Podcasts about Assistant professor

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  • 5,409PODCASTS
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  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Assistant professor

Show all podcasts related to assistant professor

Latest podcast episodes about Assistant professor

Ipse Dixit
Logan Strother on Judicial Rhetoric and Institutional Legitimacy

Ipse Dixit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:15


In this episode, Logan Strother, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University, discusses his article, "An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Supreme Court Justices' Public Rhetoric on Perceptions of Judicial Legitimacy," which he co-authored with Colin Glennon, as well as his other scholarship on judicial legitimacy. Strother observes that Supreme Court justices often argue that the Court is an apolitical, neutral arbiter of disputes, in order to increase the institutional legitimacy of the Court. He then presents experimental evidence showing that this legitimizing rhetoric appears to work, especially on people who agree with the outcome of the Court's decisions. Strother is on Twitter at @LoganRStrother.This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books in African American Studies
Erica R. Edwards, "The Other Side of Terror: Black Women and the Culture of US Empire" (NYU Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 64:22


Dr. Erica R. Edwards's The Other Side of Terror: Black Women and the Culture of US Empire (New York University, 2021) reveals the troubling intimacy between Black women and the making of US global power.  The year 1968 marked both the height of the worldwide Black liberation struggle and a turning point for the global reach of American power, which was built on the counterinsurgency honed on Black and other oppressed populations at home. The next five decades saw the consolidation of the culture of the American empire through what Erica R. Edwards calls the “imperial grammars of blackness.” This is a story of state power at its most devious and most absurd, and, at the same time, a literary history of Black feminist radicalism at its most trenchant. Edwards reveals how the long war on terror, beginning with the late–Cold War campaign against organizations like the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense and the Black Liberation Army, has relied on the labor and the fantasies of Black women to justify the imperial spread of capitalism. Black feminist writers not only understood that this would demand a shift in racial gendered power, but crafted ways of surviving it. The Other Side of Terror offers an interdisciplinary Black feminist analysis of militarism, security, policing, diversity, representation, intersectionality, and resistance, while discussing a wide array of literary and cultural texts, from the unpublished work of Black radical feminist June Jordan to the memoirs of Condoleezza Rice to the television series Scandal. With clear, moving prose, Edwards chronicles Black feminist organizing and writing on “the other side of terror”, which tracked changes in racial power, transformed African American literature and Black studies, and predicted the crises of our current era with unsettling accuracy. Brittney Edmonds is an Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies at UW-Madison. I specialize in 20th and 21st century African American Literature and Culture with a special interest in Black Humor Studies. Read more about my work at brittneymichelledmonds.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Work From Your Happy Place with Belinda Ellsworth
Believe in Yourself and Celebrate the Process with JOSH GRISETTI

Work From Your Happy Place with Belinda Ellsworth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:27


Episode No - 377Episode Title - Believe in Yourself and Celebrate the Process with JOSH GRISETTIEpisode Summary -As an actor and artist, how many times have you questioned your skills? How many times have you thought of giving up and doing something else?
Do you feel you are not doing it right? 
To be a good actor is not all about the final product; it is about the process.
In today's episode, Josh Grisetti shares some valuable advice for all the actors, especially young actors, about embracing the process of becoming an excellent artist.

“As an artist, our job is to simply engage and celebrate the process.”

Snapshot of the key points from the episode:[01:47] Josh shares his journey on how he started as an actor.[04:28] The importance of exploring other areas of acting as an actor.[08:45] Josh shares one of his greatest accomplishments.[10:31] Josh shares some of the funny events he has experienced on a live theatre.[12:04] Josh's philosophy on how to build & engage your fan base on social media.[16:04] What is the “natural fear of not being enough” which every young actor needs to overcome?[20:26] Josh's story in how he became a best-selling author from being an actor.[27:03] How has Josh navigated the business side and the creative side as an actor?[34:05] What does working from a happy place means for Josh?[35:49] Josh's advice for those who are just starting to build their career in acting

About Josh Grisetti -
Josh Grisetti is an actor, director, educator, and author. 
As a performer, Josh originated the title role of “Marty Kaufman” in It Shoulda Been You on Broadway (for which he won the 2015 Clarence Derwent Award and was nominated for the Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle awards); he also starred in Broadway's Something Rotten! and Neil Simon's revival of Broadway Bound, and starred inmany Off-Broadway and Regional shows. 
On screen, Josh starred in the ABC sitcom The Knights of Prosperity, and his major film credits include The Immigrant, Revolutionary Road, The Namesake and others. Josh currently serves as Assistant Professor of Musical Theatre at California State University Fullerton, and authored the book, God In My Head, an Amazon.com #1 best-seller in “Spirituality and Religious Psychology”.
Social Links to follow Josh:Website - https://www.joshgrisetti.com/Instagram Profile - https://www.instagram.com/joshgrisettiBook Link - https://www.amazon.com/God-My-Head-ex-Christian-accidentally/dp/1508502668About the Host -Belinda Ellsworth is a Speaker, Trainer, Best-Selling Author, and PodcasterShe has been a professional speaker, mover, and shaker for more than 25 years. Having built three successful companies, she has helped thousands of entrepreneurs make better decisions, create successful systems, and build business strategies using her "Four Pillars of Success" system.Belinda has always had a passion and zest for life with the skill for turning dreams into reality. Over the last 20 years, she has been expertly building her speaking and consulting business, Step Into Success. Social Links to follow Belinda:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stepintosuccessLinked in:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/belindaellsworthInstagram:  https://www.instagram.com/stepintosuccess/Website: www.workfromyourhappyplace.com

Lessons in Lifespan Health
Assistant Professor Joseph Saenz: Understanding Lifespan Influences On Cognitive Ability

Lessons in Lifespan Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 23:34


Assistant Professor of Gerontology Joseph Saenz joins Professor George Shannon to discuss his ongoing work on rural-urban differences in cognitive ability among older adults in Mexico, as well as whether certain personality factors make people resilient to the negative effects of early-life disadvantage. Quotes from this episode On the focus of his work I focus my research on looking at how it's socioeconomic disadvantage throughout the life course relates with cognitive ability and late life. I'm interested in education. I'm interested in income, wealth and the resources that we have available to us throughout our lives and how this relates with better cognitive functioning, as well as lower dementia risk and the population of older adults of Latino origin here at the United States and also older adults in Mexico. On demographics and differences between rural and urban populations in Mexico One of the things that's very important about the Mexican population is we've seen a lot of demographic changes over the past century. In addition to seeing rapid population aging with the share of the Mexican population aged 60 and over increasing rapidly. We've also seen a large urbanization process where people are going from rural areas to urban areas. For example, back in 1920, only about 70% of the Mexican population lived in rural areas, but by 2010, this had declined to only about 20%. So a lot of people have been going from rural areas to urban areas. And this is important because in Mexico we see a lot of differences of a lot of disparities between urban areas and rural areas. Rural areas tend to be disadvantaged in several ways. They tend to have lower access to education. There's fewer schools for people to go to. And the educational quality that people got, especially if you look at several decades ago was significantly lower quality than their urban counterparts. Also in rural areas, we tend to see higher rates of poverty and various measures of SES. And we also see that the rural population tends to have less access to healthcare. This as the gap between the rural and urban areas in terms of healthcare access has shrunk a little bit over the past couple of decades, but there's still a disparity there. And so when you bring up the idea of the life course and where people live throughout life, I think this is especially important in Mexico, where we saw that rural to urban population shift, that many people who are living in urban areas now were living in rural areas as children.  On his research looking at where people live throughout their lives In this more nuanced approach, what we see is that the people that had the lowest exposure to urban areas throughout life, those who lived in rural areas in early and late life, ended up doing the worst cognitively. And those who are doing the best are the people that lived in urban areas in early life and urban areas that late-life... And what we also see is that compared to people that stayed in rural areas throughout their entire lives, those who went from a rural to an urban area, also show advantages. So what it looks like we're finding in our current studies is that both early life, urban-dwelling and late-life urban dwelling are related with better cognitive ability. And there is an advantage that comes from moving to an urban area throughout life. On the negative impacts of indoor air pollution And then the other reason that we could expect to see these differences between rural and urban areas is that in urban areas, we know that people have high exposure to air pollution from the outdoor environment. When we look at pictures, for instance, say in Mexico City, we see the smoggy skies and we see this high level of air pollution that people are breathing in urban areas. However, in rural areas in Mexico, a significant portion of the population relies on solid cooking fuels. So this could be wood and coal and Mexico is primarily coal if people are using solid fuels for cooking. And when people use these solid fuels for cooking, particularly inside the house, you can imagine how quickly the pollution builds up inside the home. So people in rural areas have greater exposure to air pollution inside the home from solid cooking fuels. And we know that that exposure to air pollution is associated with poor cognitive functioning. And in my own work, looking at the effects of indoor air pollution from solid cooking fuels, I find that people who cook with these solid cooking fuels tend to have lower cognitive functioning and also more rapid cognitive. On the potential to improve outcomes We've seen several large policy changes in Mexico in the past couple of decades that are aimed at improving access to healthcare and primarily in rural areas. And so improvement of access to healthcare, access to health insurance, and regularly seeing doctors are something that we could use to improve cognitive ability and cognitive outcomes of older adults in rural areas. And last on the topic of cooking fuels, we know that one of the challenges and one of the reasons that people in rural areas are more likely to use these solid fuels is because maybe there's not the infrastructure to bring clean cooking fuels such as gas and electricity to more remote rural areas. Policy changes aimed at improving infrastructure to bring clean cooking fuels to rural areas and to educate people on how to cook with clean cooking fuels could be something very important to bridging these disparities that we see across rural and urban Mexico. On the role of cognitive resilience and personality characteristics in overcoming the negative effects of early life disadvantage What cognitive resilience is looking at is one's ability to not show the negative effects of stress. So people who are cognitively resilient can experience stress but don't show effects on cognitive functioning. They look like they're doing okay, cognitively, even though they're experiencing high levels of stress. In my work related to personality, I look at how personality characteristics are related with one's cognitive resilience or one's ability to overcome the negative effects of early life disadvantage. Early life disadvantage, being a stressor that I'm considering. So the personality characteristics that I tend to look at include a locus of control, which is how strongly one feels that he or she has control over their lives. And people who have an internal locus of control tend to think that the things that happen to them are the results of their own work. That they're the results of their own choices. Whereas people who have an external locus of control tend to believe it's external influences that affect their life. And so they're the ones that tend to believe that maybe the bad things or good things that happened to them throughout life are the example are, are the result of luck or of chance. Now, the other personality characteristic that I look at is conscientiousness, which has one's tendency to plan,  one's tendency to be goal-oriented and to delay gratification. And when we look at the locus of control and when we look at conscientiousness, both of these affect how people tend to cope with stressors. So in my work on personality, what I do is I look at how personality relates with one's ability to overcome those effects. And we see that having an internal locus of control and having a conscientious personality are both independently related with one's ability to overcome the effects of early life disadvantage. On the importance of midlife research We also see a lot of focus on early life, a lot of looking at early life SES, a lot of research looking at education and childhood, but I don't think we see nearly enough work looking at mid-life. I think there's a big gap in our understanding of the courses or the trajectories that people take throughout life. We don't see enough about midlife. So I think this is another area that I'd like to go into more in terms of looking at midlife. So what are the specific occupations that people worked? What are the levels of cognitive stimulation and those activities also looking at midlife, we could also look at people's marital histories when they got married, whether they were married multiple times. So I think there's a lot of information out there on midlife that could be very valuable in predicting where people are going to be 10, 20 or 30 years down the road.

Stories of Astonishing Light with KJ Nasrul
Redefining Our Feminine Armory | Nina Flores

Stories of Astonishing Light with KJ Nasrul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:41


Childhood friends KJ and Dr. Nina Flores jam about empowered presence as biracial Women Of Color.  Dr. Flores is an Assistant Professor with the Social & Cultural Analysis of Education master's program in the College of Education at California State University, Long Beach. There she engages students in deep analyses of issues concerning justice, power, and resistance. Nina's writing and research on topics such as gender-based violence, and harassment experienced at academic conferences has been featured in several esteemed Academic journals including Gender & Education and Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis as well as  national outlets: Washington Post, Huffington Post, Ms. Magazine Blog, Progressive Planning Magazine, and the OC Weekly.Today KJ and Nina discuss messaging around harassment and safety and the multitude of layers comprising true Self Care, including boundary setting and designing our "Dressed Up" Outsides in both feminine expression and armor. Takeaways:We can be impactful when we release our material attachments, even if only for minutesSelf Compassion is multilayered, whole, and an active intentionality What is your armor as you walk out your door today, Ladies? Please rate and review this podcast if our stories have astonished you as well. Your review may be featured on the show, AND  you're eligible for a FREE, private 1:1 call with KJ! https://ratethispodcast.com/astonishingstories  Episode Mentions: IG  https://instagram.com/BellHookedMe Email Nina at Nina.Flores@csulb.edu Book Rec: Pleasure Activism: The Politics of Feeling Good by Adrienne Maree Brown Book Rec: Hope in the Dark by Rebecca Solnit Ep 57 background music, Original Composition performed by KJIntro Music: Canada Lo Res by Pictures Of The Floating World Connect With KJ & Bliss Begins Within IG:  @MusingsOnOther @BlissBeginsWithin @AdopteeSociety Work With KJ https://blissbeginswithin.as.me/HelloCallWebsite: https://blissbeginswithin.com  Receive Love Letters from KJ https://bit.ly/BlissBeginsList Facebook & TwitterSupport the show (https://paypal.me/KJNasrulMFT )

Tea for Teaching
Military-Affiliated Students

Tea for Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 42:33


One student population that is often overlooked in campus DEI initiatives is the population of military-affiliated students. In this episode Kenneth James Marfilius joins us to discuss ways to support and include this segment of our student population in the classroom and on our campuses. Ken is the Director of the Falk College Office of Online and Distance Education and is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Syracuse University. While on active duty, Ken served in the U.S. Air Force Biomedical Science Corps in multiple roles: as an active duty clinical social worker, mental health therapist, family advocacy officer in charge, and as manager of the alcohol and drug prevention and treatment program. He has taught courses on topics such as social work intervention, military culture, and social work practice, psychopathology, and others. A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.  

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
What's It Like To Survive An Earthquake? with Ashly Cabas

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 69:49


Even the best earthquake early warning systems will give you only five to eight seconds of notice before you experience ground shaking. This week, Jonathan and geotechnical engineer Ashly Cabas take more than an hour exploring seismic waves, soils, risk assessment, and other earthquake fundamentals so that you can be prepared in the event of a natural hazard. Ashly Cabas, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU), where she investigates seismic hazards and earthquake effects on civil infrastructure. Her team at NCSU collaborates with seismologists, geologists, and structural engineers to understand how the response of soils and rocks to earthquake loading can influence the damaging potential of earthquakes. Her research group's work has also been recognized with EERI best paper awards in 2014 and 2018, and she has served in reconnaissance missions after the 2018 M7.1 Anchorage, Alaska earthquake, and more recently the 2021 M7.2 Nippes, Haiti earthquake. You can follow Professor Cabas on Twitter @amcabas, and keep up with her work at NCSU on Twitter @NCStateCCEE and on the Cabas Research Group site. Want to learn more about earthquakes? Here are some recommended resources: Seismological Society of America (SSA) Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) American Society of Civil Engineers - GeoInstitute US Geological Survey (USGS), Earthquake Hazards Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure Cyberinfrastructure component, DesignSafe-CI Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure Natural Hazards Reconnaissance component, RAPID Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) GeoHazards International (GHI) ShakeAlert, Early Warning System RaspberryShake Personal seismograph NCSU Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering Department Find out what today's guest and former guests are up to by following us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN. Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com.Check out Getting Curious merch at PodSwag.com.Listen to more music from Quiñ by heading over to TheQuinCat.com.Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook.

The Cordial Catholic
131: Works of the Law: Early Church vs. The Reformation (w/ Dr. Matthew J. Thomas)

The Cordial Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 89:14


In this episode of The Cordial Catholic, I'm joined by Dr. Matthew J. Thomas, Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology and the author of the incredible Paul's "Works of the Law" in the Perspective of Second Century Reception.Dr. Thomas joins us to look at the two perspectives on "Works of the Law" and what Paul may have meant – was he condemning all works meant to earn God's favour, or was there something else he was getting at?In his book, and this discussion, Dr. Thomas contrasts the perspective on "Works of the Law" from the Early Church Fathers (those closest to the apostles) to the theology of Luther and Calvin and the Reformation. And how the Catholic Church fits into it all.His conclusions, both personal and academic, are pretty incredible – and when we begin to explore how the Catholic Church shakes out in this debate, things get very interesting!For more, visit The Cordial Catholic. Send your feedback to cordialcatholic@gmail.com. Sign up for our newsletter for my reflections on  episodes, behind-the-scenes content, and exclusive contests! To watch this and other episodes please visit (and subscribe to!) our YouTube channel.Please consider financially supporting this show! For more information visit the Patreon page.  All patrons receive access to exclusive content and if you can give $5/mo or more you'll also be entered into monthly draws for fantastic books hand-picked by me.If you'd like to give a one-time donation to The Cordial Catholic, you can visit the PayPal page.Thank you to those already supporting the show!Please check out Hallow, the #1 Catholic audio prayer app. Pray the rosary, novenas, listen to Bishop Robert Barron's homilies and join the 30-day Gospel Reading Challenge by listening to the Gospel as read by Jonathan Roumie who plays Jesus in The Chosen. The app is free but visit hallow.com/cordialcatholic for a 30-day trial of the extra, in-depth features! Thanks to this week's co-producers, part of our Patreon Producers community: Stephen, Eli, Tom, Kelvin, Susan, and Eyram.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/cordialcatholic)

Syrtos
Meet us on the Dance Floor: Getting to Know Panayotis League, Part I

Syrtos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 77:42


Panayotis (Paddy) League is a performer, composer, ethnomusicologist, and author specializing in the traditional music, oral poetry, and dance of the Greek Aegean islands (as well as Northeast Brazil, the West of Ireland, and the wide world of electric guitar music). He focuses in particular on the violin, laouto (steel-string lute), and tsambouna (goatskin bagpipe) music of Kalymnos and Western Crete, performing and recording throughout Greece and the diaspora and publishing widely in academic and popular journals and online spaces. His book Echoes of the Great Catastrophe: Re-Sounding Anatolian Greekness in Diaspora, recently published by University of Michigan Press, explores the legacy of Late Ottoman intercommunality in the music and dance practices of the descendants of Greek refugees from Asia Minor. Panayotis is Assistant Professor of Musicology at Florida State University and serves as Director of the Center for Music of the Americas. He was recently named a Master Artist by the Florida Folklife Program for his work developing and disseminating the art of Kalymnian vocal and instrumental music in his home community of Tarpon Springs, Florida. James A. Notopouolos Collection of Modern Greek Ballads and Songs https://mpc.chs.harvard.edu/notopoulos-collection-1/ (https://mpc.chs.harvard.edu/notopoulos-collection-1/) Modern Greek Studies Association https://www.mgsa.org/ (https://www.mgsa.org/) Episode Music: Panayotis League, Michalis Kappas nd Irene Karavokiros

By Any Means Necessary
The Capitalist Class' Complicity in the Rise of the Far-Right

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 114:23


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman discuss the many ongoing labor struggles in various industries, how the social, political, and economic conditions created by the COVID-19 pandemic have exacerbated the already-existing issues that have contributed to this strike wave, the next steps in building a broader movement, and the need to join questions of race, labor, and class in organizing that broad labor movement.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Dr. Gnaka Lagoke, Assistant Professor of History and Pan-Africana Studies at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and a founding member of the Convention for Pan-Africanism and Progress to discuss the long past-due trial into the murder of Burkina Faso revolutionary Thomas Sankara, Sankara's significant contributions to Burkina Faso during his short time in power, and the counter-reovultion which placed Burkina Faso back in the hands of France, led by Blaise Compaoré, former president and defendant in absentia.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by technologist Chris Garaffa, the editor of TechforthePeople.org to discuss Facebook's smear and minimization campaign against whistleblower Frances Haugen, the European Parliament's call for a ban on facial recognition technology and how it signals public opposition to weaponizing AI against people, the impact of the US targeting of Huawei and how it fits into the cold war drive against China.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Dr. Gabriel Rockhill, an organizer, Founding Director of the Critical Theory Workshop and Professor of Philosophy at Villanova University to discuss the financial backing of the far-right disinformation One America News Network by AT&T and the dark money behind the rise of far right politics in the United States, the ties between the media and the national security state, the similarities between the fascist 1934 “Business Plot” to overthrow the US government and the Capitol insurrection, and how movement and alternative media can connect the dots between the stories that dominate the headlines and the broader system of capitalism.

By Any Means Necessary
Thomas Sankara Murder Trial Begins

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 14:15


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Dr. Gnaka Lagoke, Assistant Professor of History and Pan-Africana Studies at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and a founding member of the Convention for Pan-Africanism and Progress to discuss the long past-due trial into the murder of Burkina Faso revolutionary Thomas Sankara, Sankara's significant contributions to Burkina Faso during his short time in power, and the counter-reovultion which placed Burkina Faso back in the hands of France, led by Blaise Compaoré, former president and defendant in absentia.

D.O. or Do Not: The Osteopathic Physician's Journey for Premed & Medical Students
Episode 58: Dr. Tania Jenkins Assistant Professor of Sociology at UNC-Chapel Hill, Author of "Doctors' Orders: The Making of Status Hierarchies in an Elite Profession"

D.O. or Do Not: The Osteopathic Physician's Journey for Premed & Medical Students

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:59


Dr. Jenkins is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Her interest is medical sociology and she recently published a book describing her post doctoral work entitled, "Doctors' Orders: The Making of Status Hierarchies in an Elite Profession." She evaluates the differences between US MD and "Non-US MD" physicians regarding opportunities in medicine and medical specialties.  In our interview she will discuss the book and specific observations she made during her research in regards to the "osteopathic journey."  

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S25E26 - Improving Gender Diversity in Leadership by ‘Opting-Out' of the Default, with Dr. Erte Xiao

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:46


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Dr. Erte Xiao about improving gender diversity in leadership by ‘opting-out' of the default. See the video here: https://youtu.be/-LI9ptt2Lew. Professor Erte Xiao obtained her Ph.D. from George Mason University, USA, in 2006. She currently works as a professor at the Department of Economics at Monash University, Australia. Her research interests pertain to the application of experimental methods to understand how incentives and social norms influence economic behavior. Prior to her association with Monash University, Prof. Xiao worked as an Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University. She also worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania from 2006 to 2008. Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
HubWonk: Rent Control Re-Explored: What the Past Can Teach the Future (#76)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Hubwonk Host Joe Selvaggi talks with economist and MIT Professor Chris Palmer about his research and analysis of the effects of rent control in Cambridge during its 25-year implementation and in the aftermath of its repeal. Guest: Christopher Palmer is the Albert and Jeanne Clear Career Development Professor and an Assistant Professor of Finance at the MIT […]

Walk With TFB
4.3 Center Learning With Grace // Dr. Michael A. Goodman

Walk With TFB

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 63:48


During this walk, Dr. Goodman tells why learning should be centered with grace. An Oklahoma-ish native, Dr. Goodman has been a phenomenal leader since his childhood. After being named Youth of the Year (for the second time), Dr. Goodman stayed close to home and attended the University of Central Oklahoma where he earned his bachelor's in organizational communication. While at UCO, Dr. Goodman was elected Student Body President - a role that has informs his research and his practice as a higher education and student affairs educator. After earning his masters degree from Indiana University and working full-time for several years, Dr. Goodman moved to the DMV - where he earned his PhD in Student Affairs at the University of Maryland, College Park. While a Terp, Dr. Goodman worked in fraternity and sorority life, undergraduate student legal aid, and was elected President of the Graduate Student Government. These positions ultimately prepared him for his next step where he now serves as an Assistant Professor of Practice at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Goodman inspired me and reignited my curiosity and desire for learning, so it was a no brainer we had to take a walk with him on this show. Dr. Goodman Twitter: @mi_good Dr. Goodman Instagram: @michaelanthonygoodman Podcast IG: @WalkWithTFB Podcast Twitter: @WalkWithTFB Walk With TFB Website --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walkwithtfb/support

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP83: How to Age Well: The Power Positive Aging

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 26:36


How do you feel about becoming older? Do you see it as a rite of passage or a dreaded occurrence that you must endure? As we become older, "health" means more than simply being free of illnesses. Every older person may achieve "positive aging," also known as "healthy aging," if they strive to make better alternatives to improve their life in the long run. Dr. David Lereah, PhD, is one of the few who fully grasps this concept. Thus, don't miss another life-changing episode of This Is Getting Old: Moving Towards An Age-Friendly World with Dr. David Lereah, PhD. Let's all take a leaf out of his book as he shares his life story, how he survived stage three esophageal cancer, and show how minor changes to your daily habits may help you enjoy your years as much as possible. Part One Of 'How to Age Well: The Power Positive Aging' The Power Positive Aging: A Potpourri Of Rich Experiences Dr. David Lereah's book, The Power Positive Aging, started from a vision of helping older adults in need combined with his cancer battle journey, his Meals on Wheels volunteering realizations, and missions from his non-profit organization United We Age.  Diagnosed with stage three esophageal cancer, Dr. David Lereah went on a journey—a terrible journey. He went through intense chemotherapy, radiation, and a seven-hour surgery.  That's where it all started for Dr. David Lereah. He looked at life-threatening diseases as an inconvenience. He researched how to cope with aging, and that's where he discovered the power of positive aging. One thing led to another, and he wrote the book—The Power Positive Aging.  "You may experience some loss in strength as a normal part of aging, but a decline in and of itself isn't normal." Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, FGSA, FAAN How To Have A Positive Experience With Aging?  Personally, Dr. David Lereah discovered six building blocks for positive aging. He relates it to everyone through his book because he believes everyone is in the same boat coping with physical and mental decline as we grow old. The Six Building Blocks To Cope With Aging   Tapping With Our Spirit-We all know about our spirit, we talk about it, but we don't do anything about it. Instead, we worry about wrinkles on our face. We worry about losing our mobility. We may be physically declining, but our spirit could be strengthening. Thus, tapping into your spirit while physically declining is a significant asset and helps people confront the marks of aging.  Positivity-which is using affirmations and a lot of different techniques to stay positive. Mindfulness: Living in the present moment, which is the meditative practice of an optimistic age. The Four A's Of Positive Aging  Accept: Accept your mark of aging, whether mobility loss, age spots, wrinkles, or accept it. Adapt: After accepting comes adapting, which means using a walker when you've lost your mobility. Appreciate: Appreciate everything you have in life while confronting a mark of aging like mobility and loss.  Attitude: You have to have the right mindset about aging. We've climbed the hill in our lives. But you know what? We're not going down the hill. We'll stay on top and look at the scenery—that's what attitude is all about with aging. Social Support-We're social animals, we're human beings, and we need support from friends and family. Such support is essential when you're aging because you may be losing your spouse at some point. You may be losing some close friends. Thus, it would be best if you expand your social network continually.  Balance-When you age, you get out of balance. You're no longer bringing up a family with children. You're no longer striving in your career to get better and better at what you're doing now. You're retired, you're an empty nester, and you've got time on your hands—you're out of balance. And when you're out of balance, you experience stress, and you experience anxiety. We need to stay balanced in our twilight years, and that helps immensely. Part Two Of 'How to Age Well: The Power Positive Aging' United We Age—Social Support For older adults In Need The United We Age non-profit organization came from Dr. David Lereah's experience with Meals on Wheels, where he delivers hot meals to older adults in need. While volunteering for Meals from Wheels, he noticed that half the older adults on his route lost their zest for life. They were just like if you're in a laundry room waiting for the clothes to dry.  One reason was that they did not have social interaction as they were vacant of any social interaction. They didn't have a family; no family was visiting them. It turns out that half the people in long-term care facilities don't have family visiting them for one reason or another. It might be because their children live a thousand miles away, or they don't have a relationship with their family at all—they're lonely. "The best thing is to eliminate your expectations when you're in your twilight years, have possibilities instead—that way, you won't be disappointed." David Lereah, PhD From there, Dr. David Lereah created United We Age, where they…. Assure that every person experiencing a quality of life that declines due to aging has a social support network, especially living alone.  Raise Awareness and Image Building for Older Adults Assure that age is not a barrier to older adults participating in the online (internet) world.​ Inspire a movement where all generations of people are more aware and supportive of people aging.​     Assure that age is not a barrier to older adults participating in the online (internet) world​ Inspire a movement that affects changes in cultural beliefs and attitudes to make America a more age-friendly nation.   About David Lereah, PhD: Dr. David Lereah was diagnosed with Stage 3 esophageal cancer, went on a journey, and wrote the Power of Positive Aging. He created a non-profit, United We Age, designed to support older adults in need. Other Valuable Resources From Dr. David Lereah: Amazon Alexa and Echo Dot use Speak2, a voice technology platform, provides older adults in need to reduce social isolation and is available for free. Voice-assisted way to connect to the internet, send and receive messages using voice commands. Echo Show 2 Partnering with Meals on Wheels. To purchase a copy of The Power of Positive Aging – click here  How to prepare to grow old quiz: https://www.unitedweage.org/survey Connect With Dr. David Lereah, PhD: United We Age Website:   https://www.unitedweage.org Twitter: @UnitedWeAge @NextAvenue @GensUnited @amazon Email:  dlereah@unitedweage.org Phone: 703-843-1124 About Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, FGSA, FAAN: I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults.  I worked full-time for five years as an FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON lecturer. I obtained my Ph.D. in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor.  My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 and led to me joining the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the GW Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.

Charting Pediatrics
The Power of Play with Gabriella Gonzales, MD & Alex Rakowsky, MD (S5:E8)

Charting Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:28


While the majority of Western culture tends to focus on a child's academic readiness & success, the importance and benefits of play are critical to development. In today's episode, we are joined by our colleagues from Nationwide Children's Hospital to talk about a recent article they published about the important role that individual and group play has in child development. This episode is part of our Resident Files series where we are pleased to feature the thoughts and work of the talented pediatric residents. Today's guests are Dr. Gabriella Gonzales, PGY3 at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Dr. Alex Rakowsky, Associate Program Director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University. Article cited in this episode: The Importance of Play by Gabriella Gonzales, MD and Alex Rakowsky, MD to be published Fall 2021 in Peds in Review.  Do you have thoughts about today's episode or suggestions for a future topic? Write to us, chartingpediatrics@childrenscolorado.org 

Mass Construction Show
Construction Management Industry Advisory Board with Sharon Jozokos and John Cribbs

Mass Construction Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:50


In this brief episode of the Mass Construction Show I speak with Sharon Jozokos, Vice President of Healthcare at Columbia Construction, and John Cribbs, Associate Dean and Assistant Professor at Wentworth Institute of Technology. We discuss the Wentworth Construction Management Industry Advisory Board, including what it is, why someone might want to be part of it, and upcoming events. If you have interest in joining the Construction Management Industry Advisory Board, be in touch with John at cribbsj@wit.edu. Remember please, rate, review, share, and enjoy the show! Follow the Mass Construction Show here: Linkedin Instagram Twitter Facebook TikTok Intro music by Sound Revolution --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/joekelly/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/joekelly/support

Speaking to Influence
Ep 75: Ellen Weber Exec Dir., Robin Hood Ventures: Entrepreneurship & Angel Investment

Speaking to Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:28


On this episode Ellen Weber shares the common mistakes entrepreneurs make when communicating with potential investors and how you can engage and connect while asking for the funding you need. Listen in as Laura and Ellen explore the basics of building rapport, the difference between angel investors and private equity, and the three things that every investor looks for in an entrepreneur when making an investment. Ellen Weber is the Executive Director of Robin Hood Ventures, a leading angel group helping to fuel startup growth in the Philadelphia region. She also serves as the Executive Director of Mid-Atlantic Diamond Ventures, hosted by Temple University's Fox School of Business Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute, and is an Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, and the co-chair of Temple's Entrepreneurship Advisory Board.   You can connect with Ellen in the following ways: Website: https://www.robinhoodventures.com/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elleneweber/   To learn more about Dr. Laura Sicola and how mastering influence can impact your success go to https://www.speakingtoinfluence.com/quickstart and download the quick start guide for mastering the three C's of influence.   You can connect with Laura in the following ways: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurasicola LinkedIn Business Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/vocal-impact-productions/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWri2F_hhGQpMcD97DctJwA Facebook: Vocal Impact Productions Twitter: @Laura Sicola  Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/vocalimpactproductions Instagram: @VocalImpactProductions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

DKBmed Radio
10/9/2021 - Update on COVID-19 Treatment

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 52:14


Drs. Paul Long and Paul Auwaerter discuss the latest news on COVID-19 treatments for patients in and out of the hospital. Topics: *How variants (such as the Delta variant) impact treatment decisions *Test your knowledge with patient cases *The latest treatment guidelines and recommendations *Q&A Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/hospitalists/10-9-21-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/hospitalists Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA, Past President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Paul Long, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, General Internal Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Church Grammar
A Primer on Eternal Generation

Church Grammar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 8:28


This episode is a short talk from a piece I wrote at the Center for Baptist Renewal, seeking to introduce the doctrine of eternal generation with some help from Athanasius. Church Grammar is presented by the Christian Standard Bible. Intro music: Purple Dinosaur by nobigdyl. Producer: Katie Larson. Brandon D. Smith is Assistant Professor of Theology & New Testament at Cedarville University, a director for the Center for Baptist Renewal, and writes things. You can follow him on Twitter at @brandon_d_smith. *** This podcast is designed to discuss all sorts of topics from various points of view. Therefore, guests' views do not always reflect the views of the host, his church, or his institution.

Swine.It
PRRS - it's time we learn to fight back - Dr. Daniel Linhares

Swine.It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 49:15


PRRS virus has affected herds across the United States for over 30 years and has been a major cause of economic losses across the industry. As many farms are now PRRS positive, or are very likely to eventually contract PRRS, it is important to understand how to monitor, control, or even eliminate PRRS on our farms. In today's talk with Dr. Daniel Linhares, he discusses several methods of dealing with PRRS to prevent infection and subsequent economic losses and how best to mitigate its effects if infection has already occurred. "

Talking FACS
Music for your Health - Music Therapy

Talking FACS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 18:47


Host: Mindy McCulley, Extension Specialist for Instructional Support, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension, University of Kentucky Guests: Dr. Alaine Reschke-Henandez, Assistant Professor of Music Therapy and Affiliate Faculty in Gerontology, and Erica Gabriel, Doctoral Candidate in Musical Arts, Alltech Scholarship Recipient, and Lyman T. Johnson Fellow Episode 10, Season 4 Our guests, Dr. Reschke-Hernandez and Erica Gabriel discuss how music therapy can impact the lives of those who are experiencing many different life situations.  Dr. Reschke-Hernandez also explains an study that is currently being conducted in conjunction with the College of Social Work to explore how music can impact the lives of older adults.  If you or someone you know would be interested in participating in the study, contact Dr. Allison Gibson through the email or phone number provided below.  

The Beagle Has Landed Podcast
New ACMG Guidelines for Expanded Carrier Screening with Barbara Harrison and Katie Stoll

The Beagle Has Landed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


Today, Laura speaks with Barbara Harrison, Assistant Professor at Howard University (and 2020 NSGC Natalie Weissberger Paul National Achievement Award winner) and Katie Stoll, executive director of Genetic Support Foundation, about the new guidelines from ACMG on expanded carrier screening: how these changes move the field forward, and how they fall short.

Charting Pediatrics
Respiratory Roulette: COVID, RSV and other Viruses with Heather De Keyser, MD and Oren Kupfer, MD (S5:E7)

Charting Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:28


COVID-19 Town Hall for Providers: Join Dr. Brumbaugh and the Children's ID team this Thursday, October 14 at 6P MST to hear the latest information about the impact of the pandemic on pediatrics: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5597455784941724942 Fitting the unprecedented nature of the last 18 months, Summer 2021 ushered in an unusual, very early respiratory season in pediatrics, causing many of us to pause to consider what the typical Winter respiratory season may hold. Between the rise of the Delta variant, national nursing shortages, contentious mask mandates and the eager anticipation of EUA approval for the COVID vaccine use in kids aged 5-11... we in healthcare find ourselves in a sobering reality. In this episode, we are joined by our pediatric pulmonary colleagues to talk through clinical pearls for determining if patients are presenting with RSV, COVID or some other viral infection. Heather De Keyser, MD is a faculty member in the Breathing Institute at Children's Colorado and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Pulmonary Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Oren Kupfer, MD is the Inpatient Medical Director of the Breathing Institute at Children's Colorado and Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Pulmonary Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Do you have thoughts about today's episode or suggestions for a future topic? Write to us, chartingpediatrics@childrenscolorado.org 

The Hurly Burly Shakespeare Show!
Arden of Faversham 201

The Hurly Burly Shakespeare Show!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:42


This week we bring in guest Sheila Coursey, Assistant Professor of English at Saint Louis University who works on late medieval and early modern theater and narratives of crime, to talk to us about how she uses Arden of Faversham to engage students in conversations about contemporary true crime narratives. We rabbit hole (just a little) into which early modern married couples ever get to be alone together on stage (hint: it's NOT the Ardens), investigate what's with all the white girls and their tears?, and try to delineate what constitutes a “true crime” or “domestic tragedy” story. It's not as -ahem- clean cut as you might think (see what we did there?)

Growth Edge Leadership Podcast
Ruth Gotian, EdD - The Downside of High Achieving

Growth Edge Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 25:48


Dr. Ruth Gotian is the Chief Learning Officer and Assistant Professor of Education in Anesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medicine. She has done extensive research on what makes people very successful. She is an educator, author, coach, and speaker on the subject of optimizing success. In this week's episode, we dig in to the down side of high achieving.  www.ruthgotian.com 

Bad Faith
Episode 114 Promo - Wish With One Hand, Shit in the Other (w/ Dr. Charisse Burden-Stelly)

Bad Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:55


Subscribe to Bad Faith on Patreon to instantly unlock this episode and our full premium episode library: http://patreon.com/badfaithpodcast Why are folks debating whether Kamala is "Black" and is it relevant to her presidential prospects? Is Brie over-invested in Cardi B's revolutionary politics or could she be the next Paul Robeson? Is the online-left sufficiently internationalist? How does one square the belief that White Americans are too racist to vote for policies that benefit Blacks with a redistributive economic agenda -- much less Reparations? Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and Political Science at Carleton College, Dr. Charisse Burden-Stelly (Dr. CBS) weighs in on Racial Capitalism, Stacey Abrams, the "white working class," CRT, "The Squad," and more. Subscribe to Bad Faith on YouTube to access our full video library. Find Bad Faith on Twitter (@badfaithpod)and Instagram (@badfaithpod). Produced by Ben Dalton (@wbend). Theme by Nick Thorburn (@nickfromislands).

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Harness the Power of Language When Discussing Weight with Stephanie Sogg, PhD

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 57:49


This was one of my favorite interviews. I was a fledgling podcaster at the time when I interviewed, Dr. Stephanie Sogg, a clinical psychologist at the Harvard Weight Center. She had been quoted in an article in the Huffington Post that lambasted physicians for not knowing how to talk to our patients about their weight. Interviews like this were the reason why I started podcasting. I emailed her and asked her if she could teach us the right way to have these discussions and she agreed! Talking to patients about their weight is fraught with landmines created by inordinately complex psychosocial issues. It is very easy to alienate a patient. Dr. Sogg teaches us the power of language and this has come up in other interviews since. Changing racial language from minority to minoritize and slave to enslaved changes the perspective of the listener. It subtly influences how that person is perceived. The same applies to discussing weight; when we change our language about body habitus to be less stigmatizing, it subtly influences the listener, be it our patients, students or colleagues. We also need to change the way we talk about food. According to Dr. Sogg, the only bad food has gone bad, tastes bad or is poisonous. Dr. Stephanie Sogg is a clinical psychologist and an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. She has treated patients with obesity at the MGH Weight Center since 2003. Dr. Sogg earned her PhD in clinical psychology from Rutgers University in 1998, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship with Harvard Medical School. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Sogg conducts research on obesity and bariatric surgery, and the intersection between obesity and addiction, and has published widely on obesity and related topics. She is an author of the Boston Interview for Bariatric Surgery, and of the official ASMBS Recommendations for the Pre-Surgical Psychosocial Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery Patients. She is the director of the Weight Center rotation for Behavioral Medicine psychology interns, and is active in national and international scientific obesity and weight loss surgery societies. She is currently serving as a member-at-large on the Integrated Health Executive Council for the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Today's sponsor is Locumstory. You can find out more by visiting: www.locumstory.com 

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Don't Make Vertigo a Diagnostic Dizzy Spell.

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:52


This episode is going to flip the script. I'm going to be the one interviewed. I was interviewed by Dr. Indu Partha, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tuscon, on her podcast, The Ajo Way, Primary Care Pearls from South Campus. We talked about dizziness. If you are an otolaryngologist like me, you can stop listening now, but for everyone else who finds dizziness to be mystifying, this will be a good primer to understanding otologic causes of dizziness. We aren't getting granular here; no need to differentiate the saccule from the utricle. You're getting lost in the weeds. If you have trouble differentiating postural dizziness from positional vertigo, this episode is for you. 

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts
Navigating Collapse: Where Next for Lebanon?

LSE Middle East Centre Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 67:02


Over a year ago, on 4 August 2020, one of the world's most powerful non-nuclear explosions devastated Beirut, killing 218 people. While Lebanon dominated global news headlines then, attention has since fizzled. Amidst political stagnation, disastrous inflation and shortages in basic commodities from fuel to medicine, Lebanon seems in free fall. In this webinar, nearly two years on from the 17 October Revolution, we hear from speakers active in the fields of politics, labour union organising, urban space and law, who will address the aftermath of the Beirut explosion, the future of political activism, the upcoming elections and what may be emerging in Lebanon. Ghida Frangieh is a lawyer and researcher based in Beirut. She has been a member of the Legal Agenda since 2011 and is currently the head of its Strategic Litigation Unit. The Legal Agenda is a law and society research and advocacy organization with offices in Beirut and Tunis. Ghida recently worked on producing a legal guide for the victims of the Beirut blast of 4 August 2020 to support their path to justice. She holds a Master's degree in Applied Human Rights from France and has produced various publications related to social justice and human rights issues. She is also a founding member of Ruwad Al-Houkouk Association and the Lawyers Committee for the Defense of Protesters. Ibrahim Halawi is a Teaching Fellow in International Relations at Royal Holloway, University of London. His research interests focus on theories and histories of counterrevolution and revolution, with an emphasis on counterrevolution and revolution in the Middle East. He has published in peer-reviewed journals and established outlets on Lebanon, as well as revolution and sectarianism more broadly. Ibrahim is also the Secretary of Foreign Relations for Citizens in a State party, a progressive secular Lebanese party. Abir Saksouk graduated as an architect in 2005, and later did her masters in Urban Development Planning. She is co-founder and co-director of Public Works Studio, a research-based organization that addresses spatial inequality in Lebanon. Her primary focus includes urbanism and law, property and shared space, and right to the city of marginalized communities. Abir is also a member of the Legal Agenda and co-founder of Dictaphone Group. Omar Al-Ghazzi is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. His work focuses on questions around the global power asymmetries in the reporting and representation of conflict. He researches digital journalism, the politics of time and memory, and the geopolitics of popular culture, with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa.

The Impossible State
Dovish Hawk? South Korea's Military Buildup

The Impossible State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:39


In this episode, Victor Cha is joined by Dr. Lami Kim, Assistant Professor at the U.S. Army War College, and a CSIS-USC U.S.-Korea NextGen Scholar for a conversation on their recent op-eds in Foreign Affairs and War on the Rocks, military buildup under South Korean president Moon Jae-in, and options for dealing with the North Korean crisis.  Dr. Victor Cha, Foreign Affairs: https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/north-korea/2021-09-22/last-chance-stop-north-korea   Dr. Lami Kim, War on the Rocks: https://warontherocks.com/2021/09/a-hawkish-dove-president-moon-jae-in-and-south-koreas-military-buildup/

Faculty Factory
Interdisciplinary Science Habits and Hacks with Sarah Amend, PhD

Faculty Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 39:05


As you will hear on today's podcast episode, “interdisciplinary” is far more than just another buzzword. We are delighted to welcome, Sarah Amend, PhD, to the Faculty Factory Podcast this week for another enlightening “Habits and Hacks from Hopkins” episode. Today's interview focuses on how to foster healthy and productive collaborations between diverse-minded experts. Dr. Amend serves as Assistant Professor of Urology and Assistant Professor of Oncology with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. “My lab focuses on understanding, and ultimately, trying to design strategies to treat lethal prostate cancer,” she told us. Learn more: https://facultyfactory.org/ 

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Richard J. A. McGregor, "Islam and the Devotional Object" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 69:53


In Islam and the Devotional Object: Seeing Religion in Egypt and Syria (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Richard J. A. McGregor, Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University, offers a history of Islamic practice through the aesthetic reception of medieval religious objects. Elaborate parades in Cairo and Damascus included decorated objects of great value, destined for Mecca and Medina. Among these were the precious dress sewn yearly for the Ka'ba, and large colorful sedans mounted on camels, which mysteriously completed the Hajj without carrying a single passenger. Along with the brisk trade in Islamic relics, these objects and the variety of contested meanings attached to them, constituted material practices of religion that persisted into the colonial era, but were suppressed in the twentieth century. McGregor here recovers the biographies of religious objects, including relics, banners, public texts, and coverings for the Ka'ba. Reconstructing the premodern visual culture of Islamic Egypt and Syria, he follows the shifting meanings attached to objects of devotion, as well as the contingent nature of religious practice and experience. In our conversation we discuss aesthetic theory, material culture, processional objects, museum exhibition, relic typologies, devotional objects and religious landscapes, public celebrations, visual text and its illegibility, and the function of banners. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books Network
Richard J. A. McGregor, "Islam and the Devotional Object" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 69:53


In Islam and the Devotional Object: Seeing Religion in Egypt and Syria (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Richard J. A. McGregor, Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University, offers a history of Islamic practice through the aesthetic reception of medieval religious objects. Elaborate parades in Cairo and Damascus included decorated objects of great value, destined for Mecca and Medina. Among these were the precious dress sewn yearly for the Ka'ba, and large colorful sedans mounted on camels, which mysteriously completed the Hajj without carrying a single passenger. Along with the brisk trade in Islamic relics, these objects and the variety of contested meanings attached to them, constituted material practices of religion that persisted into the colonial era, but were suppressed in the twentieth century. McGregor here recovers the biographies of religious objects, including relics, banners, public texts, and coverings for the Ka'ba. Reconstructing the premodern visual culture of Islamic Egypt and Syria, he follows the shifting meanings attached to objects of devotion, as well as the contingent nature of religious practice and experience. In our conversation we discuss aesthetic theory, material culture, processional objects, museum exhibition, relic typologies, devotional objects and religious landscapes, public celebrations, visual text and its illegibility, and the function of banners. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Islamic Studies
Richard J. A. McGregor, "Islam and the Devotional Object" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 69:53


In Islam and the Devotional Object: Seeing Religion in Egypt and Syria (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Richard J. A. McGregor, Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University, offers a history of Islamic practice through the aesthetic reception of medieval religious objects. Elaborate parades in Cairo and Damascus included decorated objects of great value, destined for Mecca and Medina. Among these were the precious dress sewn yearly for the Ka'ba, and large colorful sedans mounted on camels, which mysteriously completed the Hajj without carrying a single passenger. Along with the brisk trade in Islamic relics, these objects and the variety of contested meanings attached to them, constituted material practices of religion that persisted into the colonial era, but were suppressed in the twentieth century. McGregor here recovers the biographies of religious objects, including relics, banners, public texts, and coverings for the Ka'ba. Reconstructing the premodern visual culture of Islamic Egypt and Syria, he follows the shifting meanings attached to objects of devotion, as well as the contingent nature of religious practice and experience. In our conversation we discuss aesthetic theory, material culture, processional objects, museum exhibition, relic typologies, devotional objects and religious landscapes, public celebrations, visual text and its illegibility, and the function of banners. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books in History
Richard J. A. McGregor, "Islam and the Devotional Object" (Cambridge UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 69:53


In Islam and the Devotional Object: Seeing Religion in Egypt and Syria (Cambridge University Press, 2020), Richard J. A. McGregor, Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University, offers a history of Islamic practice through the aesthetic reception of medieval religious objects. Elaborate parades in Cairo and Damascus included decorated objects of great value, destined for Mecca and Medina. Among these were the precious dress sewn yearly for the Ka'ba, and large colorful sedans mounted on camels, which mysteriously completed the Hajj without carrying a single passenger. Along with the brisk trade in Islamic relics, these objects and the variety of contested meanings attached to them, constituted material practices of religion that persisted into the colonial era, but were suppressed in the twentieth century. McGregor here recovers the biographies of religious objects, including relics, banners, public texts, and coverings for the Ka'ba. Reconstructing the premodern visual culture of Islamic Egypt and Syria, he follows the shifting meanings attached to objects of devotion, as well as the contingent nature of religious practice and experience. In our conversation we discuss aesthetic theory, material culture, processional objects, museum exhibition, relic typologies, devotional objects and religious landscapes, public celebrations, visual text and its illegibility, and the function of banners. Kristian Petersen is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Old Dominion University. You can find out more about his work on his website, follow him on Twitter @BabaKristian, or email him at kpeterse@odu.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Pod 49
Full Fathom Five: S1 Ep10 with Professor Elizabeth Alsop

Pod 49

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 77:26


Our Season 1 Rewatch pods come to an end as we discuss Full Fathom Five, We are joined by Elizabeth Alsop. We all loved Elizabeth's Film Quarterly article about Lodge 49, so we invited her on to go deeper in the Lodge Lore. Elizabeth is Assistant Professor at the CUNY School of Professional Studies, and she teaches and writes about film, TV & 20th-century lit. Her new book on the cinema of Elaine May will be forthcoming from Illinois Press..Links for Elizabeth:Her Film Quarterly articleTwitterHer last book: Making Conversation in Modernist Fiction See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Research at the National Archives and Beyond!
Free People of Color in the South with Warren Eugene Milteer Jr.

Research at the National Archives and Beyond!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:00


Join host Janice and Cherekana for a conversation with Warren Eugene Milteer Jr, Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  We will discuss his new book, Beyond Slavery's Shadow: Free People of Color in the South. Warren is also the author of North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885 (LSU Press, 2020), the independently published Hertford County, North Carolina's Free People of Color and Their Descendants (2016), as well as articles in the Journal of Social History and the North Carolina Historical Review. Milteer was the recipient of the Historical Society of North Carolina's R. D. W. Connor Award in 2014 and 2016 for the best journal article in the North Carolina Historical Review.

FedSoc Events
Panel 2: Big Tech and The Future of Section 230

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 67:32


On September 17-18, 2021, The Federalist Society's Texas chapters sponsored the seventh annual Texas Chapters Conference at the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, Texas. This panel covered "Big Tech and the Future of Section 230."Featuring:Brian W. Barnes, Partner, Cooper & Kirk PLLCJeff Kosseff, Assistant Professor of Cybersecurity Law, The United States Naval AcademyKate Tummarello, Executive Director, EngineProf. Eugene Volokh, UCLA School of LawModerator: Judge Brantley Starr, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Texas*******As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers.

Give Theory A Chance
Matthew Clair on W. E. B. Du Bois

Give Theory A Chance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:26


In this episode we are joined by Dr. Matthew Clair, an Assistant Professor of Sociology & Law at Stanford University. In our conversation, Matt introduces us to the work of W. E. B. Du Bois, discusses how Du Bois is one of the rare scholars who transcends sociology and the academy, and helps us understand how […]

Insight with Beth Ruyak
How Tahoe was protected during the Caldor Fire | Sacramento's preservation of open spaces | The return of the Aftershock Festival

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


We learn how Tahoe was able to protect itself from the Caldor Fire and what the continued threats are amid ongoing droughts and heat waves. We check in on how the Sacramento area is doing when it comes to preservation of open spaces for wildlife and plants. And, the return of the Aftershock Festival in Sacramento after being postponed in 2020. Today's Guests CapRadio Data Reporter, Emily Zentner, and KQED Climate Reporter, Ezra David Romero, join us with their reporting on how Tahoe was able to protect itself from the Caldor Fire Haven Kiers, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at UC Davis, explains how the Sacramento area is doing when it comes to preservation of open spaces for wildlife and plants following a CapRadio/Valley Vision regional survey which found that over 90% of respondents felt very strongly or somewhat strongly that we preserve wild open spaces for plants and animals.  Chief Marketing Officer, Chamie McCurry, discusses the return of the Aftershock Festival in Sacramento after being postponed in 2020.

The Interview with Hugh Hewitt
113. Dr. Matthew Lee Anderson & Dr. Anthony Nussmeier of "100 Days of Dante"

The Interview with Hugh Hewitt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 19:07


In this episode of The Interview, Hugh speaks with Dr. Anderson and Dr. Nussmeier about the "100 Days of Dante" project. Dr. Matthew Lee Anderson is an assistant research professor of ethics and theology at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Dr. Anthony Nussmeier joined the Modern Languages faculty at the University of Dallas as Assistant Professor of Italian and Director of Italian Language in 2016.      See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sound & Vision
Christine Tien Wang

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 98:51


Christine Tien Wang is an artist born in Washington D.C based out of California. She received her BFA from The Cooper Union and her MFA in painting from UCLA. Christine completed residencies at the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, VCUQatar, Chashama North, and Skowhegan. Her recent solo exhibition Coronavirus Memes was on view at Galerie Nagel Draxler in Cologne. Selected group exhibition venues include Frans Hals Museum, Rachel Uffner, Magenta Plains, and The Prince Street Gallery. Christine is in the collection of Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Groeninghe Art Collection in Belgium. She is represented by Ever Gold [Projects] in San Francisco, Night Gallery in Los Angeles and Galerie Nagel Draxler in Cologne and Berlin. She is currently Assistant Professor of Painting and Drawing at California College of Art and lives and works in San Francisco.

Wharton Business Radio Highlights
Bias in Bankruptcy Proceedings: Does Race Matter in the Decision Process?

Wharton Business Radio Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:31


Sasha Indarte, Assistant Professor of Finance at the Wharton School, talks about her new research revealing bias and disparities in the bankruptcy process. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books Network
Christian Parreno, "Boredom, Architecture, and Spatial Experience" (Bloomsbury, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 35:06


Boredom is a ubiquitous feature of modern life. Endured by everyone, it is both cause and effect of modernity, and of situations, spaces and surroundings. As such, this book argues, boredom shares an intimate relationship with architecture-one that has been seldom explored in architectural history and theory. Boredom, Architecture, and Spatial Experience (Bloomsbury, 2021) investigates that relationship, showing how an understanding of boredom affords us a new way of looking at and understanding the modern experience. It reconstructs a series of episodes in architectural history, from the 19th century to the present, to survey how boredom became a normalized component of the everyday, how it infiltrated into the production and reception of architecture, and how it serves to diagnose moments of crisis in the continuous transformations of the built environment. Erudite and innovative, the work moves deftly from architectural theory and philosophy to literature and psychology to make its case. Combining archival material, scholarly sources, and illuminating excerpts from conversations with practitioners and thinkers-including Charles Jencks, Rem Koolhaas, Sylvia Lavin, and Jorge Silvetti-it reveals the complexity and importance of boredom in architecture. Bryan Toepfer, AIA, NCARB, CAPM is the Principal Architect for TOEPFER Architecture, PLLC, an Architecture firm specializing in Residential Architecture and Virtual Reality. He has authored two books, “Contractors CANNOT Build Your House,” and “Six Months Now, ARCHITECT for Life.” He is an Assistant Professor at Alfred State College and the Director of Education for the AIA Rochester Board of Directors. Always eager to help anyone understand the world of Architecture, he can be reached by sending an email to btoepfer@toepferarchitecture. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Alarmist
The Aftermath: Genoa Bridge Collapse

The Alarmist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:17


On this week's Aftermath, Rebecca speaks with Daniele Malomo about the tragic Genoa Bridge Collapse. Daniele is an Assistant Professor at McGill University in Montreal specializing in structural and earthquake engineering. Producer Clayton Early and Fact Checker Chris Smith stop by to discuss Daniele's very thoughtful remarks on caring for our existing infrastructure. Sounds like he's on board for a maintenance rebrand!We have merch!Join our Discord!Tell us who you think is to blame at http://thealarmistpodcast.comEmail us at thealarmistpodcast@gmail.comFollow us on Instagram @thealarmistpodcastFollow us on Twitter @alarmistThe Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/alarmist. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Medicus
Ep# 73 Improv in Medicine: Dr. Orlov on the Art of Communication

Medicus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:49


Dr. Nicola Orlov is a pediatric hospitalist with an interest in improving the sleep and health of hospitalized children. She is also an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Associate Program Director for the Pediatric Residency Training Program, and Co-Clerkship Director for the University of Chicago's Pritzker School Medicine. All of which require exceptional communication skills, do they not? After working with medical students, Dr. Orlov noticed that their training was excellent at teaching them about the medical interview, but that it left something to be desired in terms of the sort of improvisational communication skills that would prepare them for the unexpected and allow them to be more present with their patients. Thanks to a yes from The Bucksbaum Institute for Clinical Excellence, and a collaboration with The Second City, she was able to develop an innovative curriculum that uses improvisational theatre to work on just that. Join us as we discuss this research and her new elective at The University of Chicago. Our host, Katherine, may or may not have signed up for an improv class immediately after completing this interview. Episode produced by: Katherine Mott Episode recording date: 9/15/20 www.medicuspodcast.com | medicuspodcast@gmail.com | Donate: http://bit.ly/MedicusDonate --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/medicus/message

Finding Genius Podcast
Behavioral Management to Assist in Managing Mood and Anxiety Issues with Mood Therapy with Samina Ahmed

Finding Genius Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 21:01


Why can giving mood support in serious medical situations make a significant difference? By providing support to patients, it may lead to more long-lasting treatment success. Listen in to learn: How a behavioral psychologist helps during medical crises Why more treatment centers do not have embedded mental health support How the field can be innovated from the inside Samina Ahmed, an Assistant Professor at the CWRU School of Medicine, shares her work assisting patients in finding mental peace and clarity while facing challenging situations. Since many medical conditions and situations offer many patients a challenging pill to swallow, their mental health is prone to decline. However, using behavioral psychologists within treatment centers, patients are able to find effective strategies to find peace, leading to greater medical success. However, this field tends to lag behind more quantifiable healthcare. By innovating in the area, the care can be spread to more patients and more accessible in the long term. Research local psychological support in your area to find a provider near you! Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

The Road to Now
A Frail League of Friendship: The Articles of Confederation w/ Greg Jackson (Expanded Rebroadcast)

The Road to Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 67:55


In 1776, the US declared independence. Eleven years later, in 1787, delegates from 12 states (we're looking at YOU Rhode Island) got together in Philadelphia and wrote the Constitution. In between those triumphant moments, there was the Articles of Confederation, that “firm league of friendship” that most Americans probably know as something they had to memorize for a history test. HOWEVER The Articles of Confederation, while certainly not a highlight of the American experiment, explain a lot about the American Revolution, the ideas that defined the founding generation, and the ways those ideas changed in the first years of independence. In fact, you can't really understand the US Constitution unless you understand the Articles and why they failed. THEREFORE In this episode, Bob and Ben speak with Greg Jackson about this very topic. Greg is Assistant Professor of Integrated Studies at Utah Valley University and host of the podcast History That Doesn't Suck. We hope you enjoy our conversation on the Articles of Confederation! AMENDED This episode also includes all-new material from Ben's appearance on Greg's podcast History That Doesn't Suck, in which Ben and Greg discuss the Gilded Age! You can find the full conversation in HTDS Episode #99, airing in full on October 11, 2021. (BTW there was no process for amending the Articles, which is just one of the many reasons they didn't last!) This is an expanded rebroadcast of RTN #128, which originally aired May 6, 2019). Want to support The Road to Now and get extra episodes and other content? Join us on Patreon! This episode was edited by Gary Fletcher.