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World religion founded by the Buddha

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    Latest podcast episodes about buddhist

    Buddhism on Air
    Buddhism on Air - 03-07-2022

    Buddhism on Air

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 28:16


    Buddhism on Air, hosted by Tenzin Chosang, discusses Buddhism and Buddhist beliefs.

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
    Education and Mindfulness Are the Bookends of Success

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 24:09


    In this episode, we are joined by Jonathan DeYoe, advisor of Mindful Money and the host of the Mindful Money Podcast. He discusses how he became a financial advisor, what his typical process is for working with clients, and what common threads he sees that people struggle with in their financial plans. Jonathan emphasizes the importance of mindfulness, especially in personal finance, and how it can help us increase wealth and lead more meaningful lives.   [00:01 - 05:03] The Money Philosopher Jonathan shares his background  Going back to the financial space Financial planning versus investment selection   [05:04 - 16:21] Mindfully Saving and Investing Setting long-term goals What it means to be mindful of the path  Getting the emergency fund covered and the rest gets invested How to invest in a volatile market Diversification is key   [16:22 - 23:10] Scaling in a Mindful Way Getting out of the poverty mindset Why Jonathan decided to merge his business with another company Understanding your purpose Sign up now for Mindful Money's FREE Values, Purpose & Goals course! [23:11 - 24:09] Closing Segment Reach out to Jonathan!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “I don't think anybody can predict anything. So given that, planning is the tool we use. And in fact, the two tools we think that are most valuable are planning and education.” - Jonathan DeYoe “The concept of mindfulness is sort of  a non-judgmental awareness of the present moment.” - Jonathan DeYoe “ Let's not judge the fear. Let's not make some kind of an assumption about what's gonna happen next, what's on the ground, what can we do to make a difference.” - Jonathan DeYoe -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Jonathan at the Mindful Money website. Check them out on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. Sign up for their Values, Purpose & Goals course for FREE!   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   [00:00:00] Jonathan DeYoe: Because of my education in sort of philosophy and, you know, mindfulness training and meditation and religious kinds of things, I think that whenever I'm on a show when I'm being interviewed, or whenever I write, that comes across the idea that, Hey, you know, there is a way to make better decisions. It's not the way that we're told all the time. [00:00:20] Jonathan DeYoe: Let's talk about the way that actually is helpful. And for some people, they go, oh, that makes a ton of sense. Let me talk to Jonathan. And when they do then that's stimulation right there.  [00:00:40] Sam Wilson: Jonathan DeYoe is a Lutheran seminary intern, Buddhist academic turned financial advisor. He's also the advisor of the Mindful Money and the host of the Mindful Money Podcast. He has been investing for over four decades in helping others build wealth for the last 25 years. Jonathan, welcome to the show. [00:00:57] Jonathan DeYoe: Thanks for having me, Sam. [00:00:58] Sam Wilson: Pleasure's mine. There are three questions I ask every guest who comes in the show: in 90 seconds or less, can you to tell me, where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?  [00:01:05] Jonathan DeYoe: In 90 seconds or less? Where did I start? So I started off in Rapid City, south Dakota, was raised pretty poor. And so I made a, made a goal for myself to make money and to not have that problem, you know, growing up. So took a detour, studied finance in college, took a detour, studied philosophy and comparative religion ended up coming to California to be a Lutheran seminarian. The Lutheran school I was, I had agreed to go to and they had given me a scholarship. [00:01:30] Jonathan DeYoe: When I got here, they said, listen, we had a bad year last year. We don't have the scholarship money. So I went across the street to a Buddhist school and they said, yeah, we have some money. So I ended up studying, compared to religion from a Buddhist side, was there for two, three years, realized that I really wanted to practice more than I wanted to be an academic. So I meditated every day since. And started off, you know, right after I left, at Dean Witter, which became Morgan Stanley Dean Witter. You know, I was at five or six different wall street firms before I started my own firm in 2001. And so the last 20 years, building that firm until last year when I merge it into EP Wealth. [00:02:05] Sam Wilson: Wow. Wow. That's interesting. Tell me, you know, in that financial planning practice, how gimme some color on what that was? I mean, there's, the say financial planning can mean 10,000 different things to 10,000 different people.  [00:02:18] Jonathan DeYoe: Yep. Yeah. It's, it's a great question. I, and I appreciate more than you probably know. So I think most people that have, that say financial planner mean investment advisor and I actually mean financial planner. I don't think anybody has the ability to guess what's happening next. I don't think anybody that can control outcomes. I don't think anybody can predict anything. So given that, planning is the tool we use. And in fact, the two tools we think that are most valuable are planning and education. So in my own personal pivot, you know, I'm, I'm working with clients on their financial plans and I go in depth on, you know, all their cash flows, incomes, outflows, all their goals, what those costs, you know, the probability of increased costs later on everything, education, we go really, really, really deep in all aspects of their financial lives. [00:03:05] Jonathan DeYoe: And what that does is it gives us the ability to make better decisions in the now. And that's, that's really what financial planning is. It isn't investment selection, it isn't market timing. And if you've got folks that are looking for better investment selection, better market timing, that's not here. And in fact it's not anywhere, but especially not here  [00:03:20] Sam Wilson: That, you know, I love the idea, what you mentioned there, differentiating between what is financial planning and what is just investment selection, 'cause those are, those are two very different things. Getting someone to a point where they want to come to you and say, Jonathan, let's sit down and let's just pull the curtains back on everything and just dissect this piece by piece has got to be, the people that are willing to take the time to do that are few and far between I would imagine. Is that, is that a fair assumption?  [00:03:49] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah. Thankfully, there are many different brands of financial advisors as you sort of alluded to. And so people can find the people that fit with them and they're out there. I don't believe it's possible that someone can select a better investment or time market any better than I can. But if you believe that someone can do that for you, then, you know, I wish you the best of luck. I think that's a great thing.  [00:04:07] Sam Wilson: Right. And I guess I would, the, what I was getting at was that what you provide is an incredibly valuable service to people that take the time to do it. [00:04:16] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah.  [00:04:17] Sam Wilson: What are the things that bring people to you to where they say, Hey, Jonathan, I need your help?  [00:04:23] Jonathan DeYoe: Well, I, so I don't know what the thing is that stimulates somebody to make a decision to ultimately call us that that's hard for me to guess, but because of my education in sort of philosophy and, you know, mindfulness training and meditation and religious kinds of things, I think that whenever I'm on a show or when I'm being interviewed or whenever I write, that comes across the idea that, Hey, you know, there is a way to make better decisions. It's not the way that we're told all the time. Let's talk about the way that actually is helpful. And for some people they go, oh, that makes a ton of sense. Let me talk to Jonathan. And when they do then that's stimulation right there.  [00:04:59] Sam Wilson: Right, right. That's really cool. I like, I like that, that answer there. Tell me, you know, when you guys dig into, or when you dig into someone's financial plan or in this case, maybe the lack thereof, what are some of the common threads you see that things you go, man, most people struggle with this, and this is how they overcome it?  [00:05:19] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah, and it's a great question. The, I think that the thing that most people do and the thing that causes the most problems that I've ever seen is we simply don't save enough. Like, we don't save enough. And how do we save more? Well, there's three different pieces of this, right? You, you earn more, you spend less. And then you sort of think longer term. So realize that right now, right now you, you're earning a certain amount and people panic about that. And I can't do anything about it. Well, you're gonna, you're gonna earn more later, almost guaranteed, right? [00:05:45] Jonathan DeYoe: You are, we are always becoming the next version of ourselves. And so we get raises, we switch jobs, we start a side gig. And, and so in terms of planning, you can think about all those kinds of things and I just, I just went through this process myself. I went back, and I don't know if you've ever done this, I went back and looked at, goals that I set 11 years ago, 10 years ago. [00:06:04] Jonathan DeYoe: And I kid you not, I beat the goals by 10. I had like five specific goals, every single one of 'em I had, I had beaten by like 5% or 10%, which, and I set 'em 10 years, you know, 10 years ago. I was 40 years old and I was like, these are crazy goals. I'm just gonna, I'm gonna really set the bar high and boom, we, we nailed them. [00:06:25] Jonathan DeYoe: And so the, the fact that you put those things on paper, that you think about them, that you write them down actually does create outcomes. You have to follow through, you've got to do the work. You got to take the time, all that kind of stuff. But if you write it down and you, you reflect on that on a regular basis. You'll get there, right? You'll get there. And I, I fully believe that. The reminder is this is what you got to do. Let's go do it.  [00:06:46] Sam Wilson: Right. And I think that goes into the, into the title of your book, which is the well you, or a title of podcast or book, which one is it? You wrote a book. [00:06:53] Jonathan DeYoe: Both. [00:06:54] Sam Wilson: Both. It is a Mindful Money and Mindful Money Podcast. There it is. That's that's the topic. Your book is Mindful Money. Can you break down what that, other than just writing it down and saying, Hey, this is, this is where I want to go. What else does that mean to you?  [00:07:10] Jonathan DeYoe: So. The second thing I would say, if we don't save enough, the second thing is we invest without knowing where we're, what we're investing for. So, so mindfulness, this concept, what is mindfulness? The concept of mindfulness is sort of a, a non-judgmental awareness of the present moment. And right now in the present moment, we've had two quarters of kind of volatile markets after nine years of just a wonderful upside. So, so people are actually experiencing this now. [00:07:35] Jonathan DeYoe: And, and if you're a real estate investor, you haven't experienced this kind of volatility, this kind of interest rate rise since 2008, 2009. So if you're, you know, this is kind of scary for a lot of folks, for sure. But the reality is this is a natural ebb and flow of markets. This is, this happens. [00:07:49] Jonathan DeYoe: It's normal, it's normal in equity markets. It's actually normal in, in real estate markets as well. And the mindfulness piece is realizing, okay, there's this scary thing. Let's not judge the fear. Let's not make some kind of an assumption about what's gonna happen next, what's on the ground, what can we do to make a difference. When you're thinking about somebody that has goals and dreams and things they wanna accomplish, if they've never thought about the goals and dreams and things, they're, they're behind, right? [00:08:13] Jonathan DeYoe: They, they don't, they don't know, they don't know what they're targeting, but more important than not knowing what they're targeting is they don't know how to course correct. You know, you got to know where you're going in order to know when you're not on the path. And so mindfulness is of the path, not mindfulness is knowing where I'm going, knowing that the decisions I need to make to get there and then course correcting along the way, being non-judgmental about the environment, knowing what I need to do internally, right?  [00:08:38] Jonathan DeYoe: And that's the, that's very tough to get to that. But when you work with people and you sit down with them, you do the full analysis of everything you wanna accomplish. You say here's the trade offs that you need to make to make that happen. Here's the expected normal run of the mill market volatility run of the mill downside you're gonna run into, and you have to just keep doing the stuff that we said you had to do while that stuff happens. [00:09:00] Jonathan DeYoe: 'Cause that's just normal. That's par for the course. That's what we can expect. Then they meet that when you're on the path, right? So you you've made the plan. You've you've talked about the trade offs. You've told them what to expect and then they, that thing hits them, that smacks 'em in the face and then they, oh, we talked about this and yeah, we'll talk about it right then again. And we'll talk about it every six months. We'll talk about it every year. We'll keep talking about it and talking about it and talking about it and then it hits them and then they can work through it. And it's that, it's that constant message of, this is what we got to do. This is what we got to do, this, what we got to do that enables people to do it when the time comes.  [00:09:32] Sam Wilson: I love it. I love it. You said one of the mistakes that you see people making is that they don't save enough. Yeah. What does saving mean to you? How, how, how would you answer this? What does saving mean to you in an environment where we see the value of especially dollars just going away. I mean, what does that, I mean, inflation is just killing savers right now. How do you save, how do you mindfully save?  [00:09:56] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah, well said, well said. So saving is, is one step in a two step process, right? Everyone has to have enough savings that is declining in value that inflation's gonna erode. [00:10:05] Jonathan DeYoe: No question about that, right, and, and it's, we're talking a lot about inflation today, but inflation has always been a fact. It's been 1.8, 2% for about 10 years. It's always gonna be coming. It's always around the corner. And you're thinking about 60 year investing lives and 30 year retirements, you're gonna face lots of inflation. [00:10:22] Jonathan DeYoe: So to this, isn't a special thing. This is something we should expect, okay? So given that, I'm always recommending saving more, but, but saving is just the first step in that two step process. Once you have your emergency fund, once you have enough sitting in cash, then you're investing it, you're seeking, you're seeking a place to put it that has the highest opportunity, right? [00:10:42] Jonathan DeYoe: And so that could be, and I know what you guys do, you know, lots of real estate, I've done a lot of real estate in my life as well. I'm a huge fan of, of just public equity markets. I'm actually a huge fan of, of private enterprise as well. I like now I invest in small businesses locally than when they, when they run into trouble. [00:10:57] Jonathan DeYoe: I invest into small tech companies where, where, you know, I might know the CEO or I might have a friend that's, that's introduced me to the CEO or something like that. I, I love that stuff. I love equity. I love business. I'm also a huge fan of real estate as a way to develop wealth.  [00:11:11] Sam Wilson: I like that. So you're saying what we do first, get the emergency fund covered, get your basic, get that covered. And the rest gets invested.  [00:11:19] Jonathan DeYoe: Totally.  [00:11:19] Sam Wilson: Where do you see prime risk right now in investments? Be it in the, in the public markets, be it in real estate. I mean, you see a lot of different stuff come across your desk. Is there anything right now that when you see it, you just get this internal gut check of like, oh boy. [00:11:37] Jonathan DeYoe: I do. I'm not sure I'm gonna win any popularity contest with this.  [00:11:41] Sam Wilson: It's okay. We're not here for popularity contest. We're here for, for honest feedback.  [00:11:46] Jonathan DeYoe: So I think, and this, goes back every two, three years. There's something that comes across the pipe that is, you know, exciting to talk about. And usually, while it's exciting to talk about, it's a really dumb idea to engage, you know, back, you know, go back 20 years. I'm starting the business in the middle of the dot com world. You know, there's plenty of people that saying nothing but technology matters, nothing, but connectivity matters. This is all that matters and that's all gonna invest in. And they did really astoundingly well, you know, 96, 97, 98, 99. And in 2000, they lost 90% of their assets. Because everything chased one idea. So now it's in this last couple years, there's been a lot of chasing going on. You've had, you've had specs. [00:12:27] Jonathan DeYoe: They're they're all destroyed NFTs. They're pretty much destroyed crypto. I think crypto has a case. I'm not investing in the currency. I think there's a case long term, not in the currency, but in the blockchain. I wouldn't, I wouldn't touch the currency myself. It's just, you know, that's speculation. [00:12:41] Jonathan DeYoe: That's not investing. So for me, I like anything that's broadly diversified. You know, I like to own lots of different stuff, 'cause I think the risk is in the concentration. The risk is engaging, the exciting thing, getting too concentrated and the exciting thing when it's exciting. I love stuff that's like, okay, everybody hates this now it's probably a pretty good investment, right? Remember,, like Tesla was killing it. Ford was getting destroyed. 2022 comes, Tesla gets destroyed. Ford is killing it. That's a pretty good story. That's kind of what you can always anticipate.  [00:13:15] Sam Wilson: I love, I love your statement there, that the risk is in the concentration. We're seeing that right now in the multifamily space. I mean, I don't know if you track anything in commercial real estate, you know, specifically, but the capital pouring into multifamily has just caused cap rate compression at a pace that I just can't, it's unfathomable to me. And yes, I did buy some multifamily last year. It was, I mean, it just made all the sense in the world. They were sweetheart deals and they're crushing it, but by and large, like, I just stepped out of it. I just said, man, this is, yeah. It's it just seems frothy.  [00:13:51] Jonathan DeYoe: Was it, I think, Buffett said, you know, you buy the thing when it's, I, I don't remember what it was.  [00:13:56] Sam Wilson: Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy only when others are fearful.  [00:13:58] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah. It's that, but if it's dear, if it's dear, if everyone wants it, that's you don't want that. You know, and there's plenty of in real estate specifically, in stocks, there's plenty of opportunity. Maybe, maybe it's parking lots now, you know, maybe it's not single family. Maybe it's, you know, there's so many different options of how you do it, that don't buy the thing that everyone's chasing. And right now, like the big money is all chasing multifamily. You've got, what is it? The Blackstone, right? Buying thousands and thousands of units that drives up prices makes the cash flow less good.  [00:14:25] Sam Wilson: Right. Drives up prices. I mean, it's great. It's great for those of us, you know, if we're exiting. [00:14:30] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah. If you're an owner, it's good time.  [00:14:33] Sam Wilson: Yeah. It's a good time to sell that. That's absolutely right. But no, I think, I think that's really, really smart there. When you say the risk is in the concentration. I mean, do people come to you and send you, you know, opportunities they have, if they're a client of yours and say, Hey, Jonathan, here, here's an idea. Here's an opportunity to invest in something. What do you think?  [00:14:51] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah. I mean, it it's rarer. I mean, the people that are, you know, I wrote a book called Mindful Money. So the, the people that attracts first is people that aren't really interested in investing. [00:15:02] Sam Wilson: Right.  [00:15:02] Jonathan DeYoe: So, they don't want to do this themselves. They want somebody to do it for them, with them, you know, hold their hand through the process. And I'm, that's what I love to do. I love, I love to actually walk people through capital markets 'cause I, I love capital markets. It's a, it's a fun place for me. [00:15:14] Jonathan DeYoe: But occasionally I have a client who will come in and say, Hey, I bet this idea. I bet this idea. Or, you know, my buddy started this company in Silicon valley, what do you think? And, and, you know, they, they run the gamut from a real estate thing to a new meta platform to a new, you know, so there's, there's so many chip companies, there's so many different things that I, that I run into. [00:15:33] Jonathan DeYoe: I actually, don't, I've only made a couple of those direct investments myself, because there's so much risk. And that, I mean, it's like 98% chance that you lose every penny you put into it, right? So again, concentrations are good. I like diversification. So I have, I have a guy that does this a hundred percent of his time. [00:15:50] Jonathan DeYoe: This is what he likes to do. And so I give him the money that I wanna invest in private enterprise. And he invests that money 'cause he invests in 60 in every fund. So that's fine. That's how I get diversification in that space. And those are out there that're available. I recommend those and I think that's, in your world, that's like syndication, right?  [00:16:04] Jonathan DeYoe: So you get somebody that does a bunch of different things and you, they pool money and that enables more investments across a broader, a broader range of opportunity.  [00:16:11] Sam Wilson: Yeah. Yeah. Especially, especially when you start getting into syndications that are funds where we might pull 10 assets into a single fund. [00:16:19] Sam Wilson: That's absolutely right. Tell me about this. You mentioned early on that you were raised poor there's oftentimes I feel that there are mindset shifts that you have to get over, especially I'm, I'm in your camp of growing up pretty much, yeah, pretty pretty on the poor side of things. [00:16:37] Sam Wilson: And so I'll just speak, maybe I'm maybe I'm projecting here. [00:16:40] Jonathan DeYoe: Project away.  [00:16:41] Sam Wilson: It took me a long time to really get out of the poverty mindset. [00:16:45] Jonathan DeYoe: Oh, yeah.  [00:16:45] Sam Wilson: It's like, oh man, this is where I come from. This is who I am. This is who I'll always be. This is the way, and my parents treated money fairly well. We just didn't have much of it, but still there, there was a lot of just getting over some of those things. Tell me, how can you contrast that upbringing and, you know, your book on, on Mindful Money and being mindful of your money? What, how do those two coincide? [00:17:07] Jonathan DeYoe: So there's actually a third point in there and we talked about it just briefly before we started. So I did, I wrote a book and there's three parts to the book. The first part of the book is all the illusions you can ignore. The middle part is the stuff that can make you, that leads to wellbeing, happiness, contentment, whatever that word is you want to use. And then the third part of the book is a plan to get there. [00:17:25] Jonathan DeYoe: So I've written a book that talks about, you know, health relationships, gratitude, generosity, all these things that we know lead to happiness, right? So I know, I know this stuff, I've read the research. I read the papers, all that kind of stuff. And it wasn't until last year when my brother died, that it really hit me that I wasn't doing it. [00:17:46] Jonathan DeYoe: Like, I wrote the book. I understand, but I was, I am still to this day, I have a poverty mindset to this day, and it's not that it holds me the way it did when I was younger. But it pops up. And you go, oh, there it is. Like, that's the thing that gets me. And I find myself worrying a lot about it all going away. [00:18:06] Jonathan DeYoe: So that's that, you know, I built the thing. I merge a thing in a larger company, I'm building more content. I'm writing, I'm teaching I'm doing all the stuff I love to do. And yet there's this thing that I'm afraid, I'm afraid that someone's gonna take it all away. It's gonna take it away. So when my brother died, it really brought home something about the way he lived his life. [00:18:23] Jonathan DeYoe: And it was, you know, he didn't mind being late to the movie. He didn't mind making you wait. He didn't mind. He didn't stress. All the things that I stress constantly. And so I'm, I'm learning to be a little bit more relaxed and, you know, it ebbs and flows. Like, I'm trying my best. And, but that man, it grips you and it shows up in places you don't expect it. [00:18:42] Sam Wilson: Yeah. It's an interesting thing. I probably didn't recognize even in myself or know that it existed. Gosh, until probably I don't even know five, seven years ago. And it's like, wait, there you are like, yeah, I have a poverty mindset and it just it's recognizing it. [00:18:57] Sam Wilson: It is a journey, you know, everybody has their own journey, but it's certainly an interesting journey to just explore. And so I was just curious how, how that worked out. One last question here for you before we sign off really curious about your business. I know we talked about this a little bit off air, but I think it's important for those who are scaling their business and thinking about ways to scale and also scaling in a mindful way. [00:19:18] Sam Wilson: We're gonna just keep playing with a mindful theme here, but you took your business and merged it with another company really so you could focus on the thing that you enjoy the most. Is that right?  [00:19:30] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah, that's absolutely right. 21 years of building a practice, I think we talked about this beforehand. [00:19:35] Jonathan DeYoe: My, my brother, when my brother died, we had plans that beginning this year. So her died middle of last year, June of 2021. He was gonna join me first quarter of 2022 and be my COO CEO. He was technology genius. He was an operations guy. He had his MBA, and I'm much better face to face with a client. [00:19:54] Jonathan DeYoe: And so I wanted to do none, none of the business management, and I wanted him to come on and do that kind of stuff. And we've been, we've been planning it. We actually started a company in 2006 that we actually shut it in 2008. So we we've been thinking about how to do this for a long, long time. So when he died, everything changes very quickly. [00:20:08] Jonathan DeYoe: And, and so I was like, okay, I know I don't wanna do this. I know I don't wanna pick the next, you know, technology tool we use. I know I don't wanna do, you know, so many things we had to think about in terms of our technology stack and I, I didn't wanna do that. So I, I had actually recently talked three years ago. [00:20:24] Jonathan DeYoe: I had talked to this firm EP wealth. And I'd gone down the road with them and I chatted with them pretty deeply. And, and I decided at that point, I'm just gonna grow this thing. I'm gonna bring my brother on. We're gonna do this together. We've always meant to do this. And so I went back to them and I went back to like 15 or 20 other companies. [00:20:38] Jonathan DeYoe: And I hired an M&A firm and said, this is, this is what my firm is doing. This is what we believe in. This is our thought process. This is our investment process. This is our planning process. You know, find a firm that's a good match and EP, you know, the people I talked to three years ago ended up to be the, the best match for me and I merged in there. [00:20:54] Jonathan DeYoe: And so now, I get to do the two things I want to do. We're six months in, so there's still some overlap. There's still some things I have to take care of, right? But I see a point in the future where I get to write and I get, do my podcast and I get to visit with you on your podcast. And I get to sit face to face with my clients and I don't have to worry about any other stuff. [00:21:13] Jonathan DeYoe: And that's for me, that's the dream. That's what I want to do. And it took 20 something years to get here. And I think this year I would've been there either way. You know, I don't, I would much have preferred doing this with Dave, but this is the world we live in now.  [00:21:26] Sam Wilson: It is. Yeah. And that's, one, I'm really sorry to hear that about your brother. I can't, I can't imagine that I've got four of my own and that had be absolutely devastating. So thanks, thanks for sharing that with us. But at the same time, I think it is scaling your business. And that's the title of the, of our podcast is how to scale commercial real estate and the number of people that come on this show and not number, number of them. [00:21:48] Sam Wilson: But, but I get kind of two camps that come on. One person's gonna say, Hey, you know, we're going gangbusters. And we're gonna, we're gonna have, you know, 500 employees and, you know, own billions of dollars in real estate. And that may be exactly what life they wanna create. And then there's other people that come on and say, look, you know what I've covered. I make 250 grand a year passively, and I'm enjoying the rest of whatever it is until I decide to go back to work and do something differently. And I'm happy as a, a pig and lop. It's just very interesting. So I think, I think mindfully scaling and figuring out and building your business around the way you want it is, is a great example that you've sat for us here by, you know, partnering up and merging with another firm. So you get to do exactly what you love.  [00:22:29] Jonathan DeYoe: Yeah, and I think I told you this in the, in the little email exchange we had before we sat down, but the key to that process is really understanding what you want. And that's that, that's that goals, vision, purpose, kind of a thing. And I think the course that we're gonna put in the show notes is the, is our vision course. [00:22:46] Jonathan DeYoe: And so we have a course that's free. Everyone can take it. And it's, it starts with like, what are, what are my values? What's my purpose? And then I can build goals on top of values and purpose. And that's, so many people never even go through that process. And I, I try to go through that process every single year. [00:23:00] Jonathan DeYoe: You know, I'm, I'm behind this year, but, I'll definitely pick it up again next year. But that's, that's huge. Know what's important to you, know what your purpose is, know why you're here, and then build goals on top of those two things.  [00:23:09] Sam Wilson: I love it. Jonathan, if our listeners wanna get in touch with you or learn more about you or take the free course, what is the best way to do that?  [00:23:16] Jonathan DeYoe: So Mindful Money is the place to find all the social media and find the website and find the courses. We have a lot of different courses that are financial education and including a financial planning course, that's, that's built basically right on the chassis of my book and all the exercises in the book. [00:23:29] Jonathan DeYoe: So people can definitely check that out. I'm hoping that we can put the, in the show notes, the link to the free course.  [00:23:34] Sam Wilson: Absolutely. Yeah, we, we'll do that. We'll put that link there in the show notes. Jonathan, thank you so much for coming on the show today. I do appreciate it. Thank you so much. Have a great rest of your day.  [00:23:43] Jonathan DeYoe: Thanks Sam. 

    Round Table China
    Meet the new podcast “Why We Love Dunhuang”

    Round Table China

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 8:22


    Heyang recommends the new podcast “Why we love Dunhuang” where you'll find out why and how Dunhuang became the world's largest Buddhist art gallery, and what its name means to the world.

    Guru Viking Podcast
    Ep156: Key To Enlightenment - Delson Armstrong 3

    Guru Viking Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 103:15


    In this episode I am once again joined by Delson Armstrong, spiritual teacher, meditation virtuoso, and author of ‘A Mind Without Craving'. Delson draws on his scriptural knowledge and personal experience to take a deep dive into dependent origination, the doctrine believed by many Buddhists to be the key to enlightenment. In practical and relatable terms, Delson explains how this doctrine works, why it is important yet so often misunderstood, and how to use meditation to move from an intellectual understanding to the experiential understanding that is Buddhist enlightenment. Delson also compares the enlightened to the unenlightened experiences of time, memory, and decision making process, and gives a surprising answer to the question: can enlightened people make mistakes? …

 Video version: https://www.guruviking.com/podcast/155-key-to-enlightenment-delson-armstrong-3 
Also available on Youtube, iTunes, & Spotify – search ‘Guru Viking Podcast'. … Topics include: 00:00 - Intro 00:53 - How to obtain an experiential understanding 05:56 - Essence of Dependent Origination 07:37 - How choices create reality 11:09 - Delson explains the 12 links 21:38 - Common mistakes in understanding the 12 links 24:25 - 6R's as a craving intervention 30:09 - Consequences of disrupting the 12 links via meditation 36:30 - Does the wisdom mind generate karma? 39:01 - Exhaustion of past life karma 41:09 - Enlightened vs unenlightened experience of life 45:14 - Enlightened vs unenlightened experience of time, memory, and future planning 48:38 - Enlightened vs unenlightened decision making processes 55:22 - Why do enlightened people make mistakes? 01:00:03 - Lifting the veil that filters reality 01:06:36 - Trauma how to recondition the mind 01:15:01 - Letting go of craving is wholesome 01:17:21 - Is cultivation of wholesome states necessary? 01:20:39 - How purification works 01:23:42 - Healing trauma and MDMA-assisted therapy 01:27:39 - Simply observing suffering is not enough 01:31:24 - Riding the 12 links to stream entry and beyond 01:41:46 - Practical advice for the practitioner ... Previous episodes with Delson Armstrong: - https://www.guruviking.com/ep120-meditation-virtuoso-delson-armstrong/ - https://www.guruviking.com/ep127-siddha-tales-delson-armstrong-2/ - https://www.guruviking.com/podcast/ep136-meeting-of-the-dharmas-daniel-ingram-delson-armstrong To find out more about Delson Armstrong, visit: - https://www.suttavada.foundation/our-teachers/ - https://www.dhammasukha.org/ 
For more interviews, videos, and more visit: - www.guruviking.com Music ‘Deva Dasi' by Steve James

    The Way Out Is In
    Beyond Words: The Power of Presence (Episode #33)

    The Way Out Is In

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 111:01


    Welcome to episode 33 of The Way Out Is In: The Zen Art of Living, a podcast series mirroring Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh's deep teachings of Buddhist philosophy: a simple yet profound methodology for dealing with our suffering, and for creating more happiness and joy in our lives. This time, the presenters – Zen Buddhist monk Brother Phap Huu and journalist Jo Confino – are joined by Zen Buddhist nun Sister Dinh Nghiem; together, they discuss Thich Nhat Hanh's years following his stroke in 2014, its impact on the community of monastics, and the Zen master's powerful presence beyond words. In this intimate and moving episode, the two monastics – both former attendants of Thich Nhat Hanh – recollect stories from the period of Thay's illness: from overcoming his coma to the lessons the Zen master continued to share with the sangha from his hospital bed, and later, from the ‘root temple' Tu Hieu in Hue, Vietnam, where he continued to be a great teacher even without the ability to speak. They also address the way the sangha became Thay's continuation, both before and after his passing in 2022; the power of presence in challenging circumstances; transmission without words; clarity; acceptance; death; and support. Sister Dinh Nghiem (Sister Concentration) was ordained in 1993, when she was 24 years old. In 2000, she became the first abbess of the New Hamlet in Plum Village (and remains the youngest ordained to date). She was also one of the monastics who attended Thich Nhat Hanh during the five and a half years after his stroke and until his passing. In this episode, she talks about her decision to become a nun, and spending her life with the practice; dealing with her father's death and the deep teachings of ‘no birth, no death'; the guidance Thich Nhat Hanh gave her during his illness; and the Zen master's final days. Co-produced by the Plum Village App:https://plumvillage.app/ And Global Optimism:https://globaloptimism.com/ With support from the Thich Nhat Hanh Foundation:https://thichnhathanhfoundation.org/ List of resources Old Path, White Clouds: Walking in the Footsteps of the Buddhahttps://www.parallax.org/product/old-path-white-clouds-walking-in-the-footsteps-of-the-buddha/Sister Chan Khonghttps://plumvillage.org/about/sister-chan-khong/‘Thich Nhat Hanh Returns Home'https://plumvillage.org/about/thich-nhat-hanh/thich-nhat-hanhs-health/thich-nhat-hanh-returns-to-vietnam/ Plum Village Thailandhttps://plumvillage.org/practice-centre/plum-village-thailand/ The Way Out Is In: ‘“Arrived, Home”: The First Plum Village Dharma Seal (40 Years Retreat #2)'https://plumvillage.org/library/dharma-talks/arrived-home-the-first-plum-village-dharma-seal-40-years-retreat-2/ ‘Parallel Verses – Continuing Thay in the Lunar New Year (Tet)'https://plumvillage.org/articles/harmony-at-home-peace-all-around/ Quotes “You may have [achieved] some awakening, but you need to maintain this concentration in your daily life so that this insight sinks deep into the body, your deep consciousness.” “When there is chaos, we have to be centered so that we all have clarity.” “We recognized that his [Thay's] breathing was incredible. It’s like the stored consciousness of 80-something years of practicing went into autopilot and Thay’s mindfulness was a continuing stream of practice.” “I need to continue to invest in this dharma because in the most critical moment, ‘What is your best friend?’ – it’s your breathing.” “I was told that one of the doctors or nurses came to see about Thay’s oxygen level in his blood and was looking at the machine and kept on tapping it. And eventually one of the monastics said, ‘What’s the problem?' They replied, ‘Well, this must be wrong because it’s showing 95%' – or whatever – ‘oxygen level. And someone in this condition, it normally goes down to 70 or 75.' And you’re just thinking, ‘Well, that’s obvious, because Thay’s one of the best breathers in the world.'” “Thay made them practice mindfulness and concentration being 100% present. Thay didn’t need to say anything. It was transmission from heart to heart, not through words.” “When we don’t use the words, we use energy and we are more sensitive with energy – the other person’s as well as our own.” “Thay has finessed and deepened and focused and taken the time and energy to show what’s possible for us. So what I’m hearing is an invitation to us all – not to be like Thay, but to show that if we are able to be attentive, to be mindful, to be ourselves, to come back to ourselves in the present moment, then we can taste that aspect of Thay.” “The joy of meditation is daily food.”

    Buddhist Wisdom, Modern Life
    My new favorite intro to Buddhism course: Dr. Kate Hartmann and Buddhist Studies Online

    Buddhist Wisdom, Modern Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 60:51


    Hello, friends. If you're interested in the basics of Buddhism and want a fun introduction to the history, beliefs, and practices of the various Buddhist lineages, I have a great new learning platform to share with you: Buddhist Studies Online or BSO. Today I'm talking with Dr. Kate Hartmann, a Harvard PhD in Religious Studies and one of the folks behind Buddhist Studies Online and the instructor for BSO 101 about the history, philosophy, and practice of Buddhism. Kate is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at the University of Wyoming. She received a PhD in Religious Studies, focused on Tibetan Buddhism, from Harvard University in May 2020. Her research focuses on the history of pilgrimage to holy mountains in Tibet. She also helped develop and launch Buddhist Studies Online, an educational platform aimed at making academic courses on Buddhism more accessible to the public. If you'd like to hear more about her story of connecting with Buddhism as an undergrad, then traveling around Asia in the course of her studies, you can find a link in the show notes to an interview she did with Seth Powell who helped found BSO. I hope you enjoy the conversation, and if you'd like to learn more about BSO 101 or 102, Buddhist Meditation in Theory and Practice, you can find links to both those courses in the show notes. BSO 101 (intro to Buddhist history, philosophy, & practice): https://geni.us/BSO101 BSO 102 (Buddhist meditation in theory and practice): https://geni.us/BSO102 (Those are affiliate links. There's no cost to you when you click them, but you do support this channel/podcast.) Listen to Kate's story: https://geni.us/katehstory May you and all beings be well. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/buddhist-wisdom/message

    Next Level Soul with Alex Ferrari: A Spirituality & Personal Growth Podcast
    NLS 086: A Monk's Guide to Happiness with Gelong Thubten

    Next Level Soul with Alex Ferrari: A Spirituality & Personal Growth Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 70:11


    Gelong Thubten is a Buddhist monk, meditation teacher and author from the UK. He became a monk 29 years ago at Samye Ling Tibetan Monastery in Scotland, and has spent over six years in intensive meditation retreats, the longest of which was 4 years long.He is now regarded as one of the UK's most influential meditation teachers, with pioneering work teaching in universities, schools, worldwide companies such as Google, hospitals, prisons and rehab centres. He has lectured at Oxford University and for the United Nations, and he provides courses to medical students, doctors and nurses.He trained Benedict Cumberbatch and Tilda Swinton in meditation on the set of the Marvel movie ‘Dr. Strange' and he collaborated with Ruby Wax and neuroscientist Ash Ranpura on the book ‘How to be Human'. Thubten is the author of the Sunday Times bestseller ‘A Monk's Guide to Happiness: Meditation in the 21st Century', which is now published in 13 countries including the US, and his next book ‘Handbook for Hard Times' will be published in 2023.A Monk's Guide to HappinessIn our never-ending search for happiness we often find ourselves looking to external things for fulfillment, thinking that happiness can be unlocked by buying a bigger house, getting the next promotion, or building a perfect family.In this profound and inspiring book, Gelong Thubten shares a practical and sustainable approach to happiness. Thubten, a Buddhist monk and meditation expert who has worked with everyone from school kids to Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and Benedict Cumberbatch, explains how meditation and mindfulness can create a direct path to happiness.A Monk's Guide to Happiness explores the nature of happiness and helps bust the myth that our lives and minds are too busy for meditation. The book can show you how to:- Learn practical methods to help you choose happiness- Develop greater compassion for yourself and others- Learn to meditate in micro-moments during a busy day- Discover that you are naturally ‘hard-wired' for happinessReading A Monk's Guide to Happiness could revolutionize your relationship with your thoughts and emotions, and help you create a life of true happiness and contentment.

    The Anxiety Podcast
    TAP 469 - Are You Carrying Unnecessary Weight?

    The Anxiety Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 5:34


    Summary: In this episode I discuss a Buddhist story relating to how we carry around unnecessary emotional weight and how it can affect us. I share so possible things you can do to process your weight and identifying what you don't neccessarily see on the surface. Links: Support the show: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/timjp Subscribe to my Youtube Channel: https://youtube.com/timjpcollins?sub_confirmation=1 To get my Toolkit to Overcome Anxiety go to - http://timjpcollins.com/free Please click here to leave a review -http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1031117023

    Ungraduated Living & Learning
    No Matter how Long it Takes

    Ungraduated Living & Learning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 8:18


    The journey into every day Buddhism may be winding down, but we will ensure that no matter how long it takes, we continue to walk our path, stay true to ourselves, and assist in service of others. Today we wind down our entire quarterly focus on Buddhist teachings, and look forward to what will come next in our Ungraduations from the system of limiting life beliefs. My website: https://ungraduated.com/ Ungraduated Book: https://www.amazon.com/Ungraduated-Finding-dropping-outdated-systems-ebook/dp/B09SXCBY6R/ref=sr_1_1?crid=28QTYUU7T5BN4&keywords=ungraduated+book&qid=1655499090&sprefix=ungraduate%2Caps%2C122&sr=8-1 Join the Ungraduated Living Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/454790476338234  

    The Jedburgh Podcast
    #066: Abacus Wealth Partners - Co-Founder Spencer Sherman

    The Jedburgh Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 114:37


    Money is always on our minds. Abacus Wealth Partners Co-Founder Spencer Sherman joins Fran Racioppi to discuss money, how we think about it, what we do with it, and where the economy is going. Spencer oversees $4B in assets. He is the author of The Cure For Money Madness and the creator of Fearless Finance, a course designed to teach us how to effectively manage and handle our views and decisions about our money. He abides by Buddhist principles and the simple concept that the road to financial freedom is long and boring. Take a listen then check out Spencer's courses to unleash your money wisdom at Spencer-Sherman.com.Read the full episode transcription here and learn more on The Jedburgh Podcast Website. Check out our video versions on YouTube.Highlights:-Why the topic of money is taboo. (5:45)-Spencer's entry into financial advisory to become an ally of the client vs a salesman of financial products. (8:13)-A fire destroyed Spencer's first firm. He re-entered the building to save his client files and changing his life. (11:17)-Fran asks Spencer to apply the core teachings of Buddhism to financial planning: Impermanence, Mindfulness, Equanimity, Interdependence/Interconnectedness. (28:18)-Spencer explains how simplicity in your portfolio is the key to long term wealth and why women are outperforming men in portfolio management. (37:46)-Emotional intelligence is essential to financial decisions and includes self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills. (45:31)-Fearless Finance: Financial Freedom on the Road to Enough is Spencer's new course; determining your inner compass, overcoming fear, why we must think about death, how to define “enough” and the importance of generosity. (51:21 & 1:22:46)-Spencer defines the four negative emotions that lead to lost money: anxiety, envy, shame or fear, selfishness. (1:06:38)Quotes:-”We have this idea that my self worth is equal to my net worth.” -”I know that the most important thing in my life is in that building…and if I don't get it I know that my life is worthless.” -”Meditation is this training for the mind.” -”Mindfulness is really about being present with what's happening and letting go of any judgment.” -”Have a boring portfolio. Live an exciting life.” -”If all of us could take on that beginner's mind, the world just opens up.” - “The problem with going for more and more and more is it trains our brain to be in a place of scarcity, a place of fear because we're never arriving.” -“We're actually thinking that we need more to get happy, when really we can be happy right now.” -”I think more about what's possible.” Spencer's Three Daily Foundations to Success:-Sit quietly to center self-Take a cold shower to shock the system-Complete a compassion practice-Spencer's bonus: journal then throw it out so you write anything down without hesitationThis episode is brought to you by Jersey Mike's, 18A Fitness, and Analytix Solutions

    The Yogic Studies Podcast
    33. Stuart Sarbacker | Aṣṭāṅgayoga: Eight Limbs of Yoga

    The Yogic Studies Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 75:17


    In this episode, we welcome back Dr. Stuart Ray Sarbacker for a wide-ranging discussing about his upcoming course, YS 121 | 8 Limbs of Yoga: History, Theory, and Practice of Aṣṭāṅgayoga. We discuss the nature of Patañjali's "classical" model, some of its possible sources and influences, comparisons with Buddhist meditation and paths, Aṣṭāṅga beyond Patañjali including Purāṇic and other medieval sources, as well as modern innovations, adaptations, and continuities with ancient modes of practice.  Speaker BioStuart Ray Sarbacker is a scholar and seasoned practitioner of yoga and the author of three books, Tracing the Path of Yoga: The History and Philosophy of Indian Mind-Body Discipline (2021), The Eight Limbs of Yoga: A Handbook of Living Yoga Philosophy (with Kevin Kimple, 2015), and Samādhi: The Numinous and Cessative in Indo-Tibetan Yoga (2005). He has published a wide range of articles and essays on classical and contemporary yoga philosophy and practice. He is particularly interested in the ways in which historical and philosophical traditions of yoga can be placed in comparison and conversation with modern and contemporary practice.He received his Ph.D. in Religious Studies with a specialization in the Languages and Cultures of Asia from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has performed research and fieldwork in India, Nepal, and Japan. He is an enthusiastic and innovative teacher, incorporating contemplative practices and social and environmental justice service-learning into his courses at Oregon State, where he contributes to certificate and teacher trainings in yoga as well as to the philosophy and religion curriculum.Links https://oregonstate.academia.edu/StuartSarbacker YS 121 | 8 Limbs of Yoga: History, Theory, and Practice of Aṣṭāṅgayoga

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery
    Justified - 06-29-22 by Sokuzan - sokukoji.org/donate

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 53:33


    This is a dynamic we quite often use in looking at something we've done or need to do. Is it justified? There is no way you can tell. That doesn't mean you wouldn't do it anyway. Do the action you need to do, but don't abandon your fundamental open responsibility by justifying it. Some people live their whole lives this way. You can justify anything, but all evidence is partial — it's relative truth. You cannot see all the causes and conditions behind anything and you can't find the first cause. It's so incredibly complicated. If you would like these talks to continue, PLEASE VISIT OUR DONATE PAGE at sokukoji.org/donate https://youtu.be/nxlygn6QhRE

    Way of Compassion Dharma Center
    4 Noble Truths 15 - Compassion

    Way of Compassion Dharma Center

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 43:32


    John Bruna, spiritual director of the Way of Compassion Dharma Center, comments on a public talk given by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. John begins by encouraging the study and practice of the Three Principal Aspects of the path. He unpacks His Holiness's comments that we all have the inborn right to be happy and to avoid suffering. John then goes on to explain that despite our best efforts we often create our own suffering. He also brings up an interesting dynamic of human intelligence and how it can help us cultivate genuine happiness but can also work against our pursuit of well-being. This teaching was given on June 22nd, 2022.Welcome to the Way of Compassion Dharma Center Podcast. Located in Carbondale, Colorado, the Way of Compassion Dharma center's primary objective is to provide programs of Buddhist studies and practices that are practical, accessible, and meet the needs of the communities we serve.  As a traditional Buddhist center, all of our teachings are offered freely. If you would like to make a donation to support the center, please visit www.wocdc.org.  May you flourish in your practice and may all beings swiftly be free of suffering.

    Buddhability
    Tips & Insights: Yes, you can change your karma

    Buddhability

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 7:35


    “Tips & Insights” new episode series in which we'll introduce one Buddhist concept each month and how it can be applied to your life! Today's is: karma.References: Outshining Our Karma With the “Sun of Wisdom” For more in-depth study of the karma, check out An Introduction to Buddhism, second edition, p. 40

    Keen on Yoga Podcast
    #97 – Keen on Yoga Podcast with Dr Jason Birch

    Keen on Yoga Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 67:08


    Jason Birch (DPhil, Oxon) is a senior research fellow for the ‘Light on Hatha Yoga' project, hosted at SOAS University of London and the University of Marburg. Jason is also a visiting researcher on the Suśruta Project at the University of Alberta. He is well known for his important paper on the meaning of haṭha in early Haṭhayoga, which has reshaped our understanding of the origins of this term by locating it within Buddhist literature. His dissertation focused on a seminal Rājayoga text called the Amanaska. Through extensive fieldwork in India and the reconstruction of primary sources, Birch has identified the earliest text to teach a system of Haṭhayoga and Rājayoga, namely the twelfth-century Amaraugha. His most recent publication has defined a corpus of Sanskrit and vernacular texts that emerged during Haṭhayoga's floruit, the period in which it thrived on the eve of colonialism. Jason has published articles in academic journals and critically edited and translated six texts on Haṭhayoga for the Hatha Yoga Project 2015–2020; taught Masters courses and Sanskrit reading classes at SOAS and given seminars on the history of yoga for MA programs at the Università Ca' Foscari in Venice, Won Kwang University in South Korea and Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles. He is a founding member of the Centre of Yoga Studies SOAS and the Journal of Yoga Studies, and combines his practical experience of yoga with academic knowledge of its history to teach online courses with Jacqueline Hargreaves on The Luminescent.  

    Just Between Us
    Embracing The Bittersweet with Susan Cain, Saying Goodbye, and Liking Yourself

    Just Between Us

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 89:58


    First, Gaby addresses some dating gossip and DMs that have been hurtful regarding their transition. Then, Allison and Gaby answer a listener's question about how to deal with breaking down every time she has to leave her long distance boyfriend. Next, they interview best-selling author Susan Cain about the unifying force of longing and how to handle grief as well as some beautiful reflections on human complexity, Buddhist philosophy, and new ways to think about healing. During hypotheticals Allison psychically predicts an upcoming event in Susan's life - or maybe it's just that time of year. And finally, how do you learn to like yourself? Why is producer Melisa so confident? And what does she like about us??? This has been a Forever Dog production  Produced by Melisa D. Monts Executive produced by Brett Boham, Joe Cilio, Alex Ramsey, Tracy Soren   To listen to this podcast ad-free  Sign up for Forever Dog Plus at foreverdogpodcasts.com/plus   Check out video clips of our podcasts on Youtube at youtube.com/foreverdogteam And make sure to follow us on Twitter, instagram and Facebook at ForeverDogTeam to keep up with all of the latest Forever Dog News Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Unreached of the Day
    Pray for the Mahar (Buddhist traditions) in India

    Unreached of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 1:01


    Sign up to receive podcast: https://joshuaproject.net/pray/unreachedoftheday/podcast People Group Summary: https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/17405 #AThirdofUs                    https://athirdofus.com/ Listen to "A Third of Us" podcast with Greg Kelley, produced by the Alliance for the Unreached: https://alliancefortheunreached.org/podcast/ Watch "Stories of Courageous Christians" w/ Mark Kordic https://storiesofcourageouschristians.com/stories-of-courageous-christians God's Best to You!  

    UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
    97. Death & Disaster, Dialog & Dharma I

    UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 15:56


    The final lesson.Cannot postpone forever;learned now or never.* * *Each fifth Sunday, of which there are four per year (unless there is yet another anomaly I do not understand about the common calendar), we hold our version of what is called “dharma combat,” or hossen in Japanese. This exercise is based upon our understanding of how the ancestors of Zen structured their public discourse. Public, that is, in the sense that all members of a temple or monastery were invited to join the dialog. Whether they really went public with it is a matter for historians.Another term, mondo, which I understand means “crossing of swords,” indicates a brief exchange, like the clashing of two samurai in the days of hand-to-hand combat, now long lost to history in the age of drones, except for the occasional storming of the capitol, much in the news lately as the January 6 committee initiates its prime-time presentations. Hossen is an extended exchange, which lasts longer than the typical clash of two swordsmen.These exchanges between Zen masters and their students, or between two students training under the same master — that somehow got written down, with rice paper and brush, mind you — constitute a major part of the written record. Some are anecdotal, others evolve into one of the body of illogical riddles attributed chiefly to the Rinzai sect, known as koan or koans in English plural form, kung-an in Chinese. One connotation of the latter is “public case,” which defines the ever-changing koan of everyday life that we are facing in these challenging times.I decided to focus one of our dharma combat sessions — which should really be disarmed to a less threatening terminology, such as “dharma dialog” — on the recent mass shootings, latest in a long history of illogical events that nobody wants to talk about, but cannot avoid discussing. Like a koan, they challenge our very grasp of reality.In looking at this problem from both a Design and Zen perspective, the first thing is to try to define it as thoroughly as possible. I reasoned that having an open-ended dialog about it, in the context of a Zen exchange of our understanding of dharma, might bring out the many dimensions of the problem. Compared to responding to the perspective of sincere students of the Way, attempting to articulate the definition of this particular problem on my own might turn out to be a fool's errand. The following is what I came up with in examining my own reaction, to be amplified by the dialog in due time. The transcription of that focus group will follow in future segments. Let's enumerate the players.The human constituents to be examined involve the victims, first and foremost, and their loved ones, the second tier of victims. Then the proximate community of witnesses, the third tier of victims. Fourth, the perpetrators, the shooters, who might be considered victims themselves, in some sense. Fifth, there are the enablers of the perps, those who directly profit from the mayhem, who can hardly be considered victims. Sixth, the onlookers, the vast media audience. And seventh, perhaps the last tier of victims, those running for their lives in other parts of the world, dealing with their own threats from local disasters, natural and man-made, and not helped by this local, disastrous distraction. And, eighth, the larger group of enablers, who indirectly profit from such catastrophes, be it from a financial or political perspective. If I have inadvertently left anybody out, I apologize. Any oversights may become clear in the dialog.Looking at this koan from a Zen perspective necessarily entails comparisons with a cultural perspective, which is largely theistic, stemming primarily from belief systems of the Abrahamic religions. We see this in the vernacular of such terms as “evil” referencing the perps, references to God's will, the victims being “laid to rest,” and so forth. Part of the pain suffered by all, amplified by media, is the sheer repetition of the same tropes, and reliance on the same memes, we have witnessed in past incidents. Which have the property of piling on, until the problem seems intractable by virtue of its very familiarity.In this context I hope and feel that the Buddhist view, as I understand it, may offer some solace, and some promise for a long-term solution to this recurrent tragedy. One of the first memes to be compared and contrasted may be the belief of being “born into sin,” versus birth arising from Ignorance, the first link in the Twelvefold Chain of Interdependent Co-Arising, Buddhism's model of how things get to be the lamentable way they are. In broaching this comparison of spiritual hypotheses, I am fully aware that we are opening a virtual Pandora's box, which we may not be able to close again.Any and all discussions of such events, while emotions are still raw, are fraught with such possibilities. But with these events now occurring weekly, and likely to get worse, it seems we no longer have the luxury of not engaging in the dialog, at least, to begin to define potential solutions, and determine what action we may take, on both personal and social levels. The timeworn expression of good intentions, “to make sure this can never happen again,” begins to ring hollow in the face of the increasing frequency and viciousness of the attacks. So please bear with me. These suggestions are for you to take under consideration in your own view of, and response to, the situation, not as superior opinions.At risk of repeating myself, let me emphasize once again that Buddhist teachings are not meant to be debated in comparison with other teachings of religion or philosophy, let alone ideology. As Buddha himself is said to have instructed on his deathbed, do not simply take his word for anything, but work out our own salvation. In that spirit we offer alternative ways of thinking, and approaching even the most difficult of traumas that the world has to offer. Again we ask, “What if?” and follow with “If, then…”If we are indeed born into ignorance, rather than the “original sin” committed by primordial ancestors, then the perpetrators and victims, as well as all observers, proximate or remote, are facing the same problem. The victims are acting out of innocence, simply pursuing their lives in accord with the expectations of families, friends and community. This amounts to a kind of innocent ignorance, simply not knowing that they are, or may be, in danger.The perpetrators act out of a different kind of ignorance, one that prompts them to turn their greed, anger and delusion — Buddhism's Three Poisons — into attacks on others, in effect blaming others for their own suffering. Taoism, one of the root sources of Zen in China, is attributed with saying something like, “When the blaming begins, there is no end to the blame.”What we always see, immediately following the latest atrocity, is the blame-game writ large. Everyone who may be held responsible for the terrible event seeks to deflect blame, citing “mental health,” the parents, the weapons manufacturers, et cetera. The list is truly endless. We all feel complicit to a certain degree. Which brings up one dual pair requiring clarification: complicity versus responsibility.We can be complicit — which simply means “involved with others,” in a situation without being responsible for what takes place — or culpable, which means “deserving blame.” The degree of culpability is often a matter of closeness to, or distance from, the given event. The trigger man is obviously closest to the crime, but beyond that, it becomes less determinant. The expression, “What did they know, and when did they know it?” becomes determinative in the investigation of the timeline, or the “tick-tock,” the current term of art.The “motive” of the shooters always becomes an obsession, at least of the news media and officials in the follow-up. In the light of the ever-accumulating history, it becomes more and more obvious that the motive does not matter, if knowing it does not help us stop the shootings. Where the perp is killed, either by himself or others, the main source of information regarding motives is lost, unless they have left a paper or virtual trail, up to and including a manifesto. On the other hand, it seems self-evident that the motives of all or most of these young men are the same: they want to deflect their own rage onto others, and perhaps draw attention or gain fame in the process. In other words, they have no real motive, in any rational sense. This is the basis of the argument that they are mentally ill. If they are mentally ill, the culpability of everyone else becomes a moot issue. But Buddhism would hold that we are all mentally ill, if not to the same degree. The main mental illness is ignorance of the truth, which we all share in common, and which defines the futility of these acts of desperation.This is where the public “debate” turns ugly, from sympathy for the innocents to the witch hunt for the guilty. One group of well-meaning people will fault the manufacturers and sales distribution of the AR rapid-fire rifles, weapons of war. Others cite the lack of preparation and failures of the policing forces, running down the minute-by-minute timeline. All sides begin to turn on each other, like rats in an overcrowded maze. Accusations fly, complaining that the real root of the problem is elsewhere, as in a recent political opinion, quote, “every time a demented or disturbed individual does this they try to use it to support their radical agenda,” the “they” here being the opposite political party. But it cuts both ways. Either side could make the same statement, equally effectively. This is the definition of stalemate.The very first of the Grave Precepts of Buddhism, translated variously, is “Affirm life – Do not kill.” Or in some versions, “I take up the way of not killing.” When we consider this objectively and absolutely, it is rendered impossible, of course. This human body has to continuously kill with its immune system, in order to survive. We have to kill in order to eat. But of course we do not have to kill indiscriminately, as in the mass shootings at various public venues, or in shelling civilians in Ukraine. We have to kill selectively, however, in order to maintain our lifestyles, whether in a modern urban setting, or in a tribal setting in the jungle. Death is inevitable, and only a matter of time. Violence is inherent, and only a matter of direction. As the charming political trope puts it, “It depends on whose ox is being gored.”This winner versus loser mentality infects and underlies much of what is askew in human interactions. In truth we are all winners and losers. We have won the birthright of Buddhism — the potential for awakening — but in the end we inevitably lose this life through aging, sickness and death. So our time available for realizing this insight is severely limited. Meanwhile most of us go through life without even knowing that we have this ability, this capability and capacity to find what we are really looking for, instead of futilely pursuing other fantasies. It is truly pitiable, and applies to all of us equally. This is the wake-up call of Zen. I hope that you hear it in your life, and that all beings will be able to do so eventually.To be continued.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

    GOLF SMARTER
    Connected Golf: Bridging The Gap Between Practice & Performance | golf SMARTER #849

    GOLF SMARTER

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 54:06


    849: Jayne Storey returns to discuss her latest book “Connected Golf: Bridging the Gap Between Practice & Performance”. https://amzn.to/3xU8jTS Jayne, Founder and Head Coach at Chi-Performance.com has a unique form of expertise based on more than three decades of practicing and teaching meditation and Tai Chi. She's worked with hundreds of athletes and her methods have shown significantly reduced nerves, anxiety and mental interference by helping athletes from golf, tennis, snowboarding, weightlifting, and more bring together the technical and mental aspects of sport into a unified whole. This episode is brought to you by mygolfingstore.com/golfsmarter home of Eagle Eye Rangefinder. Golf Smarter listeners get 50% of the usual price and pay only $129!! Eagle Eye Rangefinder has all the premium features you need, like slope technology, an 800-yard range and a “flagpole lock” vibrating sensor. Take advantage of this limited time offer now at https://MyGolfingStore.com/golfsmarter This week on Golf Smarter Mulligans #165, which has never been made public before, we hear from another performance coach, Jon Adler, talking about how golfers need to spend more time correcting our minds instead of trying endlessly trying to correct our swing.  Be part of the podcast and introduce our next episode! Write to GolfSmarterPodcast@gmail.com and we'll assign you an episode number and a brief script to record for the intro of the show. For your effort you'll receive a Glove + Glove Compartment from RedRoosterGolf.com. At Red Rooster Golf, you can choose from 11 styles of gloves in 26 sizes so that they fit you properly! With Red Rooster Golf Gloves, you can say goodbye to funky, beat-up gloves and say hello to getting a well made, great fitting, tour-grade glove delivered to your door. Plus, with every glove you buy, they'll donate a glove to youth golf. We thank RedRoosterGolf.com for giving a new glove to every Golf Smarter Ambassador who introduces an upcoming episode!

    PRAJNA SPARKS
    89 | Meditative Inquiry

    PRAJNA SPARKS

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 33:09


    Meditative inquiry fosters self-knowledge, confidence in mind's intrinsic resources, and exquisite responsiveness to our inner landscape. It can help unearth and reevaluate assumptions about our underlying emotional patterns. A vital element of healing and transforming in Tibetan Buddhist practice, it is also the heart of the Buddha's contemplative technology for cultivating view progressively, all the way to transcending views altogether. CONTENTS 00.52 Dharma Talk 16.18 Seeds of Contemplation 18.11 Guided Meditation Practice Tibetan singing bowl interludes by Shivnee Ratna PRAJNA SPARKS follows the lunar calendar. Look for new episodes on new and full moon days, and contemplation interludes on the quarter moons. RESOURCES Listen Contemplate Meditate, by Lama Yeshe, in Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Guide https://bit.ly/3ygFsus Meditative Inquiry, by Lama Yeshe, in Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Guide https://bit.ly/3xRySck Meet Lama Yeshe & Lama Zopa, in Tricycle Magazine https://bit.ly/3xRySck Join us live on Zoom every Monday at 8AM US Mountain time for a chanting practice of the Praise of the Twelve Deeds of the Buddha, until August 1, 2022, the day commemorating the Buddha's first public teaching, the Four Truths of Noble Beings. Sign up here for Zoom links and reminders: https://www.prajnafire.com/service-page/praise-of-the-twelve-deeds FOLLOW US Join our Global Community for regular updates on Prajna Fire events with Yeshe and Zopa Lama Yeshe and Lama Zopa offer individual spiritual counsel on formal Buddhist practice as well as innovative ways to integrate Buddhist perspective into your everyday life. Book Online at Prajna Fire with immediate confirmation (https://www.prajnafire.com/book-online) Hear Lama Yeshe's story on Opening Dharma Access: Listening to BIPOC Teachers https://ihr.fm/3uwqxZW And follow her guided practice of Tonglen Meditation & Sacred Creativity https://ihr.fm/3Lk9Kjy EMAIL US sparks@prajnafire.com FIND US on the Prajna Fire website (https://www.prajnafire.com/sparks) @prajnasparks on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRUzGmU7c4_TJdLhG9R8IDA/videos) Lama Yeshe and Lama Zopa (www.prajnafire.com) IG: @karmayeshechodron @karmazopajigme Shivnee Ratna, Tibetan singing bowls (www.shivgauree.com) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/prajna-sparks/message

    Dharma Glimpses with Judy Lief
    Episode 75: When You Lose Your Mind, Come Back

    Dharma Glimpses with Judy Lief

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 7:15


    The phrase, “When you lose your mind, come back” describes a lot of what happens in meditation: repeatedly losing our minds, and repeatedly bringing ourselves back  •  the moment we've noticed we've lost it is the moment we can return  •  what are we returning to? the simplicity of the present moment  •  another phrase Trungpa Rinpoche used quite a lot was, “Don't think too much”  •  what are the benefits and what are the limits of thinking and conceptual understanding?  •  in the Buddhist tradition scholarship is highly valued  •  however, to be a realized person, to live a dharmic lifestyle, you don't need to be a scholar; you don't need to be all that clever  •  “coming back” in this context could mean coming back from the tangle of conceptual notes and fascinations to something immediate and basic and close to the heart  •  Trungpa Rinpoche used the term “intellect and intuition” when referring to these two streams  •  they are not in opposition or at war; there's a sense of sophistication in the interplay between these two. 

    A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment
    Buddhist Psychologist Lorne Ladner on Depression, Compassion, and Positive Psychology

    A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 46:28


    We talk with clinical psychologist and Buddhist practitioner Lorne Ladner about his patients' top questions, the difference between selfishness and self-compassion, setting healthy boundaries, and treating depression with Buddhist psychology.Episode 110: Buddhist Psychologist Lorne LadnerRead more in Dr. Lorne Ladner's wonderful book, The Lost Art of Compassion. Support the show

    WitchSpace
    Buddhist Magic, by Sam van Schaik

    WitchSpace

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 65:52


    Though this isn't quite a "witch book", there's a ton to discuss in Sam van Schaik's anthropological text on Buddhist magic! Our hosts run the gamut of practical, historical, philosophical and theological commentary. Just don't use this episode as a drinking game where you take a shot every time Gemini says "context"

    Hey Amarillo
    Jackie Nammathao Maldonado

    Hey Amarillo

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 49:54


    A conversation with Jackie Nammathao Maldonao, a children's ministry director at the Hillside Amarillo North Grand Campus. Jackie was born in the United States, but her parents arrived in Amarillo as refugees from Laos. She grew up navigating a distinctly multicultural space, honoring her family's traditions while also fully embracing her American identity. In this conversation with host Jason Boyett, she shares about her upbringing, her struggles with identity and belonging, and how she transitioned from her Buddhist upbringing into the Christian faith. This episode is sponsored by Wieck Realty and the TEXAS Outdoor Musical.

    Buddhist Temple of Toledo Podcast

    This talk was given by the Reverend Jay Rinsen Weik Roshi at the Buddhist Temple of Toledo on May 22, 2022. In this talk Roshi discusses the direct connection between the temple, the sangha, and the lineage. If you would like to learn more about the Buddhist Temple of Toledo or to make a donation in support of this podcast please visit buddhisttempleoftoledo.org.

    Spiritual Psychology with Renee McKenna

    There is an infinite resource for unconditional love, wisdom, compassion and healthy boundaries available to us all. The Great Mother, a powerful aspect of the Divine Feminine, comes to us in many forms; through nature, the Earth, the Christian form of Mary, and the many Goddesses of world traditions. We all have a biological family, whether we love or hate them. But, ultimately we are children of the Universe, and the Great Mother is a potent and deeply healing part of our spiritual family that is present and practical when we open to receive from Her. ----- Please follow me on Insight Timer! Rate, Review & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts. If you like this podcast click here, scroll to the bottom, tap to rate with five stars, and select "Write a Review." Then be sure to let us know what you loved most about the episode! Support Spiritual Psi-Kology on Patreon. Renee's book, workbook and guided audio series "Allies & Demons: Working With Spirit For Power And Healing." is now available on Amazon, Kindle and Audible. Awaken the wisdom of your authentic self with these 15 transformative processes of Spiritual PsI-Kology. -- Click for a FREE Download: Ch. 1 and 1st Inner Journey of Allies & Demons. Spiritual Psi-Kology combines the ancient healing and wisdom traditions of Shamanism and Buddhist philosophy with the best of Western psychology to create a powerful medicine for the mind, body and spirit. If you'd like to learn more about how Spiritual Psi-Kology might be helpful in your life, get details about my Mentorship program, or set up a FREE 30 minute consultation, please visit ReneeMcKenna.com Check me out on Instagram @reneelavalleemckenna --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/spiritualpsikology/message

    Landscapes for Learning
    Bacon & Eggs: Attention Challenges

    Landscapes for Learning

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 12:31


    12 min. Pierre puts bacon on one plate, eggs on another plate.  What's up with that?  Maureen and Pierre discuss cognitive challenges of aging and / or other sources of what are affectionately called mind farts, senior moments - whatever.  Pierre attributes some of these to allo-pathetic stress load, mind fog; PtSD fog, Covid fog.   Maureen and Pierre discuss the importance of acceptance, Buddhist training in mindfulness, intention in actions; existential experiences and tipping points in life.  

    In Good Faith
    Ep 114 Art and Spirituality

    In Good Faith

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 52:50


    We speak to religious artists in the United States and gather different perspectives about how art and spirituality influence each other. We chat with Kimia Ferdosi Kline, a Bahai visual artist whose work focuses on relationships, and J. Kirk Richards, a Latter-Day Saint painter whose work is explicitly for Christian audiences and talks to us about the ways he portrays Christ. We'll also explore how spirituality influences actor and director Agam Darshi, a filmmaker from the Sikh tradition whose first film is now on Netflix. And we'll hear from musicologist Jenny Thomas, who recounts returning to public concerts in the 2022 Easter season and what that experience meant to her. Steve also interviews Vaisesika Das at the 2022 Sadhu Sanga who discusses his kirtan practice. Host Steven Kapp Perry talks with believers from all walks of faith—Catholic and Episcopalian, Buddhist and Baptist, Jewish and Hindu, Presbyterian and Seventh Day Adventist, Muslim and Latter-day Saint—in other words, human beings and believers, sharing their personal experience with the sacred and the divine. Sundays on BYUradio—and be sure to subscribe to the podcast!

    the 12-Step Buddhist Podcast
    Episode 050 - The 12-Step Buddhist Podcast: Don't Meditate\Bodhisattva Practice #8

    the 12-Step Buddhist Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 22:58


    Resuming where we left off in April, 2020 w/the 37 Compassion Practices of a Bodhisattva, #8. Reading from Advice from the Lotus Born, in regards to the view as it pertains to our disturbing emotions.  This is a juicy one for addicts! Quick check in, back at it.  New Book Announcement for  Compassionate Recovery: Mindful Healing for Trauma and Addictions.   

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery
    Look Closely You Humans - 06-26-22 by Sokuzan - sokukoji.org/donate

    SokukoJi Buddhist Temple Monastery

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 52:20


    If you would like these talks to continue, PLEASE VISIT OUR DONATE PAGE at sokukoji.org/donate

    The Chinese History Podcast
    Professor Joanna Waley-Cohen on New Qing History

    The Chinese History Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 38:28


    Since the 1990s, the New Qing History school has loomed large in the study of the Qing dynasty. It has greatly informed not only the study of the Qing but study of other dynasties as well. Yet what exactly is New Qing History? What is "new" about it? How did it come into being? How was it received in China and the West? To answer these questions, we talked to Professor Joanna Waley-Cohen of NYU, one of the leading scholars of the Qing dynasty. Contributors Joanna Waley-Cohen Professor Joanna Waley-Cohen is the Provost for NYU Shanghai and Julius Silver Professor of History at New York University. Her research interests include early modern Chinese history, especially the Qing dynasty; China and the West; and Chinese imperial culture, particularly in the Qianlong era; warfare in China and Inner Asia; and Chinese culinary history, and she has authored several books and articles on these topics. In addition, Professor Waley-Cohen has received many honors, including archival and postdoctoral fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, Goddard and Presidential Fellowships from NYU, and an Olin Fellowship in Military and Strategic History from Yale.  Yiming Ha Yiming Ha is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current research is on military mobilization and state-building in China between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on how military institutions changed over time, how the state responded to these changes, the disconnect between the center and localities, and the broader implications that the military had on the state. His project highlights in particular the role of the Mongol Yuan in introducing an alternative form of military mobilization that radically transformed the Chinese state. He is also interested in military history, nomadic history, comparative Eurasian state-building, and the history of maritime interactions in early modern East Asia. He received his BA from UCLA and his MPhil from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Credits Episode no. 12 Release date: June 25, 2022 Recording location: Los Angeles, CA/New York, NY Transcript Bibliography courtesy of Professor Waley-Cohen Images Cover Image: The Qianlong Emperor, who reigned from 1735 to 1796. After he abdicated, he continued to retain power as retired emperor until his death in 1799. He is the longest-reigning monarch in Chinese history and one of the longest in the world (Image Source). The headquarters of the First Historical Archives in Beijing, which houses documents from the Qing. The opening of this archive and access to the Manchu-language documents held within helped give birth to New Qing History. (Image Source) A copy of a Qing-era civil service examination answer sheet. Note the Manchu script on the seal. Currently held in UCLA Library Special Collections (Photo by Yiming). The Putuo Zongcheng Temple, a Buddhist temple in the Qing's Rehe Summer Resort (in today's Chengde, Hebei province). The temple was built between 1767 and 1771 by the Qianlong Emperor and was a replica of the Potala Palace in Lhasa. It is a fusion of Tibetan and Chinese architectural styles and is one of the most famous landmarks in the Chengde Summer Resort. (Image Source) A painting of a European-style palace constructed by the Jesuits for the Qing emperors in the Old Summer Palace (Yuanmingyuan). Note the fusion of Chinese and European styles. The Old Summer Palace was looted and burned by Anglo-French forces in 1860. The twelve bronze head statutes in front of the building have mostly been repatriated back to China, although some are in the hands of private collectors. (Image Source) The Qianlong Emperor commissioned a series of artwork commemorating the "Ten Great Campaigns" of his reign. This particular piece of artwork depicts the Battle of Thọ Xương River in 1788, when the Qing invaded Vietnam. These artworks were collaborative pieces between Chinese and Jesuit painters. (Image Source) References Patricia Berger, Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003. Pamela K. Crossley, A Translucent Mirror:  History and Identity in Qing Imperial Ideology.  Berkeley:  University of California Press, 1999. Mark C. Elliott, The Manchu Way:  The Eight Banners and Ethnic Identity in Late Imperial China.  Stanford, CA:  Stanford University Press, 2001. Johan Elverskog, Our Great Qing: The Mongols, Buddhists, and the State in Late Imperial China. Honolulu: University of  Hawaii Press, 2006. Philippe Foret, Mapping Chengde:  The Qing Landscape Enterprise.  Honolulu:  University of Hawaii Press, 2000. Jonathan S. Hay, Shitao:  Painting and Modernity in Early Qing China.  Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 2001. Ho Ping-ti, “The Significance of the Ch'ing Period in Chinese History,” Journal of Asian Studies 26.2 (1967):  189-95 Ho Ping-ti, “In Defense of Sinicization: A Rebuttal of Evelyn Rawski's `Reenvisioning the Qing,'” Journal of Asian Studies 57.1 (1998):  123-55. Laura Hostetler, Qing Colonial Enterprise:  Ethnography and Cartography in Early Modern China.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 2001. Susan Mann, Precious Records:  Women in China's Long Eighteenth Century.  Stanford, CA:  Stanford University Press, 1997. James P. Millward, Beyond the Pass:  Economy, Ethnicity, and Empire in Qing Central Asia, 1759-1864.  Stanford, CA:  Stanford University Press, 1998. Ronald C. Po, The Blue Frontier: Maritime Vision and Power in the Qing Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. Evelyn S. Rawski, The Last Emperors:  A Social History of Qing Imperial Institutions.  Berkeley:  University of California Press, 1998. Evelyn S. Rawski, “Presidential Address: Reenvisioning the Qing: The Significance of the Qing Period in Chinese History,” Journal of Asian Studies 55.4 (1996):  829-50.

    Buddhism on Air
    Buddhism on Air - 26-06-2022

    Buddhism on Air

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 28:05


    Buddhism on Air, hosted by Tenzin Chosang, discusses Buddhism and Buddhist beliefs.

    The Zen Studies Podcast
    207 - Dirt Zendo, Cloud Zendo, One Sangha: Buddhist Community in the Digital Age

    The Zen Studies Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 25:07


    In the last episode, I talked about the new phenomenon of a virtual space for practice, including its merits and benefits. In this episode, I talk about the merits of practicing in a "Dirt Zendo" - a physical practice space, in-the-flesh. I then describe, at Bright Way Zen, we are attempting to create a sense of Sangha that connects and includes anyone who practices with us, regardless of whether they participate in-the-flesh, online (in our Cloud Zendo), or both.

    Awakin Call
    Chloe Zelkha -- Song, Soul and Society: Learning, Unlearning and Transforming Grief in Community

    Awakin Call

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022


    “The wound is the place where light enters you.” – Rumi   At 25, Chloe Zelkha, a community organizer, chaplain and educator for young adults, suddenly found herself in the role of a first-time caregiver. Her husband sustained a debilitating injury from a car accident. Soon thereafter, her hale-and-hearty father passed away from an aortic aneurysm. Facing sudden death and dis-ease in her family, everything Chloe had learned from her academic religious studies went from conceptual to lived. From this period of tremendous trial, she emerged with a guiding question: How do we stay wide awake to the precariousness of life in and around us, and also walk in the world unafraid? Rather than running from grief, Chloe chose to lean into death and dying. She trained as a hospital chaplain at the University of California San Francisco hospitals, offering spiritual care to the ill, the dying, and their families. “Our death-denying culture,” she remarks, “insists that we look away from mortality, look away from pain.” Instead of the conventional chaplaincy response as “fixing” spiritual crises, she stepped into her role as “more of a student, sitting at the feet of the real masters,” and understood grieving as a “courageous act.” During her chaplaincy, she realized the paucity of grief programs supporting young adults. So, with some friends, she put together ongoing events, like weekend sleepover retreats for young adults who lost a parent, friend or loved one, focusing on peer connection and community — circles of sharing stories, workshops, bonfires, song and silence — instead of clinical care. When the pandemic hit, Chloe responded similarly, cofounding the COVID Grief Network, a mutual aid organization that offers free community and grief support to young adults who lost someone to COVID-19, especially in hopes to heal the isolation. From a young age, Chloe had been supported to feel that her ideas mattered — whether in rebounding from setbacks, or actualizing fresh and novel intentions. She attended Ohlone Elementary School in Palo Alto, California, where the project-based, participatory, mixed-age, whole-child pedagogy taught her to relate to her surroundings with curiosity. She kept a “teaching ideas journal” and often pitched creative curriculum ideas to her teachers (“usually unsuccessfully,” she adds with a chuckle). As she grew, the raucous discussions she initiated at her family’s dinner table on teaching and learning would come to incorporate how people unlearn, and eventually, “how learning spaces can be transformative, even sites of spiritual transformation.” Chloe’s parents also helped nurture her enterprising spirit. Her father, an Iraqi Jew raised in Iran, emigrated alone to the U.S. when he was 16. An entrepreneur, he would embrace with equal joy the failures and successes of his ventures. Her mother was a labor and delivery nurse who, having supported and witnessed countless mothers giving birth, became adept at “midwifing new ideas.” Although their family didn’t observe the religious dimensions of their Jewish culture, Chloe was enrolled in Hebrew School for becoming a bat mitsvah. It was then that she began identifying with the spiritual practices of Judaism, and for the first time in public, she sang. In St. Augustine’s words, “Those who sing pray twice,” and Chloe’s voice became one of her favorite expressions in liturgical contexts. Beyond grief work, Chloe’s work also focuses on community and healing in other sectors. Even before her chaplaincy training, she had helped design transformative group experiences for young adults (from retreats to DIY rituals to performance arts). She was an organizer with The Food Project, a youth employment program that gathers a diversity of teens to grow food, learn about oppression and liberation, and bridge differences. She also served as Fellowship Director at Urban Adamah, a Jewish farm in Berkeley, where she integrated spirituality, farming, mindfulness and social justice. Chloe's social justice interests at a young age had inspired her to study religion at Carleton College, because it “helped me understand the ways people make meaning.” Her diverse coursework included offerings like Religion and the Black Freedom Struggle; Taoism; Religious and Moral Issues in the Holocaust; and a study abroad program in Mexico on Catholic Liberation Theology. She then trained as a community organizer through the JOIN for Justice Fellowship in Boston. At Harvard University, she earned a Masters in Education, focusing on transformative experiences. Currently, she is studying toward rabbinic ordination at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Philadelphia. Her guided offerings draw from her widely inclusive approach to faith — combining song, Buddhist insight meditation, and Jewish scripture and spirituality. For anyone interested in more singing or contemplative prayer videos, she offers a whole playlist! Join us in a conversation with this experimental educator helping to transform grief into wisdom, and designing powerful spaces for collective learning and unlearning.

    Society of Reformed Podcasters
    R| PCA Pastor Aldo Leon Brings Miami Heat to Restless Summer

    Society of Reformed Podcasters

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 60:54


    We had a great time interviewing PCA Pastor Aldo Leon. Follow that Link to follow him on twitter. Listen how this Buddhist boxer became a Christian, traversed the country in YRR circles, and now is a confessional pastor in a PCA church. Right now both he and Pastor Michael at the PCA GA. We will...

    The Steebee Weebee Show
    271: Jade Catta-Preta on The Steebee Weebee Show(pt.5)

    The Steebee Weebee Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 56:38


    Jade Catta-Preta joins The Steebee Weebee show for the 5th time!!! We talk about: her doing Stand Up classes with Gerry Katzman, reinventing and exploring new material, Buddhist beliefs on Reincarnation, the "adrenaline rush" addiction from doing shows, people's fascination with Disneyland, micro dosing on mushrooms, Jade's acute "observational skills", her extensive work schedule, building communities with other female comedians, her comedy special-"A JADE IS A JADE", booking television and commercial jobs, her advice to aspiring comics ,and much more !!!!Go to: https://www.youtube.com/steebeeweebee to watch. *Get 20% plus free shipping using promo code: STEEBEE at manscaped.com More: Jade https://www.instagram.com/jadecattapreta Scissor Bros YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/scissorbros ** Now on iTunes:  https://goo.gl/CdSwyV ** Subscribe: https://goo.gl/d239PO Little Ray promises a Karma Boost if you join our Patreon: https://goo.gl/aiOi7J Or, click here for a one time Karma Boost. https://www.paypal.me/steebeeweebeeshow/2 More Steven: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/quangou Bandcamp: https://steebeeweebee.bandcamp.com/ Itunes: https://goo.gl/PSooa0 WEBSITE: https://www.steebeeweebeeshow.com Send stuff to: 1425 N. Cherokee Ave P.O. Box 1391 Los Angeles, CA 90093

    Karl Morris - The Brainbooster
    Chaos, Uncertainty and Impermanence in our game. How can we best deal with it? – Vin Harris

    Karl Morris - The Brainbooster

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 65:05


    Today we welcome back onto the Brain Booster my good friend Vin Harris. The previous shows with Vin and the discussions around mindfulness have been so well received and I believe this one will be no exception. We get the chance to look at chaos, uncertainty and impermanence in your game and in the game of life. We seem to be living now in such a chaotic world. Nothing seems to be solid and reliable and the old models seem inappropriate. Uncertain economics, worrying international conflict. So many changes which can be really disturbing. Our thoughts can become so unsettled. We can end up in a ‘sea of thought' and this type of thinking can easily follow us out onto the golf course When our mind is so busy it becomes increasingly difficult to be PRESENT to the next shot in front of you. What can we do about it? How can we begin to have a different relationship to our thinking so we can NOTICE our thinking as opposed to being lost in the endless flow of images and sensations. Vin provides us with a CALM and SAFE voice of reason to help us navigate the uncertainty. When we make peace with the uncertainty things seem to settle down We look again at GRATITUDE and how this idea is not just a flaky concept but an essential element of great performance How to care without worrying How to get out of the way of ourselves How to basically be a better friend to ourselves both on and off the course. A wonderful session with a man who has trained with some of the foremost Buddhist and Meditation teachers over the past 40 years or so As always you will gain so much listening to the wise words of Vin Harris Vin Harris was involved in writing and editing “Mindful Heroes – stories of journeys that changed lives”. The authors share their inspiring stories of how mindfulness has been applied to a variety of setting across Education, Health, Business, Sport, Creative Arts and Community work.  The book includes Vin's chapter “Its Golf…but not as we know it: Golf as a mindfulness practice and a metaphor for life” and an introduction to the Sport section by Karl. Vin has offered to send listeners to the Brain Booster Podcast the eBook versions of these two chapters.  To claim your free chapters or if you want to learn more about Mindfulness for Golfers you can contact Vin by email vinharris.hkt@gmail.com For details of an annual golf week that Vin helps to facilitate go to Home - Fairway to Heaven (spiritualgolf.com) To become a CERTIFIED MIND FACTOR coach Come and join us either in Manchester or at the Olympic Club in San Fransisco Go to www.themindfactor.com    

    ZalthoLIVE - Claude AnShin Thomas
    7.ZalthoLIVE: College students ask ‘What is Living as a Buddhist Monk Like?'

    ZalthoLIVE - Claude AnShin Thomas

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 70:36


    This is a topic that Claude AnShin Thomas - fully ordained Zen Buddhist Monk in the Japanese Soto Zen tradition - reflects on with a group of university students.  This episode was recorded during a zoom class. Claude AnShin Thomas: What you all do, what  living a Buddhist life is like, why you have chosen such a life? Question #1: How do I live in the present moment when I know that I will die, and I don't know when? (Min 21) Question #2: what are your thoughts on using meditation practice 2 reduce anxiety? (Min 23) Question #3: How does being a Buddhist impact your daily life and decision making? (Min 27) Question #4: How do you find acceptance around somebody dying before their time or dying young? (Min 33) Question #5: What are your thoughts on the current situation of the world right now and the war that is going on? Question #6: What is the ultimate peace? (Min 41) Question #7: Why is meditation so difficult sometimes, even when you want to meditate? (Min 43) Question #8: If you could expand your community into different places in the world where would you like to see it expand? (Min 46) Question #9: What can an atheist or someone with no belief in a God learn from Buddhist practices? (Min 48) Question #10: How important is vegetarianism and veganism to Buddhist practice? (Min 51) Question #11: When you started on this path did you have a goal, and did you achieve that goal? (Min 55) Question #12: Did you see a difference before and after the pandemic for why people sought out your help and guidance for retreats and teachings? (Min 56) For more interesting information: https://zaltho.org/ If you want to ask a question: info@zaltho.org Want to read up on this topic? Book recommendations: Bringing Meditation to Life - 108 Teachings on the Path of Zen Practice AT HELL'S GATE - A Soldier's Journey from War to Peace (Shambhala Publications 2003) https://zaltho.org/en/media/books.html

    Eat Your Heartland Out
    A Passion for Korean Food With a Michigan Twist

    Eat Your Heartland Out

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 60:16


    We meet Ji Hye Kim, a chef who has a passion for making Korean food with a Michigan twist.  As the owner of Miss Kim restaurant in Ann Arbor, Ji Hye calls upon Korean Buddhist food tradition which emphasizes using local and seasonal ingredients. Ji Hye works with local farmers to source her menu.  One of those farmers is Tammie Gilfoyle of TamChop Farm.  Tammie shares her journey from a desk job in California to working in the dirt in Michigan supplying restaurants like Miss Kim with produce.  Tune in to hear how Ji Hye and Tammie collaborate to grow and serve food that is uniquely Korean-American.  Eat Your Heartland Out is Powered by Simplecast.

    Buddhability
    Learning to Live My Truth, A Coming Out Story

    Buddhability

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 49:34


    Today's episode is about learning to live your truth. Chris, of Detroit, shares the incredibly moving journey to affirm himself and how his Buddhist practice helped him find the courage to come out as a trans man. A foundational element of Chris's experience was learning to believe that his life has unlimited value and worth, upon which he has been able to build a foundation for new dreams.CHEAT SHEET1:18 How Chris encountered Buddhism and why he started chanting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo8:29 The experiences that lead to Chris affirming himself17:53 How Buddhism helped him find the courage to pursue happiness25:14 What it was like to come out 30:10 What it took to break out of lifelong limitations 33:16 Continually reaffirming himself through chanting36:17 Chris's favorite Buddhist concept42:17 Building a foundation upon valuing your life45:05 Advice for anyone struggling with self-conflictReferences:  December 2016 Living Buddhism, p. 40 Soka Education: For the Happiness of the Individual, pp. 209-10

    The Scathing Atheist
    488: Even More Problematic Ezra Edition

    The Scathing Atheist

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 60:00


    In this week's episode, the foremost exporter of child molesters has strong opinions on which flags to fly, Ted Cruz warns us about the Chinese plot involving cartoon space lesbians, and Don Ford will be here to advance that plot. But don't tell Ted. --- Come see us at QED in Manchester! Find tickets here: https://qedcon.org/ To make a per episode donation at Patreon.com, click here: http://www.patreon.com/ScathingAtheist To buy our book, click there: https://www.amazon.com/Outbreak-Crisis-Religion-Ruined-Pandemic/dp/B08L2HSVS8/ To check out our sister show, The Skepticrat, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/the-skepticrat To check out our sister show's hot friend, God Awful Movies, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/god-awful-movies To check out our half-sister show, Citation Needed, click here: http://citationpod.com/ To check out our sister show's sister show, D and D minus, click here: https://danddminus.libsyn.com/ To hear more from our intrepid audio engineer Morgan Clarke, click here: https://www.morganclarkemusic.com/ --- Guest Links: Check out the Fallacious Trump podcast here: http://fallacioustrump.com/ --- Headlines: American god belief reaches new all time low: https://news.gallup.com/poll/393737/belief-god-dips-new-low.aspx Joe Biden issues executive order to fight conversion therapy & LGBTQ fostering discrimination: https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2022/06/joe-biden-issues-executive-order-fight-conversion-therapy-lgbtq-fostering-discrimination/ MA school can no longer be called Catholic after flying BLM and pride flags, bishop says: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/massachusetts-catholic-school-nativity-school-worcester-black-lives-matter-pride-flags/ Ted Cruz pouts that Disney has “lesbian toys”: https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2022/06/ted-cruz-pouts-disney-lesbian-toys/ SCOTUS forces Maine taxpayers to fund religious indoctrination: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/06/21/supreme-court-maine-religious-schools/ Christian cops are now claiming COVID swab tests violate their faith: https://onlysky.media/hemant-mehta/christian-cops-are-now-claiming-covid-swab-tests-violate-their-faith/ --- This Week in Misogyny: Franklin Graham pushes domestic abuse victim back to her abuser: https://onlysky.media/hemant-mehta/its-horrifying-to-hear-how-franklin-graham-dismissed-domestic-violence/ Buddhist leader fully ordains 144 women: https://religionnews.com/2022/06/21/buddhist-leader-in-bhutan-fully-ordains-144-women-resuming-ancient-tradition/

    Gateways to Awakening
    What people misunderstand most about children with Nicole Marie

    Gateways to Awakening

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 58:19


    In today's episode, I'll be speaking with Nicole Marie, the pedagogista at Evergreen Community School, a progressive social constructivist preschool in Santa Monica that's been educating children, teachers, and conducting teacher research for over forty years.    She was a founding member and a mentor teacher for the PilaGlobal, which has been a hub for discourse in early childhood, and currently builds and supports educational spaces for young children displaced by poverty world wide.    An educator and writer, she was the lead writer for Patagonia's award nominated book Family Business: Innovative On- Site Child Care Since 1983. Her work training and consulting with schools has taken her into educational spaces all over the country and world. A long time Buddhist meditator and practitioner of Soulmaking Dharma, there is a strong connection between her understandings of human consciousness and imagination and what it means to serve young children and their families.    In 2022, Nicole and Evergreen Community School will be publishing “The Pencil is Me: a Collection of Poetry by Young Children,” which is a selection of poems collected from over a decade's poetry written by two to five-year-olds.   We talk about the following and more:  ✅ Why understanding children is so important? And how have we misunderstood them?  ✅ How the view people have of children and childhood impact and structure children's live ✅ Where most people get stuck or misunderstand young children ✅ What the value of children and childhoodmeans  in the wider culture ✅What children have to teach us about the role of imagination in a well lived life ✅ What happens to schools and our perspective on what education is, when we shift the question from what makes a "good education" to what do young people need to learn live a fulfilled human life?   I want to thank our sponsors Athletic Greens, who have created AG1, one of the most innovative packets of supplements, including  75 high-quality vitamins, minerals, whole-food sourced superfoods, probiotics, and adaptogens to help you start your day right.     If you purchase today, you'll get a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit athleticgreens.com/yasmeen.   Please tag us and tell us what you loved! You can follow @Gateways_To_Awakening on Instagram or Facebook if you'd like to stay connected. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast
    Sitting with Compassion

    The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 41:00


    Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Roshi - Zen Mountain Monastery, New York, Wednesday 06/22/2022 - From Master Dogen's Shobogenzo Fascicle "King of Samadhis" - We speak of Samadhi as being meditation, concentration, single-minded focus. In this talk Shugen Roshi points out that in the Buddhist sense Samadhi is based in morality and compassion. It's not separate. It's one aspect of the Noble Eightfold Path, all eight of which are to be cultivated together.

    The Tim Ferriss Show
    #601: Jack Kornfield — How to Overcome Apathy, Find Beautiful Purpose, Befriend Anger, and Make Your Own Damn Sandwiches

    The Tim Ferriss Show