podcast. This season is going to be focused on leaders and topics related to how we continue to move through the challenges and the complexity that we are all navigating in our workplaces, our home life and the greater world. In today's episode, I will share what I know about the science on triggers, why they are caused, and where they're coming from. I am going to offer you a few helpful practices on how to calm emotional triggers that you can use in your life and share with others. My goal is to help you learn how to cultivate a strong inner game that will enable you to navigate triggers skillfully. The inner game rules the outer game, and the six qualities of the inner game that I've identified and highlighted in my new book really support one to navigate triggers skillfully, create healthy boundaries, and then have the brave exchanges so that the patterns that cause the trigger are minimized, and/or maybe even uprooted.   SHINE Links: Leading from Wholeness Executive Coaching Leading from Wholeness Learning and Development Resources Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World by Carley Hauck Contact Carley Hauck Book Carley for speaking Sign up for the Podcast! Carley on LinkedIn   Resources mentioned in this episode: “How to Deal With Anger at Work” by Carley Hauck   The Imperfect Shownotes   Carley Hauck 0:01   Hi, my name is Carley Hauck. Welcome to another episode of the SHINE podcast. This is the first interview of season five, which will total out 2021. And for those of you that are just joining, I'd love to give you a little backstory on the SHINE podcast and how it came to be.   It started in May 2019, where I was finally sharing lots of interviews that I had previously conducted with incredible leaders as part of the research for my new book, which I spent almost five years writing and debuted this year, February 23 2021, Shine: Ignite Your Inner Game to Lead Consciously at Work and in the World, my publisher is Sounds True.   And I have been really delighted by the response of people to the book, but the podcast continues to go strong. And the podcast is really about the intersection of three things: conscious, inclusive leadership, the recipe for high performing teams and awareness practices. And I go into the science, the spiritual perspective, and then the actual application of this into your life. I will be facilitating two to three episodes a month. And before I tell you about our topic today, I'd love if you could go over to Apple podcasts, hit the subscribe button. And if you love this episode, or any previous episodes that you might want to tune into, if you could write a positive review, it helps so much. And it supports people to find this podcast. Thank you.   This particular season is going to be focused on leaders and topics related to how we continue to move through the challenges and the complexity that we are all navigating in our workplaces, our home life and the greater world. We are in a spiritual and collective awakening, I am sure. And I hope that this podcast will be the light that will support you to shine your light. Our topic for today is how to calm emotional triggers at work and in life. And this is going to be by yours truly.   Carley Hauck 3:10   Has this ever happened to you? Listen to some possibilities. You're at work. You had an experience where most of the day was off, maybe you woke up late. meetings were suddenly canceled, rescheduled but you were prepared. Other folks were expressing impatience, frustration, and communication processes were not easy. And you felt triggered.   This might have happened at home. You could be navigating challenging children, you're working from home. They're at home too. Maybe you have a sick parent in your life, you're feeling under the weather yourself. Or perhaps you're navigating flash flooding, or smoking fires due to climate change. And it's throwing your inner calm and balance off. You feel triggered.   What I'm speaking to is pretty normal. And especially in a highly complex and always changing workplace and world. We are all navigating so much right now. We have been and it's been highlighted in the last 18 or so months since the beginning of the pandemic. Many of our so-called freedoms have been taken away. We're still wearing masks in most public places. We've been more socially isolated than any other time. And as a result are being forced to be on technology more than ever to meet our social needs and to be high performing leaders at work or just folks at work. Being connected to screens and technology is not something that we should be on this many hours a day.   Why? Because when we look at our hunter gatherer ancestors, they were living in community, living in deeper harmony with the land with their food systems. They were engaging in regular exercise, dance song, and expressive arts. Now we are a far cry from living like that. But our nervous systems aren't used to this much arousal. And what I mean by arousal is, when we are on our technology, our devices, these EMF that we're pretty much bombarded with all day long. Guess what it does to the body? It raises our blood pressure or heart rate, and therefore, our arousal, our nervous system response, and we may be perceiving things to be stressful when they actually are not. It is easier under the conditions we are living in to become more triggered, versus calm and responsive.   Carley Hauck 6:21   And so in this episode, I will share what I know about the science on triggers, why they are caused, where they're coming from, and a few helpful practices that you can use in your life, and also share with others. I have been teaching and leading a certain practice around triggers for the last few years, and I have shared it with thousands of folks and leaders in reputable companies. It's also listed in chapter two of my book. And in fact, just about a week or so ago, I shared this particular practice on a training that I facilitated with leaders on increasing empathy and emotional intelligence with some amazing folks at Capital One.   To tell you why I know a lot about triggers and why I developed this practice, I needed help with triggers. I needed help with my own triggers. And so this is where it began. I was dating a man, this was in 2017. We were in a relationship for a few months, and we were deepening into intimacy. And guess what, when intimacy happens, and the veils start to come down, you're going to trigger each other, there's going to be conflict, conflict is part of relationship, it's part of life. And if you're not having conflict in your relationships, then there's probably not a deeper connection. And conflict doesn't have to end the relationship.   In fact, by having the relational skills to navigate it with care and wisdom, it can create more trust, more psychological safety, more intimacy, more connection, more collaboration, even more innovation.   So back to this relationship experience, my partner was triggered. And he did and said some things that then created triggers in me. I am always up for staying in the midst of difficulty and staying in relationship and repairing. And, you know, trying to heal, that's just my orientation. I am a person that really values harmony. And it was a real struggle to do that in our relating. Because he would get triggered, he would go into avoidance, I would get triggered, and I would freeze. And then I wasn't able to do or say the things that would hopefully calm him down, calm myself down. And it was horrible to watch myself.   And the relationship ended. And it was meant to end, we wouldn't have been good partners or people for each other. And I knew that shortly into the relationship but you know, it was only a few months you're figuring it out. Again, conflict is normal and it's normal at work, and it's definitely normal in dating. Conflicts and triggers will arise but it can actually be something that helps you to grow closer, if you have the skills like I'm going to share with you in this episode.   Carley Hauck 10:09   So I developed this practice that I'm going to share with you in a couple minutes. Because I can only choose how I respond, I don't have control of the other. But in the moment that I feel scared, I feel triggered, I can choose how I want to respond if I have awareness and if I have the tools. And so shortly after I developed this practice, I wrote an article on this process. And the article is called “How to Deal With Anger at Work”.   And it was with the digital magazine conscious company, which is now part of socap. In 2018, this was one of the top 20 articles read that year. I felt very proud of that and thought, wow, lots of people need help with triggers, so it felt really lovely to be able to be in service in that way.   So what is a trigger? I've been saying this word a lot, a trigger is in current time, or a cue, or an event that re-stimulates sensations of the past trauma, it can be a word, it can be a verb. For example, a loud voice can be a trigger, a person's fear of being controlled or overpowered. That may have come from early childhood experiences. Additionally, another trigger could be a lack of response, you know, you reach out to someone, or you're trying to have a communication and there's no response. And that could actually create a trigger of abandonment or neglect, so to speak.   And so in the midst of the pandemic, we are becoming more comfortable speaking about trauma, and you heard the definition that I spoke to it could be something that's happening in current time, a cue or an event that really stimulates sensations of the past trauma. So we are becoming more comfortable talking about trauma, talking about mental illness in the workplace, it has always been here. But due to the increased pressure, the social isolation I was talking about before, and the large challenges we were navigating at work and in the world. The symptoms that maybe we were suppressing, maybe we were covering with unhealthy coping mechanisms like alcohol or shopping, or who knows, that can only be pushed down so long before it starts to fester and come to the surface.   Carley Hauck 13:02   And so I want to just preface that if you notice that you've been more triggered recently, in your life, this might be an important time to do some deeper inner work to go into, why is this happening more and more. Most of us have emotional healing to do. And that often affects what we are triggered by. And if we don't acknowledge what is causing the trigger, then those patterns continue and we won't be able to heal or navigate them with more skill. And I speak from experience here one I noticed myself, I've been more triggered recently, in the midst of the pandemic, I have been navigating some very uncertain and complex challenges, more so than normal. And I won't get into all of that. But just to just a preface. I am there with you if you're feeling this too.   And prior to my work and leadership and organizational development consulting, I was going through a very rigorous training, thinking that I might want to be a full time therapist but I actually decided that I wanted to do coaching and consulting more and was already starting to do that. But along the way I I went through lots and lots of supervised hours.   As a marriage and family therapist intern in the Bay Area of California I actually conducted over 3,000 supervised hours as I was learning how to be a therapist, but I was also working as a coach and getting supervision as a coach. I worked specifically for an entire year with men who had deep levels of PTSD and trauma who had been living in San Francisco's in the 80s, and had contracted HIV and AIDS. And so I bring that up because I have worked deeply with folks that are suffering from trauma. And I also worked with families and couples, and was watching the attachment trauma.   Now I bring up attachment trauma, because it actually is related to triggers. So trauma can also have lasting effects in our nervous system in our bodies, if the traumatized person doesn't have an opportunity to process the event, to talk about the event, or be comforted by someone else, right after the event. So we can imagine if this is stemming from childhood, and we didn't have the words and we didn't feel safe to talk about it, and we didn't feel soothed by that experience, then we're probably still holding it. So these are all things to think about when we are thinking about triggers.   And one of the things I also just wanted to preface here and I don't have any answer, before I move into this process is I have worked with a lot of companies and leaders in the last decades around reworks. And reworks, for the most part, are not done very skillfully. The communication I find very harsh, it's not caring, people will have been working at a company for 20 years, maybe 10 years, maybe eight years. And suddenly, they're laid off, they didn't see it coming. And the family at work that they've been a part of that they've been putting their life force, their energy, their love their service, and is no longer there. And there were many layoffs in 2020. That can be traumatic for folks.   And I'd really love to invite workplaces and leaders that are listening, that let's create a different way of treating our people and caring for our people. When we tell them that it's time to go. No, there's this process that happens where when someone is getting laid off, they immediately don't have access to their computer or their files. And some people don't even get a chance to like, gather emails or documents. And I just don't think it's the most effective practice or process. So I don't have the solution.   But my question is, can we design a more compassionate and caring communication process for those that are being asked to leave their current role or their workplace that is honoring and respectful. And I imagine I will have a podcast interview on that topic another day.   Carley Hauck 18:10   But now I'd like to go into the next part of this interview, which is on how cultivating a strong inner game is going to enable you to navigate triggers skillfully. So the inner game is the body of work that I've been developing and teaching for over a decade with 1000s of folks, leadership positions, individual contributors, and students at Stanford University and UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business.   The inner game rules the outer game. And there are six qualities of the inner game that I've identified and that I highlight in my new book that I believe really support one to navigate triggers skillfully, create healthy boundaries, and then have the brave exchanges so that the patterns that cause the trigger are minimized, and maybe even extinguished.   So I value leading with authenticity. So I'm going to share with you all, how I got triggered the other day, and then how I used the six inner game skills to help me come back into balance and have the brave exchange. So I had scheduled two interviews for Friday of last week, and I was prepared for them, and they were on my schedule, and I was looking forward to them. The first interview was canceled due to a really challenging scenario with this particular leader that I was going to be speaking to. This client leader actually shared with me that she needed to reschedule our interview because there was a threat at her child's school and she recognized that she needed some space before having a call she she wasn't actually in the right headspace and so she asked to reschedule and so I really appreciated her cell phone In his her communication, her, her ability to notice she was triggered, she was not in a good place to talk.   And so I honored her. I said, of course, please take care of yourself. And yeah, just reschedule when it's good for you. So that was the first cancellation of the day, it was totally fine. And then next, I had a podcast interview that I had scheduled about a month ago with a friend and colleague of mine, and I was very excited to have the conversation. And I had sent the, you know, Google Calendar and the zoom link, and we had corresponded about it. And the time arrived, I was on zoom, I was waiting.   And there was five minutes that had passed, and I didn't see the guests. So I, so I texted this person. And then I emailed, then there was no response. I waited another few minutes. And because I know this guest, personally, I called them, there was no response. I texted, I sent these Zoom links again. And now it's getting to be around 15 minutes. And I was like, Okay, I guess this isn't happening today. I don't know what happened.   But in the moment, I felt confused. I noticed I felt frustrated, there was some impatience, there was disappointment. After about 25 minutes, there was still no response, there was no acknowledgement. And I wasn't too triggered. But I definitely noticed I was triggered.   And I'm going to share with you a process very soon to help you understand how triggered you are. I accepted that there was some fluke, and I decided, you know what I'm triggered, I'm going to go take a break, I'm going to come back into balance, and I need a break. Anyway, I've been on my computer a lot today. So I noticed that in all these feelings that came up, that there was a need to be acknowledged, there was a need for greater respect, there was a need for efficiency so that my time had been honored.   Carley Hauck 22:19   And I also noticed that there was a request from myself that if we were to reschedule, to do this podcast interview, again, that I would want to make sure that this person was available and capable of responding. You know, maybe 30 minutes before the interview, or even afterwards, just in case there was a technology glitch, or scheduling glitch, so that this didn't happen again. But the no acknowledgement after text after emails after, you know, a call, I thought that was really odd. And I would want to make sure that they were available, their phone was on, they knew, you know that they needed to be available, just in case anything happened so that we were in communication.   So I'm going to break down the process that I went through, that corresponds to the inner game. So self awareness is the first of the six inner game skills. So again, I was aware that I felt triggered. How did I know this, I was aware of the sensations in my body. My heart rate was higher, my blood pressure, I noticed I felt irritation, I was aware of some of the feelings that I already named.   Emotional intelligence is a second inner game skill. And that comprises four dimensions- self awareness, which I already spoke to self regulation, which is this ability to regulate one's nervous system. So I noticed I was feeling triggered, I needed to take some deep breaths, I needed to take a break and shake it off, so to speak. Social awareness is another component of emotional intelligence, and then relationship mastery to our parts of the inner game, and to our parts of the outer game, which you'll see show up when I go into the conversation that I want to have.   And so again, in my self regulation, I was breathing deeply. I actually went and sat outside in the sun, and I was really enjoying the sun because where I live right now in North Carolina, there has just been so much rain and so much gray weather, and I'm not used to it. So having this break in the middle of the day to get a little bit of sun poking through the clouds was actually a really beautiful gift.   And then the third inner game practice is resilience and we can think of that as growth mindset. So the thought that I had while this was happening is I wonder what happened. Why? Why is this happening? Right? Which is coming from more curiosity versus why are they doing this to me? Why did this happen? So I had this sense that there's a reason why this is happening. And you know why? Because I was supposed to do a solo podcast on this topic. That's why it allowed me to use my experience as a teachable moment. For triggers for this first episode of Season Five.   The fourth inner game practice is well being. So again, I took time to pause, I even sang a song in the car as I was driving to get out into the sun and singing helps me to calm down. I walked barefoot in the grass, I unplugged from technology, so I could really lower my arousal state. And I calm down.   Love, that's number five. I was able to turn towards myself with compassion, Carley, you've had like, two people cancel on you today, and your schedule has gotten a little rocked, right? It's a little unpleasant. I offered myself care. And then I offered compassion to this other person, I hope they're okay, hope everything's fine. And so if I'm not able to bring that inner game of love, and compassion, and even forgiveness towards myself, first, it's really hard to put that out into the world and into my relationships.   And the number six, the inner game of authenticity. When I moved into owning what was true for me, what were my feelings? What were my needs, and even going a layer deeper, I actually acknowledged that the trigger stirred some old emotional triggers for me that I've had due to childhood experiences, where I often felt like I was, you know, having to be super responsible, holding everything down, taking care of others, and there wasn't a lot of mutuality, there was sometimes not even communication. And that often then has me feeling a bit triggered, you know, like, I'm not being respected, I'm being neglected. And why do I have to work so hard, you know, to be able to get someone to meet me in this place. So that was coming up for me too.   And I was also really recognizing my request, if we were to reschedule again. So that is coming from the inner game of authenticity. And if this person wasn't able to, you know, agree to some of my requests, in order to schedule another podcast interview, then it's not the right fit, and nothing personal, it's just, this is a process, it's not going to work for me again, and I don't want to have a repeat performance.   So about an hour later, I actually did hear from this person, and they apologize, my name that they thought they were on, you know, Pacific Standard Time, even though all my communication and our Google calendar invite was on Eastern Standard Time, I brought attention to what I did to coordinate the interview to create efficiency. And then I actually had the brave exchange and I named my parameters and the agreement in order to reschedule this interview, and support this person with their new book. So this was honoring myself, my time, my boundaries. And by doing that I can be much more compassionate and forgiving with this person's process.   Carley Hauck 29:15   So that is the way that when we cultivate these six inner game qualities of self awareness, emotional intelligence, resilience, well being love and authenticity, it supports us to have the brave exchange to navigate our triggers more easily because we've developed the skills to relate even in the midst of conflict, even in the midst of trigger. So I told you that I was going to give you a process to try and here it is: are you ready?   This is the first step because we have to understand that we're triggered before we can actually relate skillfully to triggers. This is coming from chapter two in my book, and I'd love for you to just bring your attention inward.   Just bring your awareness to your body to your breath. Kind of digesting everything I've shared, but letting it all go. Maybe move your fingers, your toes, your neck, shoulder circles back, whenever it feels good to just come into the body. This is only going to take a few minutes. So don't do this while you're driving. If you're walking, see if you can, you know, just pause to be still. And now just recall a time that happened recently where you felt triggered at work at home. And bring to mind the situation and go through this process with me.   On a scale of one to 10, see if you can identify the number of trigger one being I feel calm. 10 being I am about to lose it. Can you recall? What was your number? Next, identify your emotions, there might be many: fear, anger, patience, disappointment. All feelings are welcome. Now turn towards your body. What bodily sensations are you aware of is there a tightness constriction, an irritation. And just notice where it's taking up space in your body, your hands, your belly, your head, is it a lot of space is in a little bit of space. And trying to stay in the body, don't go into story.   And next, try to identify what the narrative is about this situation this person did or said or this happened. And we can have lots of narratives and they can either bring us up or they can bring us down. And if you recall, the experience that I shared, I was able to stay in curiosity. I wondered what happened. But I welcome you to really acknowledge whatever narrative is true. Well, what is your narrative about the situation right now.   And notice that you probably have a need from this person from this situation. What need do you have right now that would support you to come into greater balance, maybe you have a need for a break. First, maybe you have a need for connection for respect for whatever it is love for you to just acknowledge what that need is, honor it.   And then bring your awareness back to your body back to your breath. Maybe do a little movement, a little shaking. So that process can take a couple minutes. And it's really helpful for you to go through so that you can start to understand your patterns and be able to have choice over your response in the moment that you're triggered.   Carley Hauck 34:45   And I wanted to share just another piece that when you're first identifying the number on a scale of one to 10. If you're at a five or higher, I would invite you to really pause at that moment. This is not the time to have the conversation. Because in that range of trigger, you've usually left your heart and you're pretty much in your head, which means you're in a more fear based place. If you're in your heart, you're still coming from love, you might still be coming from care, compassion, forgiveness, you're able to really hold space for your experience and the other. But when we're too triggered, we're in attack mode, because that's how our nervous system is wired, we are going to be in fight flight, or freeze versus the, you know, more relaxed care and befriend space.   And so you're human, it's okay, if you're above a five, go take good care of yourself, do what you need to do to shake it off, and then identify what your need is. And so one of the ways that we can communicate that we're triggered, so that we're actually able to salvage and have care for the other, especially if this is in the midst of another person, is we just acknowledge it, I feel triggered, or I'm not in a good place to talk right now.   The other thing that can happen is that we're in dialogue or relationship with someone else who's triggered, and they may not actually even be able to say that they're triggered. So that's also a really wonderful time. If you're aware that this person's triggered, and they're coming from fight flight, or freeze, which means they're withdrawn, they're attacking, or they're just kind of frozen, that you might also interject and say, What do you think about us taking a pause, taking a break, and revisiting this in 15 minutes, or Let's reschedule to another day, right. And you don't necessarily have to say, Hey, I think you're triggered, because that could create more of a trigger for the other person, but you just offer a pause. And if that person isn't able to hear it, you can still take it, because that's you honoring you, and that's you holding healthy boundaries.   So I hope that all this information was helpful to you. And you can grow your inner game, so that you can be a conscious leader at work life in the world. And that inner game will support you to navigate triggers more skillfully. And there are a couple ways for you to cultivate a strong inner game, and to also continue these types of practices.   One is the podcast. I believe this is Episode 48. So all of the podcasts interviews that I have done, I'm sharing practices, I've interviewed leaders, and they're talking about the challenges they've had and what they've utilized to really grow their inner game and navigate their own complexities at work and at home because we bring our whole selves wherever we go, you know, it's not compartmentalised. As I was sharing earlier, our childhood experiences impact, what triggers us at work, and at home.   You can also get my book in hardcopy or an audiobook is available. And I would love to support you with the wonderful stories of leaders in the book and incredible science and the practices that you can apply to your life.   You could also book a free consultation with me and we can develop a specific training for your organization, team, or leadership. I also love creating large scale learning and leadership development programs with these foundational skills embedded. And the links for the book. And booking time with me will all be in the show notes.   Carley Hauck 39:20   Before I say farewell for now, I'd like to invite one more invitation. It's so important that we start to understand the patterns of what triggers us. And so as you go about your day, you might start to explore what are the patterns of things that are causing me to feel triggered at home, at work?   Here are some examples at work. Do I get triggered in group meetings? If so, why? And my one-on-ones with my supervisor. Do I get triggered when they do or say certain things? Why is this potentially related to old experiences in my childhood or my family of origin are another experience that reminds me of this? Do I feel triggered when I am ignored, or when I feel a lack of belonging or trust? Where's that coming from? So, just really being curious.   There's no judgment here, because we all have it. But if we can start to understand the root of it, and we bring caring, and loving awareness, we can start to shift our response and create new healthy patterns on the inside, and less on how we show up on the outside.   Before we part, I am going to share my heart's desire. This feels a bit vulnerable. And I've never used the platform for this purpose, but it feels timely, and we live in a virtual connected world. I am in a wonderful place in my life, where I am seeking a conscious inclusive human being who has a deep commitment to learning growth and using relationship as spiritual practice. This person, like me, has devoted time and energy for many years with teachers, programs, healers, therapists, coaches, to develop and cultivate the inner game skills I've been speaking of: self awareness, emotional intelligence, empathy, growth mindset, leading from love, forgiveness, authenticity. And they are excited and ready to engage in skillful relating and navigating conflict with health, and patients, and responsiveness.   And as I had shared earlier, how I came to develop this practice for myself on navigating triggers was due to the ending of a relationship. But throughout my entire existence of this life, I have yet to find a person that can stay. That has the skills for this type of relating. And I'm at a place where I will not date anyone that does not have the skills, I do not want to go through the pain that has occurred by not being met in these basic capabilities of relating, they feel basic to me. I'm aware, they're not for everyone.   So if you are listening to this, you feel a sense of resonance with me with this image of relating. And you're excited to explore beautiful partnership, and supporting one another to be the best versions of ourselves in service of a more just inclusive and regenerative world, I would love to hear from you. Please reach out. conversations are always a great way to start. And I'm always in the mindset that we are always learning and growing from each other. And I'm always willing to see how we can support each other even if it's not, you know, moving towards what I'm calling in this particular message.   If you are also listening to us and you know, an eligible, single cisgendered heterosexual male who fits this description, and you would like to reach out and introduce us, I would be delighted to hear from you. It's all about introductions and supporting one another, to grow into our best selves with the right community opportunities. So thank you for hearing my heart's desire. And as always, I so appreciate you being part of the podcast community for listening in. And until we meet again, be the light and shine your light.  

Be Brave at Work
Episode 155: Amii Barnard-Bahn

Be Brave at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:18


Join us on Be Brave at Work as we speak with Amii Barnard-Bahn. Amii is a former Fortune Global 50 executive and is a consultant to the C-Suite and leaders at global companies like Bank of the West, Adobe and The Gap. Recognized by Forbes as one of the top coaches for legal and compliance executives, she is a member of Marshall Goldsmith's 100 Coaches. Amii guest lectures at Stanford and UC Berkeley, is a contributor to Harvard Business Review, Fast Company and Compliance Week, and is a Fellow at the Harvard Institute of Coaching. Links of Interest LinkedIn Website Promotability Index® Assessment Please click the like button above and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you! More information about Ed, visit Excellius.com © 2021 Ed Evarts

Many Minds
Monkeys, monogamy, and masculinity

Many Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:52


Welcome back folks! Today's episode circles some big questions. What does it mean to be human? What's distinctive about the human mind and the human mode of being? What is human nature—if such a thing exists—and how could we catch a glimpse of it? Should we go looking for it in other primate species? Should we look deep in our fossil record? My guest today is Dr. Agustín Fuentes, Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. He is the other of a number of books, most recently The Creative Spark, in 2017, and Why We Believe, in 2019. Agustín was trained as a biological anthropologist, but as, you'll hear, he's very much interested in the whole human, not just our skulls and teeth and genes. He's spent the better part of his career trying to build a more integrated, more fully fleshed out view of our species—one that takes seriously our bodies and brains, our culture and cognition, our primate heritage and our Pleistocene past.  Here we talk about Agustín's career—how he got into anthropology in the first place, and how he went from observing langurs in Indonesia, to writing about human creativity and belief. We discuss the human niche and why it's distinctive (but maybe not unique). We touch on monogamy and how it's not a monolith. We talk about maleness and masculinity. And, for those who've been following recent hubbubs online, rest assured that we also talk about Darwin—and specifically what Darwin got wrong about biological sex and race. I've been following Agustín's work for some time and was thrilled to get him on the show. He's an unusually expansive and boundary-crossing thinker—and that's on full display in this conversation. He also doesn't shy away from messiness. He welcomes the mess. He celebrates complexity. He enthuses about the richly, entangled human condition. Whether or not you yourself celebrate mess and complexity and entanglement—I'm pretty sure you'll enjoy hearing what Agustín has to say about it.  One quick announcement before he get to it: we'd like to welcome a new member of the Many Minds team: Cecilia Padilla. She is our new Assistant Producer, and we're super excited to have her on board.  Alright friends—here's my chat with Dr. Agustín Fuentes. Enjoy!   A transcript of this episode is available here.    Notes and links 6:00 – One of the first anthropology courses to inspire Dr. Fuentes was taught by Dr. Phyllis Dolhinow of UC Berkeley. 9:15 – An early publication by Dr. Fuentes on the Mentawai langur (Presbytis potenziani). 12:00 – A 2012 paper by Dr. Fuentes laying out the aims, findings, and history of the subfield known as ethnoprimatology, which studies interactions between humans and primates. 13:30 – A 2013 paper by Dr. Fuentes describing ethnoprimatological findings from Bali. 17:30 – Dr. Fuentes's 1998 paper on monogamy, which he considers one of his first important contributions to the field. 22:00 – In 2008 Dr. Fuentes published Evolution and Human Behavior, a book-length comparison of different accounts of why humans are the way they are. 23:15 – The classic book on niche construction by Odling-Smee and colleagues. A single-article discussion of the concept of niche construction is available here. 26:00 – The Extended Evolutionary Synthesis website, which Dr. Fuentes recommends. 29:40 – A paper by Dr. Fuentes on the human niche. 32:00 – One distinctive aspect of the human niche—belief—is discussed extensively in Dr. Fuentes's book Why We Believe. 37:00 – Dr. Fuentes recently reviewed Kindred, by Rebecca Wragg Sykes, who we had on the show previously. 39:30 – Dr. Fuentes's recent paper on the search for the “roots” of masculinity. 54:00 – Dr. Fuentes recently wrote a chapter on Darwin's account of the “races of man” in A Most Interesting Problem, a volume edited by Jeremy De Silva. See also his recent editorial in Science, which raised quite a stir. Dr. Fuentes also recommends the chapter in the De Silva volume by Dr. Holly Dunsworth titled ‘This View of Wife.' 1:03:00 – For the broader historical and biographical context of Darwin's ideas, I recommend Janet Browne's two-volume biography. 1:12:15 – Dr. Fuentes quotes Tim Ingold's idea that “anthropology is philosophy with people in it.” If you're interested in learning more about the topics we discussed, be sure to check out Why We Believe and The Creative Spark. Dr. Fuentes also recommends: Kindred, Rebecca Wragg Sykes The Promise of Contemporary Primatology, Erin P. Riley Emergent Warfare in Our Evolutionary Past, Nam C. Kim & Marc Kissel Recent books on race by Dorothy Roberts and Alondra Nelson Anthropology: Why It Matters, Tim Ingold Darwin's Unfinished Symphony, Kevin Laland Pink Brain, Blue Brain, Lise Eliot The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry   You can find Dr. Fuentes on Twitter (@Anthrofuentes) and follow his research at his website.      Many Minds is a project of the Diverse Intelligences Summer Institute (DISI) (https://disi.org), which is made possible by a generous grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation to UCLA. It is hosted and produced by Kensy Cooperrider, with help from assistant producer Cecilia Padilla. Creative support is provided by DISI Directors Erica Cartmill and Jacob Foster. Our artwork is by Ben Oldroyd (https://www.mayhilldesigns.co.uk/). Our transcripts are created by Sarah Dopierala (https://sarahdopierala.wordpress.com/). You can subscribe to Many Minds on Apple, Stitcher, Spotify, Pocket Casts, Google Play, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. We welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions. Feel free to email us at: manymindspodcast@gmail.com. For updates about the show, visit our website (https://disi.org/manyminds/), or follow us on Twitter: @ManyMindsPod.

Writ Large
The Legitimacy of the Modern Age

Writ Large

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 32:08


Those of us living today generally think of ourselves as modern, that we live in modern times, and that we are very different from the people of the past. But there is an important thing that we share with all humans who have come before—we ask ourselves big, hard questions about life, questions like how we should live and why the world is so full of suffering. Each era comes up with answers to these questions. And although sometimes the answers last a long time, they are never permanent. As times change, people demand new answers. In his 1966 book The Legitimacy of the Modern Age, German philosopher Hans Blumenberg explores the evolution of humanity's answers to our perennial questions. Martin Jay is the Ehrman Professor of European History Emeritus at UC Berkeley. He is the author of Discussing Modernity: A Dialogue with Martin Jay. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod.

Perpetual Chess Podcast
EP 247- Michael Franco (Adult Improver Series)

Perpetual Chess Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 75:25


Michael Ross Franco is a 28 year old Applied Mathematics Ph.D. student at UC Berkeley who is also an accomplished chess improver. As Michael tells us, his interest in chess was sparked when he was looking for an engaging hobby while fighting leukemia in 2013. He started following the 2013 Carlsen-Anand World Championship match, and his interest has blossomed from there. Michael's chess rating has also blossomed, as he has slowly climbed from beginner level to a 2300 peak Lichess Rapid Rating in the subsequent 8 years. In our interview, Michael details the books, experiences and lessons that have influenced him along the way. Please read on for lots more details and any relevant links.  0:00- Michael shares the unique story of how in 2013, the leukemia diagnosis left him looking for an engaging hobby, which turned out to be chess. Michael followed the 2013 Carlsen-Anand match and developed a particular affinity for Magnus Carlsen.  Mentioned: Chess Network YouTube Channel, PowerPlay YouTube Channel  10:30- Michael began his chess climb with about an 1100 LiChess rating. Which books helped him ascend from there?  Mentioned: A First Book of Morphy, How to Reassess Your Chess  19:30-  Perpetual Chess is brought to you in part by Chessable.com. Check out what's new from them Here: New Chess Courses Online - For All Levels - Chessable.com Don't forget to subscribe to the How to Chess podcast as well! 20:15- How did Michael approach game analysis and learning from his games when he was climbing from Lichess 1100 to 2000 or so?  Mentioned: Instructive Modern Chess Masterpieces by GM Igor Stohl  25:30: Once he started grad school, Michael was able to take advantage of an IRL chess club at University of California-Berkeley. What lessons did he learn from face-to-face games with stronger players?  Mentioned: Chess Club at Berkeley  30:30- What was Michael's approach to studying openings?  34:00- When did Michael play his first tournament? What does he advise other online players who are new to tournaments?  43:00- Perpetual Chess is also brought to you in part by Chessmood.com  Chessmood offers a huge library of instructive videos. You can hear GM Avetik Grigoryan on Episode 192 of Perpetual Chess. Be sure to subscribe to their YouTube channel here. 43:30-  Perpetual Chess is also brought to you in part by AImchess.com. Check out the site, and if you decide to subscribe use the code Perpetual30 to save 30%. 44:30- Michael shares some more book recommendations. Mentioned: Pump Up Your Rating, Essential Chess Sacrifices, Thinking Inside the Box, Winning  Chess Middlegames, Chess Structures, James Altucher interview with GM Judit Polgar, Episode 241 with FM Peter Giannatos  49:00- What was Michael's approach to studying tactics?  54:30- Michael shares the various online resources he has joined: Mentioned: IM Andras Toth Twitch channel, Chessbrah Twitch channel, Morphy Chess Club Discord, GM Jesse Kraai The Plus Minus Equal of Chess Improvement  57:30- Patreon mailbag question: “Has Michael's mathematical background helped him succeed at chess?” Michael also gives some background on his academic/professional career.  1:02:00- What are Michael's 3 biggest chess improvement tips? Play longer games and analyze them in depth.  Play higher-rated people  Enjoy the game, expand your chess culture!  1:05:00- Thanks so much to Michael for sharing what he has learned about chess improvement. You can reach him via his Lichess account, NoseKnowsAll, here: https://lichess.org/@/NoseKnowsAll Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

An Interview with Melissa Llarena
095: Comedian Kathy Klotz-Guest Talks About Achieving Your Life's Purpose Through Laughter and Embracing Your Humanity

An Interview with Melissa Llarena

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:32


Why is a sense of humor and humanity so important that you should bring both to work and keep them in your life? In fact, a sense of playfulness can be your superpower. It certainly was for this week's guest: Kathy Klotz-Guest.  In today's episode, Kathy shares her story as a woman in technology who excelled in Silicon Valley by being funny and smart. We delved into the #1 fear most of us share: the fear of judgment especially by others (particularly from our coworkers). Kathy also shares how you can avoid living a fragmented life at work and instead bring more of your personality to the table as an asset. We talk about what you may need to feel psychologically safe enough to let your guard down a bit and show your humanity.  Kathy shares where the magic is as well as other lessons she has learned from her ‘improv' experiences, including a concept called the “yes, and.” Hopefully, after listening to this episode, you'll be inspired to add more humor and a spirit of playfulness into your life.  I also want to invite you to grab your free copy of my Courage Makerspace Playbook. In this playbook, you'll have an opportunity to grow and test your own courage muscles. See where they are today and where they can use some strengthening so that you can get more out of your life. Pick any one of my 7 specific exercises centered on boosting your courage so you get to a point where you rise up and you and you can finally be your real, authentic, and playful self. You see, approaching your life purpose or going after your dreams is a lot easier if you are intentionally playful along the way; and in my playbook, I give you my process.  Simply go to www.melissallarena.com/courage. Once you receive your playbook, turn to page 29 for an exercise that will help you intentionally add playful experiences into your life. You will also notice how intentionally planning for playful experiences each month will get you to a space where you'll be making your responsibilities work around those playful and memorable experiences and not the other way around. Grab your Courage Makerspace right now if you want to rather approach your life purpose and mission laughing, than being burnt out.  About Kathy Klotz-Guest Kathy Klotz-Guest is a speaker, author, comedian, and former tech exec who uses tools of improvisation and humor to help leaders, teams - even companies - be more human and communicate like humans. By helping people bring more of their humorous selves to work, we can lead positive change and create safe spaces for bold, "unsafe" ideas that matter. The founder of Keeping it Human, Kathy trained at ComedySportz and at LA's Second City, and she and her work have been featured in Forbes and The Huffington Post.  Inc.com named her book, “Stop Boring Me!” a must-read for leaders. It was one of the top 10 humor and communication books on Amazon in 2018.  Kathy has graduate degrees from Stanford University and UC Berkeley, and performs stand-up comedy and improv as well as teaches it in theater and business settings. Her 12 yr old still thinks she's funny, though she knows that the window is closing very soon. She is working on her 3rd book and just launched an improv and business course on LinkedIn Learning called 'Leading in the Moment.' Share this episode with a people leader whom you know is secretly a funny person who might just need a nudge to share their gift with others! Encourage them to use their superpower by sharing this conversation with them.  Highlights Curiosity: Consider the idea of saying “yes, and” in your life so that you can follow your hunches and stay the course with whatever might be necessary for you to do during your day-job Creativity: Create or find your own safe space. Watch how creative you can be when you feel psychologically safe. Courage: Honor yourself and your ideas and show up for others. It's time to stop living a fragmented life and start becoming more of yourself. Embrace who you are and that's where the magic is! Leadership: Leaders worth following have a sense of humor and humility. If you take yourself so seriously, you can't laugh at your mistakes and embrace your own humanity.  Humanity: We all have inside of us this capacity for lightheartedness and joy. If we don't want that as part of who we are, then we're not connecting with all of who we are. Fear: The number one fear is people are afraid of being judged by their co-workers, we're afraid of judgment. Perspective: Be honest about the reality that some people will not like who you are. Show up more and the world around you will start to change. Authenticity: If you can be more you during the hiring process, the right employer, the right culture, the right team, and their propensity to accept the real you will reveal itself. Humor: People feel more comfortable with humor when it's organic and when there's psychological safety. Culture: When the people in an organization aren't laughing, it could mean that fear is high and psychological safety is low. And so, look at the net you put under people. Self-aware leaders who are progressive are open to the challenge, and psychological safety starts with them. Adapt: We were born improvisers. Every day, everybody in life and in business has to adapt. They have to pivot and the greatest pivot involves COVID. Playfulness: Play is not the opposite of serious. It's the opposite of depression. Reclaim playfulness starting with doing the little things and whatever works for you. Whatever feeds your soul is valid play. There's no one way to play. Play in the workplace: There's no wrong way to do it. Play a little bit in every meeting. Meetings don't have to be boring!  Safety: As leaders, make it a safe place for people to speak of how they feel, and that kind of safety opens people up. Play is both a top-down and bottoms-up approach. It doesn't excuse leaders from doing their share to create psychological safety.  Joy space: Make sure you do something that brings you joy every day. Whether that's teaching or listening to music, whatever that looks like, create these places where you find joy and feel safe. Self-talk: We all have the universal fear of failure, fear of embarrassment, fear of being wrong, and the fear of being judged. And you've got to rewire the self-talk. The inner critic: Whenever you're criticizing somebody else's creation, you are feeding your inner critic such that when you go to do something creative, it will turn on you because you fed it with other people. So practice grace with other people. Links to continue to learn from: https://www.twiiter.com/kathyklotzguest  Join the human storytelling community: https://www.keepingithuman.com/ FREE DOWNLOAD Want to grab your free copy of the Courage Makerspace (™) Playbook? Download the Courage Makerspace(™) here www.melissallarena.com/courage   Boost your courage in 7-days using the exact courage design tools that have worked for both me and my clients. Grab your free playbook instantly so that you can discover how to:   Figure out what makes you tick Be more accountable and not procrastinate Overcome imposter syndrome Stop caring about what others think Progress despite self-doubt Manage anxiety Ask for help You will have a step-by-step playbook to help you finally fulfill your life purpose! Do not miss out on this free opportunity as it will not be available for long. Want to continue the conversation? Find me on Instagram! You can read my daily mini-blogs centered on the same three topics that my podcast features: creativity, courage, and curiosity. I believe that without all three it would be impossible to solve the challenges we were each uniquely made to solve. Wouldn't you agree? I'm easy to find on Instagram @melissallarena Rather keep it professional? Let's connect on LinkedIn. I encourage every single podcast listener to connect with me.

Business Matters
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 53:22


This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work on the minimum wage. Also in the programme, with energy prices rising across the US and Europe, we ask David Shepherd, energy editor at the Financial Times to explain what's been happening. And the President of the Environmental Defense Fund, Fred Krupp talks us through methane emission cuts and the difference they can make to climate change . We're joined throughout the programme by Karen Lema, Reuters Bureau Chief for the Philippines and Andy Uhler, Marketplace reporter in Austin Texas. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)

Queens of the Mines
The Occupation of Alcatraz - Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:53


The famed Alcatraz prison on Alcatraz Island was in operation from 1934 to 1963. For most, the thought of Alcatraz may bring up a Hollywood film or some of the most notorious criminals in America. But the island carries a different symbolism to the native coastal peoples of California. The California Ohlone Mewuk which translates to coastal people, passed down an oral history that tells us that Alcatraz was used by their Native population long before  anyone else “discovered” the San Francisco Bay. Trips would be made to the island in tule boats for gathering foods, such as bird eggs and sea-life. It was also used as a place of isolation, or for punishment for naughty members of the tribe. The island was also a camping spot and hiding place for many native Americans attempting to escape the California Mission system. In 1895, the island was being used as a US fort and military prison and 19 Hopi men served time on Alcatraz for trying to protect their children from being sent to federal Indian boarding schools, which we discussed last week.    “This is Queens of the Mines, where we discuss untold stories from the twisted roots of California. This week's episode is coming out a few days early in honor of Indigenous Peoples Day. Today we will talk about The Occupation of Alcatraz and the Red Power Movement which demanded self-determination for Native Americans to better the lives of all Indian people. To make it known to the world that they have a right to use their land for their own benefit by right of discovery. We are in a time where historians and the public are no longer dismissing the “conflict history” that has been minimized or blotted out.    In 1953, U.S. Congress established a policy towards American Indians: termination. This policy eliminated most government support for indigenous tribes and ended the protected trust status of all indigenous-owned lands. It wiped out the reservations and natives had the choice to assimilate or die out. So the BIA began a voluntary urban relocation program where American Indians could move from their rural tribes to metropolitan areas, and they would give them assistance with locating housing and employment. Numerous American Indians made the move to cities, lured by the hope of a better life. It was a struggle for them. Many struggled to adjust to life in a city with these low-end jobs, they faced discrimination, they were homesickn and they totally lost their cultural identity. Giving a person a home and a job, yet taking away everything that they are, that is defining a human only in economic terms. So, after they relocated and got job and housing placement, as soon as they received their first paycheck, the assistance was done. Termination.    This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Charles, you will love. Now, back to Alcatraz.   When Rosebud Sioux Belva Cottier heard the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary was closing in 1963 and that the property was going to be given to the City of San Francisco, she thought of the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie. The Treaty that allowed Native Americans to appropriate surplus federal land. So, she and her cousin Richard McKenzie retrieved a copy of the treaty and thought, if the property was surplus land of the government, the Sioux could claim it.    Belva organized a demonstration to raise awareness and planned to take court action to obtain the title to the island. On March 8, 1964 her group of Sioux activists, photographers, reporters and her lawyer landed on Alcatraz. About 40 people. The demonstration lasted only four hours. It was "peaceful and in accordance with Sioux treaty rights” but the demonstrators left under the threat of felony charges. The idea of reclaiming “the Rock” became a rallying cry for the indigenous population.   Five years later, on October 10, 1969, there was a fire that destroyed the San Francisco American Indian Center. It was a detrimental loss for the native community because the center provided Native Americans with jobs, health care, aid in legal affairs, and social opportunities.    An activist group formed, known as “Indians of All Tribes” with Pipestone Indian Boarding School graduate Adam Fortunate Eagle and the handsome, Mohawk college student Richard Oakes.  Richard had co-founded the American Indian Studies Dept at SF State and worked as a bartender in the Mission District of San Francisco which brought him in contact with the local Native American communities.    The goal was to take immediate action towards claiming space for the local Indian community and they set their sights on the unused federal land at Alcatraz, which would soon be sold to a billionaire developer.   Adam and Oakes planned a takeover of the island as a symbolic act. They agreed on November 9, 1969. Richard would gather approximately 75 indigenous people and Adam would arrange transportation to the island. The boats did not show up.   Nearby, a sailor was watching the natives waiting, some wearing traditional ceremony dress and Adam Fortunate Eagle convinced him, the owner of a three-masted yacht to pass by the island with him and 4 friends on board. As the boat passed by Alcatraz, Oates and two men jumped overboard, swam to shore, and claimed the island by right of discovery. At this moment, Richard became the leader of the movement. The five men were quickly removed by the Coast Guard.    Later that night, Adam, Richard and others hired a boat, making their way back to the island again, some students stayed overnight before they were again made to leave. Richard Oakes told the San Francisco Chronicle, “If a one day occupation by white men on Indian land years ago established squatter's rights, then the one day occupation of Alcatraz should establish Indian rights to the island.”   Eleven days later on November 20, 1969, Richard and Adam met 87 native men, women and children, 50 of whom California State University students at the No Name bar in Sausalito just after closing at 2, met with some free-spirited boat owners and sailed through San Francisco Bay towards Alcatraz, not knowing if they'd be killed, ignoring warnings that the occupation of the island was illegal. Indians of All Tribes made one last attempt to seize Alcatraz and claim the island for all the tribes of North America using unarmed, body and spirit politics. As they disembarked onto the island an Alcatraz security guard yelled out, may day! May day! The Indians have landed! Three days in, it became clear - this wasn't going to be a short demonstration.    Richard Oates soon addressed the media with a manifesto titled “The Great White Father and All His People.” In it, he stated the intention was to use the island for an Indian school, cultural center and museum. Oates claimed Alcatraz belonged to the Native Americans “by right of discovery”. He sarcastically offered to buy the island back for “$24 in glass beads and red cloth”, the same price that Natives received for the island of Manhattan.    Now I'll read the manifesto   “We feel that this so-called Alcatraz Island is more than suitable as an Indian Reservation, as determined by the white man's own standards. By this we mean that this place resembles most Indian reservations, in that: It is isolated from modern facilities, and without adequate means of transportation. It has no fresh running water. The sanitation facilities are inadequate. There are no oil or mineral rights. There is no industry and so unemployment is very great. There are no health care facilities. The soil is rocky and non-productive and the land does not support game. There are no educational facilities. The population has always been held as prisoners and kept dependent upon others. Further, it would be fitting and symbolic that ships from all over the world, entering the Golden Gate, would first see Indian land, and thus be reminded of the true history of this nation. This tiny island would be a symbol of the great lands once ruled by free and noble Indians.   “We hold the Rock”   The Nixon administration sent out a negotiator, and as the two sides debated, the natives continued to settle onto their new land. Native American college students and activists flocked to join the protest, and the population of Alcatraz often swelled to more than 600 people. They moved into the old warden's house and guards' quarters and began personalizing the island with graffiti. Buildings were tagged with slogans like Home of the Free, Indian Land, Peace and Freedom, Red Power and Custer Had It Coming.   This episode is brought to you by Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This episode was also brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner, carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Alcatraz   The occupation sought to unify indigenous peoples from more than 500 nations across America, the Western Hemisphere and Pacific. Everyone on the island had a job. The island soon had its own clinic, kitchen, public relations department and even a nursery and grade school for its children. A security force sarcastically dubbed the “Bureau of Caucasian Affairs” patrolled the shoreline to watch for intruders. All decisions were made by unanimous consent of the people. A Sioux named John Trudell hopped behind the mic to broadcast radio updates from Alcatraz under the banner of “Radio Free Alcatraz.” “ We all had things to offer each other,” resident Luwana Quitquit later remembered. “Brotherhood. Sisterhood.”    The federal government initially insisted that the protestors leave the island and they placed an inadequate barricade around the island. The demonstration was a media frenzy and the protestors received an enormous amount of support. There was a call for contributions  and a mainland base was set up at San Francisco's Pier 40, near Fisherman's Wharf. Supplies such as canned goods and clothes were shipped in. Visitors and volunteers were sailing in, and thousands of dollars in cash were pouring in from donors across the country. The Black Panther Party had volunteered to help provide security and celebrities like Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda and Merv Griffin visited the island in support. The band Creedence Clearwater Revival gave the Indians of All Tribes a boat, which was christened the “Clearwater.”    Things started to change in early 1970, there was a leadership crisis.  The organizers and a majority of the college students had to return to school. Many vagrants who were not interested in fighting for the cause moved in, taking advantage of the rent free living and drugs and alcohol, which were originally banned on the island, started to move freely among a select crowd.     Then tragically, Richard and Annie Oakes's daughter Yvonne fell 5 stories to her death from one of the prison's stairwells in the guards quarters. Oakes and his wife left Alcatraz in the wake of the accident, leaving groups of warring activists to fight it out for control of the island.    In May of 1970, the Nixon administration cut the electricity to Alcatraz, hoping to force the demonstrators out. Let's face it, the government was never going to meet the demands of the Indians of All Tribes. Next, they removed the water barge which had been providing fresh water to the occupiers. Three days following the removal of the water barge, a fire was started on the island, destroying the warden's house, the inside of the lighthouse which was important for SF bay navigation and several of Alcatraz's historic buildings. No one knows who started the fire. It could have come from either side. Was it - Burn it down? Or get them out?   Two months later, President Richard Nixon gave a speech saying, “The time has come…for a new era in which the Indian future is determined by Indian acts and Indian decisions.” The U.S. government later returned millions of acres of ancestral Indian land and passed more than 50 legislative proposals supporting tribal self rule. The termination policy was terminated.   In the meantime, the FBI, Coast Guard and the Government Services Administration stayed clear of the island. While it appeared to those on the island that negotiations were actually taking place, in fact, the federal government was playing a waiting game, hoping that support for the occupation would subside and those on the island would elect to end the occupation. At one point, secret negotiations were held where the occupiers were offered a portion of Fort Miley, a 15 minute walk from the Sutro Baths, as an alternative site to Alcatraz Island.    The occupation continued into 1971. Support for the cause had diminished after the press turned against them and began publishing stories of alleged beatings and assaults; one case of assault was prosecuted. In an attempt to raise money to buy food, they allegedly began stripping copper wiring and copper tubing from the buildings and selling it as scrap metal. Three of the occupiers were arrested, tried and found guilty of selling some 600lbs of copper. In January 1971, two oil tankers collided in the entrance to the San Francisco Bay. Though it was acknowledged that the lack of an Alcatraz light or fog horn played no part in the collision, it was enough to push the federal government into action. A few holdouts continued to live on the Rock for another year. “I don't want to say Alcatraz is done with,” former occupier Adam Fortunate Eagle lamented to The San Francisco Chronicle in April 1971, “but no organized Indian groups are active there. It has turned from an Indian movement to a personality thing.”    Citing a need to restore Alcatraz's foghorn and lighthouse, President Nixon gave the go-ahead to develop a removal plan to be acted upon with as little force as possible, when the smallest number of people were on the island. The government told the remaining occupiers they would have news on the deed the following Monday morning. They were told no action would be taken until the negotiations were settled. That was a lie. On June 10, 1971 armed federal marshals, FBI agents, and special forces police descended on the island and removed five women, four children, and six unarmed men. the last of the indigenous residents. The occupation was over.   An island ledger entry reads “We are about to leave for Alcatraz, maybe for the last time, To this beautiful little Island, which means a little something, which no one will ever understand my feelings.”  It is signed by Marie B. Quitiquit of Stockton. Beneath Quitiquit's words someone wrote in capital letters “I SHALL NEVER FORGET, MY PEOPLE, MY LAND ALCATRAZ”.   Oakes, who had once proclaimed that “Alcatraz was not an island, it was an idea”, never left the idea behind and continued his resistance. As a result of his activism, he endured tear gas, billy clubs, and brief stints in jail. He helped the Pit River Tribe in their attempts to regain nearly 3 million acres of land that had been seized by Pacific Gas & Electric and had plans to create a "mobile university" dedicated to creating opportunities for Native Americans.  Soon after he left the occupation, Oates was in Sonoma where Michael Morgan, a YMCA camp manager was being accussesd as a white supremacist, and being tough with Native American children. 30 year old Oakes reportedly confronted Michael Morgan. Morgan said he was in fear for his life, when he drew a handgun and fatally shot Richard Oakes. Oakes was unarmed. Morgan was charged with voluntary manslaughter, but was acquitted by a jury that agreed with Morgan that the killing was an act of self-defense, even though Oakes was unarmed. Oakes supporters contend the shooting was an act of murder, and that Morgan received support from a racially motivated jury and district attorney.  So, over the course of the 19-month occupation, more than 10,000 indigenous people visited the island to offer support. Alcatraz may have been lost, but the occupation gave birth to political movements which continue today as injustices inflicted on indigenous people is an ongoing problem. The Rock has also continued to serve as a focal point of Native American social campaigns  and it left the demonstrators with big ideas. Indian rights organizations, many of them staffed by Alcatraz veterans, later staged occupations and protests at Plymouth Rock, Mount Rushmore, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and dozens of other sites across the country. Federal officials also started listening to calls for Indian self-determination. The occupation of Alcatraz was the first demonstration of its kind for the American Indians. It was a spiritual reawakening for the indigenous peoples and renewed interest in tribal communities. Many natives did not know what it meant to be native, and they learned of and about their heritage in light of the media attention the occupation received. It was the first chance they were able to feel proud of their indigenous background. A beginning for Native pride, the kickstarter for a move back to a traditional identity. A revival of language, traditions. Awakening the native people, the tribes, the media, the government and Americans. The “return of the buffalo”. Dr LaNada War Jack, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, one of UC Berkeley's first native students & demonstration leader tells us, “We wanted to bring to the forefront that every single one of (more than 500) treaties were broken by the fed government.” The boarding schools, genocide, relocation, termination, , everything that historically happened to American Indians — continues to impact them today. They are still here.  Now, that is a real theft of freedom. A theft of freedom from the ones who were here first. So, I do not want to hear a damn word about your loss of rights for having to wear a damn mask. You want to fight for freedom? Stand up for your local indigenous people.    Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.  https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2020-11-19/alcatraz-occupation-indigenous-tribes-autry-museum https://www.history.com/news/native-american-activists-occupy-alcatraz-island-45-years-ago The Alcatraz Indian Occupation by Dr. Troy Johnson, Cal State Long Beach https://www.nps.gov/alca/learn/historyculture/we-hold-the-rock.htm https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=ALCATRAZ_Proclamation  

World Business Report
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:28


This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work. Also in the programme, with high energy prices leading to the suspension of steel production in parts of Europe, we ask Portuguese Member of the European Parliament, Pedro Marques, what governments can do to help deal with the situation. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the economic importance of donkeys to sub-Saharan Africa. Plus, we hear from Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, about whether business is doing enough to tackle climate change. Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Benjie Guy. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)

The Saad Truth with Dr Gad Saad
My Chat with Dr. Fyodor Urnov, On the Use of CRISPR to Tackle Human Diseases (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_297)

The Saad Truth with Dr Gad Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 53:04


Topics covered include CRISPR (gene editing technology), the morality and bioethics of such interventions in the quest to treat or eradicate human diseases, the long-term effects of such interventions, pleiotropy, epigenetic effects, and the difference between proximate and ultimate explanations (in evolutionary theory). _______________________________________ Dr. Fyodor Urnov is a Professor of Genetics, Genomics, and Development at UC Berkeley. His research interests include the use of CRISPR (gene editing technology) to tackle a wide range of human diseases. _______________________________________ If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This chat was posted earlier today (October 11, 2021) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1313: https://youtu.be/etZ6yvGzvuU _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________  

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad
My Chat with Dr. Fyodor Urnov, On the Use of CRISPR to Tackle Human Diseases (The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad_297)

The Saad Truth with Dr. Saad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 53:04


Topics covered include CRISPR (gene editing technology), the morality and bioethics of such interventions in the quest to treat or eradicate human diseases, the long-term effects of such interventions, pleiotropy, epigenetic effects, and the difference between proximate and ultimate explanations (in evolutionary theory). _______________________________________ Dr. Fyodor Urnov is a Professor of Genetics, Genomics, and Development at UC Berkeley. His research interests include the use of CRISPR (gene editing technology) to tackle a wide range of human diseases. _______________________________________ If you appreciate my work and would like to support it: https://subscribestar.com/the-saad-truth https://patreon.com/GadSaad https://paypal.me/GadSaad _______________________________________ This chat was posted earlier today (October 11, 2021) on my YouTube channel as THE SAAD TRUTH_1313: https://youtu.be/etZ6yvGzvuU _______________________________________ The Parasitic Mind: How Infectious Ideas Are Killing Common Sense (paperback edition) was released on October 5, 2021. Order your copy now. https://www.amazon.com/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= https://www.amazon.ca/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X https://www.amazon.co.uk/Parasitic-Mind-Infectious-Killing-Common/dp/162157959X _______________________________________ Please visit my website gadsaad.com, and sign up for alerts. If you appreciate my content, click on the "Support My Work" button. I count on my fans to support my efforts. You can donate via Patreon, PayPal, and/or SubscribeStar. _______________________________________ Dr. Gad Saad is a professor, evolutionary behavioral scientist, and author who pioneered the use of evolutionary psychology in marketing and consumer behavior. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Saad is a leading public intellectual who often writes and speaks about idea pathogens that are destroying logic, science, reason, and common sense. _______________________________________  

Her Success Story
Cybersecurity‌ ‌and‌ ‌Data‌ ‌Privacy‌ ‌-‌ ‌Why‌ ‌the‌ ‌Small‌ ‌Business‌ ‌Matters‌ ‌

Her Success Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:34


Jordan Fischer, Esq. focuses her research on data privacy and cybersecurity, bringing an interdisciplinary approach to her pedagogy. Professor Fischer explores the convergence of the law and technology, researching the practical implications of regional data protection regulations within a backdrop of the global economy. She applies her experience working with multinational companies to better understand the evolution of security and privacy within changing regulatory and legal frameworks to balance consumer and end-user rights with enterprise innovation and efficiencies. Professor Fischer clerked at the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg for Koen Lenaerts, who is now the president-judge of the court. Jordan is also a Cybersecurity Lecturer at UC Berkeley. In addition to teaching, Professor Fischer is the Global Privacy Team Lead at Beckage, a boutique international and domestic data security and privacy law firm. She focuses her practice on international data privacy, cybersecurity and cross-border data management. Professor Fischer's background in business and technology enables her to provide critical legal guidance to balance business growth and development with data management. In this episode, we discuss: How Jordan charted her own course with a global perspective How coming from a family of entrepreneurs provided a good foundation for practicing law and becoming an entrepreneur The 5-year evolution of data privacy  The reasons that data privacy and technology has become such a strong practice Going from innovation and improvements to the inclusion of safety, privacy and reducing risk Why technology skyrocketed during the pandemic The education side of Cybersecurity and Data Privacy Why the small business matters in cybersecurity The best approach to using technology Two roles that inform each other resulting in the best of both How Jordan balances the two roles of teaching and running a practice Using forward thinking and setting expectations to create success Time blocking and “Deep Work”

City Arts & Lectures
Mary Roach

City Arts & Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 68:52


Mary Roach is the author of the books Stiff, Spook, Bonk, Gulp, Grunt, and Packing for Mars, all of which bring her distinctly funny voice to popular science subjects. Her new book Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law, combines little-known forensic science and conservation genetics, with a motley cast of laser scarecrows, trespassing squirrels, and more of “nature's lawbreakers,” offering hope for compassionate coexistence in our ever-expanding human habitat. Roach has written for National Geographic, Wired, and The New York Times Magazine.  On September 29, 2021, Mary Roach came to the Sydney Goldstein Theater in San Francisco for an on-stage conversation before a live audience with Malia Wollan, director of the UC Berkeley-11th Hour Food and Farming Journalism Fellowship at the Graduate School of Journalism.

WhoWhatWhy's Podcasts
What the Hell Happened to Police and Criminal Justice Reform?

WhoWhatWhy's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 25:13


The dean of UC Berkeley's Law School looks at how the courts have prioritized criminal control over civil rights for suspects and defendants. Read More: https://whowhatwhy.org/podcast/what-the-hell-happened-to-police-and-criminal-justice-reform

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Matters of Policy & Politics: Will The Conservative Majority Hold? (#299)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


As public and private-sector employees struggle with COVID vaccine mandates, the Supreme Court returns to in-person arguments, and Donald Trump seeks an end to his Twitter suspension. John Yoo, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and UC-Berkeley law professor, discusses the legality of vaccine mandates, the High Court's likely moves on abortion, gun restriction, and religious […]

Area 45
Matters Of Policy & Politics: Will The Conservative Majority Hold?

Area 45

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 70:32


As public and private-sector employees struggle with COVID vaccine mandates, the Supreme Court returns to in-person arguments, and Donald Trump seeks an end to his Twitter suspension. John Yoo, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and UC-Berkeley law professor, discusses the legality of vaccine mandates, the High Court's likely moves on abortion, gun restriction, and religious education in what might be a landmark session, plus the chances of Trump tweeting anytime soon.

OHBM Neurosalience
S2 Ep6: Jack Gallant, Deriving fundamentals of brain organization with fMRI

OHBM Neurosalience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 90:31


This is our second episode with Jack Gallant, PhD, a neuroscientist and engineer. Jack is currently a Chancellor's Professor of Psychology and Class of 1940 Endowed Chair at UC Berkeley and is affiliated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. The first podcast with him delved so deeply into his approach to assessing fMRI data and his philosophy of doing good science and good fMRI that Peter felt they didn't get a chance to talk about Jack's groundbreaking results and what questions they open up. In this episode, Peter and Jack discuss his fascinating and potentially paradigm shifting results on widely distributed, semantic maps in the brain that shift and warp depending on the task itself. Peter's perspective is that these results open up new avenues for insight into fundamentals of brain organization. The brain is not just a conglomeration of distinct and static modules, but a shifting landscape of representation, much of which may be shaped primarily by our experience in the world. How we or our attention shifts these landscapes is an open and potentially profound question. Peter and Jack also discuss prospects for layer fMRI as well as the challenges of clinical MRI.

OHBM Neurosalience
S2 Ep5: Jack Gallant, Strong opinions about fMRI analysis

OHBM Neurosalience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 75:58


MRI is ultimately about separating a known but variable signal from highly variable noise. How one does this makes all the difference. fMRI is particularly challenging since what is signal and what is noise is not always clear, as they both vary in time and space. In this episode, Peter talks to Jack Gallant, PhD, a neuroscientist and engineer. Jack is currently a Chancellor's Professor of Psychology and Class of 1940 Endowed Chair at UC Berkeley and is affiliated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He is a huge proponent of fMRI encoding or, more generally, careful model building to probe the time series. He thinks that more model free approaches and paradigm free methods are ultimately limited. The discussion gets technical as well as intense at times; while Jack and Peter agreed most of the time, there were some nuanced differences of opinion - mostly when it came to discussing alternative methods for probing fMRI data. Overall, we think it was a fun and hopefully a useful discussion! What comes through is Jack's passion for what he does. Given that they only barely got started with Peter's questions, Peter invited him back for another chat - see S2 Episode 6!

Vox's The Weeds
Yes, vaccine mandates work

Vox's The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 53:47


Dylan, German, and Jerusalem talk about vaccine mandates. They discuss the evidence supporting vaccine requirements, the United States' history with inoculation campaigns, and the patchwork nature of America's many public health measures. Plus, a white paper about elite universities.  References: This is a good summary of the evidence supporting vaccine mandates Here is the Homevoter Hypothesis Dylan mentioned The NIMBY lawsuit against UC Berkeley and the NIMBY war against Georgetown's expansion German mentioned two vaccination studies: this one and this one This week's white paper about elite universities Leopold Aschenbrenner on the case for smaller universities Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox German Lopez (@germanrlopez), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Supercluster
Sarafina's Fascinating World of Astronomy

Supercluster

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 33:13


Robin is joined by newly-minted Analog Astronaut and PhD student Sarafina Nance who is studying Cosmology and Supernovas at UC Berkeley. Nance is also the author of the new children's book Little Leonardo's Fascinating World of Astronomy.

Writ Large
Mrs Dalloway

Writ Large

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 35:39


In the early 20th century, Europe and North America were undergoing a radical transformation. Scientific, technological, and political changes disrupted many traditional forms of life. The growth of cities opened up new freedoms and opportunities and scientists like Sigmund Freud and Ernst Mach were developing new theories about how we perceive the world and construct reality. These cultural changes gave birth to a form of art that reflected the new sensibilities of this era—modernism. The modernist literary movement was characterized in particular by its interest in revealing the inner psychology of its characters. And few texts were as successful in this goal as Virginia Woolf's 1925 novel Mrs Dalloway.  Dora Zhang is Associate professor of English and Comparative Literature at UC Berkeley. She is the author of Strange Likeness: Description and the Modernist Novel. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod.

Everyday Driver Car Debate
641: Braking Without Skidding, Power For A Village, Future Throttle Blips

Everyday Driver Car Debate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:06


For Topic Tuesday, the guys talk with Jack McCauley, American inventor and educator at the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation at UC Berkeley. Actually, he's a car guy who has designed for Guitar Hero, Forza Motorsports, Gran Turismo 2, and Oculus VR. They discuss his various car builds over the years, acknowledge the importance of sound, talk about the future of EVs, and offer advice to listeners considering an electric vehicle… Seasons 1-8 are available on Amazon Prime and Vimeo worldwide, and Season 9 coming soon! Please rate and review us on iTunes, and the TV show on IMDB and Amazon. Write to us with your Car Debates, Car Conclusions, and Topic Tuesdays at everydaydrivertv@gmail.com or everydaydriver.com. Share the podcast with your car enthusiast friends!

The Radical Secular
65: A Constitutional Software Upgrade: with Alan Dechert

The Radical Secular

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 101:23


A Constitutional Software Upgrade: with Alan Dechert Growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, Alan Dechert noticed an incomprehensible paradox. Humanity had seen incredible progress in many ways, but civilization was still in poor condition. Wars, violence, famine, environmental catastrophes, inequities, and corruption dominated the news. In the 1970s, while a student at UC Berkeley, it came to him... his grand idea for how to resolve these age-old contradictions. The idea was too big for the usual modes of presentation. He would have to break it down into manageable pieces. Instead of a book, he wrote articles; instead of one massive political campaign, he got involved in several. In 2017, he decided to roll up all his projects into one all-inclusive change-the-world project, a new system of global governance which will require constitutional reform for the United States and the world. (00:00) Intro and T-shirts. Joe and Sean introduce our guest, and discuss the importance of a planetary perspective. (07:09) History and a statement of purpose for Open Source Governance. Peace as a human right. The price of failure a century ago, at the League of Nations. (16:37) "To Secure These Rights." Addressing the question of popular sovereignty. Enumerating new rights. (24:49) Disenfranchisement, and the difficulty of eliminating the non-proportional representation of the Senate. Any new constitution has to be ratified by 38 states. (32:00) Principles of global equality are vitally important. The omission of a statement of equality from the Treaty of Versailles led directly to the hostilities of WWII. (38:06) How does this new Constitution handle the question of "limited government" which conservatives seem to be obsessed with? Answer lies in getting government out of the business of supporting the military industrial complex and the fossil fuel industry. (47:29) Separation of powers. The new Constitution reduces the power of the Presidency with a new position of an elected co-executive in the office of Attorney General who's elected for a single 10 year term. Currently, the POTUS is the chief law enforcement officer and has the power of life and death over every American. (58:08) How does the new Constitution handle federalism? Confronting the hijacking of state governments by the military industrial complex through the doling out of military contracts to every state. Need to restore equality, rule of law, and rights to the highest priority. (01:08:05) Creating a movement to fill stadiums and catalyze change. Just as the Articles of Confederation were thrown out because they were failing, so our current Constitution needs to be thrown out because it is failing. It's the same work to ratify a new Constitution, as it would be to pass a single Amendment. (01:12:50) Fighting back against theocracy. The Year Zero campaign and the new calendar for the Solar Era. Clarifying the "free exercise" clause to curtail special religious privilege in the law. (01:26:46) Actionable ideas for implementation. Coalition building. (01:35:27) The Constitution as software. The new Constitution will be like open-source software, use software development tools and iterative processes to improve and finalize the text in cooperation with legal scholars. (01:37:55) Wrapup and outro. _________________________________ Show notes: https://theanswer.fyi/frequently-asked-questions/ (Frequently Asked Questions) https://theanswer.fyi/constitutions.pdf (Draft text of the new Constitutions) https://www.facebook.com/SolarEraCalendar (FB Page for discussion of the Solar Era Calendar) https://www.facebook.com/hf.discuss (FB Page for The People's Constitution) _________________________________ https://www.patreon.com/theradicalsecular (Patreon) https://www.theradicalsecular.com/ (Website) Email: theradicalsecular@gmail.com Instagram: @radical_secular https://www.facebook.com/theradicalsecular (Facebook) Twitter: @RadicalSecular...

Innovation Files
Why There Is a Disconnect Between the Economics of Innovation and U.S. Antitrust Policy, With David Teece

Innovation Files

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 29:26


Antitrust policy should favor dynamic, innovation-driven competition, yet antitrust regulators generally don't see it that way. Why is that? Rob and Jackie sat down recently with David Teece, the Thomas W. Tusher Professor in Global Business at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business, to discuss the intersection of innovation and economics in antitrust policy.  MentionedDavid J. Teece, Dynamic Capabilities and Strategic Management: Organizing for Innovation and Growth (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).Rob D. Atkinson, Michael Lind, Big Is Beautiful: Debunking the Myth of Small Business, (MA: MIT Press, 2018). RelatedEvent, “Schumpeter v. Brandeis v. Chicago: The Antitrust Debate of Our Times” (ITIF, 2021).Rob Atkinson, “The Emergence of Anticorporate Progressivism” (American Compass, 2021).Rob Atkinson, “Antitrust Can Hurt U.S. Competitiveness” (The Wall Street Journal, 2021).

Think Like A Founder
036: James Connolly - Founder and CEO of Villa

Think Like A Founder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 18:31


On this episode of Think Like A Founder, SNP Co-Founder & CEO Maureen Taylor speaks with James Connolly, Co-Founder and CEO of Villa. They talk about taking the path of minimal regret, knowing your first idea won't be your best, and building a team to lean into your strengths.Villa builds high-quality, prefab accessory dwelling units efficiently and for a low cost. Their mission is to help solve the housing crisis through a visionary plan and hard work. Before co-founding Villa, James co-founded Olive, a company that attempted to create a network of sleeping pods across underutilized parking lots to solve the housing crisis among the “commuting workforce.” James attended UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business.Learn more about Villa on their website: https://villahomes.comThink Like A Founder is produced by SNP Communications in San Francisco, California. Learn more about the Think Like A Founder podcast and curriculum by visiting us at https://snpnet.com/tlaf/ or connect with Maureen Taylor on LinkedIn to continue the conversation there. Series Producer: Mike SullivanSound Design: Marc Ream Content and Scripting: Jaselin DrownProduction Coordinator: Natasha ThomasThanks also to Róisín Hunt, Selena Persiani-Shell, Jordan Bailey, Matt Johnson, Eli Shell, John Hughes, and Renn Vara.

Science Friday
Primate Parasites, Spider Mating Songs, Spotted Lanternfly. Oct 1, 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 46:57


Healthcare Is Hard Enough to Get. If You're A Trans Youth, It's Even Harder Healthcare can be difficult to access for anyone—that's been made clear during the COVID-19 pandemic. But for transgender youth, the barriers are exponentially higher. A new study from the journal JAMA Pediatrics shows that trans youth don't get the care they need because of a variety of obstacles. Those range from laws that prevent them from advocating for themselves, to stigma from doctors. Joining Ira to talk about this story and other big science news of the week is Sabrina Imbler, science reporting fellow for the New York Times based in New York City. Ira and Sabrina also discuss the massive undertaking of COVID-19 testing in school districts, and the impacts ivermectin misinformation is having on the livestock and veterinary industries.   See A Spotted Lanternfly? Squash It! If you live in Pennsylvania or any of its surrounding environs, you've probably seen a really interesting looking bug in the past few years: the spotted lanternfly. Around this time of year, it's in its nymph stage. But when fully grown, these lanternflies sound a little like the joke—they're black and white and red all over. They've also got spots, as their name suggests. The charming news about how interesting they look is offset by the bad news: They are an invasive species. And they frighten crop farmers because they have a taste for just about anything, and a fondness for grapes, which could have dramatic economic consequences. Many states have a unified stance on what to do if you spy a spotted lanternfly—stomp them out. But is that an effective way to stop their spread? Joining Ira to chat about stomping techniques and lanternfly biology is Julie Urban, associate research professor in entomology at Penn State University, in State College, Pennsylvania.   As Primates Go Extinct, So Do Their Parasites, Upsetting Ecosystems As of 2017, more than half of primate species—that's apes, monkeys, lemurs, and our other relatives—were considered at risk of extinction. While the loss of these animals would be its own ecological crisis, this is causing another wave of die offs: the parasites that live on those primates, many of whom are specially adapted to live on just one species for their entire lives. That includes fungi and viruses, as well as the more grimace-inducing parasites like lice and intestinal worms. Producer Christie Taylor talks to Duke Lemur Center researcher James Herrera, the first author on new research that found if endangered primates do disappear, nearly 200 species of primate parasites might also. They talk about why that loss could have consequences—not just for dwindling primates, but also for us.   The World According To Sound: How Spiders Shake Things Up For Love Amorous arachnids sing to their lovers without making a sound. Instead, they like to shake things up. Spiders aren't powerful enough to vibrate the air, the way actual singing does. Instead, they use the ground. Male spiders send vibrations down their legs, and into whatever they're standing on. Nearby females “hear” the song vibrating up their legs. Humans can't hear these spider songs with our ears, but we can listen to them with the help of a laser doppler vibrometer. This instrument can make non-contact vibration measurements of a surface. It shoots a laser beam at a particular surface, and depending on how much that surface moves, it can then measure the frequency and amplitude of the vibration, based on the Doppler shift of the reflected laser beam. Hear an example of these lovelorn spiders on The World According to Sound, a live audio show, online listening series, and miniature podcast that focuses on sound, not story. Producers Chris Hoff and Sam Harnett create intentional, communal listening experiences as a way to “reclaim autonomy in a visually dominated world that is increasingly fracturing our attention.” The spiders in this piece were recorded by researchers in Damian Elias's lab at UC Berkeley. This recording is part of their next listening series, an immersive listening party where audiences from all over the globe will be invited to experience a world of sound together, beginning in January 2022. You can get a ticket to the series here.  

Founders Unfound
Jarrett Wright - Higher Rewards

Founders Unfound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 52:02


Jarrett Wright is Founder and CEO of Higher Rewards, a company that offers nonprofits and faith-based organizations the ability to provide their members a self-branded credit card where a percentage of every purchase goes back to the organization.Jarrett is from several generations deep in the San Francisco Bay Area. Jarrett showed drive and ability from an early age. Reading by 2 years old. Doing the family's grocery shopping at 6. But the pace and structure of school frustrated him. So instead of putting his intellectual horsepower to work in college right away, he started a property development company at 19. And within a few years, he was nationally recognized and bringing in millions in revenue. And that's just the start of his story. The rest is amazing. you'll want to listen in.In this episode Jarrett and Dan discussed:growing up in Richmond Californiathe powerful influence of his family and his heritagerapidly building a business that was decidedly not recession-proofgoing to college with folks 10+ years your juniorthe 'aha' moment for Higher Rewards during a conversation with a financial execthe advantages within the UC Berkeley startup ecosystemOUR SPONSORS FOR THIS EPISODE:Trajectory: Startup - Ideation to Product/Market FitA brand new book by entrepreneur and investor Dave Parker.This hot-off-the-presses publication is THE playbook for those at the earliest stages of the startup journey. Or even if you are just contemplating the jump to entrepreneurship. To get this great resource, go to dkparker.com or find anywhere you buy books.MORE on JARRETT and HIGHER REWARDSJarrett:linkedin.com/in/jarrett-wrightinstagram.com/wrightjarrettHigher Rewards:higherrewards.comlinkedin.com/company/higher-rewardsinstagram.com/higherrewardstwitter.com/higherrewardsfacebook.com/higherrewardsFollow Founders Unfound: Like and share - help us grow!PODCAST TRANSCRIPT#blackfounders #blackentrepreneurs #founderstory #underrepresented #underestimated #founderAfricandescent #fintech #UCBerkeley See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Fiat Vox
86: Paralyzed at 15, student finds independence at Berkeley

Fiat Vox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 26:06


As a sophomore in high school, Mariana Soto Sanchez came down with transverse myelitis. Within an hour, she had total paralysis. Six years later, she has regained some mobility and will graduate from UC Berkeley with a degree in media studies this winter. And she has done things she never thought she could — including going to her first Cal football game, a dream she had since she first came to Berkeley in 2018. "I felt like, coming here, I was just going to wither away, not being able to do anything for myself," she says. "And then, just being here, having what I feel like is a newfound freedom — it's been exciting." Listen to the episode, read a transcript and see photos on Berkeley News. (UC Berkeley photo by Neil Freese) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books in History
Maria Mavroudi, “Byzantium: Beyond the Cliché” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 148:31


Byzantium: Beyond the Cliché is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Maria Mavroudi, Professor of History at UC Berkeley. Maria Mavroudi specializes in the study of the Byzantine Empire and this wide-ranging conversation explores her extensive research on the Byzantine Empire and how it has repeatedly been undervalued by historians despite its having been a military and cultural powerhouse for more than a millennium. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Smart Energy Voices
Creating Your Roadmap to Net Zero, with Tripp Borstel, Ep #47

Smart Energy Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 32:59


In this episode of Smart Energy Voices, host John Failla sits down with Tripp Borstel, Head of Transformation at ENGIE Impact. They discuss key levers to work and issues relating to the use of carbon offsets. There's a lot to cover when it comes to achieving zero emissions - and the scale of the challenge requires creating alignment across a variety of parties within an organization. Listen in to this conversation from Smart Energy Decisions' recent Renewable Energy Forum. You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in... Tripp's background and current role at ENGIE [01:46] What is needed for the energy transition? [03:29] ENGIE Impact's definition of net-zero [06:22] The importance of science-based targets [10:54] Choosing the best pathway [14:50] Green thermal and mobility [19:35] What role should offsets play? [24:21] ENGIE's emission reduction commitments [29:30] Energy efficiency Electrification is often thought of as a way to make the transition from short-term to long-term energy solutions. For a large-scale plant, electrification would be no small feat, so one area that's getting a lot of interest is heat pumps to replace or augment large boiler systems or other thermal energy sources. What's interesting is that space is going back to energy efficiency, specifically thermal energy efficiency.  On the longer-term horizon is hydrogen. One important note is the distinction between green hydrogen and other sources of hydrogen. Generating hydrogen using renewable resources is important from a carbon perspective. For instance, in Chile, which arguably has more solar capacity than just around anywhere on the planet, they're thinking about how to ship that renewable energy since they can't use it all domestically. A solution is that hydrogen can be put into different forms, sent to a port, shipped to another area, and then used as an energy source. Navigating energy transformation Decarbonization is a massive transformation, yet it's often significantly less funded than other major transformations. A lot of the work is in carefully considering what investment is needed to achieve the established goals. There are two components of transformation. One is technical transformation, which includes mobility solutions, energy efficiency solutions, and renewable energy needed. The second component is the human and organizational systems that need transforming inside of an organization. That requires designing programs that engage the entire organization and create alignment and ownership across the different parties. Everyone's role in the energy transition The scale of energy transition requires senior leaders to provide inspiration and marshal the organization's resources. Data is crucial for measuring and managing greenhouse gas emissions. It's what determines the progress and confirms ROI. CFOs play a critical role in planning how to finance those decarbonization solutions and procurement organizations in Scope 3 emissions. They determine how to engage the suppliers and help those suppliers reduce Scope 1 and 2 emissions. Marketing has an important role, particularly internally. They establish a narrative that will engage employees in a way that's authentic to the organization. Resources & People Mentioned The Paris Agreement Andrew Winston – Winston Eco-Strategies The Big Pivot Nikola Energy The Blue Carbon Initiative Connect with Tripp Borstel On LinkedIn Tripp is a Director with ENGIE Impact's Sustainability Solutions. He has 15 years of experience as a strategy consultant to senior executives in developing climate and energy strategies. His focus is on managing the cultural dynamics of strategy and building high levels of stakeholder alignment throughout the strategy development process. Tripp has worked with corporations, non-profits, and cities. Currently, his work focuses on helping organizations develop net zero targets and strategies. He lives in Oakland, California, and has an MBA from UC Berkeley. Connect With Smart Energy Decisions https://smartenergydecisions.com Follow them on Facebook Follow them on Twitter Follow them on LinkedIn Subscribe to Smart Energy Voices If you're interested in participating in the next Smart Energy Decision Event, visit smartenergydecisions.com or email our Event Operations Director, Lisa Carroll at lisa@smartenergydecisions.com Audio Production and Show notes by PODCAST FAST TRACK https://www.podcastfasttrack.com

New Books Network
Maria Mavroudi, “Byzantium: Beyond the Cliché” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 148:31


Byzantium: Beyond the Cliché is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Maria Mavroudi, Professor of History at UC Berkeley. Maria Mavroudi specializes in the study of the Byzantine Empire and this wide-ranging conversation explores her extensive research on the Byzantine Empire and how it has repeatedly been undervalued by historians despite its having been a military and cultural powerhouse for more than a millennium. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Audible Mount Diablo
A Brief History of Mount Diablo State Park: Episode 6

Audible Mount Diablo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 3:50


Our centennial celebration continues, with the story of one of Mount Diablo's most eminent advocates. After earning a Ph.D. in botany at UC Berkeley in 1936, MARY BOWERMAN wrote the The Plants and Ferns of Mount Diablo, a book that's still the bible for East Bay botanists. Decades later, she co-founded an organization called Save Mount Diablo. The rest is conservation history!  This 8-part series features Ken Lavin, Seth Adams, Robert Doyle, Michael Marchiano, Vincent Medina, and Cameron Morrison. Presented by Mount Diablo Interpretive Association in partnership with Save Mount Diablo and Mount Diablo State Park. Photography and video by Kendall Oei, Scott Hein, and Wally de Young, among others. Music by Phil Heywood. Production by Joan Hamilton. 

Latitud Podcast
Building deep relationships as a founder: Sebastian Kreis, Xepelin

Latitud Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 42:52


Fintech is extremely hot in Latin America.Chilean entrepreneur Sebastian Kreis is seeing this opportunity and is building Xepelin with the goal to be the leading SMB digital bank in LatAm. Xepelin is one of the fastest growing fintechs in the history of the region and Sebastian believes they are just getting started, and are here to stay.Prior to founding Xepelin, Sebastian was a Consultant at BCG and co-founded Safecard. He holds an MBA from UC Berkeley.In this episode, Sebastian shares:How he met his co-founder Nicolas and how they started XepelinWhy Xepelin is focusing their operations in MexicoThe importance of building deep relationships as an entrepreneurHis thoughts on debt financing in LatAmAnd his next challenges as a founderStarting something new?Apply at apply.latitud.com

Tap into The Power of Your Mind using Law of Attraction and Hypnosis Techniques
#172- The 4 Keys to Manifesting Clients with Kadidja Yansane

Tap into The Power of Your Mind using Law of Attraction and Hypnosis Techniques

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 56:51


In Episode #172, I am talking with Kadidja Yansane    A speaker, coach, & consultant for nearly two decades, Kadidja received her B.A in Women Studies at UC Berkeley. She has been passionate and dedicated her life and work to supporting women to recognize their brilliance and deliver their unique contributions.      She led and organized hundreds of women's groups, programs, seminars, and classes to support women in owning their value, charging their worth and doing what they love. Her signature program is The Client Creation Program - 8 Weeks to Mastering the Art of Getting Clients.      Additionally, Kadidja has created hundreds of online videos on the topics of women's business, empowerment, and leadership - with tens of thousands of views on youtube and facebook.    Today, Kadidja Yansane is sharing with us some of her insights on The 4 Keys to Manifesting Clients    We talked about:    How she got started as a coach.  The biggest challenge her clients face when it comes to getting clients.   The 4 M's To Manifesting Clients.  How she personally cultivates a powerful mindset.   Advice to people who are doing all the things but still not manifesting their goals.    She can be found on:  https://www.facebook.com/BloomIntoYou  www.BloomIntoYou.com    You can get a Free copy of "The Ultimate Guide to Client Creation" at. www.ManifestClientsNow.com/Guide 

Start Making Sense
Controlling the Police: What is to be Done? Erwin Chemerinsky, plus Eyal Press on Dirty Work

Start Making Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 39:27


Many proposals to reform the police were made after the Black Lives Matter protests of last summer the largest protest movement in American history. But the problem, Erwin Chemerinsky argues, is not just the police; the Supreme Court has empowered the police and subverted civil rights. Erwin is Dean of the law school at UC Berkeley, and author of many books—most recently Presumed Guilty. Also: dirty work—and the people who do it: the low-income workers who do our most ethically troubled jobs. Eyal Press will explain—his new book is Dirty Work: Essential Jobs and the Hidden Toll of Inequality in America. Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: thenation.com/podcastsubscribe.

LatinxAmerica's podcast
Daisy Garcia Talks About Her Journey into Investing in Travel and Hospitality Startups

LatinxAmerica's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 20:44


A VCFamilia member, Daisy Garcia is a passionate Sr. Investment Analyst at JetBlue Technology Ventures, where she optimizes investments by conducting in-depth analyses and due diligence of early stage startups. Her analytical focus is on startups that operate at the intersection of travel, hospitality, and technology. Some of her areas of interest include artificial intelligence, sustainability, and cybersecurity.  She previously lived in Sweden for over two years, where she worked with an early stage VC and angel syndicate, while acquiring an international education. Her career has also taken her abroad to Israel, Uganda, India, and Latvia. She holds dual MSCs in International Business from the Stockholm School of Economics, and double BAs in Mathematics and Environmental Economics from UC Berkeley. https://www.jetblueventures.com/

Voices In Validation
A Risk-Based Critical Thinking Approach to Computer Systems Validation

Voices In Validation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:23


This week, Stacey is joined by Ken Shitamoto to explore critical thinking in the systems validation department and share concepts and case history. Most industry folks have heard about CSA and understand the basics behind the shift in priorities. What's better left to understand is the if's and how's around adoption and implementation within our own organizations. A risk-based approach is nothing new. However, the evolution centers on a risk-based approach using critical thinking, with a focus on assurance needs, testing activities for our higher-risk activities. About our Guest Ken Shitamoto, MS Senor Director, IT, Gilead Sciences Ken leads the IT quality engineering function at Gilead Sciences, which performs software quality assurance (testing), validation, and infrastructure qualification. He is a multi-disciplined professional with extensive experience in quality engineering, quality management, project management, and software development. He has been in the biopharmaceutical space since 1993 and has worked both on the manufacturer, vendor, and consulting sides of the business. Additionally, he has also performed over 100 GXP computer systems compliance audits globally. He holds a BA Molecular Cell Biology and MS Computer Science and from UC Berkeley and San Jose State University respectively. He is an avid supporter of the American Lung Association, and Ken and his daughter have raised over 130K dollars to fight lung disease. Voices in Validation brings you the best in validation and compliance topics. Voices in Validation is brought to you by IVT Network, your expert source for life science regulatory knowledge. For more information on IVT Network, check out their website at http://ivtnetwork.com. 

Work From The Inside Out
144: Build Your Promotability - Amii Barnard-Bahn

Work From The Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 51:19


When Amii Barnard-Bahn graduated from college with an English degree, she didn't know what she wanted. So she applied to law school. Amii said, “It was kind of a crazy, interesting thing to do.” Attending Georgetown Law School, she tapped the advocate within wanting to impact social change. She worked as an ACLU fellow and took the first LGBT sexual orientation class ever taught at a law school. Amii was the T.A. for Dr. Anthony Cook, a well-known scholar in critical race theory, and served as editor on her law journal. Amii's piece on the black women's anti-lynching movement in the 1890s was published in the UCLA Women's Law Journal, resulting in her coining the term critical race feminism, now used regularly. Upon graduation, Amii worked for a small employment law firm where she had the unique chance to handle both plaintiff and defendant cases. While it was a valuable experience, billable hours, and metrics were not aligned with her values. After three-plus years with the firm, Amii resigned although she did not know what she wanted to do next. She said it was the scariest thing she ever did, but Amii wanted to find a better way to help people.  Amii spent nine months exploring her options, determining that her qualifications and interests were best suited to Human Resources where she could combine her legal background with her dedication to equity, compliance, and ethics. She also pursued her graduate certificate in coaching through the Hudson Institute.  Amii served in executive roles for McKesson, the California Dental Association, and Tetra Tech. Today, Amii's an executive coach and consultant to C suite leaders at global companies like Adobe, and The Gap. Amii guest lectures at Stanford and UC Berkeley, and is a contributor to Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, and Compliance Week, and is a fellow at the Harvard Institute of Coaching. She developed the Promotability Index Self-Assessment and published The PI Guidebook that works along with the assessment results. In this week's Work From The Inside Out podcast, learn more about Amii''s  journey: Amii is recognized by Forbes as one of the top coaches for legal and compliance executives, and she is a member of Marshall Goldsmith 100 coaches.  She testified for the successful passage of the first laws in the US requiring corporate boards to include women.  Learn more and connect with Amii here:  https://twitter.com/amiibb http://www.barnardbahn.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/amiibarnardbahn/ https://www.instagram.com/barnardbahn/ https://www.facebook.com/barnardbahn/

The Opperman Report
Peter Dale Scott

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 62:36


Peter Dale Scott For those primarily interested in my recent political prose, go to my Current Publications Web Page, formerly entitled “Iraq, al-Qaeda, 9/11”. For those primarily interested in my poetry, go to My Selected Writings webpage. In fact the two genres inter-relate, as exhibited by both my most important prose book, The American Deep State, and my most recent books of poetry, Minding the Darkness, Mosaic Orpheus, Tilting Point, and Walking on Darkness. For a useful overview of my political and poetic work on the Poetry Foundation website, click here. Click here to read about me on Wikipedia. . Click here to see a description and above all reviews of my book, The American Deep State: Wall Street, Big Oil, and the Attack on U.S. Democracy. Click here for a website which accesses a series of videos in which I read and discuss my long poem Coming to Jakarta, and also my book of shorter poems, Tilting Point. To hear my September 2011 reading of my poetry in Longfellow House, Cambridge, click here. For occasional political comments and news about upcoming books and activities, follow my Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/peterdalescott. Biography Peter Dale Scott, a former Canadian diplomat and English Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, is a poet, writer, and researcher. He was born in Montreal in 1929, the only son of the poet F.R. Scott and the painter Marian Dale Scott. He is married to the author and psychologist Ronna Kabatznick; and he has three children, Cassie, Mika, and John Scott, by a previous marriage to the Soto Zen roshi Maylie [Marshall] Scott. Before teaching as an English Professor at the University of California, he served for four years as a Canadian diplomat, at UN Assemblies and in Warsaw, Poland. His prose books include The War Conspiracy (1972), The Assassinations: Dallas and Beyond (in collaboration, 1976), Crime and Cover-Up: The CIA, the Mafia, and the Dallas-Watergate Connection (1977), The Iran-Contra Connection (in collaboration, 1987),Cocaine Politics: Drugs, Armies, and the CIA in Central America (in collaboration, 1991, 1998), Deep Politics and the Death of JFK (1993, 1996), Deep Politics Two (1994, 1995, 2006), Drugs Oil and War (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, March 2003), The Road to 9/11 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007), and The War Conspiracy: JFK, 9/11, and the Deep Politics of War (Ipswich, MA: Mary Ferrell Foundation Press,(2008), American War Machine (2010), and The American Deep State, 2014. His chief poetry books are the three volumes of his trilogy Seculum: Coming to Jakarta: A Poem About Terror (1989), Listening to the Candle: A Poem on Impulse (1992), and Minding the Darkness: A Poem for the Year 2000. In addition he has published Crossing Borders: Selected Shorter Poems (1994, published in Canada as Murmur of the Starsi), Mosaic Orpheus (2009), Tilting Point (2012), and Walking on Darkness. In November 2002 he was awarded the Lannan Poetry Award. An anti-war speaker during the Vietnam and Gulf Wars, he was a co-founder of the Peace and Conflict Studies Program at UC Berkeley, and of the Coalition on Political Assassinations (COPA). His poetry has dealt with both his experience and his research, the latter of which has centered on U.S. covert operations, their impact on democracy at home and abroad, and their relations to the John F. Kennedy assassination and the global drug traffic. The poet-critic Robert Hass has written (Agni, 31/32, p. 335) that “Coming to Jakarta is the most important political poem to appear in the English language in a very long time.” If you have any comments or questions, I would be glad to hear from you at pdscottweb@hotmail.com. I do believe that international public opinion, when it becomes powerful enough, will become the most effective restraint to the excesses and follies of particular governments. 5 years ago #adnan, #contra, #dale, #ed, #iran, #khashoggi, #opperman, #peter, #report, #scott

New Books Network
A. S. Dillingham, "Oaxaca Resurgent: Indigeneity, Development, and Inequality in Twentieth-Century Mexico" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 73:46


Oaxaca, in the view of the Mexican federal government, was in need of serious reform at midcentury. Reports detailing issues of land ownership, language education, and poverty prompted the Institutio Nacional Indigenista (INI) to pursue a number of reforms to integrate Oaxaca and its people into the nation. But where federal policy met local practice, Indigenous Oaxacans had their own ideas and aims for their future in Mexico and the world. The teachers, thinkers, and communities that took indigenista policy into their own hands are the focus of historian A.S. Dillingham's new book, Oaxaca Resurgent: Indigeneity, Development, and Inequality in Twentieth-Century Mexico (Stanford University Press, 2021). Dillingham combines federal documents with ethnographic materials to understand how twentieth-century Oaxacans - especially those connected to education initiatives - navigated the "double bind of indigenismo" that defined state indigenista policy in Mexico. In this "double bind," Indigenous peoples were at once celebrated and singled out as objects to be remade according to national interests. Challenging some federal projects while leveraging others, Oaxacans pursued their own educational initiatives and, in doing so, became critical agents of global anticolonial politics. An insightful engagement with Indigeneity, education, and development, Oaxaca Resurgent makes a strong case for the power and scope of Oaxacan radicalism through the twenty-first century. Annabel LaBrecque is a PhD student in the Department of History at UC Berkeley. You can find her on Twitter @labrcq. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Empowering Industry Podcast - A Production of Empowering Pumps & Equipment
Mobility in Maintenance Software with Ryan Chan

Empowering Industry Podcast - A Production of Empowering Pumps & Equipment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 50:37


This week Charli and Bethany talk about YouTube strategy in the second of a three-part series on B2B YouTube content marketing. Then Charli interviews Ryan Chan, the CEO and Founder at UpKeep. He is a Chemical Engineer from UC Berkeley and was named one of Forbes 30 Under 30 for Manufacturing in 2018. Ryan started UpKeep out of passion and frustration by the lack of mobility in today's asset optimization software. UpKeep has now been deployed to over 200,000 users and over 30,000 businesses and is a leader in mobile-first asset optimization software.  [Interview Starts @26:25]Connect with Ryan Chan on LinkedIn, or you can find him in The Maintenance Community Slack Group!  website: upkeep.com Watch this episode on YouTube.Resources and Links:Get the digital editionSign up for the NewsletterNominate an Industry Person of the WeekEmpowering Women Meetup - Wed. Oct. 13Empowering Women PodcastIndustry Person of the WeekSponsor Empowering WomenLunch & Learn with VinceLeadership SummitWireless gas detection in the process industry Inclusive Leadership Exampleshttps://empoweringpumps.comhttps://empoweringwomeninindustry.comTwitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Instagrampodcast@empoweringpumps.comhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Men On Purpose Podcast
The ADHD Advantage with Dr. Shirag Shemmassian - Episode 229

Men On Purpose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 70:15


In this episode, Shirag Shemmassian joins host Ian Lobas to explore the minds of those who are diagnosed with ADHD. Let's discover how the disadvantages of ADHD can be turned around as an advantage towards the daily struggles in modern society. Dr. Shemmassian is the Founder of Shemmassian Academic Consulting and one of the world's foremost experts on medical school admissions, college admissions, and graduate school admissions. For nearly 20 years, he and his team have helped thousands of students get into medical school and top colleges using his systematic and proprietary approach. Dr. Shemmassian's admissions expertise has been featured in various media outlets, including The Washington Post and Business Insider. Moreover, he has been invited to speak at Yale, Stanford, UC Berkeley, and other prestigious institutions about various aspects of the admissions process. By joining Shirag, you will learn the in-depth meaning of ADHD, how early you can diagnose it, and how someone with ADHD can still learn new things. As soon as your adventure in this episode is done, be sure to check out our other incredible shows on being the best version of you, including Living Your Legacy Now and Finding Your Lifelong Passion. Connect with Shirag Shemmassian on: Website: https://www.shemmassianconsulting.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/shemmassian?lang=en Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shiragshemmassian/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shemmassian/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shemmassian/ Connect with Ian Lobas & the Men on Purpose podcast: Email: listeners@menonpurposepodcast.com Website: https://ianlobas.com/podcast/ Join the Men on Purpose Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/themenonpurposecommunity Connect with us on social media: https://www.instagram.com/menonpurposepodcast/ https://www.facebook.com/MenOnPurposePodcast/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/ianrlobas/ Want to watch this and other awesome interviews? Check out our YouTube channel! #managingADHD #ADHDstruggles #schooladmission

One Woman Today
A CEO's Perspective, Followership with Priya Narasimhan

One Woman Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 43:18


A CEO's Perspective, Followership with Priya NarasimhanThis week, in the continuation of the CEO followership series, Jeanie is joined by CEO, Priya Narasimhan, the founder and CEO of Yinzcam. Priya shares her perspective of followership as not only an executive within her organization, but she also shares how she integrates the idea of followership in the classroom with her students at Carnegie Mellon University. Priya's energy and conviction around followership is one that is sure to inspire anyone who listens to this episode. Priya Narasimhan is a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research interests lie in the fields of dependable distributed systems, fault-tolerance, embedded systems, mobile systems and sports technology. She serves as the academic lead of the Intel Science and Technology Center in Embedded Computing (ISTC-EC) that comprises Carnegie Mellon, Penn State, UIUC, University of Pennsylvania, Cornell, UC Berkeley and Georgia Tech. Priya Narasimhan is the CEO and Founder of YinzCam, Inc., a company focused on mobile live streaming and scalable video technologies to provide the ultimate mobile fan experience to 40+ professional sports teams/venues.Enjoy today's episode! 3:12 Introduction to Priya3:48 How Priya describes herself as a CEO and a professor5:44 Priya shares what it looks like for her to operate at her best as a CEO and a professor7:12 Priya defines followership10:21 The concept of silent coaching 12:05 Generational differences around followership13:55 How having the awareness of what you love and what you're good at can change the trajectory of your future.15:43 Priya shares the impact the pandemic has had on her organization21:46 Attributes that fueled Priya's motivation to keep her business alive during its most difficult times24:57 An executive leadership perspective on the future of work during the pandemic27:39 The importance of supporting employees who want to pivot and evolve as the company evolves29:15 Priya shares her experience of teaching and implementing followership within the classroom 32:28 How Priya's students describe her teaching style33:59 Grading by the size of ambition vs perfecting solutions38:00 Priya talks about how she creates a culture of ambition at Yinzcam40:14 Who Priya is following and whyConnect with Priya Narasimhan:https://priyanarasimhan.com/about-me-new/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/priyanarasimhan/ Subscribe: Warriors At Work PodcastsWebsite: Jeaniecoomber.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/986666321719033/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeanie_coomber/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanie_coomberLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeanie-coomber-90973b4/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbMZ2HyNNyPoeCSqKClBC_w

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 97: Mushrooms of the Mountain Ranges & High Meadows of California (feat. Thea Chesney)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 86:27


Thea Chesney is a lifelong Sierra Nevada foothill resident and naturalist. She has had an interest in mushrooms (and plants, and the rest of the natural world) since early childhood, which gradually became an obsession. She holds a B.S. in forestry from UC Berkeley, with an emphasis in botany and natural sciences. During her time at Berkeley, she spent plenty of time working and hanging out in the Berkeley mycology labs and continues to return to campus to provide specimens for and aid in teaching their mushroom ID course. She worked on a mushroom survey crew for the U.S. Forest Service around Mt. Shasta for several seasons, which allowed her to become intimately familiar with the fungal inhabitants and ecology of the area. Since then, she has continued with the Forest Service as a botanist for a long-term California-wide meadow monitoring project. She teaches occasional workshops in mushroom and plant identification, both for work and independently. She has also been involved with the California Rare Fungi Working Group since its inception. Her fieldwork and her own studies of plants and fungi are centered in the Sierra Nevada and other mountains of California, and she is currently working on a field guide to mushrooms of these understudied regions with Noah Siegel and Christian Schwarz.   TOPICS COVERED:   Mycology Lineage & Childhood Immersion in Nature  Underexplored Mountain Ranges of California  Diversity of Bioregions in Mountain Ranges  Mycorrhizal Mushrooms & Tree Hosts  Montane Water Cycles, Plant Ecology & Fungal Diversity  High Meadows Ecosystems & Their Mushrooms  California Rare Fungi Working Group  The Future of Documenting Fungal Diversity  Fire-Following Fungi  Morel Habitat & Ecology in California  Tips for Finding Morels  Thea's Lifelong Connection to the Sierras  Klamath Mountains – The Most Biodiverse Pocket of California?!  Future Work with Christian Schwarz & Noah Siegel  EPISODE RESOURCES:   Thea Chesney iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/people/theachesney   Thea's Talk on Fire Fungi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8V9Irj0GtTE   Thea's Talk on Mycorrhizal Fungi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PISk9C6FAds   Prof. Ralph Emerson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Emerson_(botanist)   Klamath Mountains: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klamath_Mountains   Rare Fungi of CA National Forests: https://www.scribd.com/document/432145073/Rare-Fungi-of-California-National-Forests   William Bridge Cooke: https://www.mykoweb.com/articles/PDF/William%20Bridge%20Cooke,%201908-1991.pdf   Caloscypha fulgens (fungus): https://www.mushroomexpert.com/caloscypha_fulgens.html   Hygrophorus goetzii (fungus): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygrophorus_goetzii

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Bye-Bye to Single-Family Zoning in California!

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 5:16


It's a big deal in a state where homeowners have fiercely fought any changes to single-family neighborhoods. California Governor Gavin Newsom is catching up on his “to do” list after the recall election, and just signed two important pieces of housing legislation. One is SB 9 which eliminates single-family zoning in most neighborhoods across the state. The other is SB 10 which makes it easier for cities to build multi-family apartment buildings in some areas. (1) Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Senate Bill 9 is especially significant after years of homeowner opposition to previous efforts to increase housing density in single-family neighborhoods. This bill allows for single-family parcels to be split in two, and duplexes to be built on each half, which allows for a total of four units on one lot. The other bill will streamline the approval process for the development of multi-family housing near transit and urban infill areas.The Single-Family MindsetThe bill that ends single-family zoning is especially significant. It's a housing concept that is deeply entrenched in the minds of homeowners and housing codes across the U.S., not just California. The so-called “single-family neighborhood” has created the suburbs as we know them today.Single-family zoning has also been used as a racial barrier for people who can't afford bigger homes with bigger yards. And with higher home prices, the gap is growing between those who can afford to buy homes and those who can't. In California, the median price for a home has gone up more than 21% in the past year to more than $700,000. That's according to Zillow. (2)Those two bills along with Senate Bill 8 are part of Governor Newsom's California Comeback Plan. SB 8 extends the Housing Crisis Act of 2019 to jumpstart more housing production, and the Comeback Plan is a five-point plan to address major issues in a post-pandemic world.California's Comeback PlanThe first leg of that plan is the state's effort to help people hit hard by COVID-19. Other parts of the plan include housing affordability and homelessness, upgrading schools as gateways for opportunity, addressing climate change and making the state more resilient against wildfires, and creating infrastructure that will take the state into the next century.SB 9 and 10 are part of the housing affordability leg. As Newsom says: “The housing affordability crisis is undermining the California Dream for families across the state, and threatens our long-term growth and prosperity.”SB 9 Do's and Don'tsSo what does all this mean for you if you are a single-family homeowner?Currently, the law allows two units on a single-family lot. You can have a stand-alone home along with an accessory dwelling unit no larger than 500 square feet. This new law will allow up to four units on the same amount of land. But there are plenty of guidelines.For example, if someone wants to split their lot in two, each new lot must be at least 1,200 square feet. Properties that have been listed as historic landmarks cannot be altered by this law. Also, any new unit created under this law CANNOT be used as a short-term rental. That's defined as a unit that's rented for less than 30 days, so more than 30 days is okay. (3)According to the Daily Democrat, anyone who wants to build a duplex or split their property to build two duplexes must also plan to live in one of the units for at least three years. That applies to both homeowners and landlords.The law makes it difficult for local districts to deny a valid development application. Local officials can reject a proposal if the project would have a “specific adverse impact” on “public health and safety, or the physical environment” and there are no other options for eliminating that adverse impact. As for size and design, upzoning projects would still need to adhere to local standards. Will It Solve the Housing Gap?Will this make a huge difference in California's housing gap?According to a recent study by the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at UC Berkeley, 5.4% of California's single-family lots could be developed under SB 9. That could potentially create an additional 714,000 homes. But that's still far short of the 3.5 million homes that Newsom wants to create in just another four years, by 2025.If you'd like to read more about this legislation, check for links in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com. You can also join RealWealth for free at our website. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.gov.ca.gov/2021/09/16/governor-newsom-signs-historic-legislation-to-boost-californias-housing-supply-and-fight-the-housing-crisis/2 -https://www.zillow.com/ca/home-values/3 -https://www.dailydemocrat.com/2021/09/18/what-californias-new-sb9-law-means-for-single-family-zoning-in-your-neighborhood/