Podcasts about Northern California

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Region of the U.S. state of California

  • 4,029PODCASTS
  • 7,233EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 19, 2022LATEST
Northern California

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Best podcasts about Northern California

Show all podcasts related to northern california

Latest podcast episodes about Northern California

Let It Roll
TechnoRoll 3.4: Rave and Early Internet Culture Rose Together in the Bay Area in the Early 90s

Let It Roll

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 58:33


Hosts Nate Wilcox and Ryan Harkness talk about Matos' interpretation of the early days of Rave culture in Northern California in the early 1990s. Have a question or a suggestion for a topic or person for Nate to interview? Email letitrollpodcast@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter. Follow us on Facebook. Let It Roll is proud to be part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

How Do You Write
Ep, 303: Josephine Smith on How to Launch Your Writing Career Fast with Four Books in a Year

How Do You Write

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 42:18


Rachael talks to Josephine Smith about how to launch a career, fast, and answers some bonus questions about indie publishing! Josephine Smith is a cozy mystery author with a love of hot cups of tea, tricky puzzles, and spending Sunday afternoons with a good book. She lives in Northern California with her husband, dog, and cat, and they all get along most of the time. The Hemlock Inn mysteries is her current series, featuring a charming inn, two senior citizen sidekicks, and an adorable beagle named Lola.How Do You Write Podcast: Explore the processes of working writers with bestselling author Rachael Herron. Want tips on how to write the book you long to finish? Here you'll gain insight from other writers on how to get in the chair, tricks to stay in it, and inspiration to get your own words flowing. Join Rachael's Slack channel, Onward Writers: https://join.slack.com/t/onwardwriters/shared_invite/zt-7a3gorfm-C15cTKh_47CEdWIBW~RKwgRachael can be YOUR mini-coach, and she'll answer all your questions on the show! http://patreon.com/rachael See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Real Estate UnSalesperson
Unleash Your Showing Super Power with Roseann Galvan

The Real Estate UnSalesperson

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 44:08


#132 - In real estate, I don't think there is anything more satisfying than seeing a big smile develop on your buyer's face as they fall in love with their dream home that you helped them discover. That's what it's all about – bringing joy to our clients and helping them achieve their goals!Despite having success working with buyers, I know that my showing skills can use a lot of improvement. On this episode of The Real Estate UnSalesperson podcast, you will learn to unleash your showing super power with Roseann Galvan. Whether you are new to the business or experienced, you will learn a lot from this episode to better assist your buyer clients  and get fired up to get out there to show and sell more homes!Meet Roseann GalvanRoseann Galvan has always been obsessed with talking—she likes to talk, she likes to watch and listen to other people talk, and she loves to talk about talking. She also loves business—and shoes—and real estate. She speaks, writes and podcasts about….wait for it…talking! Talking at work, talking in business and talking in real estate. She earned a Master's Degree in Communications, is a trained commercial mediator and holds a California Real Estate Salesperson license. She lives in Northern California with her husband, five children, a sassy German Shepherd, two cranky bearded dragons and random foster dogs. She has written a great book called Showing Super Power. Get it and connect with Roseann at ShowingSuperPower.com.Join The UnSalesperson Community!Would you like to connect with fellow unsalesy Realtors and introverts in real estate and learn how they are doing it, share ideas on creating a great business in an unsalesy manner, get inspiration and motivation?I have created the UnSalesperson Community! Unlike the mass market advice, here's your unique opportunity to learn from like minded people. Bounce ideas off of them and me. Some of the guests who have been on my podcast are in this community.Click here for more info.Support the show

Internet Archive - Collection: ubradio_salon
UBRadio Salon #748 - DFM netcast 15 May 2022 - Outside My Bedroom Window (03)

Internet Archive - Collection: ubradio_salon

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


2-hours of live improvised experimental radio sound-art broadcast live from the Chakra Chimp Research Kitchens of Northern California-land.  Netcast on DFM Radio Television International (www.dfm.nu), 10 APR 2022....This item belongs to: audio/ubradio_salon.This item has files of the following types: AIFF, Archive BitTorrent, Columbia Peaks, Item Tile, JPEG, JPEG Thumb, Metadata, PNG, Spectrogram, VBR MP3

TNT Radio
John O'Connor on Misty Winston Show - 19 May 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 55:59


GUEST OVERVIEW: John O'Connor, is author of Postgate: How the Washington Post Betrayed Deep Throat, Covered Up Watergate, and Began Today's Partisan Advocacy Journalism and host of The Mysteries of Watergate Podcast. He served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in Northern California representing the United States in both criminal and civil cases.

Two Chicks and a Horror Flick

In this episode we have a blast talking about the movie Unfriended with the amazing duo from The Horror Bandwagon podcast!! We talk about all the aspects of the movie we loved and some we didn't love so much. A scary film with an impactful topic, we all would recommend you give it a watch if you haven't already. Tangents include: Terrifier, chonies, Northern California slang, Child's Play, Child's Play, and a little more Child's Play!Thanks again to The Horror Bandwagon for joining us! Head over to their podcast ASAP and give it a follow and listen!Unfriended (2014)Director: Levan GabriadzeTawny's rating: 3.25/5Felicia's rating: 3/5Sergio's rating: 4/5Cody's rating: 3/5WE ARE NOW ON PATREON!Support the show and get exclusive perks by being a patron! https://www.patreon.com/twochicksandahorrorflick?fan_landing=trueBe a part of the conversation!Join our horror community on Discord: https://discord.gg/8WBByTQPFXWatch us on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnzdvNtFn92f5wM3uTFvThQDon't forget to connect with us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/twochicksandahorrorflickYou can also always send us your reviews, thoughts, and recommendations by emailing us at twochicksandahorrorflick@gmail.com or visit our site https://www.twochicksandahorrorflick.com/Support the show

Great Moments in Weed History w/ Abdullah and Bean
We Helped Judge A Prestigious Weed Contest!

Great Moments in Weed History w/ Abdullah and Bean

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 50:45


The Emerald Cup began in 2003 as an underground locals-only harvest celebration among outdoor organic cannabis growers in Northern California's famed Emerald Triangle. They kept the first-ever contest a secret from the sheriff by pretending it was a birthday party. Today, the Emerald Cup is the world's most prestigious cannabis competition, drawing 30,000+ pot-lovers to a "state fair for weed" complete with its own awards show. And this year Abdullah and Bean both participated in the judging process! So roll one up and settle in for an incredible ride. Along the way you'll learn how to judge cannabis for yourself (without becoming judgmental),, discover some of the best flower, concentrates, edibles, topicals, tinctures and weed drinks on the market, and get inspired to host your own weed cup at home! Episode also includes a special appearance from Woody Harrelson, some serious terp-talk thanks to SC Labs, and a big shout out to Emerald Cup impresarios Tim and Taylor Blake. SPONSORED BY EMJAY DELIVERY If you'd like to try California's best cannabis yourself, without leaving home, head over to Emjay Delivery and remember to use promo code GREATMOMENTS (all one word) for 10% off your first order, 15% off your second order, and 20% off your third order. Abdullah and Bean both highly recommend this excellent service with incredible cannabis and unbeatable prices. EPISODE ARCHIVE Visit our Great Moments in Weed History podcast feed for 60+ episodes of our classic format, and subscribe now to get a new weekly podcast every Weednesday. PATREON Please support Great Moments in Weed HIstory on Patreon. Supporters get exclusive access to video versions of this podcast and private seshes, plus cool rewards like a signed book. And it truly helps us make the best show possible. 

Obsessed with Wine
The Daily Taste: Wednesday May 18th, 2022 - The Dos and Don'ts of Winetasting.....

Obsessed with Wine

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 4:59


DO:1 - Show up on time! We realize most people are on vacation and relaxing, but Napa Valley sees a lot of people. If you know you're going to be late, call and see if accommodations can be made but know that everyone operates on a tight schedule and reservations are there for a reason. Wine countries are pretty spread out so understand how long it will take to get from point A to point B.2 - Ask questions! Don't be afraid to learn!  The staff at the winery is there to make sure you have a great experience, and they are very knowledgeable so if you are curious about a wine or a winemaking technique, please ask.  This is one thing I don't have a problem with.  My wife hates it because I like to ask a ton of questions but in return, I get a lot of great information.  3 - Understand that you are at a tasting not a bar. If you want to be loud and drink a lot, there are plenty of wonderful bars and restaurants that would cater to you. When you are at a winery you are there to taste and learn, so be kind to your host and be mindful of those around you!4 - Drink lots of water and make sure your eating!  Studies show that consuming food before drinking alcohol can help prevent you from getting too intoxicated too soon.  A lot of people underestimate how much wine you will be consuming while wine tasting. In the summer Northern California can push 100 degrees so make sure you are taking care of yourself and staying hydrated! No one wants to faint at a winery! 5 - Have fun! Explore! Take lots of pictures! The Wine country is a breath taking and exciting place! Enjoy your time with friend and family to take advantage of what the wine country has to offer.   Don't1 - Make too many plans. Can you do 5 wineries in a day? Yes. Should you? No. I understand a lot of people aren't sure if/when they will be back to the wine country, so they want to make the most of their time but trust me 5 wineries is a lot. Stick to 2-3 a day. Your liver and friends will thank you! 2 - Just drink wine. Get out and try something that's not wine! Mad Fritz for example, is a killer brewery up in St. Helena and there are numerous olive oil tastings available in Sonoma that also appeal to the younger members of your party. 3 - Just stay in one area. For example, there are so many beautiful towns in Northern California so don't just limit yourself to one. Napa, Yountville, St. Helena, Calistoga, Sonoma, Sebastopol, and Bodega Bay just to name a few are all places that have their own stories and unique culture. Go out and explore! 4 - Just limit yourself to big wineries or wineries that you've heard of. Do some research! Ask the locals and friends what they suggest. There are close to 500 different tasting rooms in Napa alone. Try to have a good mix of places you are familiar with and new names you have not experienced. Not only will you get a better view of the wine country and how different sized wineries operate, but you may discover your new favorite wine!5 - Forget that the most important part of your wine tasting trip is the memories and the experience! The wine, the food, and the views are all there to be had but who you're with and the memories you are making are the most important. All that matters at the end of the day is “do you like this wine or not”. So, find a wine you enjoy and drink it with the people that you like! Finally, please visit the brand new show website at www.obsessedwithwine.net and take a look around.  Make sure to click on the section at the top called wine discounts.  There you can find discounts on your favorite wines and accessories from wine.com and One Stop Wine Shop Thank you very much!  I'll see you tomorrow for another Daily Taste. Cheers! 

BADLANDS: SPORTSLAND
Winona Ryder: Drowning, Designer Theft, and a Deadly Kidnapping

BADLANDS: SPORTSLAND

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 37:53


Between beatnik parents, an LSD guru godfather, and an unconventional upbringing in Northern California, it's not surprising that Winona Ryder became America's endearing weirdo in the 1990s. Her noir starpower shined from an early age in movies like Beetlejuice, Heathers, and Edward Scissorhands, but her penchant for dark roles would lead her towards crime in real life. The only thing weirder than Winona's $5,000 shoplifting spree and the kidnapping of a girl from her own hometown is how the two stories unexpectedly intertwine.This episode contains themes that may be disturbing to some listeners, including kidnapping and child abuse.Follow BADLANDS wherever you get your podcasts to hear new episodes from season 4 each Wednesday. As a bonus, Amazon Music listeners can hear all 10 new episodes on-demand right now at amazon.com/badlands.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
Ep. 137 Brian Hunt and Patrick Rue of Moonlight Brewing

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 45:08


Last week, word got out that Patrick Rue, the founder of The Bruery in Orange County California, and more recently the founder and operator of Erosion Wines in Napa had acquired a 50 percent stake in Moonlight Brewery, a beloved northern California brewery founded 30 years ago by Brian Hunt.  Moonlight is known for its beers like Death & Taxes and Reality Czech and had been half owned by Lagunitas via Heineken for the past six years.  I first learned of the news via Beer by BART, a great site run by Gail Ann Williams and Steve Shapiro. If you're not already following them on social media, rectify that quickly.  A subsequent press release release from the brewery noted that “Patrick will serve in an advisory capacity and will direct an oak barrel-aging beer program that enhances the integrity and heritage of Moonlight.”  It continued by saying that under the Heineken co-ownership Moonlight "packaging shifted from exclusively draft to additionally offering beers in cans, and both production and distribution have grown all while keeping sales limited to Northern California.  The new ownership strengthens Moonlight's dedication to remaining locally owned. This will allow for patient growth, greater availability of its coveted beers to its fans and wholesale partners, while maintaining the deliciousness and highest quality for which Moonlight is so well known.” Press release aside, in this episode we hear from the owners directly.  This Episode is sponsored by:Cigar City Brewing Co.Check out Fancy Papers from Cigar City Brewing. With aromas of freshly cut grass and tangerine along with white wine grape and bread-like aromas, this Hazy IPA has flavors of guava, melon, and lime leaf. Brewed with Strata, Sabro, and Idaho 7 hops to draw in lovers of fruit-forward Hazy IPAs, get some today where you buy beer and learn more at cigar city brewing. com Learn more at Cigar City Brewing.com  For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and visit All About Beer. Host: John Holl Guests: Brian Hunt and Patrick Rue of Moonlight Brewing Sponsors: Cigar City Brewing, The Craft Brewery Cookbook,  All About Beer and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Ownership, California, Collaboration, Innovation, Wine

Untangled with AC Fly Fishing
Episode 22: John Brassfield - The McCloud River Outpost

Untangled with AC Fly Fishing

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 61:34


John is the co-owner of Tahoe Fly Fishing Oufitters in South Lake Tahoe California as well as the owner of the McCloud River Outpost. The Outpost is an awesome piece of land on the way to the McCloud River that John and his family have owned for years. John has worn many hats in his career and we chat about his past and what led him to where he is now. John's love for the sport is obvious and his willingness to share and promote the outdoors to others is infectious. https://www.mccloudriveroutpost.com/ https://tahoeflyfishing.com/

Mess It Up Podcast
Mess it Up Show 215 - Commensurate

Mess It Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:05


Tammy from Northern California drops in to discuss her homeless ministry with the Bow Tie Guy. Tammy looks beyond the dirt and the sadness to find the person inside as she minsters to homeless people in her area. Listen in and share the blessing. Our Song of the Week is "Big House" by Audio Adrenaline.

Monday Morning Podcast
Monday Morning Podcast 5-16-22

Monday Morning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 60:53


Bill rambles about Northern California, fasting, and home remedies. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KQED's The California Report
Bomb Plot Case In Northern California Highlights Domestic Extremism Movement

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 13:08


Last year, two Bay Area men were arrested and charged with plotting to blow up the headquarters of the California Democratic Party. Prosecutors say the men planned to launch their attack on or after inauguration day.   Reporters: Julie Small and Alex Hall, KQED   One person, an adult male, was killed and five others were wounded when a gunman opened fire at a lunch banquet at the Geneva Presbyterian Church in Laguna Woods in Orange County. The banquet was held by a largely Taiwanese-American congregation. On Saturday, thousands of people showed up in cities across California, in support of reproductive rights. This comes as the U.S. Supreme Court could vote to overturn Roe v. Wade in the coming months.

And The Writer Is...with Ross Golan
Ep. 153: Luke Steele

And The Writer Is...with Ross Golan

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 56:09


With his countless musical ventures, today's guest has defined the term reinvention. In collaborating with some of the world's largest artists to date, he has paved the way for unique creativity. From being the frontman of alternative rock band, The Sleepy Jackson to half of electronic music duo Empire of the Sun, after 20 years of music making, he now emerges with a mystic, domestic wisdom on the comparatively unadorned and transportive new debut solo album, Listen To The Water. He has always taken the road less traveled, and now that road has led to a secluded cabin on a private lake in Northern California, and the birth of a new chapter of music. “I have hard-wired myself to be in a constant state of ever-grow. I will never be satisfied. You don't make a record for no-one to hear. I want people to be captivated by it. In a way it's a life story. You want them to hear the mistakes, the wisdom, the failure but also the glory”, our guest reflects. And The Writer Is… Luke Steele!Watercolor by: Michael Richey White See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bill Handel on Demand
Handel on the News [EARLY EDITION]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 31:30


Bill Handel is joined by Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee for the Early Edition of Handel on the News. The trio discusses news topics that include: California churchgoers detained a gunman after a deadly attack, a mass-shooter in Buffalo targeted a Black neighborhood in a racist attack, and four have been arrested on account of dozens of NorCal fires set over the weekend.

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.
Sophie Minchilli ( Sweetness of Doing Nothing) The Well Seasoned Librarian Podcast Season 7 Episode 3

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:10


Bio" I am Sophie Minchilli, half American, half Italian, born and raised in Rome. I have lived here all my life except for my time at university in London. While I loved my experience there, all I could think about was Italy, Italian food, Italian people and Italian markets. I finally realized that although my body was in the UK, my heart and soul were in Italy. I think that while Italy is a country with many challenges, once you experience Italian lifestyle, it's hard to adapt to anything else. So as soon as I graduated, I moved back to Rome. I decided to entirely dedicate my life to food, in any way possible. Soon after, I started working with my mother (now business partner), leading food tours and cooking classes in Rome, Puglia and Umbria. I've recently written a book, The Sweetness of Doing Nothing: Live Life the Italian Way with Dolce Far Niente (Harper Collins April 2022) The book pulls together so much of the Italy I love to share. There are chapters on Family, Friends and Leisure and of course some of my favorite recipes. But it's mostly a very sweet book about how to incorporate the concept of Dolce Far Niente – taking the time to enjoy life – into your own routines." (From Website) Sophie Minchili's Website: https://www.sophieminchilli.com/ The Sweetness of doing Nothing on Amazon This episode is sponsored by Culinary Historians of Northern California, a Bay Area educational group dedicated to the study of food, drink, and culture in human history. To learn more about this organization and their work, please visit their website at www.chnorcal.org If you follow my podcast and enjoy it, I'm on @buymeacoffee. If you like my work, you can buy me a coffee and share your thoughts

Tent Talk
Michelle Pusateri on the stability farmers markets can bring to a CPG brand

Tent Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 39:06


This week we're joined by Michelle Pusateri, Founder and Granola Master at Nana Joes Granola. After spending years working as a pastry chef in high-end restaurants in San Francisco, Michelle set off on her own venture in 2010 and launched Nana Joes Granola at local Bay Area farmers markets. Over a decade later, Nana Joes is a multi-million dollar company and Michelle's delicious granola can be found in grocery stores all over Northern California, online and of course, still at farmers markets! Tune in to hear us chat about her move from the restaurant industry to starting her own business, the important role farmers markets play in her bottom line, and an inside look on how CPG brands are adjusting in today's current economy. This week's episode is made possible by support from Gusto.

Nature's Archive
#46: Paul Johnson - Finding and Counting Butterflies

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 51:43


Do you want to find more butterflies? Paul Johnson can help. Paul is a Wildlife Biologist at Pinnacles National Park, and a long time lepidopterist, or one who studies butterflies and moths. Paul also leads several North American Butterfly Association (NABA) butterfly counts in California, which is how I got connected with Paul in the first place, and a primary focus of this episode.Today, we discuss Paul's path to wildlife biology and butterflies. Being a wildlife biologist at a National Park sounds like a dream job to me, so I also probed a bit about that, and what makes Pinnacles National Park such a unique place. As a hint, Pinnacles is named for geologically unique spires of volcanic origin.We then turn our attention to butterflies and butterfly counts - North American Butterfly Association, or NABA, Fourth of July counts. Despite the name, these counts are held over the months of June and July. We discuss the structure and goals of the counts and how to participate. With 450 counts across North America, and most skill levels needed, there might be an opportunity for you!Paul also discusses butterfly behavior, which aside from being fascinating, is also helpful for finding them. This includes behaviors such as hilltopping, mudpuddling, and larval food plant associations.You can find Paul on iNaturalist as euproserpinus (you-pro-serpinus). And if you are interested in participating in a NABA butterfly count, check out naba.org for the count circles and count leaders (or this link for additional details for Northern California counts). Did you have a question that I didn't ask? Let me know at naturesarchivepodcast@gmail.com, and I'll try to get an answer in my monthly newsletter. If you aren't already subscribed, go here. I promise, no spam. I share the latest news from the world of Nature's Archive, as well as pointers to new naturalist finds that have crossed my radar, like podcasts, books, websites, and more. FULL SHOW NOTESPeople/OrganizationsArt Shapiro - professor at UC Davis, Dr. Shapiro has been tracking butterflies for 45+ yearsJerry Powell - UC Berkeley entomologistLiam O'Brien - lepidopterist and illustrator who is creating a butterfly guide (instagram)Xerces Society - nonprofit focused on conservation of invertebrates and their habitatsBooks/OtherHandbook for Butterfly Watchers - Robert Michael PyleThe Butterflies of North America - A Natural History and Field Guide - James ScottChecklist of Butterflies at Pinnacles National ParkRelated Podcast Episodes#28 - Milkweeds - Dr. Carrie Olson-Manning and Sydney Kreutzmann#30 - Dr. Jaret Daniels Butterflies, Creating Habitat in Overlooked Landscapes, Creative Outreach#37 - Dr. Stuart Weiss – Checkerspots, Cars, and CowsSupport the show

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.
Nick Hayward (Chef, Artist, Writer) The Well Seasoned Librarian Podcast Season 7 Episode 2

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 51:40


Bio Gourmet articles ranging from; ingredients, techniques, dishes, stories, chef highlights, and investigations. I'm an experienced professional cook in NYC. Nick Hayward lives in a loft space in The City. Covered by paintings of kitchens and architecture. Paint, Write, Food, Repeat is his motto. He's been exploring the culinary landscape of America for ten years; cooking through San Francisco, Los Angeles, and currently, NYC. He's also using his deep food knowledge to write food articles on Medium. Website link: http://www.nickhayward.co/ Instagram link: www.instagram.com/_letsmeetatthetable_ This episode is sponsored by Culinary Historians of Northern California, a Bay Area educational group dedicated to the study of food, drink, and culture in human history. To learn more about this organization and their work, please visit their website at www.chnorcal.org If you follow my podcast and enjoy it, I'm on @buymeacoffee. If you like my work, you can buy me a coffee and share your thoughts

Think Out Loud
Portland filmmakers document tree-sitting activists fight to protect northern California redwood forests

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 21:39


A group of activists known as Redwood Forest Defense has been occupying treetops in northern California as a form of non-violent protest to block the logging of redwood forests. Their struggle pits them against the Green Resource Diamond Company, which has been logging in the region since 2020. Portland-based filmmakers Lawrence Lerew and Derek Knowles directed the short film, "Sentinels," that is now streaming on the L.A. Times. They join us to talk about the making of their new film.

Local SEO in 10
My Google Reviews Disappeared⭐️

Local SEO in 10

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 17:28


Did you wake up to find all of your Google reviews missing? Oh no! What to do! Well, first thing, don't buy “guided” reviews from Fiverrrr. Next, listen to this episode to learn how to get reviews that stick! About Adam Duran, Expert with Local SEO in 10 Local SEO in 10 was created by Adam Duran, director of Magnified Media. Based in San Francisco & Walnut Creek, California, Magnified Media is an online marketing agency focused on online marketing, local SEO, website designing and qualified customer lead generation for companies of all sizes. Magnified Media helps companies take control of their marketing by: • getting their website seen at the top of Google rankings, • getting them more online reviews, and • creating media content that engages with their audience. In his spare time, Adam enjoys volunteering on the board of several community-based non-profits. About Jamie Duran, host of Local SEO in 10 Local business owner Jamie Duran is the owner of Solar Harmonics, Northern California's top-rated solar company, who invite their customers to “Own Their Energy” by purchasing a solar panel system for their home, business, or farm. You can check out the website for the top solar energy equipment installer, Solar Harmonics, here. Jamie also is the creator and panel expert of Straight-Talk Solar Cast, the world's first podcast focused on answering the questions faced by anyone considering going solar. Thanks for joining us this week! Want to subscribe to Local SEO in 10? Connect with us on iTunes and leave us a review. Have a question about Local SEO? Chances are we've covered it! Go to our podcast website and check out our search feature. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/localseoin10/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/localseoin10/support

True Hollywood Crime
Episode 69 - What Have We Done To Each Other?

True Hollywood Crime

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 94:48


On this week's episode M&B celebrate Mother's Day by diving into a case that is not only a very recent case but also takes place very close to their homes in Northern California. They're talking about the "abduction" of all-American super mom, Sherri Papini, and then review the movie that is eerily similar, 2014's Gone Girl, based on the bestselling book by Gillian Flynn. 

Jasmine and Gracie Explore the USA
Jasmine and Gracie Explore Northern California

Jasmine and Gracie Explore the USA

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 11:06


Jasmine and Gracie go up north in California and feel the power of majestic trees!  And how about a glass beach!!  Join us!

Golden State Naturalist
The Sutter Buttes (World's Smallest Mountain Range!) with Steve Roddy

Golden State Naturalist

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 62:22


Did you know that Northern California is home to the smallest mountain range in the world? It lies smack in the middle of the Sacramento Valley, and it is a hotbed for unexpected creatures and unexpected stories alike. Join me with California Naturalist, Sutter Buttes guide, and educator Steve Roddy, as we explore the heart of the Buttes and discuss what makes the place so special. How were the Buttes formed? What kinds of plants and animals live there? What was the significance of this place to California Native People? Who lives in the Buttes? Can I visit them? If it's a mountain range on land in the middle of a valley, why is it sometimes called the inland island? Links: Mosses and Lichens Bay Nature on Acorn Woodpeckers Middle Mountain Interpretive Hikes LA Times on Feral Pigs Maidu History Ringtail Infrared Video FInd me on Instagram @goldenstatenaturalist TikTok @goldenstatenaturalist My website is www.goldenstatenaturalist.com My Patreon is www.patreon.com/michellefullner The theme song is called "i dunno" by grapes. You can find the song and Creative Commons License here. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Past Lives Podcast
Paranormal Stories Ep13

The Past Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:34


Paranormal Stories episode 13This week the books are'Paranormally Speaking: Knowingly Talking to the Unknown' by Ron Yacovetti.'The Unknown Other: and the Existential Proposition of Alien Contact' by Les Velez.As you may know I produce two podcasts, the past lives podcast and the Alien UFO Podcast and it is here that I combine the two. When I have a guests on my podcasts I read their books to research and work out questions for the episodes.When reading these books I always find such fascinating information which never makes it into the podcast and here I get a chance to give you a peek into the book.I did seek permission to record these extracts from the books and the authors kindly said yes.Paranormally Speaking: Knowingly Talking to the Unknown is a philosophical and satirical straight forward insight into the post taboo world of paranormal research and investigation as told by ITC and DRV Researcher, Ron “The Yacman” Yacovetti. With an eclectic background in stand-up comedy, broadcasting and over a decade of paranormal experience, Ron takes a pull no punches approach to important and sometimes underrecognized issues such as code of conduct, evidence review, reverence for our founders, the need for continuous education as well as the critical question we should all be asking ourselves, “Why am I doing this?”.This book spotlights the mystical and methodical ways to communicate with spirits, an area of study that captured Ron's focus early on, called ITC: Instrumental Transcommunication, with an emphasis on the European methodology almost entirely absent from the TV and internet landscape of shows, known as DRV: Direct Radio Voice.Whether you read his written word, see him lecture live or watch him online as a guest on video podcasts or as a co-host of his own, “Entity Voice Paranormal Evidence” show seen on the Un-X Media Network, the depth of his research, experimentation and comedic candor will have you seeing all things paranormal vastly different than you had before.BioNow back where he grew up in NJ. Ron began investigating during his 14 years in Los Angeles California. This diversity in residence gave him the opportunity to investigate some of the most notable haunts on both coasts including The Queen Mary, The Oman House, The Shanley Hotel, Whitehill Mansion, The Glen Tavern Inn several times each. He has a unique background as a stand up comedian, MMA Commentator, a writer and Paranormal Investigator. Ron has hosted and interviewed a variety of fields driven by a genuine love of connecting with others. While Ron enjoys all aspects of investigating, his affinity and area of specificity in the afterlife research is ITC Instrumental Trans-Communication. The area of study is most known in the the United States for a variety of devices seen on TV such as the Ovilus, Spirit Box, or Ghost Boxes. While Ron has and continues to use those devices and mobile apps leaving no method unexplored, he has spent two years doing innovative afterlife research experimentation, rooted in the European methodologies of ITC known as DRV: DIRECT RADIO VOICES. These methods predate any sweeping radio or app of the modern ghost hunting movement and seemingly fell out of favor with casual paranormal enthusiasts but not with the dedicated researchers. So under the banner of GonYac Paranormal with his girlfriend Lourdes Gonzalez, his ongoing DRV work has yielded very impressive results. Ron possesses skepticism and an open mind, and feels you should pursue results for any theory you may have. Period! If you have an agenda that all things are paranormal or all things are not, you are a believer. Both are ideologies that stand in opposition of each other and indicative of what defines a believer. A skeptic seeks absolution not to debunk and discredit. Ron feels that the field growing in acceptance is a paradigm shift which starts with taking a scientific approach not a scientistic one.https://www.amazon.com/Paranormally-Speaking-Knowingly-Ron-Yacovetti-ebook/dp/B09VLLL2WV/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1651842902&sr=1-1https://www.gonyacparanormal.com/'The Unknown Other: and the Existential Proposition of Alien Contact' by Les Velez.A look at how OPUS, the Organization for Paranormal Understanding and Support came about to help people with their paranormal experiences and the paranormal phenomenon of Alien Contact and the physiological and psychological characteristics along with the latest UAP information presented by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.BioLes Velez is a graduate of the University of Vermont with a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration. Beginning in September of 1970 he served in the US Army as a field artillery officer and, upon his honorable discharge, joined Luscombe Engineering, a Silicon Valleybased manufacturer's representative company and was vice president until his retirement in 2017. In 1991, Les joined MUFON, the Mutual UFO Network, and has held the following positions: Field investigator, Training coordinator for field investigators, the Assistant State Director in Northern California, Chairman of MUFON's Abduction Experiencer Research Committee, and team leader of the Abduction Response Team and presently holds the position of research consultant for the Experiencer Resource Team. He presented at the MUFON Symposium in Denver in 2009 on the proper procedures to use in an abduction investigation. In 1991, he started facilitating an abduction support group in San Jose, California, and in 1994 co-founded OPUS, the Organization for Paranormal Understanding and Support.He has appeared on Coast-to-Coast AM with George Knapp, KGRA Phenomenon Radio with Linda Moulton Howe and John Burroughs,Midnight in the Desert with Heather Wade, Open Minds Radio with Alejandro Rojas, UFONAUT Radio with Jesse Randolph, Erica Lukes, Tim Weisberg on Midnight.FM and various local public access TV productions.https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B099R218QP/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0https://www.opusnetwork.org/http://www.pastliveshypnosis.co.uk/https://www.patreon.com/alienufopodcasthttps://www.patreon.com/pastlivespodcast

Aphasia Access Conversations
Episode #84: Interprofessional Practice and Interprofessional Education: In Conversation with Mary Purdy

Aphasia Access Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:35


During this episode, Dr. Janet Patterson, Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System, speaks with Dr. Mary Purdy about aphasia rehabilitation, Interprofessional Practice (IPP) and Interprofessional Education (IPE).    In today's episode, you will:   Learn how IPP and IPE are related, in concept and practice. Hear about the similarities and differences in IPP in inpatient settings and outpatient settings. Listen to ideas on delivering client-centered treatment in an atmosphere of IPP.   Interview Transcript: Janet Patterson: Welcome to this edition of Aphasia Access Podversations, a series of conversations about community aphasia programs that follow the LPAA model. My name is Janet Patterson, and I am a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Northern California Healthcare System in Martinez, California. Today I am delighted to be speaking with my colleague and friend, Mary Purdy, about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. Dr. Purdy is Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator in the Department of Communication Disorders at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, and a speech- language pathologist at Hartford Health Care Rehabilitation Network. Mary has been involved with educating graduate students in the principles and practices of IPE for several years and is currently Chair of Southern Connecticut State University's College of Health and Human Services IPE committee. Additionally, she actively engages in Interprofessional Practice in the outpatient setting.  As Mary and I start this podcast, I want to give you a quick reminder that this year we are again sharing episodes that highlight at least one of the ten gap areas in aphasia care identified in the Aphasia Access White Paper authored by Dr. Nina Simmons-Mackie. For more information on this White Paper, check out Podversation Episode #62 with Dr. Liz Hoover as she describes these gap areas, or go to the Aphasia Access website.  This episode with Dr. Purdy focuses on gap area five, attention to life participation across the continuum of care, and gap area six, training and protocols or guidelines to aid implementation of participation-oriented intervention across the continuum of care. We focus on these areas through our discussions of IPE and IPP. Two previous Aphasia Access podcasts included conversations about IPE, Episode #7 with Darla Hagge and Episode #78 with Michelle Gravier, Albert Mendoza and Jennifer Sherwood. For so many reasons, IPE and IPP are crucial in creating and sustaining high quality aphasia rehabilitation programs. I hope our conversation today adds to the growing body of knowledge in IPP and IPE. With that introduction, I would like to welcome Dr. Mary Purdy to Aphasia Access conversations. Thank you, Mary for joining me today to discuss aphasia rehabilitation, IPP and IPE.  Mary Purdy: Well, thanks Janet. And thank you. It's really good to be here.  Janet: Let me just jump right in then Mary to say we've heard a lot about Interprofessional Education, or IPE, and Interprofessional Practice, or IPP. How do you define and think about these two related, but different concepts, both in general, and as they apply to aphasia rehabilitation?  Mary: Well, in general, when we think about IPP, the whole concept of collaboration, we know, leads to improved health care outcomes, and that's what we're all after, with our people with aphasia. In terms of the education students need, to learn how to collaborate with other professionals, and this can be quite complex. First of all, they need to understand what their own roles and responsibilities are, just related to their profession. Plus, they have to learn to work as a member of a team, and not just operate on their own, solo. In order to have students become comfortable in these roles, we have to provide them with opportunities to learn, and those opportunities, I think, really need to be both didactic and interactive.  Specifically, to aphasia rehabilitation, in addition to just general education about collaboration, students need to understand that individuals with aphasia really do have complex needs and to meet these needs, we have to focus on the patient. We hear a lot about patient-centered care, and that's really what it is that we need to be doing. So, students need to have some training in how to communicate with people with aphasia, and they need to get to the point where they can be comfortable training others to help communication. We have to help our patients identify what their goals are.  Interprofessional collaboration and practice, and patient-centered care really is all about the patient goals. They have to be really included with the whole program. Students have to be comfortable in aiding patients in identifying their goals, and they have to understand how other professionals can help meet those goals. You know, when we work with our clients, we of course, are focused on communication, but our patients are so much more than that. We have to look at them as the entire person that they are and recognize that we as speech pathologists can't take care of all their needs by ourselves. So, we have to bring in other professionals to help the clients meet their goals. The other thing is, we know that patient's needs change, as they adjust to life with aphasia, and they move throughout the continuum of care. As those needs change, the team members may also change, so students need to recognize that collaboration and interprofessional practice is always in flux. It's an ever-changing concept, in terms of practicing interprofessional collaboration. As clinicians, we need to practice what we preach, we have to remain focused on our patient, what their needs are, what their goals are. It can be difficult at times given time constraints and other constraints within the healthcare environment, but we really do need to try to make the effort.  Janet: Hearing you talk Mary, I'm envisioning a student, a graduate student, who is focused in trying to learn everything they can about the different aspects of communication disorders, not to mention everything about aphasia, and now we're asking them to learn more. That is, what an occupational therapist does or what a physical therapist does and how to organize that. Is that a daunting task for students?  Mary: I think so. As I said, they're learning what they themselves have to do, you know, what do I do as a speech-language pathologist. And so, when we start throwing everything else at them, I can imagine it's very daunting for students and it's hard to try to design educational opportunities that take into consideration where the student is in their whole educational process. I think there's a timing issue of how to be introducing all of these different concepts throughout the student's education.  Janet: Mary, as you recall from the introduction today, the White Paper authored by Dr. Simmons-Mackie identified gap areas in aphasia rehabilitation across the continuum of care, two of which I think relate to IPE and IPP. I would like to ask you about your thoughts regarding IPE and IPP and how they intersect with the LPAA model at three times: first, during graduate education as we teach and model for students who will become clinicians; second, during aphasia treatment in inpatient medical facilities; and third in the outpatient setting, including community aphasia groups. Let's begin with the educational environment. How do you teach and model IPE for your students? Can you tell us about some examples you use and how your students respond to your IPE activities?  Mary: First of all, in the educational environment when we're first really training the students, this is truly the IPE portion where we're preparing the students to learn the process of collaboration. Specific to aphasia, I usually start in my aphasia class. We have a couple of different case studies that we go through, that provide information to students about stroke, the professionals involved with stroke, then the person with aphasia. Through the case studies, I'm introducing them to the professions, and then to aphasia and how the professionals work with aphasia. Another thing that I do in class is, every semester students will interview a person with aphasia. They'll do a little language screen, and they'll interview a patient that comes up from our clinic. Recently with COVID, we've been doing this over Zoom, and it works fine. As part of that, they are instructed to ask the clients about their goals; what goals do they have both for clinic in terms of their communication, but also in general. Then later, we discuss what is needed to help the patient accomplish the specific goals, both within our own profession as well as outside. So, in class, there's a general introduction to IPE.  In the clinic, we've had some fun activities, very informative from multiple perspectives. One thing that we do is we have nursing students who are enrolled in their community health class, come into the clinic to perform a health intake with our individuals with aphasia. Now prior to that, our students have given the nursing students a little bit of background on aphasia, and we have the students view a video about it. And then when the nurses come into the clinic, they work with our students there together during the interview process. The nurses go through and ask all their questions and, I shouldn't laugh, but sometimes it's amusing to see the nursing students' reactions. They are just kind of flabbergasted in terms of, “okay, now what do I do?” For one client, the nurse was asking, the client, “Do you have a history of heart problems, cancer”, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and the client was responding “Yes” to everything. The nurse was saying “Oh, my gosh, you poor thing you've just been through so much”. I was in the observation room with the wife, who was saying he didn't have any of those problems. So, it was actually a very good learning experience for the nurse. Then our student jumped in and started using more pictures to try to help with understanding. We provided the supported communication prompts to help with that.  We've had therapeutic recreation come into the clinic, and we've had a few trips into the community. We've gone bowling, and that was interesting. The students learned about devices that are available to individuals who have hemiparesis. There are these stands that the person puts the ball on and just kind of pushes the ball off this rolling stand and it goes down the alley. Our students learn a lot about accessibility and what can be done to help our patients get around in the community a bit more. That's a couple of examples of what we've done in the clinic.  We also have worked with the Marriage and Family Therapy department to provide support to the spouses of the individuals with aphasia. I think that's another important aspect to make the students aware of, that aphasia doesn't affect just the person who has it. It affects everybody, and the spouses need support as well. Our students have sat in on and facilitated some of those sessions as well.  Some other opportunities our students have had are again related to assessment. We had our students go to the nursing lab, where they were doing simulations of assessments, and our students played people with aphasia. That was a lot of fun, and I tell you, it told me a lot about how much our students really understood about aphasia; it gave me some very good feedback as well. We've had a variety of different kinds of activities to educate other professionals about aphasia, to educate our students about the other professionals. So, it's been a lot of fun.  You asked about how the students responded to these activities, and an important component is the debriefing. After every activity, we always talk with the students about what they thought of the experience. They obviously they love the hands-on activities, they find those to be much more beneficial than the case studies and what have you. They've talked about how much they've learned about the patient; they're stunned often with the complexity of medical issues that the patients have, and it's sometimes led to new goals in our therapy sessions. We've had some goals where we would use aphasia friendly educational materials to inform the clients about their medications. We did roleplay scripts for community reentry, so that's been helpful for the students. It just increased their awareness overall. Their feedback was that it forces them to really look beyond just communication. And it also helped their interactions with the clients, kind of viewing them and accepting them as a real person, not just a client with a communication problem.  Janet: It sounds like such a rich experience for your students, when they're hearing it - the case studies, it's one thing to see those words on the piece of paper that says the patient has this diagnosis or has had that treatment, and then to see this person talk about, or try to talk about, whatever their concerns are, or their issues. I imagine the students must just be on one hand overwhelmed with everything, all the information that's coming to them, but very grateful for this experience, the whole interprofessional education experience,  Mary: They sometimes are overwhelmed, but I think the benefit outweighs the degree to which they're overwhelmed.  Janet: I'm sure that you can share stories of your own, thinking back to assure them that other people experience this, and you'll get better with time, and it will feel better and more natural in these kinds of conversations the longer you go in the career in the field of speech language pathology. Mary: I always tie in my personal experiences when I'm trying to explain one of these concepts. It does make it a bit more real to the students.  Janet: Well, that actually leads into my next question, Mary. You are, in addition to being the university faculty member, you are also a practicing clinician, and you use IPE and IPP in your work. How do you incorporate the ideas and the principles of IPP into your clinical activities, when you're in the inpatient medical settings, we'll talk about that setting for just a few minutes, the inpatient medical setting?  Mary: That's actually where I started my clinical career, in inpatient rehab, and it's always remained kind of dear to my heart, although it was very different back then, where patients would stay inpatient for three months. Two weeks they get now if they're lucky. In the inpatient situation it's a little bit easier to do collaboration because there usually are established team meetings. There are some requirements for accreditation related to collaboration. Though I have to say, that just having a group of individuals come together for a meeting doesn't necessarily include collaboration. I think it has to be approached very thoughtfully, in terms of what are we going to do to differentiate true interprofessional collaboration from just a multidisciplinary team? I think one of the main differences is truly staying focused on the patient and having more of a problem-based approach. We look at what are the issues with the patient and who needs to come together to address those issues. So, the collaboration is kind of built in through these regular team meetings.  In addition to that, though, I think the inpatient setting provides some unique opportunities. I've done a lot of co-treatment with PT and with OT. Just last week I was down in our makeshift apartment, it's actually a model of an apartment that has a bedroom, kitchen, everything, and I was working with OT. The OT was trying to help the individual manage with their one hand and also be conscious of the safety issues. The inpatient setting provides the opportunity for us to do some co-treatment as well. I've worked with PTs and OTs, trying to help the patient ambulate. We work on carryover of each other's techniques, and we educate each other about our own professions. Even at that level we have new OTS coming on the scene who had never worked with a person with aphasia. So, the co-treatments allow us to provide some of that education in a very naturalistic environment, which obviously is helpful to the patient. We also work together to figure out which discipline needs to address, what aspects of a problem. If a patient is having issues with problem solving, or flexibility, speech can address that, or OT can address that. So, we kind of work out who's going to do what, in a very non territorial way, which is fun.  One of my favorite projects that I did was a self-medication program. I work very closely with nursing to help educate the patient about their medications, what they're for, what the side effects are, what to do if there's a problem, and how to fill their med boxes. I took a lot of the information that the nurse was providing the client and incorporated that into my own therapy sessions in a much more aphasia friendly manner. It really is helpful in helping the individuals become a bit more independent. Anything that we can do to help increase their independence is so good for their psyche, for their motivation, and for their own self-worth. Not having to depend on a spouse to give them their meds is a big accomplishment. We also follow through on using techniques recommended by one profession in the other settings. So, I will make sure that I have patients positioned properly, when I'm working with them; I make sure that client has their communication book with them, or the OT would make sure the patient has the communication book when they're in the OT session. There's a lot of ongoing discussion about what we each need to be doing to help one another and help the patient.  Janet: That actually, it's both education and its practice, isn't it, because whatever you're learning and teaching new about aphasia in your classroom is also being shared, if you will, with your colleagues at the hospital, and they're teaching you, and you're doing it within the confines of the needs of a particular patient. So, I imagine that the interprofessional practice part, the education part of that, is just always there, is ongoing, and you don't make assumptions that the OT or PT automatically understand your goals in speech, nor do you automatically understand theirs for occupational or physical therapy. Mary: The education component really is carried on throughout, not with students, but as you said, with the other professionals. We're all always learning. I've been in this practice for more years than I care to count and I'm still learning things. That makes things fun and exciting and never boring.  Janet: When I think back, about the importance of LPAA and the importance of patient- centered care, when I think back on some of my practice 100 years ago, I wish I would have done things differently for patients. I could have been a much more effective clinician, but I wasn't thinking in that direction at that point in time. But I am now and I'm hoping that our listeners will also realize there's a lot out there that we can learn from, and we can impart to other professions as we all work to help patients. Mary: I cringe at some of the things that I did 30 years ago, but you live and learn. The end goal is always the same - we want to do what we can to help our patients. We want our patients to be able to lead fulfilling lives, how we get them there has changed, a little bit.  Janet: You've talked to us now about some of the activities you use when you educate students in IPE, and then you've talked about some of the things you do in Interprofessional Practice when you're in the inpatient setting. The third setting I would like to talk to you about is community aphasia groups and the outpatient setting. You may be the only speech-language pathologist on the staff, or you may not have access to other rehabilitation professionals in the outpatient setting like you do in the inpatient setting. How do you see IPE and IPP intersecting with the LPAA model in these clinical settings, either outpatient settings or community aphasia groups?  Mary: Personally, I don't work with community groups outside of the university and I think groups within a university are very different than groups in the community, you know, separate from an educational environment. I continue to work providing outpatient services to single individuals with aphasia, and without a doubt, thinking about collaboration requires more effort. Most of the time, the patients have already finished their OT and PT by the time they get to the Outpatient Center, at least where I am. I don't have those professionals nearby so collaborating would be difficult. But the thing is, even though they may have been dismissed from those other therapies, that doesn't mean that the patients don't still have needs, and their needs now might be very different than when they were discharged from the therapy, three months, or six months prior. I think we need to remain patient centered and always be thinking about, “What is this person doing? How fulfilled is this person? What are their goals?” The patient has been living with aphasia for a while now and so their needs have changed. They are, in my experience, branching out a whole lot more or wanting to branch out more so we have to know what their goals are for life participation, what is it they want to accomplish? Those goals may be completely unrelated to what I, as a speech-language pathologist, will be doing.  For example, one of my patients had always done knitting, she just loved to knit. She was lamenting that she wasn't able to knit for her new grandchild. I was asking her what was the main problem with it? Of course, she indicated her hand, she couldn't hold the knitting needles. I briefly talked with our OT in our clinic, and asked, “Would this be something that you think we should get another referral for? Is it something that you could really assist her with?” And the OT said, “Well, yeah, sure.” So, we did get a referral for her to get an OT eval, and the OT gave her a built-up knitting needle. I was familiar with them for pens, but I had never even thought of one on a needle. That enabled the patient to continue with her knitting. Granted, she was slower, and she might have missed a stitch or two, but she was so much happier that she was able to do that. And so, OT accomplished the goal of getting this patient back involved. I guess the moral of the story is, even if we're not directly working with the other professionals, they may be accessible, or we can get them re-involved, and so we need to keep an open mind about that, and not just think that, okay, they're done with PT, they're done with OT, because there definitely are things that can be done outside the realm of communication.  Having a good understanding of what our patients' skills are and what their challenges are, can also help us set realistic goals, help our patients set realistic goals. I remember working with a client a while ago who was living at home but needed assistance to get out of the house, to transfer into a car, and so on and so forth. I wasn't really even thinking about that, you know, the patient made it to my office, so I just kind of assumed that they could do whatever. The patient wanted to go back to going out to eat so we were working on scripts. I talked about this with the physical therapist as the patient was still receiving physical therapy. The physical therapist said to me that it's okay if she wants to work on that, but she's not going to be able to get into that restaurant, it's not accessible, physically accessible, and the patient has so much trouble getting out of her home into a car. The whole thing is very laborious and so the family doesn't really want to undertake that challenge at this point. They are willing to do it to get her to therapy, but the family isn't really ready to get her into the community yet. That just made me take a step back and think, “Well, duh! Yeah, of course!” I didn't have my goals aligned with what other professionals had for goals and what the patient had. Understanding more about our patients really can help us all, patient and professionals, align our goals, so that we can accomplish them in a more efficient manner. If a patient needs some therapy and isn't receiving it, we can always ask for referrals; they might be denied, but it doesn't mean we can't ask for them.  Janet: What you said made me think of a couple things. Something you said earlier that aphasia doesn't just affect the person with aphasia, it affects the family. So, when you're talking about setting goals, like your restaurant example, thinking about the PT goals, the OT goals, the family goals, the patient goals - maybe the patient's goal of wanting to be able to order in a restaurant could have been redirected to learn a script in preparation, maybe, for finding a restaurant script later on, but now, at this moment in time that isn't the best direction, as you said. So, it just makes me think really that aphasia is about the family, it is about more than just the person with aphasia.  Mary: Oh, absolutely. Patient-centered goals definitely are centered on what the patient wants, but I think have to be considered, along with what the family wants, and what's realistic. They're the ones that are existing together. They are the ones that are ultimately responsible for carrying out, or not carrying out, these different things. I think everybody needs to be on the same page. Janet: Something else you said also made me think - the knitting needle example. In addition to achieving a goal, or to listening to the patient, you're also modeling for the patient how to ask for something, or how to think about another referral, because a new set of skills has developed, or a new set of problems has developed, now that you're further along in the aphasia journey.  Mary: I think it's a part of our phase of therapy in general, I think increasing self- advocacy is a critical component, making them aware of what their rights are, and what they can be asking for and demanding. Then giving them the tools to do that is a major component of our therapy,  Janet: That is exactly what LPAA is, asking what it is the patient wants to do, looking around the environment, and asking how we can help the individual achieve those goals, and the family achieve the goals as well. So, your comments and ideas about IPE and IPP, I think are pretty exciting, Mary, I hear the excitement in your voice as you're talking. But I also think they're crucial to the way that we should be thinking about how to deliver rehabilitation services in the coming years and months ahead of us.  As we draw this Podversation to a close, what are the pearls of wisdom or lessons learned, that you would like to share with our listeners? And in particular, what practice suggestions might you offer to clinicians, as they try to incorporate principles of IPE and IPP into their own practices?  Mary: Well, I've certainly learned a lot. I've learned my lessons as I've moved through this journey. I do have fun with it, so it's always worth it. In terms of education, for educators and IPE, I think I would recommend starting small. Sometimes my excitement about IPE has led me to be a bit over ambitious, and that can get frustrating for me, it can get frustrating for my colleagues, and for my students. So, starting small I think, is a good place to start. We might set expectations that are not necessarily realistic for our particular environment or for a particular academic department. I think it's important to know that we can be effective with small changes, small changes in our curriculum, like incorporating the activities into the aphasia class. Another thing that has been helpful is finding a group of like-minded colleagues, because a lot of times many of these projects are carried out on our own time in the educational environment, so you have to be with others who are as excited about the project as you are to really make it work. I'd suggest getting involved with schoolwide Interprofessional Education efforts if they exist. If they don't exist, jump in and try to create them so that they can exist.  For clinicians, I think we have to practice what we preach - more follow through on the different principles that we're instilling in our students. I think as clinicians we have to stay patient-centered and think beyond just communication. Similar to what I mentioned for educators, start small. A meaningful change in the life of a person with aphasia doesn't necessarily require great amounts of time and effort. If we just think small, think of individual goals, little changes can have a big impact. Then finally, I would say, get to know your patient and be their advocate.  Janet: Those are good lessons for all of us and not always easy to do, but certainly worth the doing, I think.  This is Janet Patterson, and I'm speaking from the VA in Northern California, and along with Aphasia Access, I would like to thank my guest, Mary Purdy, for sharing her knowledge and experiences with us, as she continues her exciting and important work in IPE and IPP.  You can find references and links in the Show Notes from today's podcast interview with Mary Purdy at Aphasia Access under the resource tab on the homepage. On behalf of Aphasia Access, we thank you for listening to this episode of The Aphasia Access Conversations Podcast. For more information on Aphasia Access, and to access our growing library of materials, please go to www.aphasiaaccess.org. If you have an idea for a future podcast topic, please email us at info@aphasiaaccess.org. Thank you again for your ongoing support of Aphasia Access.  References  purdym1@southernct.edu  Purdy, M. H., Hindenlang, J.& Warner, H. L. (2017). "Interprofessional Education: Take the leap." Presentation to the AMERICAN speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 2017.  Gurevich, N., Osmelak, D.R. & Farris, C. (2020). Interprofessional education between speech pathology and nursing programs: A collaborative e-platform curriculum approach. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 34(4), 572-575. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2019.1657815 

The Rebuild SoCal Zone
The State of The California High-Speed Rail Project

The Rebuild SoCal Zone

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 25:56


In this episode, host Jon Switalski spoke with Brian Kelly who is the Chief Executive Officer for the California High-Speed Rail Authority. We discuss everything from the project history, status, and the ultimate goals of the project. NOTE: This episode was recorded on April 22nd, 2022. On April 28th, the California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority) Board of Directors certified the Final (EIR/EIS) and unanimously approved the approximately 90-mile San Jose to Merced project section in Northern California. This action completes the environmental clearance for nearly 400 miles of the high-speed rail project's 500-mile Phase 1 alignment from San Francisco to Los Angeles/Anaheim. Here's a link to the news release: https://hsr.ca.gov/2022/04/28/news-release-high-speed-rail-board-completes-environmental-clearance-to-connect-silicon-valley-and-central-valley/

Invincible Career - Claim your power and regain your freedom

The past two weeks have been interesting and challenging. I was selected for jury duty service here in California, and I have a few weeks left in the trial. The process has been taking up most of the time I usually spend writing, recording my podcast, and working with my clients and community. As a result, I’m not entirely happy with my progress on the latest chapter of the book I’m writing. It’s about 80% of the way there, so I need more time to wrap it up before sharing the draft with you. So, instead, I will try something new this week! I’m frequently asked career-related questions across various platforms. Instead of answering there, I will share the questions and my answers with you here. By the way, if you would like to ask me a question about anything related to work, careers, interviews, etc., there are many ways you can do that:Reply to the weekly newsletter email and send me your question.Post your question in the comments section of an article. Send me an anonymous written question.Record an audio question, and you can have your voice included in an upcoming podcast episode!Note: Please let me know if you’d like to have your name included or if you prefer to remain anonymous. For example, I can disguise your voice in the podcast. Now, without further ado, let’s dive into the six questions below!Question 1“Has working remotely part-time or full-time enhanced your well-being?”Absolutely! I have been working primarily remote for more than 12 years now and full-time remote for more than six years.I used to commute 2–3 hours every day for my last corporate job. I was overweight, unhealthy, and unhappy. I didn't see my family much during the workweek.Once I went remote running my own business, I started working out more often and eating healthier — after I recovered and repurposed those 2–3 hours every day. I lost 40 lbs! If you check out my Instagram, you'll see that I'm still working out every day.I was also able to spend more time with my children and eat dinner with my family every night. I go for a walk and run with my wife almost every day. My mental and emotional health are so much better now.Anyone who has read the advice in my newsletter knows that I'm a huge fan of remote work. I coach clients to take control of their working lives so they can work where they want and when they want. It's a life-changing experience!Question 2“What job or profession is a lot less fun than people imagine?”I think many professions look more fun from the outside than they do on the inside. For example, I was a software/web/app designer for much of my career. My friends and family (who don’t work in tech) would frequently comment that my job must be “fun” because I just had to sit around and design stuff all day. I think they confused “design” with creating art, which I actually do enjoy quite a lot. But, I can tell you that the actual profession of software design isn’t all fun and laughs. It’s a ton of long hours, arguments over requirements and design decisions, endless revisions, tedious documentation, etc. Sure, there are some fun moments, but probably no more than other professions.Likewise, I think television shows have misled us into believing that the lives of doctors, police officers, and lawyers are a lot more exciting than they really are. My brother is a surgeon, so I know he isn’t having “fun” very often on the job. I used to be a police dispatcher, so I know that most of the job is boring and full of process and paperwork (briefly interrupted by rare moments of terror). I’m sure that many of us look at the lives of professional athletes, music artists, and actors and think, “That must be nice! I sure do wish I could get paid to play like that.” But, there’s a reason that many of them struggle with substance abuse, depression, and failed relationships. The professions aren’t as glamorous as they look from the outside. Question 3“What are the considerations before making a career change?”This is a tricky question to answer because I don’t know how significant the planned career change is. So, my first follow-up question would be, “What type of career change?” Obviously, a massive change will require more serious consideration and preparation. Do you know what you're getting into? You should talk to people in the career/profession you’re considering. Explore what the job is like by receiving training, shadowing someone, etc. I have some friends who have considered opening restaurants and bars. However, after spending a few days as a chef, they changed their minds. Do you need a financial cushion? Depending on the career change, you may need funds to bridge the gap while your new career is spinning up (i.e., before it provides enough income to support you). This is often the case if you quit your job to become an entrepreneur. It takes some time for a new business to provide a reliable and sufficient income stream. Will the career change require a lifestyle change? Are you prepared for that? For example, sometimes your commute or working hours will be pretty different when you change to a new profession. You should also be prepared for the impact it may have on your circle of friends. I lost quite a few “friends” when I left my tech career behind to become a leadership and career coach. Finally, what’s your backup plan if the career change doesn’t work out? Failure is a possibility, and it can happen. Hey, my tech startup failed, and I had to quickly come up with my Plan B to keep going. So, be prepared with a backup plan ahead of time (just in case). Question 4“What (if any) new careers are open to you if you are nearing 60?”Even though age discrimination is illegal and the law protects people age 40 or over, we all know it still happens. It’s a massive issue in tech, and I encountered it several times. Unfortunately, it’s hard to prove age discrimination. So, it’s wise to plan ahead and be ready for the inevitable slowdown in opportunities that used to flow your way when you were younger. I started planning my future as I approached my 40s because I could already see where things were going. I intentionally guided my career in a direction where my age would be viewed as an asset, not a liability (e.g., management, leadership, consulting). Some examples of pivoting into a second-act career:Successful actors become directors before they age out, and it’s too late (e.g., Ron Howard, Penny Marshall, Jodie Foster).Hot music artists start their own record label before they grow weary of touring (e.g., Jay Z, The Beatles, Dave Grohl).World-class athletes know when to hang it up and transition into coaching (e.g., Bill Russell, Martina Navratilova, Mike Ditka). Careers for older folks:Many older employees move into consulting when they feel their career slowing down within the walls of a corporation. People like me leave the corporate world, become coaches, and advise the next generation of leaders.Some people realize that they can’t be forced into “early retirement” if they start their own business and become their own boss. I know many business owners over the age of 60. My optometrist owned his practice and just retired this year when he was over 90! Teaching at a local school or college is a good option and lets you give back to the next generation. I’ve watched people retire from their first career and go into real estate. It’s a job that values your experience and connections. Writing is another career that is open to anyone, no matter their age. No one knows how old you are behind the keyboard! Finally, I know several people who indulged their artistic talent and became artists in their second-act careers. I interviewed one talented lady for my podcast. As you may have guessed, some of these second-act careers won’t pay as well as your first-act career did when you were younger. So, plan accordingly. I think you’ll enjoy this article; A new start after 60: ‘I became a psychotherapist at 69 and found my calling.’ You might find this one interesting, too.Question 5“How many careers did you have before your current one?”I guess it depends on how you define a “career.” I’ve had many different jobs in my life, but I wouldn’t classify any of the earlier ones as a career to which I dedicated a significant amount of my professional life.Before I became a leadership and career coach, I spent most of my professional life in one career in tech. I was a designer, design manager, design leader, product executive, and startup founder and CEO. But, I would put all of those jobs under the umbrella of my “tech career.”I will say that the idea of having one primary career for life is outdated. My professional life has changed considerably about every ten years. I would guess that many of you will change careers more than once in your lifetime, as well. Question 6“What do you do when your business direction is becoming more risky and you feel like your life is taking too long to get to where you want to be? Mildly bittersweet and having a lot of hindsight about my past life right now :(“One of my most popular articles ever was on this very topic. What does “too long” mean? Are you comparing yourself to someone else?The focus on “where you want to be” reveals what is known as the Arrival Fallacy. Many of us experience it at a few points in our lifetime. "Arrival fallacy is this illusion that once we make it, once we attain our goal or reach our destination, we will reach lasting happiness." — Tal Ben-ShaharWhen you dream about the destination and keep thinking that reaching it will be what makes you happy, you don’t enjoy your life along the way. I know this is easier said than done, but you need to enjoy the journey too. Too many people experience a letdown when they reach their big goal. They feel like, “Is this it? Shouldn’t I feel happier now?”Now, your comment about your business direction becoming “more risky” is a valid concern. My follow-up question is, “What do you mean by that?” You should continuously evaluate progress and how things are going. Sometimes, it is time to cut your losses and move on. But I don’t know enough to tell you if you’ve reached that point yet. So, what do you think? Do you enjoy these Q&A articles? Let me know!Again, feel free to comment on this article if you’d like to ask me a question. Thank you for reading Invincible Career®. This post is public so feel free to share it.By the way, there is a great way you can support my work without spending any money on a premium subscription:📣 Recommending my newsletter on social media! It only takes a few seconds, and it helps grow my business so I can continue making time to write it.I’ll even provide some copy and paste text to make it easy to share on Twitter, Reddit, LinkedIn, Facebook, etc. Thanks in advance!I've really been enjoying the Invincible Career newsletter by Larry Cornett (@cornett). If you want to get ahead at work and be happier in your job, but you aren’t subscribed yet, you’re missing out.https://newsletter.invinciblecareer.comLarry Cornett is a leadership coach and business advisor who hosts a private mastermind community for ambitious professionals with weekly challenges, office hours, and confidential support. If you’re interested in starting your own business or side hustle someday (or accelerating an existing one), check out his “Employee to Solopreneur” course (launching later this year).Larry lives in Northern California near Lake Tahoe with his wife and children, and a gigantic Great Dane. He does his best to share advice to help others take complete control of their work and life. He’s also on Twitter @cornett. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit newsletter.invinciblecareer.com/subscribe

The Residency Podcast
Ep. 103 - From Div 1 NCAA Strength Coach to Viral AXE MAN, THOREN BRADLEY.

The Residency Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 72:33


Welcome Home! On this episode we have a man of many talents. You've all seen his videos on Tik Tok of him chopping enormous amounts of wood shirtless. THOREN BRADLEY! We chop it up with Thoren (pun intended) and get deep. He comes from a remote small town in Northern California and uses all the wood he chops. We talk everything from blowing up on Tik Tok, being a Div 1 NCAA Strength & Conditioning coach, filming his daily chores, small town living, OnlyFans and MORE. This episode is sponsored by Mandalay Bay.

What's Next with Eric Wood
Ep 149 - Living In The Present with Jason Goldsmith

What's Next with Eric Wood

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 34:44


Jason Goldsmith is a globally recognized Performance Coach and the co-author of "Take Charge of You" with NYT best selling author David Novak. Jason emphasizes on the mental aspects of optimal performance in high pressure environments. After initially focusing exclusively in golf, Jason's practice has expanded to include MLB, NFL, NBA, USTA, and athletes and coaches from the U.S. and Great Britain Olympic teams. In addition to his coaching contributions in Division I and II collegiate sports programs, including several National Championships, Jason's practice includes athletes of all levels including world-ranked juniors, amateurs, Fortune 500 executives, and professionals. In golf, he has coached 6 Major champions, multiple top 10 and World #1 golfers, including the 2016 Olympic Gold Medalist and 2018 FedEx Cup Champion, Justin Rose. Today on the show, Eric and Jason discuss the importance of living in the present and how to reach a neutral state of thinking. Other topics include: (2:20-4:20) - Growing up in Northern California, playing tennis (4:20-7:50) - Career journey, joining the Air Force at 17 (7:50-11:05) - Becoming self aware (11:05-15:10) - Reaching a neutral sate of mind (15:10-20:00) - Goal setting, golf mindset training (20:00-23:50) - Take Charge of You with David Novak (23:50-28:15) - Jason's golf game, favorite course And much more. Rate, review and subscribe to the show today! For more information about our sponsors today: Jordan Yocum LouisvilleCustomClothing.com Instagram: @KentuckyClothier

PHNX Rising Football Podcast
A chance at history

PHNX Rising Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:05


Phoenix Rising heads to Northern California to face off against USL Championship side Sacramento Republic FC in a Round of 32 matchup in the 2022 U.S. Open Cup. Will Rising be able to continue their cup run alive and have a chance at facing an MLS team in the next round? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Essential Ingredients Podcast
034: Designing the Perfect Plate with Executive Chef Sieger Bayer, Etta Restaurant

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 14:16


Dine and Design Series Part VIII “This isn't just me on the menu…There's a bunch of beautiful minds that go into it.” -Sieger Bayer Episode Description: Most people want to eat the healthiest foods available, but it can be difficult to do when we don't know where our food comes from. Buying directly from local farmers gives us the ability to shop at places that care about our health as much as we do. In addition, when we buy locally sourced food, we know that we're getting quality foods year-round rather than eating something grown elsewhere, which might have been sitting in storage for weeks, in conditions that aren't ideal for taste or nutrition. Buying local produce allows us to savor crisp, fresh flavor and foods' nutrients at their peak.   However, freshness isn't everything when it comes to food. A lot of products have been sprayed with chemicals that can be harmful to our health, so it makes sense to buy locally wherever possible. This gives us the opportunity to advocate for our well-being and support farmers who practice sustainable farming. Not only that, buying directly from local farmers means getting access to more varieties of produce than what might be available in stores. We can also find vendors who are happy to explain how they grow their food and answer any questions we might have about their products. It's also a great place to get inspiration for cooking as many vendors are thrilled to share recipes and cooking tips.   Etta Culver City is a celebrated neighborhood restaurant that serves delicious, wood-fired food in a fun, relaxed dining environment. Led by two-time Michelin Chef/Partner Danny Grant and the What If Syndicate restaurant group, Etta and its sister companies Monarch, Maple&Ash, Celestina, and Kessaku aim to serve nutritious, savory, and high-quality food. To do this, they make sure they only buy fresh ingredients directly from local farmers.   In this episode of EI's Dine & Design, Justine and Bridget interview Etta's Executive Chef, Sieger Bayer. Listen to their fun exchange as Chef Sieger talks about the beginning of his journey with food, building relationships with local farmers, capturing the eyes and palates of diners through the art of plating, and how he helps chefs in-training to be better at their craft.  Chef Sieger also reveals his passion project for the first time and tells the audience how they can get involved!   Meet Sieger:  Sieger Bayer is the Executive Chef of Etta Culver City, a neighborhood restaurant that serves delicious, wood-fired food in a fun, relaxed dining environment. True to its namesake, “Keeper of the Hearth”, Etta is known for its perfectly baked wood-fired pizza and other familiar dishes that are perfect for the whole family. Sieger understands the impact of buying directly from local farmers on the quality of food served, the well-being of their customers, and its benefit to the farmers themselves and the environment.  Sieger has also partnered up with Erika Chan and other artists on an art-driven cookbook, re.c.o.o.k.e.d  You can connect with Sieger and the fellow cookbook authors and artists via instagram using the links below.    Instagram   Connect with Etta:  Website Instagram Twitter   Connect with re.c.o.o.k.e.d Instagram   Connect with Erika Chan: Instagram   Connect with Alec Battistoni: Instagram   Connect with Ryan Roxy Kinsley: Instagram   Connect with Bridget Cooper (Co-Host, Dine & Design):  A native of NZ, Bridget Cooper moved to NY when she was 18 to pursue a career in Interior Design. This journey started a life of the international jet set for Cooper, as travel became the source of inspiration and resource for herself and so many of her clients.    Her innate ability to seek out the extraordinary is the foundation for curating layered interiors and unforgettable experiences. This has built her a reputation in the design world as the “one in the know” and “to know”.   Bridget's interior work ranges from chic high-rise apartments in Chicago and NY to modern farmhouses in Northern California. In recent years, Bridget Cooper has expanded her creative talents by working on many commercial projects and events creating unforgettable experiences on both big and small scales.  Bridget delights in over-thinking every detail and loves pushing the boundaries to keep things fresh and unexpected.   Currently, Bridget and her husband Rob have moved from SF to Ojai, Ca (a small town north of Los Angeles) where they are building the Iverson House.   Website Instagram LinkedIn Pinterest   Connect with NextGenChef: Website  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  YouTube   Episode Highlights: 02:09 You Need to Join!  05:02 Plating and Design  07:53 When Food Critics Arrive 09:42 More Than a Cookbook  11:14 Expand Your Network

She's All Over The Place
Carcerem The Series Fantasy Fiction Audio Drama Series with Voiceover Actor Dana Powers

She's All Over The Place

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 45:57


Shakespeare meets Voiceover with VO star Dana Powers, the empowerment of emotions for the love of the theatre!  Being a mom, motherhood, and demystifying the stigma of being a working mom in Entertainment. Born and raised in Northern California, I started acting at the age of 8 years old in community theatre and then was accepted into a performing arts high school where my love and skills grew. I graduated from CSU Northridge with a BA in theatre, was introduced to voiceover, and joined an LA-based theatre company called independent Shakespeare Co. I've worked with a number of theatre companies in Los Angeles, but primarily the Independent Shakespeare Co. performing Free Shakespeare in Griffith Park for 7 years. I began my voiceover career in 2013, and it ultimately became my entire focus, along with directing and coaching, and I absolutely love it!   Carcerem The Series, Voice acting, Theatre or acting in general, self improvement or practices. Fantasy Fiction | Carcerem - The Series (carceremtheseries.com) Carcerem on Apple Podcasts Independent Shakespeare Co. (iscla.org) Carcerem the Fantasy Podcast Series with Creator and Mastermind Shane Salk (chonacas.com)   Connect with Katie more: https://www.chonacas.com/ https://withkoji.com/@saintkyriaki

The Biohacking Secrets Show
EP 254: Smart Nutrition, Precision Medicine, And The Future Of Peak Performance with Ari Tulla of Elo.Health

The Biohacking Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 63:35


Claim your free at-home blood test and biomarker kit at Elo.Health by entering discount code “biohackingsecrets”.    Ari Tulla is a San Francisco-based entrepreneur and the co-founder and CEO of Elo smart nutrition service, transforming food from the cause of disease to medicine. Ari is also an active angel investor with a portfolio of 40 startups, including Virta Health, Good Eggs, and Oura. Previously, Ari was the CEO of Quest Analytics, the market leader in doctor data and network management. Ari led the company through a pivotal growth stage from $15M to $40M in revenue. Before joining Quest Analytics, Ari was co-founder and CEO of BetterDoctor, a doctor search engine. BetterDoctor raised $30M from first-tier investors, including NEA and Uncork Capital. June 2018, BetterDoctor was acquired by private equity firm Vestar Capital. When not working/parenting, Ari spends his time on the steep cliffs, powdery slopes, and big cold waves that only Northern California can offer. Learn more at Elo.Health (discount code: “biohackingsecrets”)   Resources and products mentioned in this episode:    Vagus nerve tracking https://vagus.co — happy to intro to the founder/CEO   Biomarker tracking https://nightingalehealth.com — happy to intro to their team.     Ari's Sleep Hacks     Sleep tech Oura ring sleep tracker (or similar) helps you to test how your body reacts to the recommendations listed below.    Sleep timing & environment Set a “go-to-sleep” time instead of wake-up time. I go to sleep between 10pm-11pm. Going to sleep before 10pm always gives better quality sleep (and more REM sleep).  Cool environment 65 degrees Blackout curtains Comfortable mattress (avoid hot memory foam mattresses), small pillow, down blanket Earplugs — I have worn earplugs on for the last 6 years and they significantly improve sleep quality   Sleep supplement (30 minutes prior to sleep) L-theanine 200mg  — Several studies suggest that L-theanine could help people relax before bedtime, get to sleep more easily, and sleep more deeply. These benefits may result from the specific effects that amino acid has on brain chemicals that play a role in sleep. Magnesium L-Threonate 1,000mg — Magnesium plays a particularly important role as it is needed to form serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline. Magnesium also helps form melatonin as serotonin gets converted to melatonin which is needed for sleep. Apigenin 50mg — Apigenin binds to specific receptors in your brain that may decrease anxiety and initiate sleep.     Food/Drink Eat dinner (or other food) before 7pm  No alcohol after 7pm No caffeine after 2pm Chamomile tea 8pm   Physical Hot shower right before going to bed No physical training after 7pm Evening stretching (15minutes) and Theragun massage (10 minutes) on days with intense exercise  Lower the light level and avoid screens (blue light) after 8pm 30 minutes of sunlight in the morning (within 1 hour of waking up) to set your circadian rhythm   Mental Wind-down rituals before sleep (journaling, turning on night lights, and putting on pajamas). Yoga Nidra breathing exercise in bed to help you fall asleep (go through your body and relax from toes to head). Read more here. Deep breathing in bed (physiological sigh). Breathe deeply through the nose and once lungs feel full do one quick inhale. Repeat 4-6 times and you are relaxed and ready to fall asleep.  Learn details at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBdhqBGqiMc   Read/Listen Why we sleep? By Matt Walker Matt Walker on HubermanLab Podcast   - Learn more about our one-on-one Biohacker Coaching program www.BiohackerCoaching.com   - Grab your free copy of The Biohacker's Guide to Upgraded Energy and Focus (just help with s/h) https://biohackersguide.com/free-guide   - Subscribe to our free email newsletter www.biohackersguide.com/energycrash    - Subscribe to The Biohacking Secrets Show podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-biohacking-secrets-show/id1139825099   Join Our Uncensored Telegram Channel for VIP Biohacking Content You Can't Get On Social

The Flipping 50 Show
Create Natural Hormone Boosts with Dr. John Gray | MarsVenus

The Flipping 50 Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 72:07


Not many people listening, or living, don't know Men Are from Mars, Women Are From Venus, the famous book by Dr. John Gray. It's my honor to interview him on this episode.  00:00 Dr. Gray is the quintessential relationship expert. He's also an active health and wellness advocate and he's talking now and has always been, about hormones.  Are you tempted by a juicy little piece of gossip? Or know someone who always is full of the latest dish on everyone from your high school classmates to celebrities? Did you know there is a hormonal link?  Since there is no real value in looking at fitness in a silo, when we understand that mind, body, and soul work in integration, then this guest makes complete sense.  For myself, relationships with others from friends to family and myself, become more important than ever. Understanding how to nurture them may be as important as those intervals and repetitions we're scheduling. They are, after all, for many of us, a part of the why.  So, today we look at natural hormone boosts through a different lens.  My Guest:  John Gray is the author of the most well-known and trusted relationship book of all time, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus. USA Today listed his book as one of the top 10 most influential books of the last quarter-century. In hardcover, it was the #1 bestselling book of the 1990s. Dr. Gray's books are translated into approximately 45 languages in more than 100 countries and continues to be a bestseller. Dr. Gray has written over 20 books. His most recent book is Beyond Mars and Venus. His Mars/Venus book series has forever changed the way men and women view their relationships. John helps men and women better understand and respect their differences in both personal and professional relationships. His approach combines specific communication techniques with healthy, nutritional choices that create the brain and body chemistry for lasting health, happiness, and romance. His many books, blogs, and free online workshops at MarsVenus.com provide practical insights to improve relationships at all stages of life and love. An advocate of health and optimal brain function, he also provides natural solutions for overcoming depression, anxiety, and stress to support increased energy, libido, hormonal balance, and better sleep. He has appeared repeatedly on Oprah, as well as on The Dr. Oz Show, TODAY, CBS This Morning, Good Morning America, and others. He has been profiled in Time, Forbes, USA Today, and People. He was also the subject of a three-hour special hosted by Barbara Walters. John Gray lives in Northern California, where for 34 years he happily shared his life with his beautiful wife, Bonnie until her passing in 2018. They have three grown daughters and four grandchildren. He is an avid follower of his health and relationship advice. Questions we answer in this episode:  04:39 On your website you share some tips for women (who are still cycling) for natural hormone boosts. Can you share some of the activities and influence on hormones?  Is this pertinent to women post-menopause?  25:14 You share this thought that makes a girl… on bioidenticals… think. And that is: that if estrogen needs during cycles vary, at times we need estrogen higher, at others progesterone, if we're taking the same amount of hormones all the time we don't get that benefit. What about women in menopause, not cycling?  You have a program called Isoflex - will you share the basis and benefit of the program?  We can cycle with exercise prescription as well, focusing on strength training and higher intensity interval training during the first part of the cycle and easier lighter workouts at the end, just before a woman gets her period. Even during menopause we all still as humans follow cycles of the moon and tide, what are your thoughts on that?  How has the pandemic and isolation impacted women's hormones and what can she do to support herself? If A) she's in a home with others and B) if she's living alone 45:33 There are a lot of working women in the world, many more than ever before entrepreneurs, and that could be a problem if working creates a need or even nurtures testosterone. Can you say more about that.. And what to do? If say, you're a very independent woman working solo (asking for a friend) and living alone…  50:33 I heard you discuss with Sara Banta how gossip and talking together can boost certain hormones. Can you share which ones and how that can be good/bad?  1:01:25 I recently hosted a retreat with 13 women and never before in prior retreats have I noticed such a strong desire for connection and coming together as in this particular retreat. What was going on?  Is there any connection with the avoidance of exercise or physical activity and what's happening with our relationships?  Natural hormone boosts can occur from exercise planned and done right. I prefer to look at hormone needs and current status (the way a woman feels) to support the type of exercise she needs. Notoriously, women are drawn more to cardio than strength. That has a lot to do with societal conditioning, but do you think there is also a hormonal explanation for this?  “Too much intensity can inhibit fat burning in women.”  - Dr. John Gray    FREE GIFT: John's course “How to Get Everything You Want in Relationships For Women, Men, Couples, and Singles”https://marsvenus.com/gift He's Social:  Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/marsvenus Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Mars.Venus.John.Gray Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johngraymarsvenus_official/ Resources:  Don't Miss Dr. Gray's Free Gift! https://marsvenus.com/gift Hot Not Bothered: https://www.flippingfifty.com/hnb-challenge Other Episodes You May Like:  The Number One Hormone to Watch Out for At 40+ (Hint: It's Not Estrogen): https://www.flippingfifty.com/number-one-hormone/ Natural Solutions You'll Love for Hormone Balance: https://www.flippingfifty.com/natural-solutions-youll-love-for-hormone-balance/          

MS Living Well: Key Info from Multiple Sclerosis Experts

Multiple sclerosis frequently causes visual impairment. 70% of people living with the disease can develop optic neuritis at some point and often the first sign of MS. The symptoms, medical evaluation, treatment and prognosis of optic neuritis are conveyed. Besides multiple sclerosis, other causes are discussed including MOG antibody-associated disease (MOGAD) and neuromyelitis (NMO). Double vision and shaky (or jumpy) vision are other concerning visual symptoms for people with MS. The reason for these eye movement abnormalities and detailed treatment options are covered. Experts share the latest advancements in vision research for those living with multiple sclerosis. Barry Singer MD, Director of The MS Center for Innovations in Care, interviews: Dr. Anneke van der Walt is an Associate Professor of Neurology at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She is the head of the MS and Neuro-ophthalmology Research Group. She completed her undergraduate work in South Africa and completed her neurology training and PhD at the University of Melbourne. She is also the Chief Operating Officer of MSBase Foundation. Dr. Tariq Bhatti is a neuro-ophthalmologist currently at Kaiser Permanente in Northern California. He completed his neuro-ophthalmology fellowship at Emory.  Dr. Bhatti was most recently a Professor of Ophthalmology and Neurology at Mayo Clinic and previously Chief of Neuro-ophthalmology at Duke University. 

Gay Mystery Podcast
Bud Gundy On His Newest Release, The History Of Alcatraz, And Working In Public Broadcasting

Gay Mystery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 56:16


Ep: 119: How risqué was Tales of the City and was there male nudity? This isn't the primary topic but one of the many Bud Gundy discusses with Brad, including Bud's latest novel Inherit the Lightening, and even some history about Alcatraz.Podcast Website:www.queerwritersofcrime.comSign up for the show's newsletter:https://tinyurl.com/qworcrimenewsletterCheck out blog posts by guests on the website:https://www.queerwritersofcrime.com/blog/Chip in and help support this podcast:buymeacoffee.com/queerwriters   Disclosure: To cover the cost of producing Queer Writers of Crime, some of the links below are affiliate links. This means that, at zero cost to you, Brad will earn an affiliate commission if you click through the link and finalize a purchase.Get a Kindle Paperwhite:https://amzn.to/3KCfUuOBud Gundy's Website:www.budgundy.comPurchase Inherit the Lighteninghttps://www.boldstrokesbooks.com/books/inherit-the-lightning-by-bud-gundy-3866-bFind Bud on Facebookwww.facebook/budgundyauthorBud on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/BudGundyBud's Amazon Page:https://amzn.to/37d00cBBud Gundy is Lambda Literary Award finalist and an Executive Producer and on-air host at KQED, the PBS and NPR affiliate for Northern California. In 2003, he received an Emmy Award for producing the documentary Lonely Island: Hidden Alcatraz. He won his second Emmy Award in 2016 for directing the KQED News special, State of Surveillance. He's been nominated for two other works.He began his television career in 1983 as the Program Director at the Nationality Broadcasting Network in Lakewood, Ohio, a job which has given him a lifetime of funny stories to share. Following that, he worked as a Desk Assistant, Associate Producer and Producer for the various newscasts at WKYC, the NBC affiliate in Cleveland, Ohio.  The stories from Channel 3 aren't as funny, but perhaps more illuminating.  After stints as a business reporter and a marketing executive in Northern California, he joined San Francisco's KQED in 1994, and loves the environment and dedication to the audience at PBS and NPR.  You can see and hear him on-the-air, asking for support during those annoying pledge drives. Brad's Website:bradshreve.comSupport Requeered Tales  re-publishing award-winning, post-Stonewall gay and lesbian fiction — with a focus on mystery, literary and horror/sci-fi genres.requeeredtales.comKindly give to The Trevor Project, a much-needed charity focusing not only suicide prevention for LGBTQ youth, but also helps to get answers and information to support them, and connect with an international community of LGBTQ youth aged 13 - 24.https://www.thetrevorproject.org/

Places I Remember with Lea Lane
Portland, Seattle, And The Glorious -- And Sometimes 'Weird' -- Pacific Northwest

Places I Remember with Lea Lane

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 26:13


,Marie Sutro, who sets her newest crime thriller, Dark Obsession, in the Pacific Northwest, loves the beauty and creativity of Oregon and Washington State. She shares info and memories of the best -- from Portland to Seattle, and all around the spectacular region. We begin the episode talking of Portland and environs, including its creative "weirdness":  the Oregon Coast and inland Oregon, including  the Dunes; charming, artsy Ashland; Crater Lake, the bluest, deepest lake in the world, and the historic Gold Rush Towns.In Washington State, we discuss Seattle and nearby beauty spots including Puget Sound and the Olympic Peninsula.And we end with Lea's and Marie's two special memories of the PNW -- each very different._____Marie Sutro is an award-winning and bestselling mystery author, as well as a travel enthusiast. In 2018, she won the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Award for the Best New Voice in Fiction, for her debut novel, Dark Associations. She is a member of Sisters In Crime and volunteers with California Library Literacy Services.Her father, grandfather and great-grandfather all served in the San Francisco Police Department, collectively inspiring her writing. She resides in Northern California and is currently at work on the next book in the Kate Barnes series. _____Podcast host Lea Lane blogs at forbes.com, has traveled to over 100 countries, written nine books, including Places I Remember, and contributed to many guidebooks. Contact Lea, on Twitter: @lealane ; on Insta, PlacesIRememberLeaLane;  on  Facebook, Places I Remember with Lea Lane. Lea's Website: placesirememberlealane.com.  New episodes drop every other week, on Tuesdays. Please tell your friends, family and colleagues about us, and follow, rate and review this award-winning travel podcast!

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.
Chetna Makan (The Great British Bakeoff,Chetna's Healthy Indian,)The Well Seasoned Librarian- Season 7 Episode 1

The Well Seasoned Librarian : A conversation about Food, Food Writing and more.

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 42:33


Bio: "I was born and brought up in a small town in Central India called Jabalpur. I then moved to Mumbai to train as a Fashion Designer in NIFT. After my college, I worked in Mumbai for a few years before moving to the U.K. in 2004. I have always been interested in food and cooking and have been greatly inspired by my mum's cooking who has taught me everything I know about flavours. After having my 2 children I found my interest in baking grow, it was a perfect way for me to relax and found it very relaxing. I am a creative yet meticulous baker and find baking a perfect outlet for my creativity. Trying out new techniques and challenging myself is what keeps me going. Being on Great British Bake Off 2014 has been an amazing journey and has given me the confidence to try new combinations of flavours. I will always cherish this experience and the time I spent in the tent with my fellow bakers. Soon after the show, I started work on my first book which is all about Indian flavours in some very western bakes. The book is called ‘The Cardamom Trail' and was published in 2016. After that, I went on to write my second book called ‘Chai, Chaat and Chutney' which is all about Indian street food from the 4 corners of India. I wrote this book after intensive research into the 4 cities of India to find some of the most delicious street food. This book was published in 2017. My third book ‘Chetna's Healthy Indian' is all about the food I cook at home for my family. It is the quick, delicious and healthy recipes we enjoy to balance out all the cakes I bake. This book was published in 2019. This episode is sponsored by Culinary Historians of Northern California, a Bay Area educational group dedicated to the study of food, drink, and culture in human history. To learn more about this organization and their work, please visit their website at www.chnorcal.org If you follow my podcast and enjoy it, I'm on @buymeacoffee. If you like my work, you can buy me a coffee and share your thoughts