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Healthy Wealthy & Smart
573: Dr. Sheree Bekker: A Contemporary Vision for Sports Injury Prevention

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:43


In this episode, Social Justice and Sports Medicine Research Specialist, Sheree Bekker, talks about social justice in sports, medicine, and research. Today, Sheree talks about the conversations around physiology and injuries, and the different environments that affect the ACL injury cycle. How do clinicians implement the findings in the research? Hear about Sheree's qualitative research methods, the importance of recognising the social determinants of injuries, tackling systemic experiences, and get Sheree's advice to her younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “We have to recognise the human at the centre of those experiences.” “Gendered language that seems like everyday language in sport can be really harmful to both men and women.” “[Be] cognisant of, and [be] able to have those conversations with athletes, patients, people that you work with all the time about their social conditions of their lives.” “The social conditions of our lives play into our injuries and our rehabilitation.” “It is about not simply seeing rehab as a biomedical issue alone to solve, but thinking about it as socially, politically, and materially oriented is a practice that you might incorporate in your way of thinking.” “Injury prevention, and a contemporary vision for injury prevention, needs to be athlete-centred and human-focused.” “We need to have those uncomfortable conversations about our complex, messy realities.” “Context is everything.” “Sport isn't neutral. It isn't apolitical.” “We can start to ask these questions, start to have these conversations. The answers aren't going to come tomorrow.” “These ripples will take some time.” “Connection is greater than competition.” “Hold on to the power of connecting with people who are at the same career stage and doing work with people who are at the same career stage as you.”   More about Sheree Bekker Dr Sheree Bekker (she/her) was born in South Africa, grew up in Botswana, completed her PhD in Australia, and now calls Bath (UK) home. She is an expert in ‘complexity' and research that links social justice and (sports) injury prevention. She has a special interest in sex/gender and uses qualitative methods. This underpins her work as an Assistant Professor in Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion in the Department for Health at the University of Bath. At Bath, she is Co-Director of the Centre for Qualitative Research, and a member of the Centre for Health and Injury and Illness Prevention in Sport (CHI2PS), and the Gender and Sexuality Research Group. Internationally, Sheree is an Early Career Representative for the International Society for Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise, and a founding member of the Qualitative Research in Sports Medicine (QRSMed) special interest group. In 2020 she was appointed as an Associate Editor of the British Journal of Sports Medicine, and in 2021 she was appointed Qualitative Research Editor of BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine. She completed a Prize Research Fellowship in Injury Prevention at the University of Bath from 2018-2020, and received the 2019 British Journal of Sports Medicine Editor's Choice Academy Award for her PhD research.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Physiotherapy, Social Justice, Injury, Prevention, Gender, Sexuality, Physiology, Sociology, Environment, Research, Change,   Resources: Anterior cruciate ligament injury: towards a gendered environmental approach   To learn more, follow Sheree at: Website:          https://sites.google.com/view/shereebekker/home Twitter:            @shereebekker Instagram:       @sheree_bekker   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hi, Sheree, welcome to the podcast. I'm so excited to have you on. I've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you so much for joining.   00:12 Thank you for having me. Karen. I am delighted to be talking to you today.   00:16 And today we're going to talk about some of now you had a couple of different presentations at the International Olympic Committee meeting in Monaco a few weeks ago, and we're going to talk about a couple of them. But first, I would love for you to tell the audience a little bit more about you, and about the direction of your research and kind of the why behind it. Because I think that's important.   00:43 Mm hmm. Yeah, I've actually I have been thinking about this a lot recently, over the course of the pandemic, and thinking about where my research and my work is going and why I'm so interested in in kind of social justice issues in sports injury research in Sport and Exercise medicine. And I guess for me, there are two reasons for that both of them related to my background. First of all, I was born in South Africa. And I grew up in Botswana. And I think, you know, growing up into countries that have interesting pasts, you know, South Africa having post of apartheid and Botswana having been a colonized country, I think I grew up in places where we were used to having difficult conversations about social justice issues on a national level. And I think, you know, that is something that has influenced me definitely in the way that I see the world. The second part for me is I studied human movement science at university. And my program was in a Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. And I didn't realize at the time that most people get their sport and exercise medicine, sports science, human movement, science training, in medical faculties, or in health faculties, whereas mine was very much social sciences and humanities. And I only realized this later that my training in this regard was quite different in terms of the way that I see the work that we do. And so now, I've landed here at the University of Bath, and I'm in a department for health. But once again, I'm back in a Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. So it's been a really, really nice connection for me to come back to these bigger social justice questions, I guess, that I'm interested, you know, in our field. So for me, that's really the why I think of why I do this work.   02:42 And, and kind of carrying along those themes of social justice and really taking a quat. Know, a quantitative, qualitative, sorry, qualitative eye, on athletes and on injury, let's talk about your first talk that you gave it at IOC, which is about the athletes voice. So take us through it. And then we'll ask some questions. So I'll, I'll shoot it over to you.   03:17 Yeah, so um, my first talk, the first symposium that I was involved in at IOC this year, we had titled The athlete's voice, and those of us who were involved with it, we're really proud to be able to get this topic, this kind of conversation onto the agenda in Monaco. I had so many people comment to me afterwards, that this was the first time that we've been able to have this kind of discussion at this specific conference. And, you know, previous editions, I think, have been very much focused on that biomedical that I was just talking about, given that it's Sport and Exercise medicine. And it was the first time that we've been able to bring athlete voice into this space. And so this symposium in my talk in particular, was really focused on qualitative research. Even though when we pitched the symposium, we kind of decided that we couldn't call it qualitative research, because it wouldn't have been accepted at the time. And, and now, it's amazing to me how far we've come that we can actually talk about qualitative research in these spaces. So what I spoke about, and what I was interested in is, you know, what are the kinds of different knowledges and who are the people that we might listen to in Sport and Exercise medicine and sports injury more broadly, that traditionally we maybe haven't scented and haven't listened to? And I was interested in those kinds of social meanings of injury and of injury prevention and how we might do things differently. So you know, for me, it was that Recognizing the value of alternative perspectives, and working across disciplines and advancing our research and practice in this way. And so that's really what I spoke about was, you know how we might do these things differently by actually listening to the people at the center of our work and listening to athletes themselves. And that was really the focus of that symposium.   05:26 And in looking through some of the slides from the symposium, some of the quotes that I'm assuming we're taking from the qualitative work are, gosh, they're kind of heartbreaking. So what do you do with that information once you have it, right? So you're conditioned not to quit, you turn off your emotions, you become a robot as soon as you step onto the field or the pitch or the court. So how do you take that qualitative research? And what do you do with that once you have it?   06:01 Yeah, so you know, my talk, the way I kind of structured my talk was to talk about how we generally do injury prevention. And what we generally do is we, you know, figure out what the issue is what the injury problem is, we develop an intervention, and then we implement that in intervention and hope that it works. And, and some, you know, that's the kind of general cycle that we use. And what I decided to do in my talk, which was only a 10 minute talk was to dedicate two of those minutes to a video that I showed, that was just set to music that flashed up all of these quotes from athletes. And there were quotes that I'd collected from a number of different sports, a number of different athletes and spaces over the years, that really speak about their experience in sports and these toxic environments, which is something that I think we tend to kind of put to the side, maybe sometimes and ignore, sometimes in sport, when we put sport up on a pedestal and only think about the good things that happen in sports. And those quotes are also, I guess, a throwback or connection to one of the other talks that I had at IOC, which is not something that I think we'll speak about today, but about safeguarding and recognizing safeguarding as an injury prevention issue. And so we had these, like two minutes of these quotes from athletes. And I think that video really signaled a palpable shift in the room in recognizing what athletes are actually saying, and what their experiences are in sport about needing to, I guess, you know, put their their kind of robot hat on and be this strong person within sport where they can't break down where they can't have injuries or anything like that. Otherwise, they're going to be the team. And just for us to come back and to recognize that humanity in that experience, within sport, I think is really, really important, especially when we're at a conference where we're talking about injury prevention and interventions, we have to recognize the human at the center of those experiences. And so for me, coming back to your question about what do we do with that information? I think that's really powerful information, in terms of how we think about what injury prevention is, and does. And I guess we always focus on bodies, and you know, body parts, the ankle, the knee, the hip, the growing. You know, that's, that's kind of been a big focus of injury prevention. And I think we often forget that injury prevention is and can be so much more than that. And that there are these social factors, or social determinants, that to play into injury and its prevention. So the social aspects of our lives in terms of, you know, abuse that might happen in these spaces, or just being exposed to toxic spaces, you know, how that does actually render us more susceptible to injury, and how that can thwart our injury prevention efforts in these spaces. So for me, it's about integrating both of those two things I think together, and that's what I'm kind of getting at with qualitative research.   09:19 And, and that leads me into something else I wanted to talk about, and that is a review from the British Journal of Sports Medicine that you co authored with Joanne Parsons and Stephanie Cohen, anterior cruciate ligament injury towards a gendered environmental approach. And what you just said, triggered in me something in in reading through that article was that there's intrinsic factors and extrinsic factors that can lead to injury and injury prevention programs, if done well, should incorporate both of those. Right but they often concentrate on the biomedical part of the The, whether it be strength training, or landing, or, you know, whatever it may be when we look at a lot of these injury prevention programs, but there are so many contextual issues and extrinsic issues that can impact any of those programs. So I'll kind of let you sort of talk through that a little bit and talk through some of the main points that you found in that paper. But gosh, it really gets you thinking like, Well, wait a second, it could be, like you said, if you are, depending on the environment in which you live, can have a huge impact. And it's, it's more than just, especially when it comes to girls and women, it's more than just oh, it's because you have your period. And that's why this happened. Or if your hips are wider, that's why you got injured, right? So go ahead, I'll throw it over to you. And you can kind of talk through that paper a little bit, and then we'll see what comes up.   11:04 Mm hmm. You know, I'm so happy to hear you say that, because I'm so I'm not a clinician, but it has been amazing to me to hear how this paper has resonated with clinicians and people working in this space in terms of your own experiences and what you see and what you hear from the people that you're working with. So yeah, you're absolutely right. I mean, this paper was born out of conversations that Steph and Joanne and I had in terms of how we were frustrated by I guess, the discourse around sports injury, particularly for girls and women, often being blamed on our physiology on our bodies, right. And to us, that seems like a bit of a cop out. And just to say, oh, you know, girls are more susceptible to ACL injury, because they have wider hips, so there's nothing that we can do about it, you know, so that's really pitched us that intrinsic risk factor that girls and women are just inherently weaker, or supposedly more fragile than boys and men, and there's nothing that we can do about it. So we're just going to have to kind of live with those injury breeds. Right. And, and we found that this kind of thinking had really underpins so much of the injury prevention work that we'd seen over the last 10 or 20 years. And we wanted to problematize this a little bit and to think through what those kind of other social and I would say structural determinants of sports injuries are. So I'm starting to talk about this idea of the social determinants of injury. So not just what are those intrinsic things, but actually, what are the what are the other other social modes, I guess, that we might carry that might lead to injury. So in this paper, we speak about how we, as human beings, literally incorporate I think, biologically, the world in which we live. So our societal or ecological circumstances, we incorporate that into our bodies. And so we can start to see how injury might be a biological manifestation of exposure to that kind of social load. So for girls and women, how our gendered experience of the world might render us more susceptible to injury, rather than just positioning ourselves as being more weak, or more fragile. So we were interested in how society makes us and skills in women more weaker, and more fragile. And so in this way, we speak about how you know, from the time that we're babies, girls are not expected to do as much physically we are brought up differently to young boy babies might be when we go through school and play sport in school, we play different kinds of sports, and again, you know, on average, or in general, and girls, goes out, you know, not encouraged to be as active and to do as much with our bodies as boys. And we then go in right to have this kind of that cumulative effect of less exposure to activities and doing things with our bodies. Actually, that is what leads to us being more susceptible to things like ACL injury over time. And this is carried on in the kind of elite sports space as well. So we see how girls and women's sports are devalued in so many ways and how we're not expected to do as much or to perform as well. Or to train as hard I guess, as boys and men So an example of this that actually happened a couple of weeks after we published the paper was the NCAA March Madness. I don't know if you remember, there were those pictures that were tweeted all over social media, about the women's division, only being supplied with one set of teeny, tiny Dunda. Whereas the men's division was given, you know, massive weight room with everything that they needed to be able to train to be able to warm up and do everything that they needed to do in that state. And the first that was just an excellent example of what we're talking about in terms of girls and women being expected to and actually being made, I guess, weaker than boys and men are in exactly the same sports spaces. And so that's kind of a rundown, I guess, of what we wrote about in the paper.   15:53 Yeah, and I look back on my career as I was a high school athlete, college athlete, and not once was it, hey, we should go into the gym and train with specific training programs, because it will help to make you stronger, maybe faster, better, less prone to injury, but the boys were always had a training program. You know, they always had a workout program. So I can concur. That is like a lived experience for me as to what training was like, comparing the boys versus girls college straight through or high school straight through to college. And yes, that March Madness thing was maddening. Pun intended. I couldn't you could not believe couldn't believe what we were seeing there. That was that was completely out of bounds. But what I'd like to dive in a little bit deeper to the article, not not having you go through everything line by line. But let's talk about the different environments that you bring up within the article, because I think they're important. And a little more explanation would be great. So throughout this kind of ACL injury paradigm, you come up with four different environments, the pre sport environment, the training environment, the competition environment, and the treatment environment. So would you like to touch on each of those a little bit? Just to explain to the listeners, how that fits into your, into this paper and into the structure of injury prevention?   17:31 Yeah, sure. So um, yeah, what we did with this paper was we take we take the the traditional ACL injury cycle, and that a lot of us working in sports injury prevention are aware of, and we overlay what we called gendered environmental factors on top of that, so we wanted to take this this site, call and think through how our gendered experiences and girls and women, again render us more susceptible, and over the course of a lifetime, or a Korean. And so starting with the pre sport environment, you know, that goes back to what I was just saying about girls and boys being girls being socialized differently to boys, when we're growing up. So that kind of life course effect, gender affects over the life course, in terms of what we're expected to do with our bodies. That really starts in that pre sport environment when we're babies and young boys and young girls. And then we track how that works throughout the ACL injury cycle. So moving into the next step, coming back to this NCAA example, you know, what the training environment looks like, and how it might be gendered in ways that we might not even pick up on. So another example here, and this is a practical example that we've given to some sports organizations, since then, is, you know, the kind of gendered language that seems like everyday language and sport that can actually be really harmful to both men and women. So for example, you know, talking about girl push ups, you know, that really does set a precedent for what we think about girls and women in sports spaces. When you say, Oh, you go over there and do some girl push ups, it really does render girls and women as being more weak, you know, weaker and more fragile than boys and men. So those kinds of gendered experience in sports spaces, and you're an example there is really key. But then we also talk about kind of during injury and post injury as well. And this comes more into the kind of rehabilitation space and so on how, again, expectations of girls and women's bodies might play into what we expect when we go through rehabilitation as well and, and how that plays into that ACL injury cycle of recovery, as well. So that's really for So it was overlaying gender, across all of those spaces. And I think that gives us a really powerful way of looking at ACL injury differently and to, to conceptualize what we might do both in injury prevention, but also once injury has happened to help girls and women differently.   20:20 And in reading through this paper, and and also going through the slides that you graciously provided on Twitter, of of all of your talks at IOC, as a clinician, it for me, gives me so much more to think about, and really sparked some thoughts in my head as to conversations to have with the patient. So what advice would you give to clinicians, when it comes to synthesizing a lot of this work? And taking it into the clinic, talking with their patient in front of them and then implementing it? Because some people may say, oh, my gosh, I have so much to do. Now, I have to read all of this. Now I have to incorporate this, do you know what I mean? So it can some be somewhat overwhelming. So what advice do you have for clinicians? Yes,   21:13 so I really do think and as I said earlier, I think a lot of what we're seeing here is what clinicians are doing all the time anyway, I think, especially people who are already connected to this kind of idea of this social determinants of health. And so I guess, for me, it is really just being cognizant of, and being able to have those conversations with athletes, with patients with people that you work with all the time, about their social conditions of their lives. So not again, not just reducing people down to bodies, but recognizing that people have you know, that the social conditions of our lives play into our injuries and our rehabilitation, and holding space for that, you know, when I'm teaching, that's what I say to my students all the time, but I know that that you know, this, and clinicians know this better than I do. You, you know, it's not just about saying to someone, go away and do these exercises, and come back to me when you know, that person might have a full time job with three kids to look after. And, you know, a lot of other things on their plate as well that that one exercise or exercise program isn't necessarily going to be the silver bullet or the answer to, you know, the way that they need to be dealing with that injury. So I think for me, it's again, that re humanizing and being able to have those those conversations and recognizing those social determinants of injury or recovery, and so on. And so I think for clinicians, it is about not simply seeing rehab as a biomedical issue alone to solve, but thinking about it as socially and politically and materially oriented as a practice that you might incorporate in your way of thinking. That's really it. It doesn't need to be any more than that. We don't need to complicate it. Any more than that.   23:10 Yeah. Perfect. Thank you for that. And as we start to wrap things up, is there a, are there any kind of key points that you want to leave the listeners with? Or is there anything that we didn't touch on that you were like, oh, I need I need people to know this. This is really important. Hmm.   23:36 Yeah, I think, you know, if we kind of connect the conversations that we've kind of had today with the different points that we've connected to, I think, you know, what I saw in IRC at the IOC conference in Monaco is I really felt especially on day one at that athlete centered symposium that we had, I really felt like a palpable shift in that room. And in the conversations that I've had afterwards, with people I've had so many people come up to me to say that, you know, that it was really inspiring, and it's helped them to be able to go away and have different kinds of conversations, incredibly have different kinds of conversations about the work that we're doing in injury prevention and in Sport and Exercise medicine more broadly. And so I really think that we need to focus on that idea that injury prevention and a contemporary vision for injury prevention needs to be athlete centered and human focused. And I think if we truly committed to this, I think the ways in which we develop our interventions, and the ways in which we might go about our work, more generally in Sport and Exercise medicine, in physiotherapy and so on, it needs to reflect the socio cultural, so meaning those social determinants of injury in cluding the ways in which things like sexism, and misogyny, and racism, and classism, and ableism, and homophobia and transphobia, how that all can and does actually lead to injury. I think those are larger conversations that we need to be having enough field that we've started to have very slowly, but they are difficult conversations to have. And we often cut them out when we only think about injury as a biomedical thing, again, only thinking about bodies. And so for me, I think those are the those are the thing that we now need to get uncomfortable, you know, about, we need to have those uncomfortable conversations about our complex, messy realities, and that we're dealing with that athletes are human beings, that these are our experiences of the world, that sport and exercise medicine needs to reflect that as well. In terms of our composition, we need to reflect the communities that we serve as well. And Tracy Blake talks about that often. And you know, those are the conversations that I'd like to see our field having going forward. And I do think there was a shift in being able to say those things at Monaco this year.   26:16 Yeah. And so what I'm hearing is, was the big takeaway for me from Monaco is context is everything. And we can't, we can no longer take that out. And focus, like you said, just on the biomedical aspect of this person in front of us as if they don't have past experiences and emotions and thoughts and fears and concerns. And context is everything. And for clinicians, it sounds like a challenge to start having these conversations at more conferences. I know it's this little kind of bubble of clinicians, but if it can start there, perhaps it can make a ripple out into the wider public and into having these conversations with your athletes and patients and not be afraid to have these difficult conversations, or to ask the probing questions to the person in front of you. Because they're more than just their ACL injury, they're more than just their back pain. So I think challenging clinicians to have these conversations, whether it be one on one like this, or within large groups at conferences, and then take that back to your, to your practice and really start living it and understanding that this can is as important, maybe, in some cases more important than the biomedical injury in front of you.   27:41 Oh, I could not agree more with that statement. I mean, something that I've spoken about a lot before is that, you know, sport isn't neutral. It's not a political. And it's the same for the work that we do. It's, you know, for far too long, it's been positioned as a neutral science thing that we do. And I think we're now starting to recognize the context around that, that our values and our principles and people's lives and experiences, you know, as you say, play as much as if not more of a role in their experience of sport, and injury, and rehab, and all of that. So I would agree with you completely, we need to be having more of these conversations, we need to recognize this within our research, we need to recognize this within our practice. And we can't keep going on as if you know, none of so if we can remove all of that from the practice of working with human beings and being human beings as well. You know, all of this is connected for me. And as you know, as we're seeing now, it's for all of us who work in this space, once we start to have these conversations, we can start to ask different questions, we can start to think about things differently. And I think that that's really powerful for the future of our work in this space.   28:55 Yeah. And I think it's also important to remember that we can start to ask these questions start to have these conversations that the answers aren't going to come tomorrow. So that instant gratification that has become the world that we are now living in that if it doesn't happen within the next couple of days, that means it's not going to happen, but that these ripples will take some time. Yeah, absolutely.   29:19 And, you know, so a lot of my work is in complexity theory. And what I say about that is, you know, there probably are not going to be hard and fast answers here. But it will bring up new considerations and it will bring up I think, I'd like us to move away from this idea that we can solve things, but actually move closer towards the idea that this is an ongoing practice. And that that's always going to be I think, more powerful for me when we see things like injury prevention as a process or a practice. That's not necessarily going to solve things. But that is you know, really To the context in which we live in our lives is an ongoing thing. And I think that's what we brought into the ACL injury cycle. Papers. Well,   30:09 yeah, I think it takes away from the clinician as being the MS or Mr. Fix it to, okay, we are layering ourselves into people's lives. And we need to be able to do that in a way that fits the person in front of us as best we can.   30:26 Yeah, exactly. Beautifully said exactly. We can't necessarily solve those things for them. But these provide considerations, things that we can do. And yeah, we can move with that.   30:39 Yeah, absolutely. Well, Cherie, thank you so much. I mean, we can go on and talk for days on end about this stuff. And perhaps when one of these days we will we'll have a bigger, wider, broader conversation and and make it go on for a couple of hours, because I'm sure it will bring up a lot of questions, maybe some answers, and perhaps some changing of minds when it comes to injury prevention and what our role is as clinicians. So thank you so much, where can people find you?   31:13 Thank you, Karen. And I love that I think broader conversations are so helpful in this space. So people can find me on Twitter at Shree Becker, that's probably the best place to find me. I'm always over there and happy to have broader conversations with everybody. So please come and find me on Twitter.   31:32 Perfect. And we'll have links to everything, including the paper that we're talking about. From BDSM. We'll have links to everything at the show notes at podcast dot healthy, wealthy, smart, calm. So one question left that I asked everyone and that is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career? What advice would you give to your younger self?   31:51 Oh, so that's a really good question. And it's I think it's my Elan series, again, connected to what we saw in Monaco. And something that I've said for many years now is connection is greater than competition. And something that I live in that I feel like I wish I had done earlier is to hold on to the power of connecting with people who are at the same career stage and doing work with people who are at the same career stages as you especially someone who has and is an emerging researcher, or researcher clinician in this space, because I think the exciting new conversations that we're seeing in this space are coming from people who are you know, recently merging, I guess, in these researchers faces and so it's okay to collaborate rather than being in competition with people who are doing great work in your area. So that would be my advice.   32:54 I love it. I love it and couldn't agree more. So Sheree, thank you so much for coming on. Thank you again. I appreciate it.   33:02 Thank you so much, Karen. And everyone. Thanks   33:04 so much for tuning in and listening and have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Trending In Education
Multidimensional Diversity in Library Spaces with Dr. Robin Naughton

Trending In Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:01


Dr. Robin Naughton is an Assistant Professor and Web and Digital Services Librarian at Queens College in New York. She joins Mike Palmer (who happens to be her husband) in a conversation about diversity, digital inclusion, and the design of library spaces. We also share our experiences raising a young son in these challenging times. Robin explains what it's been like managing the library's digital presence during the pandemic and how she's thinking about the blending of digital and in-person experiences as library spaces evolve into something new. We're joined briefly by Nancy, our Virtual Cohost, as Robin describes how libraries can serve as innovation spaces and as hubs that provide resources and services to a wide array of users cutting across all dimensions of diversity. We talk about VR and the Metaverse before looking for insights into understanding diversity with the help of book recommendations including Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America by Eugene Robinson and The End of Average: Unlocking Our Potential by Embracing What Makes Us Different by Todd Rose. Robin also shares her takes on our 22 Trends for 2022 and the world of virtual assistants as we hope to seek out difference and lean into emerging challenges and opportunities as we head into the rest of 2022. Subscribe to Trending in Education wherever you get your podcasts. Visit us at TrendinginEd.com for more insightful takes on where the world of learning is heading.

New Books in African American Studies
Suzanne Cope, "Power Hungry: Women of the Black Panther Party and Freedom Summer and Their Fight to Feed a Movement" (Lawrence Hill Books, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 70:47


Today I talked to Suzanne Cope about her new book Power Hungry: Women of the Black Panther Party and Freedom Summer and Their Fight to Feed a Movement (Lawrence Hill Books, 2021) In early 1969 Cleo Silvers and a few Black Panther Party members met at a community center laden with boxes of donated food to cook for the neighborhood children. By the end of the year, the Black Panthers would be feeding more children daily in all of their breakfast programs than the state of California was at that time. More than a thousand miles away, Aylene Quin had spent the decade using her restaurant in McComb, Mississippi, to host secret planning meetings of civil rights leaders and organizations, feed the hungry, and cement herself as a community leader who could bring people together--physically and philosophically--over a meal. These two women's tales, separated by a handful of years, tell the same story: how food was used by women as a potent and necessary ideological tool in both the rural south and urban north to create lasting social and political change. The leadership of these women cooking and serving food in a safe space for their communities was so powerful, the FBI resorted to coordinated extensive and often illegal means to stop the efforts of these two women, and those using similar tactics, under COINTELPRO--turning a blind eye to the firebombing of the children of a restaurant owner, destroying food intended for poor kids, and declaring a community breakfast program a major threat to public safety. But of course, it was never just about the food. Carrie Helms Tippen is Assistant Professor of English at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, PA, where she teaches courses in American Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Finding Your Village
Episode 85: Reducing Children's Fear of Shots and Doctors Visits: Interview with Dr. Jody Thomas

Finding Your Village

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 41:14


In today's episode, I had the honor of interviewing Dr. Jody Thomas, who is a licensed clinical psychologist, and specialist in pediatric medical illness and trauma. She is an internationally known expert on pediatric pain, she is also a founder and CEO of the Meg Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to empowering kids and families to prevent and relieve pain and medical anxiety. She is the former Clinical Director of the Packard Pediatric Pain Rehabilitation Center at Stanford, and a former Assistant Professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Though she now lives in Denver, CO, she still serves as Adjunct Faculty for Stanford, providing supervision and teaching. She is passionate about bringing together the power of medical science, technology and design to transform the way we think about kids and pain and ensuring kids have a positive relationship with healthcare.In this episode we discussed: The importance of pain mitigation strategies for infants and childrenThe SuperMeg coping plan builder for kids.  Resources for parents is the  Pain Champions Guide for parentsthe Be The Boss Of Your Brain video that Dr. Thomas did for Stanford. It's being used in several different hospitals, and we did some great pilot studies looking specifically at parent self efficacy around procedures.  ImaginAction is a self hypnosis project that Dr. Thomas did for Stanford aThe Provider Kit that parents can use before doctors appointmentsHere is an article written by Dr. Thomas talking about this further: How to follow/get in touch with Dr. Jody Thomashttps://www.jodythomasphd.com/https://www.megfoundationforpain.org/FacebookInstagramTwitterTikTokHow to get in touch with me: Sign up for a 4 week online birth class with meFollow me on Instagram and on TikTokFind other episodes at: www.findingyourvillage.com/podcastEmail me at amanda@findingyourvillagepod.comDownload for free: Seven Experts to have in Your Parenting VillageMonthly NewsletterSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/findingyourvillagepod?fan_landing=true)

Everyday MBA
Accelerating Innovation in High-Tech Teams

Everyday MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 29:29


Professors Hila Lifshitz-Assaf and Sarah Lebovitz discuss their new, ground-breaking research on accelerating innovation in high-tech teams. Hila is an Associate Professor of Technologyat New York University and Sarah is an Assistant Professor of Information Technology at the University of Virginia McIntire School of Commerce. They have been conducting pioneering research on how teams accelerate innovation. Research Paper - Embrace a Little Chaos When Innovating Under Pressure was recently published in The Academy of Management Journal. Their research analyzed high-tech product development teams and found that, under extreme pressure, successful teams abandon traditional team approaches to innovation. The results are dramatic and surprising. Listen to hear the findings and how you can apply the principles to your own high-tech teams. Host, Kevin Craine Do you want to be a guest?

Trends + Tensions presented by BHDP
Designing Space for Esports—A Growing Campus Phenomenon: Part 1

Trends + Tensions presented by BHDP

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 16:20


As gamification and VR have edged into apps, shopping, and even work, one gaming phenomenon is taking college—and the world—by storm. Esports has grown exponentially in the last five years, and Miami University in Ohio has been at the forefront. Phil Alexander, Co-Director and Co-Founder of Miami's varsity esports team and Assistant Professor of Game Studies, joins BHDP Senior Architect AJ Medina and Host Brian Trainer to discuss the unexpected benefits for students when space is made for esports.

Death Panel
Cancel Student Debt w/ Astra Taylor and Marshall Steinbaum (01/13/22)

Death Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 71:28


We're joined by Astra Taylor and Marshall Steinbaum for a conversation on why ending student debt is so pressing, the Biden administration's failure to fulfill its promises on student debt, and why we need a broader debt jubilee. Astra Taylor is cofounder of the Debt Collective, a filmmaker, and the author of The People's Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age and Democracy May Not Exist, but We'll Miss It When It's Gone (Metropolitan Books). Marshall Steinbaum is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Utah and a Senior Fellow in Higher Education Finance at Jain Family Institute. As always, support Death Panel at www.patreon.com/deathpanelpod new Death Panel merch here (patrons get a discount code): www.deathpanel.net/merch join our Discord here: discord.com/invite/3KjKbB2

The Conversation Weekly
Crypto countries: Nigeria and El Salvador's opposing journeys into digital currencies

The Conversation Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 44:58


We dive into the world of crypto and digital currencies in this episode to take a close look at two countries approaching them in very different ways. In 2021, El Salvador made the cryptocurrency bitcoin legal tender, while Nigeria launched its own central bank digital currency. Experts talk us through why they've taken such radically different paths.Featuring Iwa Salami, Reader (Associate Professor) in Law at the University of East London in the UK and Erica Pimentel, Assistant Professor at the Smith School of Business at Queen's University, Ontario in Canada.And if the latest Matrix film has left you wondering whether we are really living in a simulation, we talk to Benjamin Curtis, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy and Ethics at the Nottingham Trent University in the UK, on the long history of that idea. (At 30m20)Plus, Rob Reddick, COVID-19 editor at The Conversation in the UK, picks out some recent coverage of the wave of omicron cases sweeping the world. (At 42m10)The Conversation Weekly is produced by Mend Mariwany and Gemma Ware, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. Our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. You can sign up to The Conversation's free daily email here. Full credits for this episode available here. And a transcript is available here.Further reading:Nigeria's digital currency: what the eNaira is for and why it's not perfect, by Iwa Salami, University of East LondonAfter a big year for cryptocurrencies, what's on the horizon in 2022?, by Erica Pimentel, Bertrand Malsch, and Nathaniel Loh, Queen's University, OntarioFree Guy's philosophy: could we just be lines of code in a grand simulation, by Benjamin Curtis, Nottingham Trent UniversityWhat are the symptoms of omicron?, by Tim Spector, King's College LondonWhy does omicron appear to cause less severe disease than previous variants?, by Paul Hunter, University of East Anglia See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pekingology
Performative Governance

Pekingology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 29:09


In this episode of Pekingology, Freeman Chair Jude Blanchette is joined by Iza Ding, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pittsburg, to discuss her paper, Performative Governance.

JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast
Talk Therapy: Aphasia Awareness with Avi Golden & Kaitlin Brooks, PhD, CCC-SLP

JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 45:27


Dr. Kaitlin Brooks is an Assistant Professor and Clinical Supervisor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Molloy College in Rockville Centre, NY. Dr. Brooks is a licensed and certified speech-language pathologist with experience working with adults with speech, language, cognitive and swallowing disorders in various settings. Dr. Brooks has published and presented on topics related to communication and swallowing disorders related to stroke as well as the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the rehabilitation process. Dr. Brooks is passionate about improving awareness of aphasia and other communication disorders and educating allied health professionals on ways to improve communication with individuals with a communication disorder, especially in emergency situations.  Avi Golden is a practicing EMT and former Critical Care and Flight Paramedic with North Shore LIJ (Northwell) EMS and NY Presbyterian EMS. Avi holds a Bachelors of Science in Biology and has extensive experience as a practicing paramedic both in the US and with Magen Adom David in Israel. After experiencing a stroke in 2007 and experiencing resulting aphasia, Avi now educates the medical and lay community and advocates for aphasia awareness. NYCOutdoorsDisability.comFacebook: NYC Outdoors Disability

Press the Button
Space Junk

Press the Button

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 15:30


In this special bonus episode, co-host Tom Collina sits down with Dr. Lisa Ruth Rand, Assistant Professor of History at CalTech. She discusses ASATs, space junk, our dependence on satellites, and what all that means for the possibility of space warfare.

The_C.O.W.S.
The C.O.W.S. w/ Dr. Kevin Waite: Reparations for Black Californians?

The_C.O.W.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022


The Context of White Supremacy welcomes Dr. Kevin Waite. A political historian of the 19th-century United States with a focus on slavery, imperialism, and the American West, Dr. Waite is an Assistant Professor of Modern American History at the Durham University in England. He's current working on project to share the history of Biddy Mason, a black female slave who helped build Los Angeles. Dr. Waite is also a member of Mayor Eric Garcetti's Steering Committee for the creation of memorial to recognize the non-white victims of the 1871 Los Angeles Chinese Massacre. Dr. Waite's work, including his historical work, West of Slavery, may be a part of the research being used by a California state task force to determine if Reparations are owed to black people. We'll see if Dr. Waite thinks will happen, and if this may be widespread - black people being compensated and repaired for centuries of White Terrorism. #Reparations INVEST in The COWS – http://paypal.me/TheCOWS Cash App: https://cash.app/$TheCOWS CALL IN NUMBER: 720.716.7300 CODE: 564943#

SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human

We're launching a new season, asking what makes you … you? And who tells which stories and why?  SAPIENS hosts Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali explore stories of Black and Indigenous scholars as they transform the field of archeology and the stories that make us … us.  [00:00:02] Meet Dr. Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali [00:00:51] How season four came to be. [00:01:53] Season four previews. SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human, is produced by House of Pod and supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation. SAPIENS is also part of the American Anthropological Association Podcast Library. This season was created in collaboration with the Indigenous Archaeology Collective and Society of Black Archeologists, with art by Carla Keaton, and music from Jobii, _91nova, and Justnormal.   For more information and transcripts, visit sapiens.org. Webinar Series: From the Margins to the Mainstream: Black and Indigenous Futures in Archaeology About The Hosts: Dr. Ora Marek-Martinez (she/her/asdzaìaì) is a citizen of the Diné Nation, she's also Nez Perce. A Director at the Native American Cultural Center, her work includes supporting & ensuring the success of Northern Arizona University Native American & Indigenous students through Indigenized programming & services. An Assistant Professor in the Northern Arizona University Anthropology Department, her research interests include Indigenous archaeology & heritage management, research and approaches that utilize ancestral knowledge, decolonizing & Indigenizing methodologies and storytelling in the creation of archaeological knowledge to reaffirm Indigenous connections to land & place. Dr. Marek-Martinez is a founding member of the Indigenous Archaeology Coalition. Yoli Ngandali (she/he/hers) is a member of the Ngbaka Tribe from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a Ronald E. McNair Fellow, and a Ph.D. Candidate in Archaeology at the University of Washington. Her research interests span Archaeologies of colonialism, Indigenous archeology, Archaeologies of Central Africa, Trans-Indigenous traditions of culture sharing, Black & Indigenous futurity, digital conservation science, remote sensing, and multi-spectral imaging. Her doctoral dissertation develops digital and community-based participatory research approaches to Indigenous art revitalization within museum settings and highlights Indigenous carving traditions in the Pacific Northwest.

Tea for Teaching
Interleaved Practice

Tea for Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 40:28


Students engaging in blocked practice focus their efforts on a particular topic and then move on to the next topic in sequence, resulting in a perception of content mastery. Interleaved practice provides an alternative approach in which students engage in learning activities that require them to determine which concepts are relevant in a given application. In this episode, Josh Samani and Steven Pan join us to discuss their study comparing the effects of blocked and interleaved practice on student learning. Josh is an Assistant Teaching Professor of Physics at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also an instructional consultant for the Center of Education Innovation and Learning in the Sciences and Director of the UCLA-APS Physics Bridge Program. Steven is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at National University of Singapore whose research focuses on evidence-based teaching approaches. A transcript of this episode and show notes may be found at http://teaforteaching.com.

Rehab Confidential
Carl Erik Fisher, addiction physician, bioethicist and assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University

Rehab Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 83:59


Joe and Amy interview Carl Erik Fisher, addiction physician, bioethicist and assistant professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University. We talk about his own addiction journey during med school and his new book “The Urge:  Our History of Addiction”.

Cardionerds
172. CCC: The Hemodynamic Evaluation of Cardiogenic Shock with Dr. Nosheen Reza

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:53


The hemodynamic evaluation of cardiogenic shock obtained via a Swan-Ganz catheter plays an essential role in the characterization of cardiogenic shock patients. Join Dr. Nosheen Reza, (Assistant Professor of Medicine and Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant cardiologist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania), episode fellow lead Dr. Brian McCauley (Interventional and Critical Care Fellow at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania), Dr. Mark Belkin (Cardiac Critical Care Series Co-Chair and AHFT fellow at University of Chicago), and CardioNerds Co-Founders, Amit Goyal and Dan Ambinder, for this tour through the heart aboard the Swan-Ganz catheter. In this episode, we evaluate three separate admissions for a single patient to highlight pearls regarding waveform assessment, evaluating cardiac output, phenotyping hemodynamic profiles, targeted therapies based on hemodynamics and so much more. Episode introduction and audio editing by Dr. Gurleen Kaur (Director of the CardioNerds Internship). Claim free CME for enjoying this episode! Disclosures: None Pearls • Notes • References • Guest Profiles • Production Team CardioNerds Cardiac Critical Care PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Pearls and Quotes - Hemodynamic Evaluation of Cardiogenic Shock Swan-Ganz catheters are not dead #ReviveTheSwan!  They remain a useful tool to characterize cardiac patients & to help direct therapy, especially in Cardiogenic Shock.When looking at Swan-Ganz catheter data, it is important to always interpret your own tracings, to know what values are acquired directly, and which values are derived.It is important to understand the strengths and weakness of hemodynamic characterization by Swan-Ganz cathetersAdvanced metrics such as cardiac power output, pulmonary artery pulsatility index, and aortic pulsatility index are extremely useful in further phenotyping patients as well as guiding mechanical support platforms“The data will be wrong if the preparation is not right” Show notes - Hemodynamic Evaluation of Cardiogenic Shock 1. Swan-Ganz catheters are a useful tool to characterize cardiac patients and to direct therapy.  With the ESCAPE trial in 2004, Swan-Ganz catheter utilization dropped drastically outside transplant centers across the United States (2). While the ESCAPE trial did demonstrate the possibility of harm when using a Swan-Ganz catheter, many of the truly ill cardiac patients we care for would have been excluded from the trial. For instance, patients on dobutamine at doses above 3 µg/kg/min or any dose of milrinone during the hospitalization were excluded from the trial.This is a classic example of “throwing the baby out with the bath water.”In a recent large, multicenter cardiogenic shock registry, complete hemodynamic assessment using pulmonary artery catheters prior to MCS is associated with lower in-hospital mortality compared with incomplete or no assessment (3). 2. When looking at Swan-Ganz catheter data, it is important to always interpret your own tracings, to know what values are acquired directly, and which values are derived. Incomplete or incorrect data can lead to mischaracterization of our patients. Therefore, it is essential to review all of the tracings, calculations, and data acquired for each individual patient before any clinical adjustments are made (1). An incomplete pulmonary capillary wedge tracing is an example from clinical practice (causing the PCWP, and therefore the left-sided filling pressures to be overestimated).  It is equally important to know the limitations of cardiac output equations, and that no one measurement is perfect.Foibles of the Fick equation include assumed rather than measured oxygen consumption and variations in hemoglobin concentration. Traditionally,

Preaching and Preachers
“Best of Preaching and Preachers” Episode 205: Gospel Driven Ministry

Preaching and Preachers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 21:32


*This episode was originally published on March 22, 2021 This week I want to welcome Jared Wilson to the podcast. Jared serves as Assistant Professor of Pastoral Ministry, Author in Residence, and General Editor of For the Church. He is an accomplished author publishing many books including Echo Island, The Gospel According to Satan, and others. Jared recently published his new book Gospel Driven Ministry: An Introduction to the Calling and Work of a Pastor.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Reaganism: When History Repeats Itself with Reagan Revisionist Simon Miles (#103)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022


Roger sits down with Simon Miles, Assistant Professor at Duke University, and the author of Engaging the Evil Empire: Washington, Moscow, and the Beginning of the End of the Cold War and co-editor of a new book, The Reagan Moment: America and the World in the 1980s. Roger and Simon discuss President Reagan’s foreign policy, […]

Play Your Position with Mary Lou Kayser
413: Dr. Ruth Gotian on the Four Elements of Success

Play Your Position with Mary Lou Kayser

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 49:22


As we enter a new year, many of us are thinking about what success means moving forward. My conversation on today's episode with Dr. Ruth Gotian is sure to get you thinking about your own definition of success and what you will prioritize in the coming months.    Dr. Ruth Gotian is the Chief Learning Officer and Assistant Professor of Education in Anesthesiology and former Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Executive Director of the Mentoring Academy at Weill Cornell Medicine. She has been hailed by the journal Nature and Columbia University as an expert in mentoring and leadership development and is currently a contributor to Forbes and Psychology Today where she writes about ‘optimizing success'. She also has a weekly show and podcast by the same name where she gathers high achievers to talk about their journey to success. She was recently recognized as the #1 Emerging Management Thinker In The World with the Thinkers50 Radar Award, dubbed the Oscars of management thinking. She's talking to us today from New York City. Her new book The Success Factor is available.   = = = = = The Team here at PYP has put together another uplifting, insightful, and inspiring show for you today. Our goal is to bring you timely, relevant, and useful conversations so that you can experience more success, energy, and LIFE as the leader of your business, career, side hustle, or passion.   We always appreciate your 5-star rating and review of the show. Thank you for helping us get the word out about PYP!   Here are a few ways I can help you: Share this episode with one person who could use a boost of inspiration and positivity today. Grab your copy of my leadership playbook that teaches you the 11 skills you can quickly master to become an exceptional leader.   Buy one of my books on Amazon and leave me a 5-star review. How's your writing these days? Is what you write and say more "ho-hum" than "oh ya!" Let's work on making your writing work better for you.  Book a free call with me today!  

Filter: Biblical Clarity in a Confusing World
Mark Talbot on Suffering, Lament, and Hope in the Christian Life

Filter: Biblical Clarity in a Confusing World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 49:43


All of human life is accompanied by pain and difficulty. Christians are frequently caught off guard by the suffering they experience. They are unprepared either due to bad assumptions about the gospel's promises or by poor discipleship. Since everyone will face hardship in some form, it's important that believers understand what the Bible has to say about suffering in the Christian life. My guest on today's show is Dr. Mark Talbot and he has written an excellent book called When the Stars Disappear to help with this task. Mark Talbot grew up in the Seattle area. When he was seventeen, he fell off a Tarzan-like rope swing and suffered a paralyzing accident that left him partially paraplegic. After graduating from Seattle Pacific College with a B. A. in English Literature, he completed his Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. He began his teaching career as an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Calvin College in 1987 and then moved to Wheaton College in 1992, where he teaches courses on suffering, philosophical theology, philosophical psychology, David Hume, and Jonathan Edwards. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, he served as the Vice-Chair of the Council for the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals as well as the Executive Editor of Modern Reformation magazine. More recently, he has published When the Stars Disappear: Help and Hope from Stories of Suffering in Scripture, which is the first of four volumes on Suffering and the Christian Life. The second volume, Give Me Understanding that I May Live: Situating Our Suffering within God's Redemptive Plan will be available in July of 2022. He has received the Leland Ryken Award for Teaching Excellence in the Humanities and is currently a Scholar for the Christian Scholars' Fund. He and his wife, Cindy, have one grown daughter. They reside in Wheaton. Check out the full show notes for highlights and resources from this episode: https://tinyurl.com/2p8fhy8s SUPPORT THIS PODCAST: PayPal: https://paypal.me/AaronShamp?locale.x=en_US Venmo: @AaronShamp Cash App: $AaronShamp –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Track: Perseverance — Land of Fire [Audio Library Release] Music provided by Audio Library Plus Watch: https://youtu.be/Ue48lJLVA30​Free Download / Stream: https://alplus.io/perseverance​–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Black Doctors Podcast
The Intersection of Neonatology and Medical Ethics

The Black Doctors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 27:02


This episode features Dr. Uchenna Anani, a Neonatologist and Medical Ethicist. She is also a fellow alumnus of the Howard University College of Medicine. Dr. Anani shares her pathway to becoming a physician. In fact, she wanted to become a Neonatologist before she realized she needed to become a Pediatrician first. She developed an interest in Medical Ethics which she has incorporated into her position as an Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. Learn about the incredible subspecialty of Neonatology Learn how Medical Ethics and Shared Decision Making is crucial in this field **This episode was sponsored by Picmonic . Visit their website and mention the podcast when you subscribe. If you enjoyed this episode, please share with a friend and leave a comment and rating on iTunes. TBDP is a volunteer passion project with the goal of inspiring all who listen. In-house music and audio production, so any ideas for improvements or suggestions for future guests are welcome. Visit www.StevenBradleyMD.com to learn more about our host. He is available for consultations or speaking engagements regarding health equity and medical ethics.

FreshEd
FreshEd #193 – Occupying Schools in Brazil (Rebecca Tarlau)

FreshEd

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 39:51


FreshEd is taking a break for the next few weeks. While we are away, we'll re-play some of our favourite episodes. Special Note: We need your support to keep us ad-free in 2022. If you have the means to do so, please consider donating to FreshEd by visiting freshedpodcast.com/donate. Today I talk with Rebecca Tarlau about her new book, Occupying Schools, Occupying Land, which was published last year. The book details the way in which the Landless Workers Movement transformed Brazilian Education. Rebecca Tarlau is an Assistant Professor of Education and Labor and Employment Relations at the Pennsylvania State University. She is affiliated with the Lifelong Learning and Adult Education Program, the Comparative and International Education program, and the Center for Global Workers' Rights. Occupying Schools, Occupying Land won the 2020 book award from the Globalization and Education Special Interest Group of the Comparative and International Education Society. www.freshedpodcast.com/tarlau/ -- Get in touch! Twitter: @FreshEdpodcast Facebook: FreshEd Email: info@freshedpodcast.com Support FreshEd: www.freshedpodcast.com/support/

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
Decriminalize All Capitalist Acts Between Consenting Adults. Jonathan Newman, Ph.D. & Keith Knight

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 77:05


https://youtu.be/z7vdWiUa-pQ We should compare the outcome of some event or policy to the alternative timeline in which that event never happened or that policy was never put in place. We should not compare before and after only. This alternative timeline, the “what would have been”. Is called counterfactual. Economics is all about counterfactuals because economics is all about choices. A choice is choosing one course of action over all others. The next-best course of action is the counterfactual (and the value of that next-best course of action is called the opportunity cost of the choice).....Moreover, taxes and inflation do not bring about new resources - they only increase the amount of our resources that are consumed according to politicians' and bureaucrats' preferences.   Jonathan Newman, Ph.D., The Broken Window (2021) Jonathan Newman is Assistant Professor of Economics and Finance at Bryan College and an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. He earned his PhD at Auburn University while a Research Fellow at the Mises Institute. The Broken Window by Jonathan Newman Dr. Newman on Twitter Odysee BitChute Minds Archive Spotify

OrthoClips Podcast Series
Keys to success with the Masquelet technique

OrthoClips Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 15:36


Interview with Dr. Benjamin Taylor, Fellowship Director of the Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship at Grant Medical Center, Columbus Ohio, Associate Program Director for OhioHealth Orthopaedic Surgery Residency, and Associate Clinical Professor at Ohio University and Dr. David Galos, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. […]

Expanding Reality
102 - Jennifer Verdolin - Wild Connections - Discovering ourselves through the behavior of animals

Expanding Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 58:45


Thank you for listening!  On this episode we hav e the honor of speaking with Dr. Jennifer Verdolin. She is a widely regarded animal behavior scientist, author, and science communicator, Jennifer has been a featured guest on BBC Earth Podcast, National Public Radio, and many others. From 2014-2018 she had a recurring role as a radio personality on the nationally syndicated D.L Hughley Show, hosted by American Peabody award-winning comedian, D.L. Hughley.  After the publication of her two nonfiction popular science books, Wild Connection and Raised by Animals, Jennifer has been using her expertise to contribute to the development and production of documentaries. From Animals in Love (Oxford Scientific Films) to Spy in the Wild (John Downer Productions) and Animal Social Networks (Rotating Planet Productions), Jennifer has been a scientific consultant, writer, researcher, and on-screen contributor. She also writes for Psychology Today and is an Assistant Professor in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona. Aside from being sought after to contribute to media projects, Jennifer is an engaging speaker, delighting and sharing with audiences the lessons we can learn from other animals to improve our lives, relationships, and families. Her appearances have included places like the world-renowned 92nd St Y in New York City. Delivering engaging science is her specialty whether it's in print, on the radio, on screen, or in front of a live audience.  JenniferVerdolin.com Our Website Rokfin Deliberate Acts of Kindness Shirts N Such YouTube Music By Vinny The Saint Graphics Expert Bo Shafnowski  

Audible Bleeding
VSITE/RPVI Review: Vascular Lab

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 51:27


In today's episode, Dr. Alaska Pendleton and Dr. Anahita Dua discuss vascular lab pearls for your VSITE exam and the RPVI.    Dr. Alaska Pendleton is a third year resident in the Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital completing  her  second year of research. Dr. Anahita Dua is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and a vascular surgeon at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She is also director of the Vascular Laboratory and co-director of the Peripheral Arterial Disease Center there.   Episode created by Alaska Pendleton MD and Anahita Dua MD. Edited by Matthew Smith MD PhD Reviewed by Sharif Ellozy MD   If you enjoy our content, please contribute to Support Audible Bleeding! Help us improve through our Listener Survey! Follow us on Twitter: @AudibleBleeding

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast
Opposing Views: Is Home-Schooling Better? | Dr. T Jamerson Brewer & T. J. Schmidt - MP Podcast #132

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 75:14


This episode was sponsored by: - BetterHelp. Get 10% off your first month at https://www.betterhelp.com/peterson and join over 2M people who have taken charge of their mental health In this episode of Opposing Views, Dr. T. Jamerson Brewer, T. J. Schmidt, and I discuss homeschooling: home vs. public education, socializing kids, curriculum ideology, factors to academic success, ideology, and much more. T. Jameson Brewer, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Social Foundations. He received his Ph.D. in Educational Policy Studies from the U of Illinois. T. J. Schmidt earned his Juris doctor from Oak Brook College of Law. As an HSLDA attorney, T. J. helps people with legal questions and challenges surrounding homeschooling. If you enjoyed this, please subscribe! - Find T. Jameson Brewer at @tjamesonbrewer https://twitter.com/tjamesonbrewer And T. J. Schmidt at www.HSLDA.org ———————————— Follow Me On ———————————— Facebook: https://facebook.com/mikhailapete​rson Facebook health groups: https://linktr.ee/mikhailasupportgrou... Twitter: https://twitter.com/MikhailaAleksis​​ Instagram: https://instagram.com/mikhailapeterson Telegram main channel: https://t.me/mikhailapeterson​​ Discussion group: https://t.me/mikhailapetersondiscussion ———————————— Show Notes ———————————— [00:00] Intro [2:30] Introducing T. J. Schmidt [3:00] Why homeschool? [4:30] “We made the decision because we both had a great experience growing up homeschooled" - T. J. Schmidt [05:00] Main arguments against homeschooling [05:30] TJ retells a day of homeschooling with his family [08:00] States where homeschooling is illegal [10:00] Is every parent qualified to teach? [11:00] “Homeschooling isn't easy [or] for everyone, but anyone can homeschool regardless of background" - TJ [12:30] Homeschool, isolation, and echo chambers [13:00] Do people who homeschool make more on average? [15:30] Typically, “homeschool families aren't as well off as their neighbors" - TJ [16:30] Combined schooling methods [18:30] COVID & hybrid homeschooling [20:30] Home vs. public curriculum [21:30] “Most states [have compulsory subjects] It is up to the parent, however, what material they use to teach that" - TJ [23:30] How expensive is it? [26:00] Ideology & teaching [27:30] Parents & trickle-down opinions on (potentially touchy) subjects [28:30] “Homeschooling isn't about [religion]" - TJ [30:00] Wrapping up [32:30] “We are doing [it] because we love our children and we want them to be successful" - TJ [33:00] “There's no research on homeschooling being any more dangerous" - TJ [38:00] Brewer's take on homeschooling [38:30] “It's the quintessential iteration of school choice and it's also one of the oldest forms of schooling" - Jameson Brewer [41:00] “As a parent, I have the option to homeschool. And I have specifically chosen not to because I don't believe [it's] the best way" - JB [42:30] Public school: Origins [43:00] Should certain educational guidelines be endorsed by the government? [43:30] “In almost every state, it is exceedingly easy [to homeschool]" - JB [47:00] Brewer's data-plea to the homeschoolers [47:30] Efficacy of public vs. homeschooling [48:00] Based on self-reports, homeschooled kids “are doing better than their public school peers" - JB [49:30] “Homeschool families typically [make x2 or x3 the] household income" - JB [50:30] Religion, politics, and other homeschool rationales [51:00] Is socialization a problem? [52:30] Public & Homeschooling: 2 shades of echo chamber? [57:00] Should we get to choose what we learn? [58:30] Lower-income households & the value of a quality education [1:02:30] CRT (critical race theory) in public education [1:04:30] Could homeschooling gain cred via compulsory, standardized testing? [1:05:00] “Testing for the sake of testing… isn't typically beneficial" - JB [1:05:30] How can people return to a system they don't believe in? [1:07:30] “I think the media has certainly played a role in hyping up the myth of the failed school" - JB [1:09:00] How is the curriculum chosen? [1:10:30] Curriculum differences [1:12:30] Closing thoughts [1:13:30] “We need to understand that public schools [are] the better opportunity… better than a child kept at home" - JB [01:15:00] Farewells Congratulations to Salissa Souto for successfully guessing today's episode in the telegram group! - https://t.me/mikhailapeterson​​ #Homeschooling #Parenting #Education #EchoChambers #CRT

The Round Table: A Next Generation Politics Podcast

At this week's Round Table, Inica, Jack, Kenisha, and Madeline spoke with Charles Tocci, Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education at Loyola University Chicago. Professor Tocci's work explores the connections between American education and democracy in the past and in the present–so as you can imagine, we had a vibrant conversation. We talked about what makes for good civic education–and how often the reality of what's on offer falls short of that. Civics has many facets and many features. We agreed that a good civics class should focus on power: how do we access, exercise, and share power? What role do each of us play? How do we make decisions that address the common good? How can we have a collective mindset that makes us feel powerful rather than powerless and rudderless? We agreed that highlighting that we all have a relationship to power—through whether or not we vote, through writing to council members, etc–and reflecting upon how we participate in and circulate power, both currently and over the course of our lives, should be central. As young people, we often don't see ourselves pictured in government—but we should: we are the missing link. Charlie shared that the bar is often lower than we might think: if 13 constituents reach out to a legislator about an issue, that legislator will often investigate. That said, another key civics lesson we discussed is that you're going to lose. A lot. It's important to build civic persistence and resilience if we aspire to be lifelong change-makers. We need to play the long game, and collectively imagine new ways to do politics. Thank you for joining us! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message

Design Lab with Bon Ku
EP 54: Designing for Inclusivity | Grace Jun

Design Lab with Bon Ku

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 36:35


Grace Jun is the CEO of a Smithsonian National award-winning nonprofit organization called Open Style Lab and Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia where she researches creative practices that are inclusive of disability, which manifests into outcomes such as accessible graphic design and adaptive fashion. Grace's commitment to designing with disability groups is reflected in her latest publication, Universal Materiality, and an anticipated book on fashion & disability to be released for 2023. Grace has been featured in Forbes, New York Times Style, and recently the Washington Post. From the White House to ABC Channel News, Grace has been asked to speak about disability and design in numerous settings around the world. She is a proud alumnus of both Parsons School of Design and RISD majoring in Design & Technology (MFA) and Graphic Design (BFA) respectively. Grace has previously held positions as a UX Designer at Samsung Electronics and as an Assistant Professor at The New School, Parsons School of Fashion. A recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts, Grace also serves on jury committees and organizations that advance the arts & design. Bon and Grace talk about co-design, the definition of inclusivity and why accessible design is better design.

The Common Good Podcast
Dr. Tom Nelson shares encouragement from his book, “The Flourishing Pastor,” Dr. Dalene Joy Fisher discusses her book, “Resisting the Marriage Plot,” and Brian and Aubrey talk about the importance of kindness - January 5, 2022

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 55:25


(00:00-8:23): Brian and Aubrey talked about the following articles: “Chicago students miss out on remote and in-person learning after a deadlock between the teachers union and school district” “No Way to Grow Up” (8:23-25:42): Dr. Tom Nelson, Founder & Lead Senior Pastor of Christ Community Church and President of Made To Flourish, joined Brian and Aubrey to talk about his new book, “The Flourishing Pastor: Recovering the Lost Art of Shepherd Leadership.” Learn more about Tom and his work at madetoflourish.org and connect with Made to Flourish on Twitter @madetoflourish (25:42-37:00): Dr. Dalene Joy Fisher is Assistant Provost, Dean, and Assistant Professor of English at Oklahoma Wesleyan University, joined Brian and Aubrey to talk about her new book, “Resisting the Marriage Plot.” Learn more about Dalene's book at ivpress.com and dalenejoy.com and connect with her on Twitter @DaleneJoy (37:00-46:19): Brian and Aubrey discussed Kirk Cameron and Candace Cameron Bure's conversation on kindness on TBN's Takeaways with Kirk Cameron. (46:19-55:25): Brian and Aubrey shared their thoughts on an excerpt from Ruth Chou Simons' book, “When Strivings Cease: Replacing the Gospel of Self-Improvement with the Gospel of Life-Transforming Grace.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 228: Celebrating Haitian Independence w/Dr. Paul Mocombe

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 109:36


It is Independence Day! Haitian Independence Day of course! Pascal talks to Paul Mocombe about the Haitian Revolution, its origins, its development, and its legacy.   Paul C. Mocombe is a Haitian philosopher and sociologist. A former Visiting Professor of Philosophy and Sociology at Bethune Cookman University, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Sociology at West Virginia State University, and the President/CEO of The Mocombeian Foundation, Inc., he is interested in the application of his theories of phenomenological structuralism and consciousness field theory to contemporary issues such as the constitution of consciousness, race, class, and capitalism (globalization).   Dr. Mocombe, who for ten years argued for the newly found fifth force of nature, which he posits is associated with consciousness in the multiverse, is the author of, among many others, The Theory of Phenomenological Structuralism; Haitian Epistemology; Identity and Ideology in Haiti; Jesus and the Streets; Race and Class Distinctions Within Black Communities; Language, Literacy, and Pedagogy in Postindustrial Societies; A labor Approach to the Development of the Self or Modern Personality: The Case of Public Education, Education in Globalization; Mocombe's Reading Room Series; and The Mocombeian Strategy: The Reason for, and Answer to Black Failure in Capitalist Education.   Dr. Mocombe currently lives in Lauderhill, Florida with his wife, Tiara S. Mocombe. www.paulcmocombe.info www.readingroomcurriculum.com www.mocombeian.com   About TIR Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron-only programming, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now: https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents   Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, especially YouTube!   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast   Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast & www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   Pascal Robert in Black Agenda Report: https://www.blackagendareport.com/author/PascalRobert   Read Jason's Work here:  https://jasonmyles.medium.com/   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com   Get the music from the show here: https://bitterlakeoakland.bandcamp.com/   Follow Djene Bajalan @djenebajalan Follow Kuba Wrzesniewski @DrKuba2

The Two Cities
Episode #102 - Asian-American Representation in Film with Abel Vang

The Two Cities

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 67:40


In this episode we discuss Asian-American Representation in Film with Abel Vang. Abel Vang is an awarded independent film producer, director, writer, and Assistant Professor of Entertainment Producing at Biola University. Some of his major film credits include: What Lies Below, Bedeviled, and the forthcoming, They Live In The Grey. Over the course of the conversation, Abel gives us loads of firsthand insight into the complex challenges that Asian-Americans face in the film industry. He recounts many of the struggles that he has experienced personally, but notes some of the progress that he's seen in recent years in the industry, and highlights how he puts his hope in God in order to continue persevering in his desire to see more Asian-American representation in film. Team members on the episode from The Two Cities include: Dr. Grace Sangalang Ng, Dr. Chris Porter, and Dr. Kris Song.

This Academic Life
Ep.23 – The Adventures of Faculty Sabbatical Leave

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 26:37


Sabbatical for academic professors is a sacred opportunity to rejuvenate research ideas and initiate research collaborations. In this episode, we talk about the history and various forms of sabbatical. We also share how we planned and made our own sabbaticals as meaningful enrichment experiences.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  Useful Resources and References: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabbatical  https://blog.trello.com/sabbatical-leave http://inside.scrippscollege.edu/grants/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/sabbatical-funding.pdf https://www.universityaffairs.ca/features/feature-article/the-changing-sabbatical/ Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

ASRA News
How I Do It: Scalp Blocks for the Neuroanesthesiologist

ASRA News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 10:21


"How I Do It: Scalp Blocks for the Neuroanesthesiologist," by Cassandra Dean, MD, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology; and Alexander Papangelou, MD, Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Division Chief of Neuroanesthesiology; both of Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. From ASRA Pain Medicine News, November 2021. See original article at www.asra.com/asra-news for figures and references. This material is copyrighted. 

Sickboy
Routine Checkup: The Opioid Epidemic - Not Ending Any Time Soon

Sickboy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 55:28


Dr. Michael L. Barnett is Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a primary care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital. His research focuses on high-risk medications and the organization of primary and specialty care. This week he joins the fellas to talk about the opioid epidemic that continues to ravage the United States and what needs to change in order for us to see light at the end of the tunnel. There are many huge gaps in the addiction treatment system in the U.S. — reliance on abstinence-based therapy, low provider supply, unwillingness to address uninsurance or housing as a major issue. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

Sickboy
Routine Checkup: The Opioid Epidemic - Not Ending Any Time Soon

Sickboy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 55:28


Dr. Michael L. Barnett is Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a primary care physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital. His research focuses on high-risk medications and the organization of primary and specialty care. This week he joins the fellas to talk about the opioid epidemic that continues to ravage the United States and what needs to change in order for us to see light at the end of the tunnel. There are many huge gaps in the addiction treatment system in the U.S. — reliance on abstinence-based therapy, low provider supply, unwillingness to address uninsurance or housing as a major issue. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

Ancient Faith Today Live
Reception of Adult Converts. Historical Precedents and Contemporary Practices

Ancient Faith Today Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 67:12


Fr. Thomas welcomes Fr. Alexander Rentel, Assistant Professor of Canon Law at St Vladimir's Orthodox Theological Seminary, to discuss the way converts are received into the Orthodox Church. What does ancient Church history teach us and how does it inform our current practices? Why are there varying practices within the Orthodox Church?

InspirED School Marketers SPARKCAST
How To Be A Leader In An Independent School

InspirED School Marketers SPARKCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 48:15


Dr. Carrie Grimes is an Assistant Professor of the Practice in the Leadership, Policy, and Organizations department and also serves as the Director of the Independent School Leadership Master's program at Vanderbilt University. She completed her Ed.D. in Leadership and Learning in Organizations, where her research focused on social identity and community within school settings. Carrie's career has been centered in independent school leadership, including roles in administration, teaching, counseling, and institutional advancement in schools and programs in New York, California, and Maryland. Throughout her career, she has focused on community building, imaginative problem solving, and cross-team collaboration across a wide range of stakeholder groups including toddlers through adolescents, parents, adult learners, donors, and alumni. Carrie has a B.A. in English from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.A. in Applied Psychology from New York University. For show notes, visit InspirED School Marketers website.

20-Minute Health Talk
Top 5 medical innovations of 2021

20-Minute Health Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 20:03


The advent of the Covid-19 vaccines propelled us into 2021 and put a spotlight on the critical role of research and clinical trials. In this episode we spotlight five innovations coming out of the last year from researchers at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. The innovations aim to improve life for patients living with paralysis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disease, Covid-19, brain cancer and PTSD.   Chapters:   00:42 – Treating PTSD with inner-ear stimulation – Dr. Rebecca Schwartz and Dr. Theodoros Zanos  04:13 – Virtual trials – Dr. Christina Brennan and Dr. Mark Butler  08:30 – Artificial intelligence to help diagnose schizophrenia – Dr. Sunny Tang  11:17 – Restoring movement in paralyzed patients – Chad Bouton   13:30 – Treating glioblastoma with belly fat – Dr. John Boockvar    16:33 – Northwell's Top 5 moments in 2021   In a bonus segment, we reflect on Northwell Health's most newsworthy moments, including the release of The First Wave Documentary; the Northwell Health Nurse Choir competes on America's Got Talent; the 20th anniversary of 9/11; the authorization on Covid-19 vaccinations for children; and the anniversary of the first Covid-19 vaccination in the U.S.     Meet our guests:  Rebecca Schwartz, PhD, associate investigator, Institute of Health System Science at Feinstein Institutes and Director, Research and Evaluation, Northwell Center for Traumatic Stress, Resilience and Recovery  Theodoros Zanos, PhD, assistant professor, Institute of Bioelectronic Medicine, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research and Assistant Professor, Molecular Medicine, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell  Christina Brennan, MD, MBA, vice president of clinical research at Northwell Health's Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research  Mark Butler, PhD, assistant investigator, Center for Personalized Health, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research  Sunny Tang, MD, assistant professor, Institute of Behavioral Science, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research and Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell  Chad Bouton, professor, Institute of Bioelectronic Medicine, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Vice President, Advanced Engineering, Northwell Health, and Professor, Molecular Medicine, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell  John Boockvar, MD, professor, Feinstein Center for Neuroscience and Laboratory for Brain Tumor Biology and Therapy, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Co-Director, Brain Tumor Biotech Center, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, and Vice Chair, Department of Neurosurgery, Lenox Hill Hospital   Watch episodes of 20-Minute Health Talk on YouTube. 

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP93: Part II: Four Tips for Caregivers of a Person Living with Alzheimer's Disease with Shimoda Donna Emanuel

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 18:15


Artist Shimoda Emanuel rearranged her life when she had to take care of her 95-year young mom with Alzheimer's. Changing her whole way of doing things wasn't easy; she was freaking out, losing sleep, feeling like her time wasn't hers anymore.  Determined to make a change, she found better ways of implementing a healthy lifestyle of art, laughter and music into caregiving. This is a 2-part series on Caring for the Person Living with Alzheimer's Disease.  ---------------------------------------------------------------- ✔️ Main Point 1: Getting Out of Overwhelm - A strategy Shimoda shares is first to pick up the phone and talk to somebody. At times you need to vent even without finding solutions. Just let it out. - Release your emotions by writing it all out, making drawings or even putting on some rock music, just dancing as another way of releasing overwhelm.  ---------------------------------------------------------------- ✔️ Main Point 2: Role of the Support Team - Sometimes, it's easy to become pretty isolated if you're a caregiver and feel like people have forgotten about you or that they don't care. Other people help lighten the load. The Alzheimer's Association has a 24-hour support line 1-800-272-3900.  - Be sure to tap into resources and other communities across the country with support groups to help people get connected because you need help.  ---------------------------------------------------------------- ✔️ Main Point 3: Getting Affairs in Order - Understand the value that it's never too early to have that talk with mom and dad. Getting their affairs in order is highly important to avoid facing problems with legalities in the future. - Having someone to help walk you through it in fulfilling major papers. It's a lot to do and will trigger overwhelm.  Resource: https://cameronhuddleston.com/resources/  You can find the In Case of Emergency Organizer, a 26-page document that takes you through everything you need to have in place.  ---------------------------------------------------------------- ✔️ Main Point 4: Doctors Appointments - Find a company that will have a car service ready to pick you up. Schedule that considering how long your loved one with Alzheimer's takes time to get dressed, eat, and prepare.  - Make sure that medications are ready; bring a snack, a magazine, something for them to play or be occupied with while waiting.  - Keep a bag packed that you could grab and go when you have to go to the emergency room.  Shimoda Donna Emanuel is a mixed media artist living in Harlem, N.Y. She grew up influenced by her artistic parents.  Shimoda Accessories has a range of work that includes intuitive jewelry and fiber art.  Her art has been on HGTV, covers of Essence magazine and other various publications. She is honored to have her art available for purchase at The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture gift shop. As her sister's caregiver and a 96-year young mom with Alzheimer's, Shimoda decided to create 'Sacred Stitches: The Art of Caregiving.' This colorful book offers tips for other caregivers. She found solutions that worked for her with creative exercises, rituals and more.  Shimoda also published 'Sacred Stitches: Fiber Art Dolls for the Soul' and 'Sacred Stitches, an inspirational 25-piece card deck. Shimoda, husband and mom were recently filmed for an Alzheimer documentary that will air in the near future. Link to all the Care Givers Items  Book & Paper — Shimoda Accessories (shimoda-accessories.com) Book   Sacred Stitches: The Art of Care Giving Tips for Stitching Yourself Together When Caring for Someone with Alzheimer's Link NEW BOOK! Sacred Stitches: The Art of Care Giving - Tips for Stitching Yourself Together When Caring for Someone with Alzheimer's — Shimoda Accessories (shimoda-accessories.com) Notecards   Sacred Stitches – Caregivers Need Love Also  Link Sacred Stitches - Caregivers Need Love Note Cards — Shimoda Accessories (shimoda-accessories.com) 25 Card Deck   Sacred Stitches – Your Intuitive Wisdom Guide Connecting You to Focus, Clarity & Peace Link Sacred Stitches: A 25-Card Deck — Shimoda Accessories (shimoda-accessories.com)   --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.  About Melissa Batchelor, Ph.D., RN, FNP-BC, FGSA, FAAN: I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my Ph.D. in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 and led to me joining the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the GW Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.

New Books in Latino Studies
Sonia Hernández and John Morán González, "Reverberations of Racial Violence: Critical Reflections on the History of the Border" (U Texas Press, 2021)

New Books in Latino Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 42:39


In the wake of protests and marches for racial and gender justice in the twenty-first century, scholars have located and argued that racial violence has been embedded in the very fabric of the United States since its inception. In Drs. Sonia Hernández and John Morán González recent anthology, Reverberations of Racial Violence: Critical Reflections on the History of the Border (U Texas Press, 2021), the editors and contributors cement the issue that state-sanctioned violence affected the Mexican community in the Texas-Mexico borderlands. The volume brings together eminent researchers of Mexican American and borderlands studies to showcase the varying ways the Tejana/o community navigated and challenged state-encouraged violence in the early twentieth century. The book consists of fourteen essays to illustrate the formation of the Refusing to Forget collective, the influence that the Texas Rangers held in Texas, lynching and extralegal violence in Mexico and the United States, educational justice, the Idar family, J.T. Canales and his 1919 investigation into the Texas Ranger Force, intergenerational trauma, public memory and public history exhibits, family history in South Texas, and the legacies of violence. The volume is a critical addition to Latina/o/x and borderlands studies, given its thoughtful and exceptionally argued premise that the reverberations of racial violence extend well into the Southwest region of the United States. Tiffany González is an Assistant Professor of History at James Madison University. She is a historian of Chicana/Latinx history, American politics, and social movements. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latino-studies

Expositors Collective
Character Formation And Biblical Interpretation - Andreas Köstenberger

Expositors Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 56:56


Andreas Köstenberger speaks with Mike Neglia on a broad range of topics related to personal formation and Bible study and proclamation.You will hear about:The formative role that both the joy of family and marriage have played as well as the pain of betrayal have formed him as a Bible teacher.The value of Biblical Theology in understanding individual texts as part of the bigger picture.Esther as a Joseph-like delivererThe types of quotations that preachers should use in their sermonsThe right and wrong way to use commentariesAll that, plus NF, Kanye West and TikTok![Originally released in April of 2021]Resources Mentioned: God Marriage and Family - https://www.crossway.org/books/god-marriage-and-family-tpb-1/New Studies in Biblical Theology - https://www.ivpress.com/new-studies-in-biblical-theologyEvangelical Biblical Theology Commentary: https://lexhampress.com/product/194957/evangelical-biblical-theology-commentary-part-1TableTalk Magazine: https://tabletalkmagazine.com/ Related Episodes:Steven Wellum (Christ from beginning to end) : https://www.expositorscollective.com/podcast/2018/11/20/episode-22-preaching-christ-from-beginning-to-end Rafael Manzanares (The Power and Danger of Personal Illustrations) : https://www.expositorscollective.com/podcast/2020/2/24/zj3d28nijrb4moagh63yp2znkqhijs David Guzik (The Character of the Expositor) https://www.expositorscollective.com/podcast/2019/6/4/episode-50-the-character-of-the-expositor Andreas Köstenberger is Research Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology and Director of the Center for Biblical Studies at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is also the Founder of Biblical Foundations,™ an organization devoted to encouraging a return to the biblical foundations in the home, the church, and society.Dr. Köstenberger is a leading evangelical scholar and prolific author. He has authored, edited, or translated close to fifty books, including God, Marriage, and Family; A Theology of John's Gospel; Excellence; and the commentary on 1-2 Timothy and Titus in the Biblical Theology for Christian Proclamation series. He also serves as editor of the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society. In 2007, he was elected by the Governing Body to a 5-year term as Visiting Fellow at St. Edmund's College in Cambridge, England.Dr. Köstenberger is originally from Vienna, Austria and received a masters and doctorate in social and economic sciences at the Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien (Vienna University of Economics) in 1980 and 1982. He subsequently earned his M.Div. from Columbia Biblical Seminary & Graduate School of Missions in Columbia, South Carolina (1988) and his Ph.D. from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois (1993). He has received multiple honors and awards, including the Award for Scholarly Productivity at TEDS (1996), the Presidential Appreciation Award at SEBTS (2002), the Wayne Grudem Award for Complementarian Scholarship (with wife Margaret, 2014), and Christian Retailing's Best Award in the category of Evangelism for his book Truth Matters (2015).Having served in a variety of roles in multiple academic settings—Senior Research Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Assistant Professor of New Testament at Trinity International University, Professor of Biblical Studies and Theology at Briercrest Bible College, and more—Dr. Köstenberger moved to Kansas City in 2018 to serve the community at Midwestern Seminary. He and his wife Margaret have four children: Lauren, Tahlia, David, and Timothy. The Expositors Collective podcast is part of the GoodLion podcast network, for more thought provoking Christian podcasts visit https://goodlion.io

EM Pulse Podcast™
2021: Looking back and moving forward

EM Pulse Podcast™

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 26:12


Happy New Year! Well, 2021 may not have been quite the year we hoped for, and 2022 is off to a bit of a rough start with the omicron variant.  But we've been fortunate to have some amazing guests on the podcast and we've learned a lot - we hope you have, too! In this episode, we follow up with experts from some of the episodes that really stuck with us. We get updates on COVID vaccinations for kids, vaccine mandates, long haul COVID, and trauma informed care. Wishing you all good health in the new year, and cheers to another year of EM Pulse! What was your favorite episode of 2021? What topics would you like to hear on the podcast? Hot is up on social media, @empulsepodcast, on email empulsepodcast@gmail.com, or through our website, ucdavisem.com. ***Please rate us and leave us a review on iTunes! It helps us reach more people.*** Hosts: Dr. Julia Magaña, Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at UC Davis Dr. Sarah Medeiros, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at UC Davis Guests: Dr. Dean Blumberg, Professor and Chief of Pediatric Infectious Disease at UC Davis, Co-Host of the Kids Considered Podcast Dr. Hunter Pattison, Emergency Medicine Health Policy Research Fellow at UC Davis and Advocacy Fellow for California ACEP Dr. Larissa May, Professor of Emergency Medicine with a Masters in Emerging Infectious Diseases, and Director of Emergency Department Antibiotic Stewardship at UC Davis. Dr. Angela Jarman, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and Sex and Gender Researcher at UC Davis Dr. Bryn Mumma, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Co-Chair of the Human Trafficking Workgroup at UC Davis Resources: The Long Haul, January 17, 2021 Trauma Informed Care 101, May 16 2021 A Mandate for Health, October 17, 2021 COVID-19 Kids Vaccine Considered, November 3, 2021 *** Thank you to the UC Davis Department of Emergency Medicine for supporting this podcast and to Orlando Magaña at OM Audio Productions for audio production services.

Sigma Nutrition Radio
#420: Cannabis – Kevin Boehnke, PhD & Carrie Cuttler, PhD

Sigma Nutrition Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 81:02


Kevin Boehnke is a researcher at the University of Michigan, in the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center. His current research focuses on therapeutic applications of illicit or semi-licit substances (cannabis, psychedelics). His goal is to rigorously assess appropriate use of these substances and to help address the public health harms caused by their criminalization. Carrie Cuttler is an Assistant Professor at Washington State University. Her research at the Health and Cognition Laboratory there focuses on elucidating the potentially beneficial and detrimental effects of chronic cannabis use and acute cannabis intoxication. Her recent work has focused on examining links between cannabis use and mental health (e.g., ADHD, PTSD, OCD, depression, anxiety). Show notes available at sigmanutrition.com/episode420/

ManTalks Podcast
Lara Aknin - The Science Of Happiness

ManTalks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 52:14


It's more important than ever to ground healing work with expertise, careful research, and study. Otherwise, it's basically just cheerleading. This is why I brought on one of Canada's best social psychologists, Lara Aknin. Lara's work centers on not just what makes people happy, but what keeps them happy: gratitude, reminding yourself and others of shared connections and community, and more. Obviously, the pandemic shut out a lot of ways we cultivate connection and community—at least physically. So I wanted Lara to share some scientific grounding on how covid has affected anxiety and depression rates, stress levels, and mental resiliency in general. Lara Beth Aknin is a Canadian social psychologist. She is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Simon Fraser University and a Distinguished University Professor. After earning her Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia, Aknin joined the faculty of psychology at Simon Fraser University in 2012. That year, she published Giving Leads to Happiness in Young Children with J. Kiley Hamlin and Elizabeth Dunn, which supported the idea that humans may have evolved to find giving rewarding. In 2014, Lara and her colleagues Michael Norton and Elizabeth Dunn co-published a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and CIHR funded review of whether spending money had a positive effect on people's happiness. The following year, her contributions to the field of social psychology earned her the President's New Researcher Award from the Canadian Psychological Association and a fellowship at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. By 2019, she received an SSHRC grant for her project, Can Repeated and Reflective Giving Nurture Canada's Next Generation of Philanthropists? She was also honored by the university for her research and contributions to social Psychology with the title of Distinguished SFU Professor. During the pandemic, she has served as Chair of the Mental Health and Wellbeing Task Force of the Lancet COVID-19 Commission. She also serves as an associate editor of the World Happiness Report. Connect with Lara: -Website: https://www.sfu.ca/psychology/about/people/profiles/laknin.html -Twitter: https://twitter.com/lbaknin -Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=6a21v6wAAAAJ     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Run the List
Episode 69: Asthma & Social Determinants of Health

Run the List

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 24:16


Dr. Jefferson, an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the division of Allergy & Immunology and bioethicist at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, discusses the care of both pediatric and adult patients with asthma with host Dr. Walker Redd. Together, they define asthma and cover its triggers, diagnosis, and stepwise therapy plans. They also discuss how upstream factors - from environmental exposures to housing issues - can both exacerbate and affect access to appropriate care for patients with asthma.

Maryland CC Project
Krutsinger – Nudging Critical Care Research Enrollment in the Setting of Historic Abuses, Present Disparities, and Systemic Racism

Maryland CC Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 48:41


Dr. Dustin Krutsinger is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Krutsinger presents a lecture on "Nudging Critical Care Research Enrollment in the Setting of Historic Abuses, Present Disparities, and Systemic Racism" as part of the DEI lecture series.

Causing The Effect
160 Health Science with Dr. Christopher Swart

Causing The Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 48:43


Dr. Christopher Swart is the Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at Endicott College with his PhD in Exercise Physiology. His instagram is @doctor.swart.If you enjoyed the podcast please rate, subscribe and share with your friends!Follow Scott on Instagram for more here. www.instagram.com/causingtheeffectpodcastYou can email Scott @ causingtheeffectpodcast@gmail.com

The Clinical Problem Solvers
Episode 216: The Consult Question #5 – Vision Loss

The Clinical Problem Solvers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 44:57


Doug presents an unknown case of vision loss to Dr. Cherayil, Lindsey and Dan.    Dr. Neena Cherayil. Dr. Cherayil is an Assistant Professor of Neurology in the Departments of Neurology and Ophthalmology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. She completed her neurology residency followed by a neuro-ophthalmology fellowship at the… Read More »Episode 216: The Consult Question #5 – Vision Loss

The Peter Attia Drive
Iñigo San Millán, Ph.D.: Zone 2 Training and Metabolic Health (Ep. #85 Rebroadcast)

The Peter Attia Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 170:56


Today's episode of The Drive is a rebroadcast of the conversation with Iñigo San Millán, (released on December 23rd, 2019). This episode with Iñigo was one of the most popular discussions to date and is a prelude to an upcoming follow-up discussion in 2022. In this episode, Dr. Iñigo San Millán, Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains the crucial role of mitochondrial function in everything from metabolic health to elite exercise performance. Iñigo provides a masterclass into the many different energy system pathways, the various fuel sources (including the misunderstood lactate), the six zones of exercise training, and the parameters he uses to measure metabolic health. Additionally, he highlights the power of zone 2 training as both an effective diagnostic tool and, perhaps more importantly, as a treatment for mitochondrial and metabolic dysfunction. We discuss: Iñigo's background in sports and decision to focus on education [3:45]; The various energy systems and fuels used during exercise [11:15]; Iñigo's qualification of energy systems into six training zones [19:30]; Lactate as an important fuel source [29:30]; Zone 2 training—physiologic characteristics, fuel sources, lactate, and the transition into zone 3 [37:00]; Using blood lactate levels (and zone-2 threshold) to assess mitochondrial function [43:30]; Accessing mitochondrial function by testing one's ability to utilize fat as fuel [51:30]; Athletes vs. metabolically ill patients—mitochondria, fat oxidation, muscle glycogen capacity, “fat droplets”, and more [56:30]; Physiologic characteristics of zone 3, zone 4, and the lactate threshold [1:16:30]; Fueling exercise—dietary implications on glycolytic function [1:27:00]; Relationship between exercise and insulin sensitivity (and what we can learn from studying patients with type 1 diabetes) [1:43:00]; Metformin's impact on mitochondrial function, lactate production, and how this affects the benefits of exercise [2:00:45]; Raising awareness of the risk of “double diabetes” [2:11:30]; How to dose zone 2 training, and balancing exercise with nutrition [2:14:30]; Proposed explanation of the Warburg Effect: Role of lactate in carcinogenesis [2:23:30]; Doping in cycling, and the trend towards altitude training [2:35:45] and; More. View the Show Notes Page for This EpisodeBecome a Member to Receive Exclusive ContentLearn More About Peter AttiaSign Up to Receive Peter's Weekly NewsletterConnect With Peter on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook & YouTube