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Pathfinder Church Messages
Authority on Demand - Succession (Week 6)

Pathfinder Church Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 44:43


Pathfinder Church | June 26, 2022 | Doug MaussMartin Luther paved the way for the individual's right to decide—he prioritized each believer's conscience over the dictates of the church authorities and even over hundreds of years' worth of traditions. How much authority should tradition have in our lives? Conversely, are we our own best decider—should our individual choices supersede those of the group? Website | https://pathfinderstl.orgOnline Giving | https://pathfinderstl.org/givePodcasts | https://pathfinderstl.org/podcastsFacebook | https://facebook.com/pathfinderstlInstagram |  https://instagram.com/pathfinderstlSt. John School | http://stjls.orgContact Us | churchinfo@pathfinderstl.org

10-Minute Contrarian
Ep55: WATCHLIST - Polygon/MATIC

10-Minute Contrarian

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 11:56


At the very top of my watchlist is the MATIC token from Polygon.  This blockchain is murdering it, in so many ways, in particular the way we care about most here on the 10 Minute Contrarian Podcast.   Recommended Crypto Trading Platform (Bonus and Contest Eligibility) - https://nononsenseforex.com/cryptocurrencies/best-crypto-trading-platform/   Blueberry Markets Blog (Top FX Broker) - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/blueberry-markets-review-my-top-broker-for-2019/   Markets.com Blog (Other top FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/markets-com-review/   US Residents Go Here (Top US FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/ig-us-review/   Sam Bankman-Fried Blog Post -  https://nononsenseforex.com/cryptocurrencies/sam-bankman-frieds-political-strategy/   Follow VP on Twitter https://twitter.com/This_Is_VP4X Check out my Forex trading material too! https://nononsenseforex.com/   The host of this podcast is not a licensed financial advisor, and nothing heard on this podcast should be taken as financial advice.  Do your own research and understand all financial decisions and the results therein are yours and yours alone.  The host is not responsible for the actions of their sponsors and/or affiliates.  Conversely, views expressed on this podcast are that of the host only and may not reflect the views of any companies mentioned. Trading Forex involves risk.  Losses can exceed deposits. We are not taking requests for episode topics at this time.  Thank you for understanding.

Bob, Groz and Tom
Hour 4 - If it at first you don't succeed, spend spend some more ALSO M's reliever Ken Giles

Bob, Groz and Tom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:02


Are the Mariners hesitant to spend because of years of doing that and missing the playoffs? Conversely, are the Seahawks spending too frivolously on non-impact players? Bump and Stacy look at both situations to start off hour four. Fresh off his first relief appearance in nearly two season, M's reliever Ken Giles joins Bump and Stacy to offer his perspective on his long road back to the bigs. What I Need to Know finishes Wednesday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 06.22.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 59:33


Videos: 1. The great recycling LIE (what really happens to plastic) (10:44) 2. Is It Game Over? New NASA Report (5:30) 2. You won't believe what Justin Trudeau's government just did | Redacted with Clayton Morris (13:26) 3. Neil Oliver – Who pulls the strings – Pandemic Treaty, Wealth & Power? (2:00) 4. He's EXPOSING the truth in Syria and they don't like it | Redacted conversation w/ Kevork Almassian (first 10:00) 5. Russian Ruble now best performing currency in the world this year… another example of how US sanctions have failed. 6. Vanessa Beeley and Eva Bartlett are smeared by the Guardian for reporting the truth (3:07) 7. Kim Iversen: Inside The SECRET Bilderberg Meetings Between Spies, War Hawks And World Leaders (9:28) 8. New Rule: The Misinformation Age | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO) 9. https://theduran.locals.com/post/2311112/title  10. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3maIN4-ZJl8    Strawberry Compound Shown to Protect Against Alzheimer's, Memory Loss Salk Institute for Biological Studies, June 16, 2022  The thought of losing your mind is a frightening one, but one in three Americans die with Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Regardless how frightening the possibility is, the chances of it happening to you aren't exactly slim, which means prevention should be at the forefront of your mind. A recent study from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies indicates prevention could be as simple as a natural foods diet—rich in fruits (such as strawberries) and vegetables containing something called fisetin. Fisetin is a flavonol found in strawberries, mangoes, cucumbers, and other vegetables and fruits. Researchers with the Salk Institute found this simple compound can actually reduce the risk of Alzheimer's in mice, and could be effective in humans as well. Maher and her team have documented that fisetin has both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in the brain. It is also able to turn on a cellular pathway related to memory function. The team looked to a type of mouse with mutated genes making them vulnerable to Alzheimer's. At three months old, the researchers began feeding the mice a diet enriched with fisetin. Mice who hadn't received the fisetin began struggling in the mazes at nine months of age, but the fisetin mice performed as well as normal (non-predisposed) mice at both nine and twelve months of age. Avocados may hold the answer to beating leukemia University of Waterloo (Canada), June 16, 2022 Rich, creamy, nutritious and now cancer fighting. New research reveals that molecules derived from avocados could be effective in treating a form of cancer. Professor Paul Spagnuolo from the University of Waterloo has discovered a lipid in avocados that combats acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by targeting the root of the disease – leukemia stem cells. Worldwide, there are few drug treatments available to patients that target leukemia stem cells. “The stem cell is really the cell that drives the disease,” said Professor Spagnuolo, in Waterloo's School of Pharmacy. “The stem cell is largely responsible for the disease developing and it's the reason why so many patients with leukemia relapse. We've performed many rounds of testing to determine how this new drug works at a molecular level and confirmed that it targets stem cells selectively, leaving healthy cells unharmed.” Inability to stand on one leg for 10 seconds in mid to later life linked to near doubling in risk of death Exercise Medicine Clinic-CLINIMEX (Brazil) and University of Eastern Finland, June 21, 2022 The inability to stand on one leg for 10 seconds in mid- to later life is linked to a near doubling in the risk of death from any cause within the next 10 years, finds research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine This simple and safe balance test could be included in routine health checks for older adults, say the researchers. The researchers wanted to find out whether a balance test might be a reliable indicator of a person's risk of death from any cause within the next decade, and, as such, might therefore merit inclusion in routine health checks in later life. Participants were asked to stand on one leg for 10 seconds without any additional support.  To improve standardization of the test, participants were asked to place the front of the free foot on the back of the opposite lower leg, while keeping their arms by their sides and their gaze fixed straight ahead. Up to three attempts on either foot were permitted. In all, around 1 in 5 (20.5%; 348) participants failed to pass the test. The inability to do so rose in tandem with age, more or less doubling at subsequent 5 year intervals from the age of 51-55 onwards.  The proportions of those unable to stand on one leg for 10 seconds were: nearly 5% among 51-55 year-olds; 8% among 56-60 year-olds; just under 18% among 61-65 year-olds; and just under 37% among 66-70 year-olds.  More than half (around 54%) of those aged 71-75 were unable to complete the test. In other words, people in this age group were more than 11 times as likely to fail the test as those just 20 years younger. During an average monitoring period of 7 years, 123 (7%) people died: cancer (32%); cardiovascular disease (30%); respiratory disease (9%); and COVID-19 complications (7%). The proportion of deaths among those who failed the test was significantly higher: 17.5% vs. 4.5%, reflecting an absolute difference of just under 13%. Anxious Children have Bigger “Fear Centers” in the Brain Stanford University School of Medicine, June 16, 2022 The amygdala is a key “fear center” in the brain. Alterations in the development of the amygdala during childhood may have an important influence on the development of anxiety problems, reports a new study in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry.

 Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine recruited 76 children, 7 to 9 years of age, a period when anxiety-related traits and symptoms can first be reliably identified.  The researchers found that children with high levels of anxiety had enlarged amygdala volume and increased connectivity with other brain regions responsible for attention, emotion perception, and regulation, compared to children with low levels of anxiety. They also developed an equation that reliably predicted the children's anxiety level from the MRI measurements of amygdala volume and amygdala functional connectivity.

The most affected region was the basolateral portion of the amygdala, a subregion of the amygdala implicated in fear learning and the processing of emotion-related information.

 Our study represents an important step in characterizing altered brain systems and developing predictive biomarkers in the identification for young children at risk for anxiety disorders,” Qin said.  New research: Olive oil compound destroys cancer cells in 30 minutes Rutgers University & Hunter College, June 12, 2022  Oleocanthal, a polyphenolic, therapeutic compound found in olive oil is the subject of a new anti-cancer study performed by nutritional science and cancer biology researchers with The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers and Hunter's College in New York City. Programmed cell death, known as apoptosis takes approximately 16-24 hours. Dynamic new research just published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Oncology blew scientists away – when exposed to oleocanthal, a polyphenol compound found in olive oil, cancerous cells died within 30 minutes to an hour. While researchers previously understood that compounds in olive oil were capable of killing cancer cells, until now, such short apoptosis had not been observed. Even more fascinating was when the team looked closely to surmise why apoptosis was occurring under such swift circumstances – they discovered that cancer cells were being killed by their own enzymes. And, not only one isolated type of cancerous cell, but all of the cancerous cells they were examining. Unlike chemotherapeutic pharmaceuticals that devastate healthy cellular activity, the therapeutic polyphenolic compound found in olive oil kills cancer while maintaining vitality among healthy cells. As Paul Breslin, one of the study's authors at Rutgers noted, while cancerous cells died, healthy cells were not harmed, but rather the oleocanthal “put them to sleep.” The lifecycle of healthy cells was only temporarily affected in this way, without any negative observations and in approximately 24 hours, the healthy cells resumed their life cycle.  Sports, not screens: The key to happier, healthier children University of South Australia, June 21, 2022 Whether it's sports practice, music lessons or a casual catch up with friends, when children are involved in after-school activities, they're more likely to feel happier and healthier than their counterparts who are glued to a screen. In a new study conducted by the University of South Australia, researchers found that children's well-being is heightened when they participate in extra-curricular activities, yet lowered when they spent time on social media or playing video games. Published in BMC Pediatrics, the study analyzed data from 61,759 school students in years 4 to 9, assessing the average number of days per week children participated in after-school activities (3–6pm), and measure these against well-being factors—happiness, sadness, worry, engagement, perseverance, optimism, emotion regulation, and life satisfaction. It found that most students watched TV about four days of the school week and spent time on social media about three days of the week. Our study highlights how some out-of-school activities can boost children's well-being, while others—particularly screens—can chip away at their mental and physical health. “Screens are a massive distraction for children of all ages. And whether children are gaming, watching TV or on social media, there's something about all screens that's damaging to their well-being. Students in lower socio-economic backgrounds who frequently played sports were 15% more likely to be optimistic, 14% more likely to be happy and satisfied with their life, and 10% more likely to be able to regulate their emotions. Conversely, children who played video games and used social media almost always had lower levels of well-being: up to 9% less likely to be happy, up to 8% to be less optimism and 11% to be more likely to give up on things.

Screaming in the Cloud
Transparency in Cloud Security with Gafnit Amiga

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 30:10


Full Description / Show Notes Gafnit explains how she found a vulnerability in RDS, an Amazon database service (1:40) Gafnit and Corey discuss the concept of not being able to win in cloud security (7:20) Gafnit talks about transparency around security breaches (11:02) Corey and Gafnit discuss effectively communicating with customers about security (13:00) Gafnit answers the question “Did you come at the RDS vulnerability exploration from a perspective of being deeper on the Postgres side or deeper on the AWS side? (18:10) Corey and Gafnit talk about the risk of taking a pre-existing open source solution and offering it as a managed service (19:07) Security measures in cloud-native approaches versus cloud-hosted (22:41) Gafnit and Corey discuss the security community (25:04) About GafnitGafnit Amiga is the Director of Security Research at Lightspin. Gafnit has 7 years of experience in Application Security and Cloud Security Research. Gafnit leads the Security Research Group at Lightspin, focused on developing new methods to conduct research for new cloud native services and Kubernetes. Previously, Gafnit was a lead product security engineer at Salesforce focused on their core platform and a security researcher at GE Digital. Gafnit holds a Bs.c in Computer Science from IDC Herzliya and a student for Ms.c in Data Science.Links Referenced: Lightspin: https://www.lightspin.io/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/gafnitav LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gafnit-amiga-b1357b125/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We've taken a bit of a security bent to the conversations that we've been having on this show and over the past year or so and, well, today's episode is no different. In fact, we're going a little bit deeper than we normally tend to. My guest today is Gafnit Amiga, who's the Director of Security Research at Lightspin. Gafnit, thank you for joining me.Gafnit: Hey, Corey. Thank you for inviting me to the show.Corey: You sort of burst onto the scene—and by ‘scene,' I of course mean the cloud space, at least to the level of community awareness—back, I want to say in April of 2022 when you posted a very in-depth blog post about exploiting RDS and some misconfigurations on AWS's side to effectively display internal service credentials for the RDS service itself. Now, that sounds like it's one of those incredibly deep, incredibly murky things because it is, let's be clear. At a high level, can you explain to me exactly what it is that you found and how you did it? Gafnit: Yes, so, RDS is database service of Amazon. It's a managed service where you can choose the engine that you prefer. One of them is Postgres. There, I found the vulnerability. The vulnerability was in the extension in the log_fdw—so it's for—like, stands for Foreign Data Wrapper—where this extension is, therefore reading the logs directly of the engine, and then you can query it using SQL queries, which should be simpler and easy to use.And this extension enables you to provide a path. And there was a path traversal, but the traversal happened only when you dropped a validation of the wrapper. And this is how I managed to read local files from the database EC2 machine, which shouldn't happen because this is a managed service and you shouldn't have any access to the underlying host.Corey: It's always odd when the abstraction starts leaking, from an AWS perspective. I know that a friend of mine was on Aurora during the beta and was doing some high-performance work and suddenly started seeing SQL errors about /var/temp filling up, which is, for those who are not well versed in SQL, and even for those who are, that's not the sort of thing you tend to expect to show up on there. It feels like the underlying system tends to leak in—particularly in RDS sense—into what is otherwise at least imagined to be a fully-managed service.Gafnit: Yes because sometimes they want to give you an informative error so you will be able to realize what happened and what caused to the error, and sometimes they prefer not to give you too many information because they don't want you to get to the underlying machine. This is why, for example, you don't get a regular superuser; you have an RDS superuser in the database.Corey: It seems to me that this is sort of a problem of layering different security models on top of each other. If you take a cloud-native database that they designed, start to finish, themselves, like DynamoDB, the entire security model for Dynamo, as best I can determine, is wrapped up within IAM. So, if you know IAM—spoiler, nobody knows IAM completely, it seems—but if you have that on lock you've got it; there's nothing else you need to think about. Whereas with RDS, you have to layer on IAM to get access to the database and what you're allowed to do with it.But then there's an entirely separate user management system, in many respects, of local users for other Postgres or MySQL or any other systems that were using, to a point where even when they started supporting IRM for authentication to RDS at the database user level. It was flagged in the documentation with a bunch of warnings of, “Don't do this for high-volume stuff; only do this in development style environments.” So, it's clear that it has been a difficult marriage, for lack of a better term. And then you have to layer on all the other stuff that if God forbid, you're in a multi-cloud style environment or working with Kubernetes on top of all of this, and it seems like you're having to pick and choose between four or five different levels of security modeling, as well as understand how all of those things interplay together. How come we don't see things like this happening four times a day as a result?Gafnit: Well, I guess that there are more issues being found, but not always published but I think that this is what makes it more complex for both sides. Creating managed services with resources and third parties that everybody knows. To make it easy for them to use requires a deep understanding of the existing permission models of the service where you want to integrate it with your permission model and how the combination works. So, you actually need to understand how every change is going to affect the restrictions that you want to have. So, for example, if you don't want the database users to be able to read-write or do a network activity, so you really need to understand the permission model of the Postgres itself. So, it makes it more complicated for development, but it's also good for researchers because they already know Postgres and they have a good starting point.Corey: My philosophy has always been when you're trying to secure something, you need to have at least a topical level of understanding of the entire system, start to finish. One of the problems I've had with the idea of microservices as is frequently envisioned is that there's separation, but not real separation, so you have to hand-wave over a whole bunch of the security model. If you don't understand something, I believe it's very difficult to secure it. And let's be honest, even if you do understand [laugh] something, it can be very difficult to secure it. And the cloud vendors with IAM and similar systems don't seem to be doing themselves any favors, given the sheer complexity and the capabilities that they're demanding of themselves, even for having one AWS service talk to another one, but in the right way.And it's finicky, and it's nuanced, and debugging it becomes a colossal pain. And finally, at least those of us who are bad at these things, finally say, “The hell with it,” and they just grant full access from Service A to Service B—in the confines of a test environment. I'm not quite that nuts myself, most days. And then it's the biggest lie we always tell ourselves is once we have something overscoped like that, usually for CI/CD, it's, “Oh, todo: I'll go back and fix that later.” Yeah, I'm looking back five years ago and that's still on my todo list.For some reason, it's never been the number one priority. And in all likelihood, it won't be until right after it really should have been my number one priority. It feels like in cloud security particularly, you can't win, you can only not lose. I always found that to be something of a depressing perspective and I didn't accept it for the longest time. But increasingly, these days, it started to feel like that is the state of the world. Am I wrong on that? Am I just being too dour?Gafnit: What do you mean by you cannot lose?Corey: There's no winning in security from my perspective because no one is going to say, “All right. We won the security. Problem solved. The end.” Companies don't view security as a value-add. It is only about a downside risk mitigation play.It's, “Yay, another day of not getting breached.” And the failure mode from there is, “Okay, well, we got breached, but we found out about it ourselves immediately internally, rather than reading about it in The New York Times in two weeks.” The winning is just the steady-state, the status quo. It's just all different flavors of losing beyond that.Gafnit: So, I don't think it's quite the case because I can tell that they do do always an active work on securing the services and their structure because I went over other extensions before reaching to the log foreign data wrapper, and they actually excluded high-risk functionalities that could help me to achieve privileged access to the underlying host. And they do it with other services as well because they do always do the security review before having it integrated externally. But you know, it's an endless zone. You can always have something. Security vulnerabilities are always [arrays 00:09:06]. So everyone, whenever they can help and to search and to give their value, it's appreciated.Corey: I feel like I need to clarify a bit of nuance. When your blog post first came out talking about this, I was, well let's say a little irritated toward AWS on Twitter and other places. And Twitter is not a place for nuance, it is easy to look at that and think, “Oh, I was upset at AWS for having a vulnerability.” I am not, I want to be very clear on that. Now, it's certainly not good, but these are computers; that is the nature of how they work.If you want to completely secure computer, cut the power to it, sink it in concrete and then drop it in the ocean. And even then, there are exceptions to all of that. So, it's always a question of not blocking all risk; it's about trade-offs and what risk is acceptable. And to AWS is credit, they do say that they practice defense-in-depth. Being able to access the credentials for the running RDS service on top of the instance that it was running on, while that's certainly not good, isn't as if you'd suddenly had keys to everything inside of AWS and all their security model crumbles away before you.They do the right thing and the people working on these things are incredibly good. And they work very hard at these things. My concern and my complaint is, as much as I enjoy the work that you do and reading these blog posts talking about how you did it, it bothers me that I have to learn about a vulnerability in a service for which I pay not small amounts of money—RDS is the number one largest charge in my AWS bill every month—and I have to hear about it from a third-party rather than the vendor themselves. In this case, it was a full day later, where after your blog post went up, and they finally had a small security disclosure on AWS's site talking about it. And that pattern feels to me like it leads nowhere good.Gafnit: So, transparency is a key word here. And when I wrote the post, I asked if they want to add anything from their side, and they told that they already reached out to the vulnerable customers and they helped them to migrate to their fixed version. So, from their side, it didn't felt it's necessary to add it over there. But I did mention the fact that I did the investigation and no customer data was hurt. Yeah, but I think that if there will be maybe a more organized process for any submission of any vulnerability that where all the steps are aligned, it will help everyone and anyone can be informed with everything that happens.Corey: I have always been extraordinarily impressed by people who work at AWS and handle a lot of the triaging of vulnerability reports. Zack Glick, before he left, was doing an awful lot of that Dan [Erson 00:12:05] continues to be a one of the bright lights of AWS, from my perspective, just as far as customer communication and understanding exactly what the customer perspective is. And as individuals, I see nothing but stars over at AWS. To be clear, ‘Nothing but Stars' is also the name of most of my IAM policies, but that's neither here nor there.It seems like, on some level, there's a communications and policy misalignment, on some level, because I look at this and every conversation I ever have with AWS's security folks, they are eminently reasonable, they're incredibly intelligent, and they care. There's no mistaking that they legitimately care. But somewhere at the scale of company they're at, incentives get crossed, and everyone has a different position they're looking at these things from, and it feels like that disjointedness leads to almost a misalignment as far as how to effectively communicate things like this to customers.Gafnit: Yes, it looks like this is the case, but if more things will be discovered and published, I think that they will have eventually an organized process for that. Because I guess the researchers do find things over there, but they're not always being published for several reasons. But yes, they should work on that. [laugh].Corey: And that is part of the challenge as well, where AWS does not have a public vulnerability disclosure program. [unintelligible 00:13:30] hacker one, they don't have a public bug bounty program. They have a vulnerability disclosure email address, and the people working behind that are some of the hardest working folks in tech, but there is no unified way of building a community of researchers around the idea of exploring this. And that is a challenge because you have reported vulnerabilities, I have reported significantly fewer vulnerabilities, but it always feels like it's a hurry up and wait scenario where the communication is not always immediate and clear. And at best, it feels like we often get a begrudging, “Thank you.”Versus all right, if we just throw ethics completely out the window and decide instead that now we're going to wind up focusing on just effectively selling it to the highest bidder, the value of, for example, a hypervisor escape on EC2 for example, is incalculable. There is no amount of money that a bug bounty program could offer for something like that compared to what it is worth to the right bad actor at the right time. So, the vulnerabilities that we hear about are already we're starting from a basis of people who have a functioning sense of ethics, people who are not deeply compromised trying to do something truly nefarious. What worries me is the story of—what are the stories that we aren't seeing? What are the things that are being found where instead of fighting against the bureaucracy around disclosure and the rest, people just use them for their own ends? And I'm gratified by the level of response I see from AWS on the things that they do find out about, but I always have to wonder, what aren't we seeing?Gafnit: That's a good question. And it really depends on their side if they choose to expose it or not.Corey: Part of the challenge too, is the messaging and the communication around it and who gets credit and the rest. And it's weird, whenever they release some additional feature to one of their big headline services, there are blog posts, there are keynote speeches, there are customer references, they go on speaking tours, and the emails, oh, God, they never stopped the emails talking about how amazing all of these things are. But whenever there's a security vulnerability or a disclosure like this—and to be fair, AWS's response to this speaks very well of them—it's like you have to go sneak down into the dark sub-basement, with the filing cabinet behind the leopard sign and the rest, to even find out that these things exist. And I feel like they're not doing themselves any favors by developing that reputation for lack of transparency around these things. “Well, while there was no customer impact, so why would we talk about it?”Because otherwise, you're setting up a myth that there never is a vulnerability on the side of—what is it that you're building as a cloud provider. And when there is a problem down the road—because there always is going to be; nothing is perfect—people are going to say, “Hey, wait a minute. You didn't talk about this. What else haven't you talked about?”And it rebounds on them with sometimes really unfortunate side effects. With Azure as a counterexample here, we see a number of Azure exploits where, “Yeah, turned out that we had access to other customers' data and Azure had no idea until we told them.” And Azure does it statements about, “Oh, we have no evidence of any of this stuff being used improperly.” Okay, that can mean that you've either check your logs and things are great or you don't have logging. I don't know that necessarily is something I trust.Conversely, AWS has said in the past, “We have looked at the audit logs for this service dating back to its launch years ago, and have validated that none of that has never been used like this.” One of those responses breeds an awful lot of customer trust. The other one doesn't. And I just wish AWS knew a little bit more how good crisis communication around vulnerabilities can improve customer trust rather than erode it.Gafnit: Yes, and I think that, as you said, there will always be vulnerabilities. And I think that we are expecting to find more, so being able to communicate as clearly as you can and to expose things about maybe the fakes and how the investigation is being done, even in a high level, for all the vulnerabilities can gain more trust from the customer side.Corey: DoorDash had a problem. As their cloud-native environment scaled and developers delivered new features, their monitoring system kept breaking down. In an organization where data is used to make better decisions about technology and about the business, losing observability means the entire company loses their competitive edge. With Chronosphere, DoorDash is no longer losing visibility into their applications suite. The key? Chronosphere is an open-source compatible, scalable, and reliable observability solution that gives the observability lead at DoorDash business, confidence, and peace of mind. Read the full success story at snark.cloud/chronosphere. That's snark.cloud slash C-H-R-O-N-O-S-P-H-E-R-E.Corey: You have experience in your background specifically around application security and cloud security research. You've been doing this for seven years at this point. When you started looking into this, did you come at the RDS vulnerability exploration from a perspective of being deeper on the Postgres side or deeper on the AWS side of things?Gafnit: So, it was both. I actually came to the RDS lead from another service where there was something [about 00:18:21] in the application level. But then I reached to an RDS and thought, well, it will be really nice to find thing over here and to reach the underlying machine. And when I entered to the RDS zone, I started to look at it from the application security eyes, but you have to know the cloud as well because there are integrations with S3, you need to understand the IAM model. So, you need a mix of both to exploit specifically this kind of issue. But you can also be database experts because the payload is a pure SQL.Corey: It always seems to me that this is an inherent risk in trying to take something that is pre-existing is an open-source solution—Postgres is one example but there are many more—and offer it as a managed service. Because I think one of the big misunderstandings is that when—well, AWS is just going to take something like Redis and offer that as a managed service, it's okay, I accept that they will offer a thing that respects the endpoints and then acts as if it were Redis, but under the hood, there is so much in all of these open-source projects that is built for optionality of wherever you want to run this thing, it will run there; whatever type of workload you want to throw at it, it can work. Whereas when you have a cloud provider converting these things into a managed service, they are going to strip out an awful lot of those things. An easy example might be okay, there's this thing that winds up having to calculate for the way the hard drives on a computer work and from a storage perspective.Well, all the big cloud providers already have interesting ways that they have solved storage. Every team does not reimplement that particular wheel; they use in-house services. Chubby's file locking, for example, over on Google side is a classic example of this that they've talked about an awful lot so every team building something doesn't have to rediscover all of that. So, the idea that, oh, we're just going to take up this open-source thing, clone it off a GitHub, fork it, and then just throw it into production as a managed service seems more than a little naive. What's your experience around seeing, as you get more [laugh] into the weeds of these things than most customers are allowed to get, what's your take on this?Do you find that this looks an awful lot like the open-source version that we all use? Or is it something that looks like it has been heavily customized to take advantage of what AWS is offering internally as underlying bedrock services?Gafnit: So, from what I saw until now, they do want to save the functionality so you will have the same experience as you're working with the same service that not on AWS because you're you are used to that. So, they are not doing dramatic changes, but they do want to reduce the risk in the security space. So, there will be some functionalities that they will not let you to do. And this is because of the managed party in areas where the full workload is deployed in your account and you can access it anyway, so they will not have the same security restrictions because you can access the workload anyway. But when it's managed, they need to prevent you from accessing the underlying host, for example. And they do the changes, but they're really picked to the specific actions that can lead you to that.Corey: It also feels like RDS is something of a, I don't want to call it a legacy service because it is clearly still very much actively developed, but it's what we'll call it a ‘classic service.' When I look at a new AWS launch, I tend to mentally bucket them into two things. There's the cloud-native approach, and we've already talked about DynamoDB. That would be one example of this. And there's the cloud-hosted model where you have to worry about things like instances and security groups and the networking stuff, and so on and so forth, where it's basically feels like they're running their thing on top of a pile of EC2 instances, and that abstraction starts leaking.Part of me wonders if looking at some of these older services like RDS, they made decisions in the design and build out of these things that they might not if they were to go ahead and build it out today. I mean, Aurora is an example of what that might look like. Have you found as you start looking around the various security foibles of different cloud services, that the security posture of some of the more cloud-native approaches is better or worse or the same as the cloud-hosted world?Gafnit: Well, so for example, in the several issues that were found, and also here in the RDS where you can see credentials in a file, this is not a best practice in security space. And so, definitely there are things to improve, even if it's developed on the provider side. But it's really hard to answer this question because in a managed area where you don't have any access, it's hard to tell how it's configured and if it's configured properly. So, you need to have some certification from their side.Corey: This is, on some level, part of the great security challenge, especially for something that is not itself open-source, where they obviously have terrific security teams, don't get me wrong. At no point do I want to ever come across a saying, “Oh, those AWS people don't know how security works.” That is provably untrue. But there is something to be said for the value of having a strong community in the security space focusing on this from the outside of looking at these things, of even helping other people contextualize these things. And I'm a little disheartened that none of the major cloud providers seem to have really embraced the idea of a cloud security community, to the point where the one that I'm most familiar with, the cloud security forum Slack team seems to be my default place where I go for context on things.Because I dabble. I keep my hand in when it comes to security, but I'm certainly no expert. That's what people like you are for. I make fun of clouds and I work on the billing parts of it and that's about as far as it goes for me. But being able to get context around is this a big deal? Is this description that a company is giving, is it accurate?For example, when your post came out, I had not heard of Lightspin in this context. So, reaching out to a few people I trusted, is this legitimate? The answer was, “Yes. It's legitimate and it's brilliant. That's a company that keep your eye on.” Great. That's useful context and there's no way to buy that. It has to come from having those conversations with people in the [broader 00:24:57] sense of the community. What's your experience been looking at the community side of the world of security?Gafnit: Well, so I think that the cloud security has a great community, and this is one of the things that we at Lightspin really want to increase and push forward. And we see ourselves as a security-driven company. We always do the best to publish a post, even detailed posts, not about vulnerabilities, about how things works in the cloud and how things are being evaluated, to release open-source tools where you can use them to check your environment even if you're not a customer. And I think that the community is always willing to explain and to investigate together. And it's a welcome effort, but I think that the messaging should be also for all layers, you know, also for the DevOps and the developers because it can really help if it will start from this point from their side, as well.Corey: It needs to be baked in, from start to finish.Gafnit: Yeah, exactly.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where's the best place for them to find you?Gafnit: So, you can find me on Twitter and on LinkedIn, and feel free to reach out.Corey: We will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:26:25]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time today. I appreciate it.Gafnit: Thank you, Corey.Corey: Gafnit Amiga, Director of Security Research at Lightspin. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, and if it's on the YouTubes, smash the like and subscribe buttons, which I'm told are there. Whereas if you've hated this podcast, same story, like and subscribe and the buttons, leave a five-star review on a various platform, but also leave an insulting, angry comment about how my observation that our IAM policies are all full of stars is inaccurate. And then I will go ahead and delete that comment later because you didn't set a strong password.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

RESTōR.church podcast
Resistance // The Flesh // Pr Gene Troyer

RESTōR.church podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 31:58


Deceitful ideas feed our disordered desires but this does not need to lead to the normalization of sin. Instead, discipline your desires, curb some of your wants and cultivate others and experience the ability to resist the enemies of your soul. Because every action has a reaction and the reaction is always disproportionate to the action. Small compromises turn into big consequences. Conversely, seemingly insignificant acts of good have a way of turning into unexpected, oversized blessings.

In Conversation: An OUP Podcast
Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

In Conversation: An OUP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland.

New Books in Medicine
Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in Animal Studies
Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Animal Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/animal-studies

New Books in Economic and Business History
Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Robert N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher, "The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 84:32


Insects are seldom mentioned in discussions surrounding human history, yet they have dramatically impacted today's societies. The Silken Thread: Five Insects and Their Impacts on Human History (Oxford UP, 2021) places them front and center, offering a multidisciplinary view of their significance. Diseases vectored by insects have killed more people than all weapons of war. Fleas are common pests, but some can transmit illnesses such as the bubonic plague. In fact, three pandemics can be traced back to them. Epidemics of typhus have been caused by lice. Conversely, humans have also benefitted from insects for millennia. Silk comes from silkworms and honey comes from bees. Despite the undeniably powerful effects of insects on humans, their stories are typically left out of our history books. In The Silken Thread, entomologists Robert. N. Wiedenmann and J. Ray Fisher link the history of insects to the history of empires, cultural exchanges, and warfare. The book narrows its focus to just five insects: a moth, a flea, a louse, a mosquito, and a bee. The authors explore the impact of these insects throughout time and the common threads connecting them. Using biology to complement history, they showcase these small creatures in a whole new light. On every page, the authors thoughtfully analyze the links between history and entomology. The book begins with silkworms, which have been farmed for centuries. It then moves to fleas and their involvement in the spread of the plague before introducing the role lice played in the Black Death, wars, and immigration. The following section concerns yellow fever mosquitos, emphasizing the effects of yellow fever in the Americas and the connection to sugar and slavery. After discussing the importance of western honey bees, the authors tie these five insects together in an exciting closing chapter. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

10-Minute Contrarian
Ep54: More To Come

10-Minute Contrarian

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 21:36


Things are bad right now, and they will probably get worse.  But believe it or not, fortunes are made more in bear markets than in bull markets, but only a few people ever seem to know what to do when things are bad and everyone around them is panicking.  If you don't already know what to do, let's talk about it.   90-95% Rule Blog Post - https://nononsenseforex.com/investing/the-90-95-rule/   Recommended Crypto Trading Platform (Bonus and Contest Eligibility) - https://nononsenseforex.com/cryptocurrencies/best-crypto-trading-platform/   Blueberry Markets Blog (Top FX Broker) - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/blueberry-markets-review-my-top-broker-for-2019/   Markets.com Blog (Other top FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/markets-com-review/   US Residents Go Here (Top US FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/ig-us-review/   Follow VP on Twitter https://twitter.com/This_Is_VP4X Check out my Forex trading material too! https://nononsenseforex.com/   The host of this podcast is not a licensed financial advisor, and nothing heard on this podcast should be taken as financial advice.  Do your own research and understand all financial decisions and the results therein are yours and yours alone.  The host is not responsible for the actions of their sponsors and/or affiliates.  Conversely, views expressed on this podcast are that of the host only and may not reflect the views of any companies mentioned. Trading Forex involves risk.  Losses can exceed deposits.   We are not taking requests for episode topics at this time.  Thank you for understanding.

THE POWER OF REINVENTION with Kathi Sharpe-Ross
E72: Starting, Scaling and Growing a Business with Jackie Reses and Lauren Weinberg

THE POWER OF REINVENTION with Kathi Sharpe-Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 48:01


Starting and growing a small business is a challenge. If you're finding it isn't, you might not be pushing hard enough. Scaling doesn't happen overnight either: it's a process — a long one. In this episode, Jackie Reses and Lauren Weinberg share their business journeys to becoming the Self-Made Bosses they are today. We discuss everything from the mental side of starting a company to the practical aspects of a business plan. Sometimes you know what you want from the beginning, and sometimes opportunities bring you to unexpected places. Here are some power takeaways from today's conversation: Your company's working environment will depend on what your employees want and what your company does. Starting a business is a challenge: are you ready with both mental and physical assets? SMEs need to pay attention to many things, but cash flow is typically the most critical. [07:47] Jackie and Lauren's Journeys Jackie grew up with the grittiness of entrepreneurship, eventually starting her own business at 16. She retained this mindset all her life. Combined with her desire for independence, an amazing education, and good experience at the start of her career, she had a solid mental foundation for work. Lauren's career path took her through multiple jobs. She took opportunities wherever she could, leading to a happy, accidental journey through a broad range of things. [17:04] The Philosophical and the Practical Starting a business alone is a highly personal journey — it's almost all about you and your resources. It has two aspects: a philosophical side and a practical one. The philosophical asks: “Are you ready?” Conversely, the practical requires creating and breaking down your plan. You have to know what you're going to do before you do it. Starting a business will always be a stressful challenge, so it's critical to be mindful: Do you need a break? Do you need to delegate? Stress can cause mistakes, so look for those signals. [29:47] The Workplace Environment The last two years have changed how people work and spend their time. People have different priorities now, making staffing a challenge. While there's a lot to be gained by working in person, not everyone wants to go to the office anymore. Ultimately, it depends on the business and the people. [34:25] The Growth Journey There are several factors to consider when you want to scale as a business, such as cash flow, product lines, and staffing. Cash flow is typically the most significant issue for small businesses. It's essential to consider how to acquire inventory capital or invest, but that's not always readily available. Resources Mentioned: Get the book, Self-Made Boss, here: https://www.selfmadeboss.com/ Jackie Reses's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jacqueline-reses-938b7850/ Lauren Weinberg's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurenweinberg13/ For more Reinvention content, hundreds of engaging interviews and blogs visit — https://www.thereinventionexchange.com/ My Book — RE:INVENT YOUR LIFE! WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? — available on Amazon, Apple Books, and at https://www.thereinventionexchange.com/shopthebook

Sefer Hachinuch
Misva 216: Leaving a Corner of One's Field for the Poor

Sefer Hachinuch

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


The Torah in Parashat Kedoshim (19:10) commands leaving certain portions of one's agricultural produce to the poor, including Pe'a – the corner of one's field. The Sefer Ha'hinuch lists the Pe'a obligation as the 216 th Biblical command. The Torah instructs that the corner of the field must be left for the “Ani” (pauper) and “Ger” (foreigner). The word “Ger” in this context refers to a “Ger Sedek” – a gentile who converted to Judaism with sincere motives. However, the Sages enacted the even needy gentiles are permitted to take produce from the corner of a field in the interest of “Darkeh Shalom” (peaceful relations with non-Jews). The famous first Mishna of Masechet Pe'a lists a number of Misvot which have no “Shiur” (fixed amount), including Pe'a. As far as Torah law is concerned, there is no minimum required size of the corner of a field which must be left for the poor. However, the Sages enacted that one should leave at least one-sixtieth of one's field as Pe'a. To explain the reason for this Misva, the Sefer Ha'hinuch writes that G-d wants us to develop proper character traits, including generosity. By leaving for the poor a portion of one's yield, which he invested a great deal of hard work and effort to produce, one is trained to become generous. As a result, the Sefer Ha'hinuch writes, the person becomes worthy of G-d's kindness, because the way a person treats the others is the way he is then treated by the Almighty. Conversely, the Sefer Ha'hinuch writes, if one insists on keeping all his produce for himself, then he develops the trait of stinginess, and he will thus be unworthy of G-d's blessing. This obligation applies to both men and women, and to Kohanim, Leviyim and Yisraelim. It applies in the Land of Israel, when the majority of the Jewish Nation lives there. The Sages enacted that this Misva should be observed also in certain other places, as well. If one failed to leave the corner of his field in Eretz Yisrael for the poor (when this command applied), then he is in violation of this affirmative command, and also transgresses the prohibition against harvesting the entirety of one's field (“Lo Techaleh”). However, as long as the harvested produce is extant, he can still fulfill the Misva by giving the poor the required quantity of the harvested produce. If he had made the grain to bread, then he can give the poor the required amount of bread, and thereby fulfill the obligation. If, however, there is no longer any possibility of giving the required amount to the poor, such as if the produce was all consumed by a fire, then he is liable to Malkut for violating the prohibition of “Lo Techaleh.” As long as he still has the possibility of rectifying his mistake and giving the required percentage to the needy, he does not receive Malkut; but once this is no longer possible, he is liable to punishment.

Unexpected with Hannah Love
Episode 9: Obedience (Jonah's story)

Unexpected with Hannah Love

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 14:05


Since my first trip to the ocean as a little girl, I've loved chasing shells. Searching eyes as the waves roll and retreat. It becomes a chase. You catch a glimpse and step further to grab ahold. Isn't it funny though? Before you know it, you look up and you're a long distance from where you began. So often for me, God's speaks through the rhythms of nature. His creation parallels His truth. Like chasing shells. With one step at a time, searching for the flash of what you hope to find. Just as we seek after God. One step at a time. Through the waves, our eyes are stayed on Him. And before you know it, you're further and deeper in pursuit of Him. It's a beautiful reminder not to be overwhelmed. In years past, I remember feeling like the gap between us was too far. But over the years, God has been good to remind me that He only asks for one small step at a time. Conversely, we can also drift in pursuit of things that take us further from God and His truth... with small choices over time resulting in a great distance of your heart from His desires for you. So today, I ask you to reflect on where your steps are taking you. Are you chasing the shells God has laid before you? Or are you following things that draw you away... This seems to be the great tension of our lives.. choosing things (in obedience) that contradict world logic. Oftentimes the hardest things ARE unseen. The choices made and the fight to honor them go largely unnoticed...until those moments of obedience make you stand out from the crowd. That's hard, too, in today's society. To stand up for something that doesn't make sense because it goes against everything our culture praises. But, sweet friends, I want to remind you that you aren't alone in it. Choosing Obedience to God has been a fight through the ages. Every story in the Bible is there because a person or nation chose obedience or disobedience and they all serve as examples to us because of it. Today, however I thought I would tie in an old bedtime favorite… it seemed especially fitting since I imagine there was a beach with sand somewhere in this story (which is how really how we began this whole conversation)! Anyway, this is this story of Jonah… I know Jonah's story seems dramatic. But I kind of love that so many Bible stories are. They really happened and they really teach us through their lives, their mistakes, and their learned lessons. And for any of you thinking, “It would be way easier to obey God if he gave me a personal directive like he did to Jonah..” That may be so, BUT here is another reminder. God speaks in many ways. If you're unsure of what He's saying, there's a manual that always holds His principles and His truths. That's the Bible. It lays out wrongs and rights, cause and effects, AND is full of wisdom to live by. Obedience won't always be some big personal mission like going to preach to a whole evil city like Nineveh. Obedience can be as simple as living your life by Biblical truths. In fact, it is that simple. One step at a time like the seashells I used to chase in the waves. Remember… inner obedience may be the hardest choice, but it will always yield the harvest of a blessed life. It only takes one step at a time. Today, I pray that our paths are directed by obedient hearts. And I pray that all who hear these words ask for the wisdom to seek peace over pride, insight over influence, and grace over greatness. May we be so full of joy in pursuit of Him that everything else seems secondary

Bark n Wag 15 Minute Vet Talk
Safe Outdoor Dogs Act update with Shelby Bobosky, Executive Director, for the Texas Humane Legislation Network

Bark n Wag 15 Minute Vet Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 12:08


On October 25, 2021, after the most contentious Texas legislative session in memory, the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act was signed into law. THLN never wavered during the six-year quest to pass this legislation, even when it was targeted by an extremist lawmaker and unexpectedly vetoed. Texas dogs and the communities where they reside deserve a common-sense, balanced policy governing the restraint of dogs outdoors. The Safe Outdoor Dogs Act, which goes into effect January 18, 2022, achieves that by: Defining adequate shelter to protect dogs from extreme temperatures, inclement weather, and standing water. Previously, there was no definition for shelter, thus tethered dogs routinely perished from exposure. Requiring access to drinkable water. Before the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act, state law did not include this vital requirement. Requiring safe restraints. The Safe Outdoor Dogs Act strikes the use of chains. Other means of restraint, such as cable tie-outs, may be used so long as they are correctly attached to a collar or harness designed to restrain a dog. Arguably the most significant change wrought by the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act is removing the 24-hour warning period that allowed bad actors to flout the law. Officers can take immediate action for tethered dogs in distress from now on. What the Safe Outdoor Act Does - English | Spanish How to Properly Restrain Your Dog Outdoors - English | Spanish Key Exceptions to the Safe Outdoors Act - English | Spanish Exceptions to the Safe Outdoor Dogs ActThe Safe Outdoor Dogs Act does not prevent owners from tethering dogs. The law requires that unattended dogs are tethered in a way that keeps them and the people around them safe, and there are several exceptions to the law. The Safe Outdoor Dogs Act does not apply to dogs who are: Attached to a cable-tie out or trolley system. Camping or using other public recreational areas. Herding livestock or assisting with farming tasks. Hunting or participating in field trials. In an open-air truck bed while the owner completes a temporary task. Restraining Dogs Without Using ChainsThe American Veterinary Medical Association and the Center for Disease Control agree that chaining dogs is an inappropriate method of restraint. Not only do chains tangle, rust, and break, but they often cause pain and injury. Conversely, cable tie-outs and trolley systems are designed to restrain dogs, so they are lightweight, strong, and flexible. On average, they cost between $15-$30 and are easy to find in stores and online. Below are links to highly rated cable tie-outs and trolley systems: Tumbo Trolley Dog Containment System Expawlorer Dog Tie Out Cable Boss Pet Prestige Skyline Trolly BV Pet Heavy Extra-Large Tie Out Cable Petest Trolley Runner Cable XiaZ Dog Runner Tie Out Cable Watch this short video to see examples of cable tie-outs recommended by a company that rates affordable pet products. Always install cable tie-outs and trolley systems according to the manufacturer's instructions. Read FAQs When the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act goes into effect on January 18, 2022, we all want our friends and neighbors who have dogs tethered outdoors to be prepared for this change. The following list of resources is available to qualified applicants. Bear in mind each organization has its own application process and service area. Local nonprofits and civic groups: BASTROP & TRAVIS COUNTIES: Dejando Huella ATX – donates dog houses & specializes in outreach to Spanish-speaking dog owners. | Contact: dejando.huella.atx@gmail.com CORPUS CHRISTI: People Assisting Animal Control organizes pet wellness & educational events, distributing cable tie-outs. | Contact: cmmutt70@aol.com DALLAS/FORT WORTH: SPCA of Texas' Russell H. Perry Pet Resource Center provides temporary support to pet owners in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex who are experiencing financial hardship and are at risk of having to surrender their pets. | Contact: helpmypet@spca.org MCLENNAN COUNTY: Cribs For Canines provides dog houses to under-resourced dog owners. | Contact: Cribs for Canines (cribs4canines.com) MIDLAND: Fix West Texas donates dog houses and other pet supplies to under-resourced dog owners. | Contact: karen@fixwesttexas.org NORTH TEXAS: The Love Pit is a Dallas-based nonprofit that improves the quality of life for pit bull-type dogs through rescue, education, and outreach in the DFW area. | Contact: info@thelovepitrescue.org PLEASANTON: Atascosa Animal Allies donates dog houses within the city limits of Pleasanton, Texas to those who qualify. They also operate a TNR program for feral cats and host monthly subsidized spay/neuter clinics for under-resourced pet owners in Atascosa County. | Contact: AtascosaAnimalAllies@gmail.com TRAVIS COUNTY: The City of Austin Fencing Assistance Program donates fence material to under-resourced dog owners in Travis County. The city also donates dog houses to qualified residents. | Contact: Amber.Harvey@austintexas.gov TYLER: The SPCA of East Texas donates doghouses and other pet supplies to under-resourced dog owners. | Contact: spca@spcaeasttx.com VICTORIA: South Texas Tales – donates dog houses and other resources to under-resourced dog owners. | Contact: southtexastails@yahoo.com WICHITA FALLS: Chain Off Wichita Falls – donates fencing materials and labor for under-resourced dog owners. | Contact: chainoffwf@gmail.com WILLIAMSON COUNTY: Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter – serving Round Rock, Cedar Park, Leander, Hutto, and rural Williamson County. Donates dog houses and other items to under-resourced dog owners. | Contact: wcras@wilco.org Chain Off | P.E.T.S. Low-Cost Spay and Neuter Clinic (petsclinic.org) National Organizations: The Home Depot | Community Impact Grants Grants are available to nonprofit groups working to help local citizens. Fences for Fido Provides support and mentorship to groups dedicated to getting dogs off chains | Contact: katrina.FencesForFido@gmail.com THLN wants to help those in underserved communities, and we need your help! We encourage everyone who wants to see the successful implementation of the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act to engage at the local level. Consider doing the following in your community to help outdoor dogs: Partner with your local shelter or rescue group to fundraise for dog houses and cable tie-outs. Co-host a neighborhood event with your local shelter/rescue to distribute free cable tie-outs. If the event is part of a spay/neuter or vaccine clinic or pet food distribution event, dog owners are sure to attend. Attend dog-friendly public events and distribute Safe Outdoor Dogs Act Fact Sheets. Share Safe Outdoor Dogs Act information on all your social media platforms. Add cable tie-outs and dog houses to your shelter or rescue group "Wish List." Ask local retailers like Home Depot, Lowe's, Ace Hardware, and Tractor Supply to donate dog houses, fencing materials, or cable tie-outs. Many high schoolers and college students need community service hours – why not involve them in a dog house building project? Whether it is the Eagle Scouts, ROTC, National Honor Society, church youth groups, or high school shop classes – these groups are all looking to make a positive community impact. Help your local shelter or rescue create a "Donate a Dog House" program. Click here for free DIY Doghouse blueprints. Are you already working in your community to help under-resourced dog owners? Do you have other ideas for assisting folks in complying with the new law? We'd love to hear it! CONTACT US NOW Show Us Your Success StoriesThe Safe Outdoor Dogs Act starts a brand-new chapter for Texas dogs. And nothing is better for showing the impact of this law than your stories of helping those in need. Send us your photos, videos, and firsthand accounts of helping those in your community…we can't wait to see your success!     Showing 1 reaction   Jessica Hagmaierpublished this page in Legislation5 months ago      

10-Minute Contrarian
Ep53: Watchlist -- XRP

10-Minute Contrarian

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 11:21


XRP is back on my radar after a serious and unexpected tilt in the odds of Ripple Labs winning their case over the SEC, and a host of other bullish use cases we may end up seeing sooner rather than later.   Recommended Crypto Trading Platform (Bonus and Contest Eligibility) - https://nononsenseforex.com/cryptocurrencies/best-crypto-trading-platform/   Blueberry Markets Blog (Top FX Broker) - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/blueberry-markets-review-my-top-broker-for-2019/   Markets.com Blog (Other top FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/markets-com-review/   US Residents Go Here (Top US FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/ig-us-review/   Follow VP on Twitter https://twitter.com/This_Is_VP4X   Check out my Forex trading material too! https://nononsenseforex.com/   The host of this podcast is not a licensed financial advisor, and nothing heard on this podcast should be taken as financial advice.  Do your own research and understand all financial decisions and the results therein are yours and yours alone.  The host is not responsible for the actions of their sponsors and/or affiliates.  Conversely, views expressed on this podcast are that of the host only and may not reflect the views of any companies mentioned. Trading Forex involves risk.  Losses can exceed deposits. We are not taking requests for episode topics at this time.  Thank you for understanding.

Fire and Earth Podcast
Are You Seeking Contentment or Excitement?

Fire and Earth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 13:46


Today we discuss the difference between contentment and excitement. Contentment can be nice because we can enter into a relaxed state, but is there a point where we get TOO content? Conversely excitement can be fun, but at what point can excitement seeking become detrimental?  Like many things balance is incredibly important, and in this episode we discuss finding that balance, and what that may look like.  Listen in at: http://www.jasonmefford.com/fireandearth182/

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 229: What one college did to triple their applicants in 10 years

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 119:13


In this episode you will hear:   (18:05) Vince Garcia makes his debut as one of our co-hosts in our monthly rotation for our “In the News” segment. Mark and Vince discuss an Inside Higher Ed article by Scott Jaschik entitled, “How Stevens Tech attracts applicants and students”. The 4/25/2022 article looks at some of the strategic decisions one NJ school did to upgrade the academic caliber of their student body while expanded their diversity.     (32:58) Diana from Wisconsin sent us an outstanding list of questions that are all designed to get some guidance about the transition to college. Mark and Lisa acknowledge that the transition to college is an area that we haven't adequately covered. Mark and Lisa answer half of Diana's questions in this episode and the other half next Thursday in episode 231. how much spending money should we give our student each month should we tie spending money to grades or offer any incentive related to grades. Conversely, if grades are poor, should we take away spending money. mid-term grades - and any type of progress grades - how should we as parents be involved in progress grades so we can try to be helpful if any advocacy or tutoring needs to happen before it's too late at the end of the semester? end of semester grades - will these be shared with us as parents? If they are not good, will there be any consequences, or what would happen?   (01:01:30) Our interview is with Karen Kristof, a 30+ year admission veteran who has worked at five colleges. Karen is the Dean of admissions at Colorado College. Karen will address three different topics over for three consecutive Thursdays. In this week's episode Karen answers the question, how do colleges evaluate a transcript. Preview-How admission officers evaluate a transcript   Karen gives her backstory Karen tells us what selective schools look for when they evaluate a transcript Karen shares some of the mistakes students make with their course selection   (01:13:22) The Recommended Resource is one of the best books I have ever read about college admissions. I have listened to it three times in the last three months. I strongly recommend the audiobook which is informative and entertaining: The name of the book is, "Valedictorians at the Gate: Standing Out, Getting In, and Staying Sane While Applying to College" by Rebecca Munsterer Sabky, Eliza Foss. Sabky did admissions at Dartmouth for 13 years. Her honesty about the business side of admissions is refreshing and enlightening.   (01:34:44) Our College Spotlight is The University of Michigan, Part 1 of 2     Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 25 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Oregon State-Jon Boeckenstadt (Interview about a range of admission topics)-July 19th Reed-Milyon Truelove- Rice University-Tamara Siler St Johns College-Benjamin Baum-This interview is on June 8th University Pittsburgh-Tom Becker- American University-Andrea Felder Texas Christian University (TCU)-Heath Einstein-This interview is on July 6th Michigan State University-John Ambrose-This interview is on June 10th Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* Trinity University-Justin Doty-(interview about athletic recruitment process for DIII schools)-July 15th College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) University of Connecticut-Vern Granger* Colby College-Randi Arsenault* Hamilton College-Peaches Valdes* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner University of Rochester-Robert Alexander* University of Delaware-Darrell Edmonds     To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email four times a year, just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons”   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice
0525 – Finding The ‘Sweet Spot'

Get A Better Broadcast, Podcast and Video Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 3:47


2022.06.09 – 0525 – Finding The ‘Sweet Spot'Having said that, a greater mic-to-mouth distance will give your voice a lighter pitch, with more treble, a thinness to the sound and more of the room acoustics, especially if you turn up the recording level. Conversely, standing away from the mic and raising the voice can make it sound as though you are speaking live on location – useful for giving a lift to studio commentary over outdoor scenes or sound effects. But somewhere in between will be a ‘sweet spot of sound' where the mic will enhance the deeper bass tones in your voice. With the help of a studio sound engineer if you have one, try various mics and positions according to you and your surroundings to find that the ‘Goldilocks' position of the mic (not too close, not too distant, but just right). Another consideration is not to speak directly into the mic, but across it or from one side. Again, this will depend on your personal preference of mic location (within the parameters of it still working well!), and the kind of mic it is (different designs of mic pick up sounds from different areas around the head: its ‘pick-up pattern'). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

All Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe Podcasts
TORAH 101: The Afterlife in Torah Literature

All Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 49:17


A central pillar of our belief is that when we adhere to the word of God, He will reward us in the Afterlife. Conversely, if we disobey God, we will suffer the consequences of our rebellion in the Afterlife as well. In this podcast we ponder an interesting question: the Torah discusses reward and punishment […]

TORAH 101 - By Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe
#57: The Afterlife in Torah Literature

TORAH 101 - By Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 49:17


A central pillar of our belief is that when we adhere to the word of God, He will reward us in the Afterlife. Conversely, if we disobey God, we will suffer the consequences of our rebellion in the Afterlife as well. In this podcast we ponder an interesting question: the Torah discusses reward and punishment […]

Suuuper Anime Podcast
Started From The Bottom - Looking Back And Picking Our Favourite Episodes From The Previous 100 + Reflecting On Life As A Podcaster! | Ep. 102

Suuuper Anime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 126:12


" Wanna start something dont wait, Just do it" - Solo We relflect on how we started the podcast, learnings as well as what our favourite episodes have been so far. Discussion Points: Did you ever think we would make it to 100 episodes? – 50% of shows fail before the first 7 episodesHow has the podcast changed our life? Did it meet your expectations of what it means to be a podcaster?Has there been anything that has surprised you about podcasting?  Has there been times when we thought, you know what i dont wanna do this anymore?Conversely has there been times when we have thought, you know what i could possibly do this as a career if it took off?Let's break it down by quarters?Whats our top 3 episodes from each quarter 0-25, 26-50, 51 - 75, 76 - 100.Whats our funniest or some of your funniest moments per quarter?Our most memorable guest?!Whats our favourite Ed guest introductionWhats yur favourite Solo Special StoriesQuiz questions for soloWhat are you hoping for in the potential next 100 episodes?Blog with all the links to our favourite episodes here  If you enjoy the podcast, please don't forget to FOLLOW, RATE and REVIEW the show (it takes less than 30 seconds) Please do also share with anyone you fill will enjoy the show. Doing so will allows us to grow the show and encourage us to keep putting out more content. Also as mentioned we love your reviews, so please keep them coming and will read them out in future shows.In case you're wondering here is how to rate and review our show.Also, to keep conversation going were super keen to hear your thoughts, questions and opinions on the show's discussion points, so please do drop us a voice note on our website www.suuuperanimepodcast.com or email at www.suuuperanimepodcast.com/contact  Suuuper podcast title inspired by Drake – Started from the bottom | Listen Here!  Social media links Instagram: SuuuperanimepodcastTwitter: @SuuuperanimeFacebook: SuuuperAnimePodcast 

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
592: David Wood: The Mouse In The Room - Because the Elephant Isn't Alone

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 38:09


In this episode, Founder of Focus.CEO, David Wood, talks about his new book, Mouse in the Room: Because the Elephant isn't Alone. Today, David talks about the importance of naming your mice, the hurdle of instant gratification and being unapologetically authentic. What does it mean to have 30% more courage? Hear about the art of dealing with rejection, when not to follow your courage, and get David's advice to his younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “A lot of us are putting on, unconsciously, an act for the world because we don't want to get in trouble, and we don't want to be uncomfortable, and we don't want to make the other person uncomfortable, so we say what's going to fit into a nice box.” “You can choose the discomfort of wearing a mask or the discomfort of telling the truth.” “If you don't ask, you're already starting with a no.” “Every time you name a mouse, it gives you a chance to increase your confidence and belief in yourself.” “You can have anything you want in life if you're willing to ask 1000 people.” – Byron Katie “Start writing things down, knowing that you don't have to do anything on those pieces of paper.” “You're already doing things right. You got this far. You don't need fixing.” “At times it's going to get very hard. It might get so hard that you don't know if you're going to make it, but you do.”   More about David Wood David is a former consulting actuary to Fortune 100 companies. He built the world's largest coaching business, becoming #1 on Google for life coaching and coaching thousands of hours in 12 countries around the globe. As well as helping others, David is no stranger to overcoming challenges himself, having survived a full collapse of his paraglider and a fractured spine, witnessing the death of his sister at age seven, anxiety and depression, and a national Gong Show! (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgKwAJieQes). He helps business owners and leaders become the badass leaders people want to follow, creating more authenticity, connection, confidence, and revenue.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Courage, Challenges, Confidence, Discomfort, Authenticity, Rejection, Persistence, Commitment, Awareness,   Get Your FREE Gift Mouse in the Room Book.   To learn more, follow David at: Website:          https://focus.ceo Twitter:            @_focusceo Instagram:       @_focusceo Facebook:       @extraordinaryfocus YouTube:        https://www.youtube.com/c/ExtraordinaryFocuswithDavidWood LinkedIn:         https://www.linkedin.com/in/focus-ceo   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hey, David, welcome to the podcast, I am happy to have you on to talk about, amongst other things, a new book release that's coming out today, which is for people not listening. Today is June 13. So we will definitely get to the book, and we'll get to a lot of other things. But thank you so much for coming on.   00:23 My pleasure. And it's nice to meet you.   00:25 Yeah, it's great to meet you as well. So I guess I let the cat out of the bag a little too quickly. We're gonna get to the book towards the end. But let's get to the book in the beginning. And at the end, how's that sound? Yeah, so tell us the name of the book. And I will hand the mic over to you to give us a little snippet.   00:42 Sure. And the I would have mentioned the book because it's going to fit in with the topics we want to talk about, like courage, and practicing deliberate discomfort. The books called the mouse in the room, because the elephant is not alone. And I'm writing this book, because we all know about that expression, the elephant in the room, you see it, I see it, no one's saying anything. Well, that's just weird. And I think we should all address the elephant in the room. But for most of us, many creatures in the room are much more subtle. They're not as huge as an elephant, maybe it's something that I see in you don't see it, or I don't know, if you see it. I think a lot of us are actually putting on unconsciously an act for the world, because we don't want to get in trouble. And we don't want to be uncomfortable. And we don't want to make the other person uncomfortable. So we say what's going to fit into a nice box. The problem is when we do that, we can feel disconnected from the world, we can feel more isolated, lonely. And people won't trust us as much, they won't know why. They'll just know something's off because this person isn't being real. So we're writing, we wrote mouse in the room, so that people can start to notice their mice and go all I'm actually upset about that. Or I have a desire I haven't mentioned or I have a confession mouse over here, or you know what, there's some appreciation I need to bring into this space here. When people identify their mice, and then artfully name them, so that they can come into more connection, more intimacy. And then through more trust, there's good business application to people are going to want to work with you and buy from you and, and follow you as a leader. They may not necessarily know why. But they'll be like, Oh, this person's real. This is someone I can count on. So there's the short version of mouse in the room.   02:37 Excellent. And maybe we'll get into a little bit of those mice later on. But before we get into that, as you were speaking, you had mentioned the word courage. And it I always think that it does take courage to speak your mind. And should we always be speaking our mind? And should we always be using our courage? So why don't you talk a little bit about how would you say 30% more courage? can double your happiness? We have a lot of people who are entrepreneurs who are listening, so we double your revenue. So what does that mean? Can you break it down?   03:14 Yeah. Something my co author said recently that stuck with me was, you can choose the discomfort of wearing a mask, or the discomfort of telling you truth. It's one or the other. And there's a lot more upside associated with one of those things. So I love the concept of courage I found as a kid, whenever I didn't do something that felt right be out of fear. I would like myself a little less. So if I didn't ask that girl out, or if I didn't confront that bully, or if I didn't stand up for myself, I would I just feel smaller. And it's an icky feeling. I don't want anyone to have that. Conversely, I discovered that when I am willing to take a risk and do something that's a little scary, even if I don't get the result that I wanted, I feel better about myself. It's like I went for it. An example of this I went to a conference where I was awestruck by the people that I was hanging out with there was like Jack Canfield from chicken soup and John Gray from Mars and Venus and Don Miguel Ruiz is a member and I'm like, Oh my God. And when I left the event, I look back on it and I realized I made four bold requests that terrified me. Like I asked Jack Canfield if you'd be interested in writing a book together. That was very scary. I figured he probably gets about 100 proposals a day for something like that. I asked someone if she wanted to go out with me and have our first date be a trip to Colombia. I asked an obstacle when Oscar winning producer if, like what it would take for me to do a ride along on his next film shoot. These were all scary things. Now. I didn't get a yes to Everything that I asked for, but I felt complete. I felt like yes, I went for it. They say if you I'm gonna butcher this quote it's, it's something about the trivial quote is, if you don't ask, you don't get you're already starting with a novel. That's the default answer. So I think it behooves us to find our edge like, what is our edge? Is it? If you're an entrepreneur? Is it asking a celebrity to endorse your product? Is it asking 10 people to be affiliate partners that that you think would never give you the time of day? Is it calling 10 people and asking them to become clients? Because you think you could serve them? I don't know where your edge is. But each listener needs to find their own edge, like what would feel uncomfortable and a little scary, but could have some great upside. And again, I'll say the main benefit is you get to feel better about yourself. And as a bonus, you may actually get some yeses, which might surprise you like, Oh, my God, someone said, yes. That's a bonus.   06:12 And do you feel like even if you fail, or even if you get these nose, or even if people don't give you the time of day? Does it help to boost your confidence? Because you're asking the question, and you're putting yourself out there?   06:28 I think it absolutely does. And this ties into the book really well. Because if you're going to name a mouse with someone, you're going to sit like that what I just mentioned at that conference with desire mice, I had like four desires. And so I named them, I felt better about myself, I felt more confident. And I actually got a yes, one of those four questions got me a yes. And was like, Oh, my God, that's really cool. So yeah, and what what we did have as a subtitle is, this is your pathway to connection, confidence, and becoming a badass leader that people want to follow. Because if you hide what you're tolerating, if you hide what you desire, if you hide what you're ashamed of, then those mice get to breed, and you get more and more of them. And that's where shame can really thrive. Whereas if you bring yourself to the world and say, Hey, this is who I am, every time you do that, every time you name a mouse, it gives you a chance to increase your confidence and belief in yourself. Because it's you. It's like, this is my desire. You don't want to grant that. Okay. Thanks. Hey, this is something that's bugging me. Can we change that? No. All right, gave it a shot. We want to get back to like that. That confidence of when we were five years old, for many of us, and we're able to just go for stuff and we hadn't been beaten down by life. And people get back in touch with what's going on inside and then artfully bring it. Now you brought up earlier on? Do we shall we name everything? No. If you go to someone's house, and it looks like a pigsty and you're uncomfortable there, maybe you suck it up for 20 minutes until you leave. And maybe they don't need to know that. Or maybe if you got a gift from someone, maybe you don't have to tell them. But hey, if they've given you that thing, three years in a row, it might be a kindness stood due to speak up. Well, in one of the chapters of the book, we give you a test to work out. Is this worth naming? Is this something that I should bring and could bring? And if yes, how will they artfully do it so that I'm unlikely to trigger a huge response in the other person? And they can be like, Oh, alright, I get where you're coming from. Yeah, let's, let's work that out.   08:49 And what do you say to people who may think well, okay, I can have the courage, I can ask all these questions. But I keep getting no, no, no, no, no, no, no. You know, is that going to kind of reinforce this? I don't want to say, lack of confidence, but maybe reinforce to people that oh, it's not worth it. I keep asking these questions. I keep getting nose and it reminds me of, let's say, actors or actresses who go out for parts because they get a lot of rejection. But they keep doing it. Right. So yeah, what do you say to those people who are like I've gotten enough nose and I don't want to get any more nose.   09:38 Did you know that eight months ago I started acting now and I started acting eight months ago and in three weeks I'm moving to Los Angeles to pursue acting so I know a bit about this by I have two answers two broad answers to this one is if you're getting it so you ask Katie says Byron, Katie says, you can have anything you want in life if you're willing to ask 1000 people. So I think there's real value in asking 1000 people. And if you ask 1000 people and get 1000 knows, there might be something wrong with the question. So that might be where some coaching can come in. It's like, how am I asking? And is there a way that I'm, am I selling the sizzle? And this am I like, you know, so there's two answers, and they're both true. You want to ask in a way that's enrolling. But be careful about getting attached to the outcome. This is what people collapse, and I got this from landmark education. A long time ago, people think it's one or the other, you can be committed to something, I am going to make this happen Martin Luther King, I'm going to free the slaves, Gandhi, I'm going to free India, you can be committed to something. Or you can be unattached, but you can't be both. And so as soon as they get committed to something, they think they have to get it. And if it's not coming straight away, or early on, there's a problem. And I'm going to collapse, I'm going to make it mean something about me. Landmark helped me distinguish the two is that there's commitment, and then there's attachment. And they're two separate things. What if you could be committed to something and how you show up every day is aligned with that? And yet you're unattached, or if the universe says yes. Now, that's a powerful place to stand.   11:44 Yeah. And that's something that, you know, I'm a physical therapist. So as a physical therapist, you know, I often tell younger therapists that you can't detach yourself to the outcomes of your patient. So you can't be judging your success as a therapist, wholly on the outcomes of your patients. Because sometimes people improve, and sometimes they don't, which may be wholly out of your control. But you have to show up and do the best you can based on the evidence that you have. So kind of the same line of thinking great.   12:22 It's a really good example. And I heard an expression recently that I decided to steal because it spoke so well to this. You know, a friend of mine said, Oh, well, it sounds like you're moving the ball further down the field. And I was like, I love that. Because that I can control. I can't control the goal. I can't control what other people say or do. I can't control if I make the sale. But I can move the ball further down the field, I can position it in the best possible way. And I can own Don't ask 500 or 1000 people. If, if, if they want to buy what I have. Recently, I decided to Oh, it's happening in acting all the time. Now, if I was attached to getting a yes to every audition, I'd have to give up after two days. Totally. But the way I'm reframing it for myself is those auditions are my performance that is my acting. And so I'm submitting to 100 plus things a week around the country, and most of them I know I'll never hear back from but I'm playing the long game. I'm playing the law of large numbers. And in the last eight months, I've had a yes to playing the lead in a local paid production of Dracula. I got a yes to doing two commercials that I got paid for six short films for them free to have them paid. Now I had to do a lot of auditioning and submitting because I don't have a lot of experience. And so some of its luck, is keep going until someone says oh, I like the look of you. Let's get that guy in. And when Jack Canfield came to my live event, he got up there and he spoke about the law of large numbers. You need to ask enough people now sure you ask 1000 people you get to know there's something about how you're asking. But don't give up after five or 10 or 50 100. Don't be like that kid in the playground. Say hey, do you want to ride on my tricycle? No. Okay. Hey, do you want to ride on my tricycle? No. Okay. Hey, do you want to ride on my tricycle? Be you that's what the books about like, express yourself. Express your desires. I think at some point someone's gonna be like, Oh, that sounds pretty cool. Yeah, I'll do it in you're like what? Really? I didn't think I get a yes. And then the next time you won't be as surprised and you are you'll hide the shock better.   15:00 Yeah, at some point that key fits the lock, right. And I also love kind of that concept of moving the ball down the field a little bit at a time. And I know for myself, I have always been like, well, it needs to happen. If it's not happening now, then it's never gonna happen. Or if it's not happening, the timeline, I perceive something to happen, then that means Oh, well, it's not going to happen. It's not for me, and I used to kind of tend to give up a little too easily. But now, I have come to the realization that, like you said, if you move the ball down the field a little bit at a time that it doesn't have to happen all at once. But as long as you're making forward progress, and you're working towards the goal, it'll happen. Because let's be honest, we're living in a now everything has to happen quickly, this social media, quick, quick, quick decisions. And if it doesn't, then we're losers.   15:54 And that's a problem for people who want to be successful. Because if there are any good rewards to doing something, let's suppose you're going to start a big business selling widgets. If there are any good rewards for their business, it's not going to be easy to do. Because if it's easy, then the first three people into the market are going to take all those rewards and, and it's going to be flooded by people doing the easy thing. And there'll be less rewards, the rewards are gone. Seth Godin wrote a wonderful book on this called the dip. And if you're not prepared for any kind of a dip, it might be hard to get any good rewards. Now, don't go overboard, you might not decide on brain surgery as a career. Because that's, that's a really big dip. But if you want to start a business, or go and get a better job, or switch careers, or find a life partner or something like that some of those things are going to have a dip to them. And it's good to just know that going in and say, All right, roughly, how long are we looking at? Like, if you're going to start any new business, if you do it well, and work hard, you're probably looking at at least three years to turn the corner and make a profit. Now, know that going in? And then have someone to remind you, when things look bleak, yeah, this is gonna take some time, you gotta keep going at it. I've been doing podcast interviews for three years now. I think I've done 300 interviews. And I think I might only just be starting to get some some traction and to get get known. And people like, oh, yeah, that guy from that, you know, from mouse in the room. And now I'm about to launch a book. And, you know, I'll do six months of beating the bushes, just Yes, a few days ago, I said, decided to reach out to my colleagues and thought leaders and influences. Some of those people are never going to get back to me. They're not even going to respond and give me the time of day because they're busy, or I'm not big enough on the totem pole. That takes something to reach out to all those people. I got to screw up my courage and be willing to be uncomfortable, and then put it out there. And then be surprised by who says yes. And who says no.   18:08 Yeah. And as we're talking about courage, are there times when maybe you shouldn't be following your courage? When are the times that that you say, hey, well, let's pull back for a second?   18:22 Great question. When I was growing up, and I realized I didn't like feeling small. I started leaning into my fears, and is a name for it. Apparently, it's so counter phobic. So if you're afraid of something, you lean into it, and that's my style. And that produced a lot of benefits and rewards and a lot of growth. But I didn't know when to say when I didn't know how far was too far. And you can traumatize yourself, you can burn out, you can push yourself too far. I would go into paragliding and hang gliding because I was afraid of heights. And I've had a couple of accidents and even had a slight compression fracture in my spine. Doing a couple of things that were out there. I was afraid of abandonment. So I thought well, let me see what open relationships is like in dating more than one person at once and see if I can conquer this fear. I found that I have limits my nervous system or my psyche has limits that I need to respect and be humble about. So I think it's about finding your sweet spot. You don't want to stay in the comfort zone your whole life it gets very uncomfortable over time. You need to find your edge but don't go way past it to the point where you might be like, you know killing yourself in a motorcycle accident or doing something completely reckless are going on national TV to speak if you haven't even spoken yet, like find your edge. There's a sweet spot for each person. Here's a wonderful exercise It's very practical, you grab a piece of paper, and right at the top of it, if I was fearless, the big capital I f, if I was fearless, what would I do? And you're gonna have one page for business and work. This is what I do. This is who I asked, this is what I go for I do a TED talk, I get to blah, blah, blah, blah, and then another page for personal. This might be what I'd say to my partner. This is what I might say to my kids, this is what I might ask for. This is what I might do, I might move to Brazil, I might go cross country and move to Los Angeles to start acting like whatever it is for you. Start writing things down knowing that you don't have to do anything on those pieces of paper. That's important. Because otherwise your mind might hide these things from you. You just want to find out what would be edgy. And then you don't have to do any of it. But you might like to circle two or three things that would be in the right at that edge like yep, that would be uncomfortable. And I think I'd feel proud that I did it. Do those, you can start with those and work your way up to the biggest stuff. Or if you like me do the scariest one first. And everything else is easier after that.   21:15 Right? Oh, that's a great exercise. I have it written down here. So I am going to do it. And it's almost like a way to open up your mind to more possibilities. Maybe things that you you you didn't think that didn't think you could ever even imagine doing but I like that you said listen, you don't have to do it. But let's write some stuff down. Just see what comes out of your mind. Because you never know. We start   21:40 with awareness. And it's the same with mouse naming with mouse in the room. You want to become aware of your mice? What are what is going on in your body? What are the confessions that might be looking? What are the desires that haven't been named? The tolerations. The appreciations, you want to become aware of these? Now you have a choice? Am I gonna name it? Well, let me go through the paint by numbers system in the book and oh, okay, yeah, I could do that. And then you're gonna name that mouse, there might be another one. You, you weigh it up, and you're like, alright, I can see the upside. There's also a downside. Like, if you committed a crime, you might be prosecuted, you might be arrested, you could do jail time, your if you if you cheated on your partner, and you decide to go and name a confession mouse, it could be consequences. So it's not for the faint of heart to tell your truth. And you don't have to name all of them. But the book will help you weigh it up and go, Alright, here's the upside. Here's the downside. And here's the downside. If I never seen anything, that's often what we don't address. And so then you can factor it and go, Alright, I think I'm just going to call call this person, we're going to have a chat about it. And we'll see what comes out of it. Even if it doesn't go well. Does that mean it was the wrong move? Just because the first round didn't go well? No. Maybe they need to have their reaction. And then you felt uncomfortable, and you have a bit of space? And then you might say, Hey, can I have a round two? I feel like I could have listened better. And I'd really like to work this out with you. Let's have another one. And then maybe you surprise yourself and you're like, Wow, I feel really close to that person. Now, if you really connected now we've got a great working relationship. Now for closer to my kid. Now I feel lighter. Because I'm being me in the world. That's what I want for people.   23:40 And can you give an example of maybe a mouse or two that you've named for yourself? Just so people have a better idea of like, what is he talking about? When you say saying name name, these mice are named this mouse? So can you give an example or two of maybe a mouse that you've named for yourself?   24:02 I'll give you an example of one from last night that I wish I had named earlier. And I kept it to myself for too long. I had a poker game, had some friends over and at one stage someone else arrived to the game and there's so much commotion and people getting up and noise and whatever. I got anxious. I had a panic feeling. And so, but I didn't say anything. I just tried to deal with it. I went outside I calmed down a little bit on my own. And then I had the resources to say hey, yeah, I got really activated. And I think I'm okay now but I could have said that in the moment. I said wow, really activate I'm gonna go outside for a little bit with someone come out with me. I could have said that. But I was a little bit too triggered to do it. That's, that's um that's what I would call a maybe a medium sized mouse. was pretty big in the moment effect in the moment was huge. We call them rodents of unusual size. For any Princess Bride fan.   25:07 I was just gonna say the RT R O SS. R Us is yes,   25:12 yeah, I'm just gonna restart my video because it went all fuzzy for a second. Then there were, you know, bigger ones that might have stayed with you for years, you might have had them for a long time, I was asked by one of my coaches to make a list of anyone I wouldn't want to pass on the street. Anyone I'd feel uncomfortable seeing or anyone I, I still harbored resentment for. And initially, I'm like, oh, there's no one. But as we dug in, you know, over time, I came up with a few people, and one of them was a bully from high school, like 20 years earlier, who had just really not treated me well and made fun of me. And we used to be friends. And the coach said, All right, call him. You know, we didn't have the terminology, name that mouse. But the coach was like, call him and clear it up. And I said, Hell, no. I'm not gonna call this guy after 20 years, he's gonna think I'm an idiot. And she said, and I'm going to translate it to this language. He said, basically, well, that's another mouse. So start with that. And I was like, oh, okay, I could do that. So I tracked down his number, and I called him and I said, I'm so worried you're gonna think I'm a complete idiot for calling you about this after 20 years? And he got curious. He said, Oh, well, what is it? What do you got? What's going on? I said, you always pushed me around and one off to me, and I tried to one up you, but you were better at it. And I really resented you, and I'm letting it go. You don't have to do anything. I just thought I'd let you know. And he said, the most mind blowing thing. This was the jerk. Like for 20 years, I'd been treating him as a jerk in my head. He said, Well, what could I say or do now to help you or us move forward? It just blew my mind. And if I can call him and call the girl who dumped me twice in high school, and call the guy who ran the company that I sued, to see if there are any ill feelings, and cold the person that I committed a crime against when I was younger, and I could have been prosecuted by saying, hey, it was me. And I'm sorry, can I make it right? I've done that twice. Actually, if I can do that, then just consider what could you do? It might be uncomfortable. And you don't have to do it without the paint by number system we outlined in the book that'll make it so much easier for you. But there are really beautiful things on the other side of that discomfort.   27:56 Right, so So these, these mice are the mouse that you name is just sort of this discomfort or this uneasy feeling that you've been harboring about topic XYZ or person XYZ, you naming it so that you can confront it and move past it.   28:13 Yeah, that might be a there might be a healing for me involved. Maybe the other person's got something going on it that you don't even know. I had my my brother was getting coached. And they gave him homework to call somebody and name a mouse. And he couldn't think of anyone and the coach. And the coach said to him, it doesn't matter how small it is just trust in the homework, go and do it. So he called a girl that he broken up with a year earlier, and said, Look, I just I don't know if you made it mean anything about you. But I want you to know, that was everything about me. I was not in a space to be in a relationship. And I really think you're awesome. And just in case you were thinking anything else. I wanted to let you know. And he said the impact on her was unbelievable. She started crying. And she said she'd been thinking that she was a loser because of that whole thing. And he came back to me and said, Look, I got no money. But that call was worth $10,000 to me. This and he was like 22 at the time. He's like that call was just unbelievable. So the upside of sharing your truth in an artful, ideally blameless way can be extraordinary. Everyone wants to be human. They want to be human and they want to open their heart That's my belief. That's my story. Now it's not going to happen every time you talk with people but even that boss that I called where i i sent a letter of demand and was threatening a lawsuit. We got chatting and he said all look back at the time. It didn't feel very good. I didn't Like, depart with the money, but that's water under the bridge. And I said, Well, how you doing? He told me we never had a personal conversation. He told me about his divorce and what was going on, I felt so close to that guy, I hung up the phone feel like we're buds now, all of it because I just called to say, is there any hard feelings from them? I'm hoping, hoping not. So it's it's a gateway courage in general. And I think particularly courage about the things where we have a bit of charge can be a gateway to connection, confidence, and being the badass leader that people want to follow.   30:37 I love it. And where can people find the book gets out today, which is again, yeah, June 13. In case you're listening to this on the 14th, through the 15th, or whenever,   30:48 or whenever, whenever, yeah, go to mouse in the room.com. And there'll be a link there for you to go to Amazon and get your book, we've got a special going. Special going, we're going to do the Kindle for like something crazy, like 99 cents, because we want to just do a best seller campaign. And so you could get the book for almost nothing, or pay for the you know, pay the 1295 or whatever, whatever for the book. But we'd love you to support the best seller campaign. And the way you can do that is get the book posted on social media that you got the book because it's good idea to have your friends naming mice with you. It's hard to do in isolation. But if your friends and the people around you are like, oh, yeah, this is what can I name a mouse with you? Oh, you got a mouse to name with me? Yeah, shoot. That's what I want for the world. And if you think it deserves a five star review, please leave one because that's what will help us climb in the rankings and hit that lovely bestseller title, which is really just an excuse to bring people together for a party.   31:53 Absolutely. And if people want to get in touch with you, if they have questions, maybe they want to work with you. They want to know how you know where you are in life, where can they find you?   32:05 Yeah, there's a contact form on my website. So mouse in the room.com, might even redirect you to my other website. But then you'll be able to see contact form, you can request coaching from me, I usually get on the phone with people and we see if, if we're a fit. And if it makes sense. If you're interested in mouse naming for your team, or your company, I'm particularly interested in that because we can start shifting the culture and have people sharing their desires and actually not letting things fester. I think it's wonderful for team building. And so you can reach out through the contact form about corporate trainings, or team team trainings.   32:45 Perfect. And before we wrap things up, is there anything that maybe we missed or that you want to really leave the listeners with?   32:56 You're already doing things, right? You got this far, you don't need fixing. And there can be a lot more connection in the world for each of us. And I found if you can just go through some of those scary places of discomfort and just screw up some courage. There are some beautiful things waiting on the other side. And I will, I could almost promise you that on your deathbed. You're not going to go I should have stayed quiet. You're going to say I'm glad I read that book. And I'm glad I spoke up my truth more and more often. And I went in that direction. That's how to live. We don't want to watch movies about people hiding their truth and staying small. We want to watch movies about people being themselves in the world. And that's what I want for the world. I think this is what can really heal the planet is people being more of themselves.   33:55 Awesome. And last question I asked everyone and that's knowing where you are today in your life and in your career. What advice would you give to your younger self?   34:10 At times, it's gonna get very hard. It might get so hard that you don't know if you're gonna make it. But you do you know, even because it's even though it seems like you just can't make it. You're stronger than you think. And you will find something new, you will learn a new way to cope. And then you'll go on and the universe is going to bring you something else. But try to remember when you're in the middle of it. Okay, it feels like life and death, but usually it isn't.   34:42 I love it. That is great advice. David, thank you so much for coming on to the podcast. I really appreciate it and again, everyone run out, get the book, get it on a Kindle, get it in and something in your hands if you can as well. The book is out today the mouse in the room. David, thank you so much for coming on.   35:03 Sure. I'd also say read it to your kids. You want your kids naming mice, you want to name mice with your kids. So, we didn't talk about parenting, but I think it's very as a chapter on on mouse naming for parents. So, thank you. I am excited and I appreciate the chance to talk about it.   35:20 Pleasure and everyone. Thanks so much for taking the time to listen. Get out there, start naming your mice and have and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

Attached to Hygiene
29. The APAC Market pt. 1 with Rockey Ye and Tina Li

Attached to Hygiene

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 37:47


The absorbent hygiene market varies by region, and each has its own history, cultures, customs, and languages. However, there are distinctions between and even within countries. As an article producer, you need to keep these factors in mind when it comes to consumer preferences and expectations. In this episode of ‘Attached to Hygiene', Rockey Ye, Business Director for Bostik's Asia-Pacific (APAC) region, and Tina Li, Bostik's Strategic Market and Technical Service Manager, share their knowledge of absorbent hygiene in the APAC region. Topics include market size, growth potential, demographics, user habits, and the influence of local and international brands.The Impact of Culture, Demographics, Income, and More on Consumer Buying HabitsEven within the same region, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to meeting your consumer's needs. For example, some consider the menstrual health market in APAC to be the most diversified of all the world's regions. This plays a significant role in what types of articles are produced. In some APAC countries, individuals who menstruate prefer a thicker, longer-lasting pad. In other countries within this region, users want a product with additives that help keep them cooler in a warm climate.In certain areas of the industry, product supply is outpacing demand. Because of this, commoditisation is occurring in the low- and mid-tier levels of absorbent articles. Conversely, innovation is shaping higher-end products. Families, especially those with greater disposable incomes, are having fewer children. As a result, fewer baby diapers are produced and when they are, the products include more premium features. This lower birth rate, coupled with an aging population, is leading some manufacturers to shift their focus. Especially notable are growth opportunities in adult incontinence and period care. While local brands are entering the absorbent hygiene market, the global and regional brands continue to dominate. As a manufacturer who serves the APAC region, you can benefit from understanding these and other evolving dynamics and trends.Outline of the Episode[05:10] Introduction of Rockey Ye and Tina Li[07:53] The APAC region's market size and growth potential[13:10] How APAC differs from other regions, based on demographics and other factors[14:29] Higher income and its connection to a declining birth rate[17:22] The effect of Asia's diverse cultures on user habits [20:02] More disposable income means a higher demand for premium products[24:15] Material science innovation in absorbent hygiene[28:45] Divergent trends: Low-end commoditisation and high-end innovation[31:51] Consolidation in the manufacturing market[34:08] An e-commerce report on the company BabyCare[35:30] Global and regional brands still dominant in APACResourcesYou can find Tina Li on LinkedIn. You may wish to leave her or Rockey a message through our email at hygiene@bostik.com. Listen to our episode on absorbent hygiene market trends:Hygiene Market Trends and InsightsListen to both parts of our episodes on the EMEA market which includes Europe, the Middle East, and Africa:The EMEA Market Part 1The EMEA Market Part 2Read our article on how industry innovations are meeting the top five consumer needs in absorbent hygiene.Get Connected with Attached to HygieneTake our Listener Survey to receive an early copy of our CSR Whitepaper.Connect with Jack Hughes on LinkedIn. You can also find us at Disposable Hygiene Adhesives on LinkedIn or by visiting the Attached to Hygiene Podcast on our official website. Email us with questions, comments, or ideas for future episodes at hygiene@bostik.com. Host: Jack HughesMusic by Jonathan BoyleProduced and edited by: Jack Hughes with help from Paul Andrews, Michele Tonkovitz, Emory Churness, and Nikki Ackerman from GreenOnion Creative.

Tcast
Expectations vs Reality on Human Progress, Experience, & Our Existence

Tcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 21:17


Your government is a Ponzi scheme. Yes, we're talking about all governments. Think of all the money being printed out by the central bank just to cover all the debt that's being incurred, while they're simultaneously encouraging more investors to enter the system. It's a long cycle of paying earlier investors with funds from recent investors, and all that debt gets transferred to the shoulders of the general public. Yes, people like you. So much social engineering goes into making sure that you are controlled by money. The truth is it's just a piece of paper. “It's no longer actual, like a certificate to trade it back in for gold or something else. It's a note. It's debt. We're just, we're throwing debt around, you work so someone else can print more and make your work worth less,” Alexander explained. As the system grows, more people join, earn debt, and pay back into it. The people issuing are the ones who get more funds. The ones at the top are earning big. The one thing that the government cannot regulate, no matter how hard they try, is trade. Trade is incredibly dynamic and grows alongside humans. It adapts and comes from all different areas. It's a core human activity—one that TARTLE is passionate about preserving. Here's the Key. Unlock Your Cage. Your existence is highly improbable. Imagine the long list of successful choices your ancestors make so that you could become a living, breathing, and thinking being.  Going through the daily motions of working, eating, and sleeping can make it difficult to think of the bigger picture. But you deserve to have opportunities where you can connect, find meaning, and explore the world around you. No false sense of scarcity. No limits. TARTLE was made to allow that sense of independence and connection. On this platform, all transactions occur exclusively between a buyer and a seller. Everything on the platform comes with no strings attached and was made because someone worked hard to create it. Conversely, everything you bring to the platform is borne out of your own efforts. You will get paid for your hard work and no one else. Transact in truth. Act with power. It's time to step out of that cage. Sign up for TARTLE through this link here.

10-Minute Contrarian
Ep52: Stablecoin Tier List

10-Minute Contrarian

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 23:00


The landscape in Stablecoins is changing, so while we wait for it all to play out, let's have some fun and take a look at VP's rankings for the options currently available to us now.   This is one man's opinion, nothing more.  Do not take it too seriously.  For entertainment purposes only, as always.   Recommended Crypto Trading Platform (Bonus and Contest Eligibility) - https://nononsenseforex.com/cryptocurrencies/best-crypto-trading-platform/   Blueberry Markets Blog (Top FX Broker) - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/blueberry-markets-review-my-top-broker-for-2019/   Markets.com Blog (Other top FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/markets-com-review/   US Residents Go Here (Top US FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/ig-us-review/   Follow VP on Twitter https://twitter.com/This_Is_VP4X   Check out my Forex trading material too! https://nononsenseforex.com/   The host of this podcast is not a licensed financial advisor, and nothing heard on this podcast should be taken as financial advice.  Do your own research and understand all financial decisions and the results therein are yours and yours alone.  The host is not responsible for the actions of their sponsors and/or affiliates.  Conversely, views expressed on this podcast are that of the host only and may not reflect the views of any companies mentioned. Trading Forex involves risk.  Losses can exceed deposits.   We are not taking requests for episode topics at this time.  Thank you for understanding.

Don't Be Pressed
14. TRAVEL HORROR STORIES + Would you Rather Travel with your Boyfriend/Girlfriend or Your Friends?

Don't Be Pressed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 27:06


TRAVEL HORROR STORIES + Would you Rather Travel with your Boyfriend/Girlfriend or Your Friends?// What up doe y'all! After a two week hiatus, your favorite duo Chuckles and Slim have decided to share the mic once again. Today, Devin and Morgan discuss what it's like to travel with friends versus a partner. While trips can be a great relationship builder for couples and friends groups it can also be a headache with differing personalities. We've all had that one vacation where we wished we would've just stayed home, but instead we spent too much money to be miserable. Conversely, we've also all had vacations we never wanted to leave with friends we'll never forget. Listen to todays episode to learn some tricks the ladies have picked up along the way that helps them have a good time whether traveling with friends or a partner. Oh! And y'all know The Diamond Club has those CRAZZZYYY write ins where people anonymously tell their worst traveling stories. You won't want to miss it!!SUBSCRIBE! Don't Be Pressed: Where we cover PRESSING topics from the point of view of 2 Black girls Learn more about us on our website: www.dontbepressedpodcast.com Listen on the go! Podcast on: iTunes Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, Pandora, iHeart Radio & Tune In FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: @dontbepressedpod INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/dontbepressedpod TWITTER: https://twitter.com/dontbepressedpod TIK TOK: https://www.tiktok.com/dontbepressed To tell us what you're pressed about for the podcast: dontbepressed@gmail.com For collaborations, guest opportunities and other business inquiries, email us at: media.dontbepressed@gmail.com 

Sales IQ Podcast
The Perfect First Meeting: A Micro Masterclass

Sales IQ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 20:34


Discovery is not dead. Conversely, running the right first meeting can help power your deal through the entire buying journey. In this episode of the Sales IQ Podcast, Luigi is solo and providing you with a micro masterclass on running the perfect first meeting. Find out his six key steps, why they're critical, and how to nail them.

Hidden Forces
The Revenge of Risk Rates & the Return of Dividend Investing | Daniel Peris

Hidden Forces

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 51:48


In Episode 252 of Hidden Forces, Demetri Kofinas speaks with Daniel Peris, Senior Vice President and Senior Portfolio Manager at Federated Hermes in Pittsburgh. Daniel is also the author of three books that together explore the intellectual underpinnings of modern portfolio allocation, with a particular focus on dividend investing, why it's fallen out of favor with investors over the last 30 years, and why dividend-paying securities are positioned to outperform some of their more growth-oriented, cashless competitors in the next 30. While our recent episodes with Tony Greer and Jeff Currie also focus on the rotation from growth stocks to value stocks, those conversations are industry-specific, namely, they focus on commodities and industrial resources. Conversely, the objective of today's conversation with Daniel is to narrow that focus to companies that pay some portion of their profits to shareholders, irrespective of industry. The goal of today's episode is to help you reimagine what is possible for your portfolios and how to manage them in a stagflationary global economy characterized by rising risk rates and persistently higher levels of financial volatility. You can access the full episode, transcript, and intelligence report to this week's conversation by going directly to the episode page at HiddenForces.io and clicking on "premium extras." All subscribers gain access to our premium feed, which can be easily added to your favorite podcast application. If you enjoyed listening to today's episode of Hidden Forces you can help support the show by doing the following: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | YouTube | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | CastBox | RSS Feed Write us a review on Apple Podcasts & Spotify Subscribe to our mailing list at https://hiddenforces.io/newsletter/ Producer & Host: Demetri Kofinas Editor & Engineer: Stylianos Nicolaou Subscribe & Support the Podcast at https://hiddenforces.io Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @hiddenforcespod Follow Demetri on Twitter at @Kofinas Episode Recorded on 05/23/2022

Functional Nutrition and Learning for Kids
94. Changing your child's genes through food with Amanda Archibald

Functional Nutrition and Learning for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 39:38


Can you change your genetic expression based on what you eat? Conversely, if you are one of those people that are chronically deficient in say, Iron or Vitamin D, are your genes to blame? And what can you do about it? How can this apply to factors that affect Autism/ADHD symptoms? In this episode, Amanda Archibald, pioneer in genomic nutrition, explains to us how - not only do genes affect how you can process food, but you can actually fine tune the food you eat to optimize your genes? Whether you need help with Omega-3 supplementation, or whether you need to USE Omega-3s to modulate some “slacker” genes, nutrigenomics is the field you have been waiting for. You can find Amanda Archibald at www.genomickitchen.com In the meantime, we are using nutrigenomics practically in our 5-day dosa challenge. Sign up at www.functionalnutritionforkids.com/dosa to find out how to make a dosa over 5 days and why a Dosa is the perfect breakfast for your child.

Side Hustle Teachers
How to Track Your Blogging Income and Expenses

Side Hustle Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 19:04


When I started blogging I did everything I could to avoid looking at any numbers other than page views. For months I was “too busy” or I “forgot” to update my income and expenses report, so it just didn't get done. This is a very common mistake that a lot of new bloggers make and it's usually for one (or both) of 2 reasons:  You know that in the very beginning you're likely not making as much as you're spending or you're just making a few dollars, so you stick your head in the sand to avoid the topic of money altogether. You have a mindset issue around money, so you stick your head in the sand and avoid the topic of money altogether. This could also show up in other areas of life if you let your partner handle all the money stuff in your personal life, too. In reality, knowing where your money is going, where it's coming from, and how the incoming and outgoing funds balance out is essential.  This is yet another instance where knowledge is power. Tracking your income. Let's say you have 3 streams of income on your blog; ads, affiliate income, and an ebook. Keeping track of your income from each source not only gives you a nice self-esteem boost because you can see the numbers grow, but it allows you to more actively promote things that are making you money.  If your ebook had a few more or fewer sales in a particular month, you can explore why and update your marketing strategy. Maybe you put a widget in your sidebar promoting the ebook and it resulted in more sales. Great! See if there's another place you can link to your ebook on your site to give it more exposure. If you notice your ad income drop because traffic dropped, you can find out why. Maybe you didn't email your list every week or you didn't share as much on social media as the month before, so you need to get back to it. Or maybe you find that it's part of a trend that your traffic drops for a month or two each year, and then you know not to freak out about it next year.  Tracking your expenses. Even if you're on board with tracking your income, you might still hesitate to look at what you're spending. This, too, is very common. We like to see what we're making, but thinking about what we're spending… pass. But income is just part of the profit equation. In order to know what your blog is actually generating for you and your family, you've got to track your expenses, too. For example, if you decided to invest in LeadPages to create gorgeous popups and a beautiful sales funnel, are you getting a return on that investment? Are more people signing up for your freebie, or are more people going through your funnel and purchasing your product? This may take a few months to know for sure, but if you're not seeing a return after 6 months, that's money you don't need to be spending. Conversely, if you're building your blog with the bare minimum of support and are only paying for your domain and hosting, you might find that your income is stagnating because you don't have a quality email service provider and you aren't as present on social media (because you have that pesky job) and need to consider a scheduler to help you grow. There are plenty of programs available to help you track your income and expenses, and if you're looking for a good one, I recommend QuickBooks Self-Employed (click here to save 55% on your first 3 months). You can connect your bank accounts and credit cards so the program will track your incoming and outgoing funds automatically. You just need to categorize each expense. A tool like this also makes tax time easier because they'll create a schedule K-1 form for you. If you are looking to save as much money as possible, or would prefer to track your finances yourself (like me), here's how I do it. Use an Excel Spreadsheet Yes, Google has sheets, but I'm old school and I like Excel. Not sorry. If you want a downloadable copy of my spreadsheet, click here, or you can create it yourself. Column A is your income and expense items (leave an empty box in the top row). Then columns B-M are the months, and column N is a year-end total. Organize your income and expenses by category, with each item listed under its category. I suggest using the categories from the IRS Schedule K-1 form to make tax time easier. Income. Create a row for each stream of income. Software Subscriptions. In this category you'll find your domain and hosting, email service provider, premium theme subscription, podcast host, social media scheduler, etc. Advertising & Marketing. Here is any money you spend on ads, paying influencers to promote you, or any other marketing materials, like hiring someone to design a logo. You can also create a miscellaneous item here for those one-time expenditures. Legal & Professional Fees. In this category you can put any legal expenses, like templates or the services of an attorney. You can also include any professional memberships you pay for as well as any courses or trainings you take. Contract Labor. This includes anyone you hire (other than an attorney) on an hourly basis. A virtual assistant is a common expense in this category, along with graphic designers, social media managers, etc. You may also want a row for miscellaneous contract labor if you hire per job rather than on an ongoing basis. Travel Expenses. Conferences, speaking gigs, and the related expenses are most common here. Also, if you see clients face-to-face, you can track gas and other costs, like a cup of coffee if you meet them at a cafe, networking events, etc. Utilize Formulas and Formatting Excel offers the option of setting specific cells (or a whole sheet) to be formatted a specific way, such as all numbers entered are translated as dollars. While it's not necessary, it does make things a bit easier and I find that seeing the numbers with dollar signs next to them helps me feel more like it's really money we're talking about. I also color code things to make it easier to read, and merge cells to make header rows for the categories. Again, not required, but it makes me feel better. One tool you will want to use is the formula feature. At the bottom of each category I use the SUM formula. Then at the bottom of the month I take the month's income and subtract (or add the negative) each category's subtotal to get the total profit or loss for the month In the year-end column add up each month's cell so you can see how much you made from each income stream and spent on each program, tool, service, or contractor for the year.  Grab a downloadable version of the spreadsheet I use to track my income and expenses here. Gather Your Numbers Once your spreadsheet is set up, it should only take 30-60 minutes a month to update it with your info. Go to PayPal, Stripe, or whatever payment processor you use and determine your income by stream.  Similarly, open the accounts you use to pay business expenses (this could also be PayPal, your business credit card, etc.). I strongly suggest you limit your business payments to specific cards or programs. This not only simplifies things when you do your monthly profit and loss, but also keeps things separate in case you're audited or sued. Enter all your monthly data into the spreadsheet! When you get into the habit of looking at your income and expenses on a monthly basis you will not only have a better handle on how your business is functioning and how you can make it even more profitable, you'll start to notice trends and be able to anticipate changes in your income. This is a process you want to start as soon as possible. Trust me! Next week I'll show you how to set up your accounts to make sure you're paying yourself every month, putting aside money for taxes, saving for large purchases, and only spending money you have. For now, grab my FREE Income and Expense Tracker here.

10-Minute Contrarian
Ep51: Rare Earth Elements

10-Minute Contrarian

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022


Not enough people are looking at this.  The world not only relies on REE now, the amount of places where you can mine or process them has remained very low.  Green energy and the ongoing war will only increase the demand, whilst the supply stays low.  We love this combination here.   Recommended Crypto Trading Platform (Bonus and Contest Eligibility) - https://nononsenseforex.com/cryptocurrencies/best-crypto-trading-platform/   Blueberry Markets Blog (Top FX Broker) - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/blueberry-markets-review-my-top-broker-for-2019/   Markets.com Blog (Other top FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/markets-com-review/   US Residents Go Here (Top US FX Broker)- https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/ig-us-review/   Follow VP on Twitter https://twitter.com/This_Is_VP4X Check out my Forex trading material too! https://nononsenseforex.com/   The host of this podcast is not a licensed financial advisor, and nothing heard on this podcast should be taken as financial advice.  Do your own research and understand all financial decisions and the results therein are yours and yours alone.  The host is not responsible for the actions of their sponsors and/or affiliates.  Conversely, views expressed on this podcast are that of the host only and may not reflect the views of any companies mentioned. Trading Forex involves risk.  Losses can exceed deposits.   We are not taking requests for episode topics at this time.  Thank you for understanding.

Good Risings
53.5. The Rising Sign: With Whom Am I Valued and Why?

Good Risings

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 4:33


Venus enters Taurus tomorrow. How can this transit help you with relationally and financially around your values? Today I want you to consider with whom you are valued and why. Be very clear about who values you because of who you are. Conversely, who do you value because of who they are? Think of them for who they are and not what they do.  Go out of your way to tell someone and show them appreciation for who they are. Show them that you value them simply for their values and who they are.    Good Risings is a mindset. Join Colin Bedell for a daily dose of Astrology. Presented By: Cavalry Audio.  Producers: Jason Seagraves & Margot Carmichael.    Audio Editing: Revision Sound. Music: Gramoscope Music.  Show Notes by: Brett Burris Executive Producers: Colin Bedell, Dana Brunetti & Keegan Rosenberger.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com You can now search all of the Good Risings episodes on Fathom.fm/GoodRisings!   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Flink vs Kafka Streams/ksqlDB: Comparing Stream Processing Tools

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 55:55


Stream processing can be hard or easy depending on the approach you take, and the tools you choose. This sentiment is at the heart of the discussion with Matthias J. Sax (Apache Kafka® PMC member; Software Engineer, ksqlDB and Kafka Streams, Confluent) and Jeff Bean (Sr. Technical Marketing Manager, Confluent). With immense collective experience in Kafka, ksqlDB, Kafka Streams, and Apache Flink®, they delve into the types of stream processing operations and explain the different ways of solving for their respective issues.The best stream processing tools they consider are Flink along with the options from the Kafka ecosystem: Java-based Kafka Streams and its SQL-wrapped variant—ksqlDB. Flink and ksqlDB tend to be used by divergent types of teams, since they differ in terms of both design and philosophy.Why Use Apache Flink?The teams using Flink are often highly specialized, with deep expertise, and with an absolute focus on stream processing. They tend to be responsible for unusually large, industry-outlying amounts of both state and scale, and they usually require complex aggregations. Flink can excel in these use cases, which potentially makes the difficulty of its learning curve and implementation worthwhile.Why use ksqlDB/Kafka Streams?Conversely, teams employing ksqlDB/Kafka Streams require less expertise to get started and also less expertise and time to manage their solutions. Jeff notes that the skills of a developer may not even be needed in some cases—those of a data analyst may suffice. ksqlDB and Kafka Streams seamlessly integrate with Kafka itself, as well as with external systems through the use of Kafka Connect. In addition to being easy to adopt, ksqlDB is also deployed on production stream processing applications requiring large scale and state.There are also other considerations beyond the strictly architectural. Local support availability, the administrative overhead of using a library versus a separate framework, and the availability of stream processing as a fully managed service all matter. Choosing a stream processing tool is a fraught decision partially because switching between them isn't trivial: the frameworks are different, the APIs are different, and the interfaces are different. In addition to the high-level discussion, Jeff and Matthias also share lots of details you can use to understand the options, covering employment models, transactions, batching, and parallelism, as well as a few interesting tangential topics along the way such as the tyranny of state and the Turing completeness of SQL.EPISODE LINKSThe Future of SQL: Databases Meet Stream ProcessingBuilding Real-Time Event Streams in the Cloud, On PremisesKafka Streams 101 courseksqlDB 101 courseWatch the video version of this podcastKris Jenkins' TwitterStreaming Audio Playlist Join the Confluent CommunityLearn more on Confluent DeveloperUse PODCAST100 for additional $100 of  Confluent Cloud usage (details)

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB RADIO BIBLE STUDY: The Day Of The Lord Starts With The Catching Away Of The Blood-Bought Church And Goes All The Way Out Into Eternity

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 112:24


On this episode of Rightly Dividing, we once again get in out King James Bible time machine and travel the prophetic pathway to see all the different events that are associated with the day of the Lord. Technically speaking, the Pretribulation Rapture of the Church is the Day of Christ, but when that blessed event happens, it will also start the day of the Lord for all those lost souls who will be left behind to enjoy the strong delusion. The Day of Christ takes you from rapture, to Judgement Seat of Christ, to the Marriage of the Lamb, to returning with King Jesus on the single-day day of the Lord. Conversely, the day of the Lord which starts on the same day as the rapture of the Church, takes you from being left behind and strongly deluded, to 3.5 years of fake peace with the Abraham Accords, the Mark of the Beast, into great Tribulation, to the armies of Antichrist, to watching King Jesus on the single-day day of the Lord. Confused? You won't be after tonight's rocket ride on the End Times Highway! Did you know that the 'day of the Lord' includes a specific day and dates on the calendar in addition to also being a period of time that begins with the catching away of the Church all the way to past the Great White Throne Judgment? All of that is the day of the Lord, quite a day, isn't it?

UnYielded: Thriving No Matter What
Are Your Values Showing Up On Your Calendar?

UnYielded: Thriving No Matter What

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 57:50


Many of us have been taught to look for flaws. Instead, it is time to start noticing the great things that occur in our lives, even on a tiny scale, and realize how grateful we ought to be. Conversely, practicing gratitude and discovering the ideal criteria for measuring success can completely transform our life. My guest today is someone who integrates social and emotional intelligence into all aspects of her life. She serves as the executive director at the Institute for Social and Emotional Intelligence. She is also a coach for social and emotional intelligence. Amy Sargent-Kossoff joins this episode to discuss her extraordinary knowledge and expertise in rethinking and rewriting life stories with emotional intelligence. Amy's Story – Amy recounts how she incorporated thankfulness into her life by keeping a gratitude jar and how it completely altered her life.Negative Experience – Mentioning that most of us tend to look for the negative, Amy demonstrates ways to cope with adverse situations and emotions.Success – We talk about how our list of shoulds and our success criteria affect us and the importance of continuously redefining success. Core Values – Highlighting that the method we spend our time reflects our values, we examine how to identify our core values. Social Intelligence – We explain the distinction between social intelligence and emotional intelligence. In addition, we address the importance of social intelligence in our everyday lives.Conflicts – Amy discusses how to deal with conflicts while emphasizing the need for self-awareness.Toxic Positivity – Amy shares her thoughts on the negative labeling of emotions. Moreover, she defines toxic positivity in straightforward terms.Amy's Work – Amy describes how she assists individuals with the offered courses and assessments.   Resources:Connect with Amy:Website: isei.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/amy-sargent-kossoff-a902a36b/  Mentioned in the episode:VIA Character Strengths Survey: viacharacter.org/Six Seconds Can Change Your Life: bobbikahler.com/awareness/episode068/The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work: goodreads.com/book/show/9484114-the-happiness-advantage?from_search=true&from_srp=true&qid=TtVLDyMHFs&rank=1

Work In Progress
WorkingNation @ SXSW EDU: Don’t Leave Older Workers Out of the Jobs Recovery

Work In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 44:12


In this episode of Work in Progress, we take a look at the challenges the midcareer workforce faces in a labor market reshaped by a health pandemic. The majority of the long-term unemployed are over the age of 45. A majority of hiring managers admit hesitating when it comes to hiring an older worker, fearing they don't have the necessary skills for today's jobs and are not tech-adaptable. Conversely, they say the older workers already on the job are valued employees. So, where does that leave midcareer workers trying to find a new job in the post-pandemic workforce? In March, WorkingNation partnered with SXSW EDU to bring together a panel to address this issue and examine what's being done to correct it. It was honored to moderate our Don't Leave Older Workers Out of the Jobs Recovery panel, which featured Jean Accius, SVP Global Thought Leadership, AARP; Wendi Safstrom, President, SHRM Foundation; and Maria Heidkamp, Director, Program Development and Senior Researcher, Heldrich Center at Rutgers University. You can listen to the conversation here. Episode 232: Don't Leave Older Workers Out of the Jobs RecoveryHost & Executive Producer: Ramona Schindelheim, Editor-in-Chief, WorkingNationProducer: Larry BuhlExecutive Producers: Joan Lynch and Melissa PanzerTheme Music: Composed by Lee Rosevere and licensed under CC by 4.0 Download the transcript for this podcast here.You can check out all the other podcasts at this link: Work in Progress podcasts  

The Daily Gardener
May 24, 2022 William Whewell, Queen Victoria, Anne Frobel, H. Howard Pepper, Cultivated by Christin Geall, and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 26:18


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee   Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter | Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1794 Birth of William Whewell ("Hyoo- uhl"), English polymath, scientist, and Anglican priest. He was Master of Trinity College, Cambridge. William was a unique blend of right and left brain aptitudes. As a university student, he was recognized for his work in both poetry and mathematics. In Elizabeth Gilbert's The Signature of All Things, she wrote of William's signature accomplishment - devising the word "scientist." She wrote, ...the word scientist had been coined, by the polymath William Whewell. Many scholars had objected to this blunt new term, as it sounded so sinisterly similar to that awful word atheist;  Why not simply continue to call themselves natural philosophers?  Was that designation not more godly, more pure?  But divisions were being drawn now between the realm of nature and the realm of philosophy.  Ministers who doubled as botanists or geologists were becoming increasingly rare, as far too many challenges to biblical truths were stirred up through investigation of the natural world.  It used to be that God was revealed in the wonders of nature;  now God was being challenged by those same wonders.  Scholars were now required to choose one side or the other.   1819 Birth of Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from June 20, 1837, until she died in 1901. Her reign of 63 years and seven months was longer than any previous British monarch and is known as the Victorian era. In 2019, Kensington Palace celebrated the bicentenary, the 200th anniversary, of Victoria's birth with a large floral display in the sunken garden. The display included blossoms from the Victorian era, such as heliotropes, cannas, pelargonium, and begonias. The humble violet was Queen Victoria's favorite flower. Today many plants are named for Queen Victoria, including the Victoria agave and the giant waterlily, Victoria amazonica.   1861 It was on this day that 45-year-old Anne Frobel, who lived outside of Alexandria, Virginia, not far from Mount Vernon started her Civil War diary with these words, I never saw 'Wilton' my dear old home looking more lovely and inviting.  The trees and plants had put on their loveliest spring attire, and the garden was resplendent with the bloom of rare and brilliant flowers, and the fields were all smiling with a bright prospect of an abundant harvest.    The following day, Anne's farmhouse, like many homes in Alexandria and all along the Potomac, was ceased by Union soldiers looking for quarters. Anne shared her home with her sister Lizzie. The two women never married.  Anne's journal gives a glimpse of what it was like for Southern women of the Civil War era to endure four years of occupation as troops and scavengers used their land for firewood, food, and water. One day, Anne recounted how a Union officer shared a story over dinner at her table about how he had destroyed the last turnips. Anne wrote, My very blood boiled!   1905 On this day, the banker H. Howard Pepper of Providence, Rhode Island, wrote a letter to the magazine Country Life in America, I have had the gardening fever for three summers. ...All the work in the garden is done by myself, and it takes about two hours a day.  We started with these objects in view: To have cut flowers for the house at all times. To have a mass of roses in the backyard. To have [flowers] in the garden all season. Our lot is the average city size, fifty by one hundred feet. The house is twenty feet from the street line, where there are two large elm trees that shade the lawn and beds in front. While these trees are beautiful and we would not part with them, yet they are great deal of trouble, They require spraying each spring, and their roots fill ... the drainpipes, causing much annoyance and expense. I should never plant elm trees near flowerbeds or drain pipes.  The backyard is surrounded by a five-foot board fence on the north and east and picket fence on the south. Climbing nasturtiums cover the picket fence, and [we want] to have climbers hide the board fence, which is covered with wire netting hung on hooks In case the fence is to be painted, the vines and netting can easily be laid down. A woodbine trumpet-vine and Clematis paniculeta are already established,  The single tuberous begonias are the best bedding plants I know; they bloom all summer.  Last year's hollyhocks were affected with blight; we have overcome that disease by spraying with ... One ounce of carbonate of copper made into a paste with one• half pint of water; slowly add one-half pint of strong ammonia water (twenty-six degrees}; water, nine gallons. Our spraying outfit consists of a wooden pail and whisk broom. The broom is far ahead of the ordinary syringe, as it is not so wasteful. The sweet-pea bed, or No. 5, is twelve feet long and three and one-half feet wide. Last year, by planting the peas four inches deep in the middle of October and giving them heavy covering during the winter, we had flowers on May 24th. Early in the fall the sweet peas and nasturtiums were removed to make way for the homemade cold- frame, with a second-hand sash that cost us one dollar. In this frame six by three feet are two hundred small plants of oriental poppies, foxgloves, cardinal flowers, and pansies, also three hundred cuttings of phlox, wisteria, hibiscus, snow-ball, althea, and roses. We have seventy-five rose bushes, mostly vigorous hybrid perpetuals. Last winter we carried over a number of hybrid tea roses by covering them with nail kegs filled with leaves, the kegs having one stave removed for ventilation. When the ground freezes, the rose beds receive a three-inch coating of fresh cow manure, part of which is forked in in the spring. Our greatest difficulty in gardening has been to keep the roses free from aphids. We have tried almost everything advertised but fall back on spraying with the hose. The roses receive weekly applications of liquid manure, two quarts to a plant, from the time the buds appear until they show color. It is usually applied after a rain or when the ground is wet, to prevent burning the roots. We have two piazza boxes. Last fall one was filled with snowdrops, scillas, chionodoxas and crocuses; the other with hyacinths and tulips; they were buried in a vacant lot near by, As soon as the ground thawed in the spring they were placed in position. The bulbs were succeeded by tuberous begonias.  We have raised hundreds of hardy plants like cardinal flowers, foxgloves, Boston ivies, and Oriental poppies in small candy and cigar bases placed on the walk in the rear of the house. Tin marshmallow boxes are excellent for this purpose, as they hold moisture longer than wooden boxes. Our chief error in growing seedlings has been in giving them too much sun. WHY WE HAVE A GOOD LAWN We take great delight in the back lawn because we have overcome SO much in getting it into its present condition.  The weeds are removed from the lawn at least twice a year. The grass is cut once in ten days and the clippings are not raked up.    Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation Cultivated by Christin Geall This book came out in 2020, and the subtitle is The Elements of Floral Style.  This book is so highly rated on Amazon. There are almost 400 reviews, and this is a five-star book. I like to think of this book as a masterclass In floral design. The arrangement on the cover of this book is stunning. An excellent floral design book is so essential. It's a good thing to brush up on those skills - especially this time of year as we're wrapping up spring. We've got beautiful blossoms, like lilacs and peonies, and the roses are just starting to bud. And then, as we get into early summer, there is just an entire buffet of beautiful blossoms that you may want to cut and bring indoors. Just because you're a good gardener doesn't mean that you're a good floral designer or arranger. Like gardening, floral art is a skill that you can learn and get better at. Now I thought I would just give you a quick overview of how Christin has this book laid out. Because very quickly - you'll be able to deduce that Christin is truly a pro. She is a conscious-competent and when it comes to working with flowers. And that's precisely the kind of expert that you want. So Christin begins by talking about finding the flowers and the plants you want to work with. Now you can source many of these things right from your backyard or your patio as a gardener, or you can even supplement some of those with items that you forage or purchase when you're out and about. Then next, Christin has a section that she calls Gearing Up. Here, what she walks you through is everything from, Where are you going to work? (Do you have a potting bench or a room or part of your kitchen that you'll use when you're creating with cut flowers.) What are the vessels or the containers that you're planning on using? What are the tools you plan to use? (What Christin calls the mechanics). And then she has an entire section Where she talks about color. When I think about color, I think about both the art and the science of color. So if you're not good with picking colors, if you struggle with what color to paint a room or what colors to accessorize with, that struggle can translate into your work with flowers. Conversely, if you have a knack for choosing color or working with color, this section will be a slam dunk. But there is a science to it for those of us who struggle with color. And just like with gardening, you can get better and more confident in your work with color. Now two things I want to call out here that Christin talks about in her book that I think are especially helpful is she spends some time talking about two colors, in particular, which can be a true challenge for your work putting together floral designs. One is the color red. Red is such a bold color. And then the other color is green. While you might be thinking about green: how can green be a problem or a challenge? It's because there are different tones and shades of green, and believe it or not; there are times when the green you might be working with can conflict, get dragged down, or just be a little bit off with the rest of your floral work. So you do have to pay attention to the greens you're using. Now the following four sections that are covered in Christin's book, to me, are really where her expertise is. This is Christin in her wheelhouse. She talks about shape and shaping your work. There are so many ways to mold and take control of the form of your floral design. So I loved this section. And then she has one that's called learning from the past. And here is where she looks at garden history, and she looks at some of the best garden artists that have ever lived and how they composed with flowers. So she takes a look at, in particular at the Baroque style, what the Dutch masters were doing with their flowers and their flower paintings, the Rococo style, and SO on. Next, she features a little section on design, creativity and style, restraint, and constraint. And then, finally, she brings it all together by talking about how you can deepen your work: How you can know your why when it comes to creating with flowers. She spends a little bit of time talking about how to photograph flowers - a topic near and dear to my heart. Now I wanted to take one second here. And just share a little bit from what Christin writes in the introduction to this book. Christin is a gardener. She is a writer. She's a garden writer. And at one point, she found herself serving as a florist in residence on an estate in Scotland. And she had absolutely no experience as a florist. So, here's what she wrote. If you'd asked me at the time what I was doing in that shed in Scotland, the professor in me would have had an answer, but I myself might not have believed it: I was serving as a florist in residence on the estate. What does such a person do? I didn't know entirely, even after I pitched the idea to the owners and head gardener. They just let me get on with it, assuming I knew what "it" was.  So I roamed around with a borrowed bucket and wheelbarrow looking for flowers to pick in the dark days of October. I begged vessels and an old folding card table from the house manager. I tried to put together color palettes. I sought out places to photograph my arrangements. And I silently questioned my every move. One thing in my favor: I knew plants. I'd spent thirty years learning about them, growing them, selling them, and loving them.  So I made a deal with myself to do at least one arrangement a day, no matter what, and photograph it as best I could. I had no tripod, SO most of my pictures were blurry, and because of the latitude and time of year, there was very little light. I had no idea where my designs might take me from one day to the next, but no matter what, I got started. And that starting, that instinct to begin without a doubt, is what matters most. That's predominantly what this book is about-discovering how to see flowers. My magpie tendencies have thankfully suited me well; in this book you'll find color theory and discussions of fashion, form, and style but also ruminations on gardening and seasonality that I feel are fundamental to an appreciation of the art.    This book is rated a best-of-DIY book on Amazon. It is 224 pages of a fresh and thoughtful guide to flower arranging for gardeners. You can get a copy of Cultivated by Christin Geall and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $14.   Botanic Spark 1884 On this day, the Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky ("chai-kaaf-skee") threw out his work on Suite No. 3 in G major, Op. 55 - and began all over again. Weeks earlier, he had written in his journal that he had gone out to his garden and found inspiration for the melody. He wrote, In the forest and indoors I have been trying to lay the foundation of a new symphony but - am not at all satisfied.... Walked in the garden and found the germ, not of a symphony, but of a future Suite. Prone to self-doubt and angst, Tchaikovsky was tender-hearted and easily wounded by critics of his work. Tchaikovsky's most popular music was often written for ballets like Swan Lake (1877), The Sleeping Beauty (1889), and The Nutcracker(1892), featuring a favorite melody on many gardener's playlists, The Waltz of the Flowers.  Tchaikovsky was a nature lover and a gardener. He loved flowers and spent much of his free time cultivating his flowers. He wrote in a letter on June 1 (13th), 1888. Just now I am busy with flowers and flower-growing. I should like to have as many flowers as possible in my garden, but I have very little knowledge or experience. am not lacking in zeal, and have indeed taken cold from pottering about in the damp. Now, thank goodness, it is warmer weather; I am glad of it, for you, for myself, and for my dear flowers, for I have sown a quantity, and the cold nights made me anxious for them....'   Later that same summer, on July 25 (August 6), 1888, Tchaikovsky wrote his patron once more, The real summer weather has not lasted long, but how I enjoyed it! My flowers, which I feared would die, have nearly all recovered, and some have blossomed luxuriantly. I cannot tell you what a pleasure it has been to watch them grow and to see daily- even hourly-new blossoms coming out. Now I have as many as - want.  When I am quite old, and past composing, I shall devote myself to growing flowers.   Today, the Tchaikovsky House and Museum still stands at his final country home in Klin ("Kuh-lin"), 85 kilometers northwest of Moscow. Tchaikovsky loved his place in Kiln. He once wrote, It is impossible to suggest a better a more suitable way of living than in the countryside. After each new trip to Moscow I come to realize more and more how city life ruins me. Each time I return here I'm completely ill, but I immediately recover in my quiet corner. and Never before have I reveled so much in the beauty of spring, the awakening vegetation, birds returning home – in short, everything which is brought by the Russian spring, actually the most beautiful and jovial spring on earth.   Tchaikovsky's garden was essentially an idealized forest garden - a little wild and wooly - with a winding path and a gazebo. Tchaikovsky loved wildflowers and woodland flowers. One of his favorite flowers was the lily of the valley. He even wrote a poem about it, telling his brother Modest that, like his musical compositions, he was  "terribly proud of this poem." There he is!  I pluck the wondrous gift of the enchantress Spring. O lily of the valley, why do you so please the eye? Where lies the secret of your charms?  ...Your balmy fragrance, Like flowing wine, warms and intoxicates me, Like music, it takes my breath away, ...I am happy while you bloom.   Fittingly, after Tchaikovsky's death at 53, his brother Modest planted lilies of the valley all around the garden at Kiln. Modest also grew other favorites enjoyed by his brother, like violets, forget-me-nots, and bluebells. Today, the garden also boasts roses, begonias, gillyflowers, phloxes, sweet tobacco, and a large statue of Tchaikovsky sitting on the end of a garden bench. You can get your picture taken beside him among the flowers.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.    

Cheating: When Love Lies
Why Married Women Sleep With Me & Why I Stayed Faithful To A Cheater

Cheating: When Love Lies

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 46:48


Is it possible to be a beautiful, accomplished woman in your 30s, and have never once cheated on a partner - not even a secret emotional flirtation? My guest Joanne Nosuchinsky, co-host of the show “Mornin' with Bill and Joanne” is that woman. Joanne has managed to remain faithful in her relationships even at times when a partner has cheated on her. Conversely, her very good friend and co-host Bill Schulz has slept with “many married women” (his words not mine). I plan on asking Bill how many is many, and why he thinks they all slept with him. Bill says the married women he's been with “don't expect very much.” (Umm… what does that mean?) Bill, Joanne and I also play a game that tests their knowledge of modern dating terms and tactics. It's a show filled with LMAO moments, and some pretty surprising revelations from both Bill and Joanne.

10-Minute Contrarian
Ep50: Cornucopias

10-Minute Contrarian

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 16:33


We are at a rare moment in time, where one of the best (and most affordable) metaverse play-to-earn projects is not only putting out crazy amounts of information on its game (rare), but has still yet to have their first land sale.  We have a lot to go over.   ByBit Blog (With Contest Info) - https://nononsenseforex.com/cryptocurrencies/best-crypto-trading-platform/   Blueberry Markets Blog - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/blueberry-markets-review-my-top-broker-for-2019/   Markets.com Blog - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/markets-com-review/ US Residents Go Here - https://nononsenseforex.com/uncategorized/ig-us-review/   Cornucopias Medium Post - https://medium.com/copiwatch/a-glimpse-of-virtual-land-in-cornucopias-cardano-metaverse-42d19663755c   Cornucopias Wiki - https://copiwiki.cornucopias.io/   Copi Cafe can be found on their YT Channel (check out their trailer too)- https://www.youtube.com/c/CornucopiasGame   Follow VP on Twitter https://twitter.com/This_Is_VP4X Check out my Forex trading material too! https://nononsenseforex.com/   The host of this podcast is not a licensed financial advisor, and nothing heard on this podcast should be taken as financial advice.  Do your own research and understand all financial decisions and the results therein are yours and yours alone.  The host is not responsible for the actions of their sponsors and/or affiliates.  Conversely, views expressed on this podcast are that of the host only and may not reflect the views of any companies mentioned. Trading Forex involves risk.  Losses can exceed deposits. We are not taking requests for episode topics at this time.  Thank you for understanding.

Female Athlete Nutrition
78: The Truth About Weighing Scales

Female Athlete Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 30:45


In this solo episode of the Female Athlete Podcast, I give our amazing podcast producer Ruby Wyles a big shoutout and recommend you go follow her on Instagram @rwyles_xctf! Today, I dive deep into the topic of scales. I differentiate between food scales and body weight scales and their usefulness, or lack thereof. Both have places for some people and not others: scales are not essential, should not be used daily, and I often recommend clients get rid of theirs. I discuss how my own relationship with the scale has evolved, from an unhealthy obsession with the numbers and daily weigh-ins in my early 20s, to getting rid of the scale and finding intuitive eating when injured years later. I give advice on developing a healthy relationship with the scale, which for most people involves not stepping on it! You don't need the scale! Tune in to your body and all its amazing functions: numbers cannot tell you anything about that! Personally, I do occasionally weigh myself and am at a place where I view the number objectively without emotion..., mostly! Despite being a sports dietitian, during my recent pregnancy I did find myself getting a bit caught up with the number on the scale. At this point when I was no longer seeing the number as objective data, I got rid of the scale because it wasn't serving me! I recommend that you do the same! Smash that scale and remember that the numbers you see can't tell you anything about how amazing your body is or what it is made up of: organs, muscle, fat, blood, water, etc. Finally, I propose listeners question that even if the scale is not hurting you, how is it helping you? Conversely, think about all the ways the scale may be hurting you: emotionally, physically, mentally, socially? What is your relationship with the scale really costing you?  Follow my podcast producer Ruby Wyles on Instagram @rwyles_xctf Rate and review the podcast on all platforms. Share the episodes you like with friends and family.  Tag us on Instagram and we'll reshare! Reach out with any questions, get in touch, we're here to help! Learn more about Lindsey's Services and the Team at Rise Up Nutrition: www.riseupnutritionrun.com Worried that you have RED-S? Curious to know how we could help or how you can recover fast?! Download the RED-S Recovery Race & see how you place for more support: www.riseupnutritionrun.com/reds

Screaming in the Cloud
At the Head of Community Development with Wesley Faulkner

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 35:19


About WesleyWesley Faulkner is a first-generation American, public speaker, and podcaster. He is a founding member of the government transparency group Open Austin and a staunch supporter of racial justice, workplace equity, and neurodiversity. His professional experience spans technology from AMD, Atlassian, Dell, IBM, and MongoDB. Wesley currently works as a Developer Advocate, and in addition, co-hosts the developer relations focused podcast Community Pulse and serves on the board for SXSW.Links Referenced: Twitter: https://twitter.com/wesley83 Polywork: https://polywork.com/wesley83 Personal Website: https://www.wesleyfaulkner.com/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am joined again for a second time this year by Wesley Faulkner. Last time we spoke, he was a developer advocate. And since then, as so many have, he's changed companies. Wesley, thank you for joining me again. You're the Head of Community at SingleStore, now. Congrats on the promotion.Wesley: Thank you. It's been a very welcome change. I love developer advocates and developer advocacy. But I love people, too, so it's almost, I think, very analogous to the ebbs and flow that we all have gone through, through the pandemic, and leaning into my strong suits.Corey: It's a big deal having a ‘head of' in a role title, as opposed to Developer Advocate, Senior Developer Advocate. And it is a different role. It's easy to default into the world of thinking that it's a promotion. Management is in many ways orthogonal to what it takes to succeed in an actual role. And further, you're not the head of DevRel, or DevRelopers or whatever you want to call the term. You are instead the Head of Community. How tied is that to developer relations, developer advocacy, or other things that we are used to using as terms of art in this space?Wesley: If we're talking about other companies, I would say the Head of Community is something that's under the umbrella of developer relations, where it's just a peer to some of the other different elements or columns of developer relations. But in SingleStore specifically, I have to say that developer relations in terms of what you think about whole umbrella is very new to the company. And so, I consider myself the first person in the role of developer relations by being the Head of Community. So, a lot of the other parts are being bolted in, but under the focus of developer as a community. So, I'm liaisoning right now as helping with spearheading some of the design of the activities that the advocates do, as well as architecting the platform and the experiences of people coming in and experiencing SingleStore through the community's perspective.So, all that to say is, what I'm doing is extremely structured, and a lot of stuff that we're doing with the efficacy, I'm using some of my expertise to help guide that, but it's still something that's kind of like an offshoot and not well integrated at the moment.Corey: How has it changed the way that you view the function of someone who's advocating to developers, which is from my cynical perspective, “Oh, it's marketing, but we don't tell people it's marketing because they won't like it.” And yes, I know, I'll get emails about that. But how does it differ from doing that yourself versus being the head of the function of a company? Because leadership is a heck of a switch? I thought earlier in my career that oh, yeah, it's a natural evolution of being a mediocre engineer. Time to be a mediocre manager. And oh, no, no, I aspired to be a mediocre manager. It's a completely different skill set and I got things hilariously wrong. What's it like for you going through that shift?Wesley: First of all, it is kind of like advertising, and people may not think of it that way. Just to give an example, movie trailers is advertising. The free samples at the grocery store is advertising. But people love those because it gives an experience that they like in a package that they are accustomed to. And so, it's the same with developer relations; it's finding the thing that makes the experience worthwhile.On the community side, this is not new to me. I've done several different roles, maybe not in this combination. But when I was at MongoDB, I was a technical community manager, which is like a cog in the whole giant machine. But before that, in my other life, I managed social and community interactions for Walmart, and I had, at the slow period, around 65, but during the holidays, it would ramp up to 95 direct reports that I managed.It's almost—if you're a fan of The Princess Bride, it's different than fighting one person. Sometimes it's easier to fight, like, a squad or a gang of people. So, being Head of Community with such a young company is definitely a lot different than. In some ways, harder to deal with this type of community where we're just growing and emerging, rather than something more well-established.Corey: It probably gives you an interesting opportunity. Because back when I was doing engineering work as an SRE or whatever we call them in that era, it was, “Yeah, wow, my boss is terrible and has no idea what the hell they're doing.” So, then I found myself in the role, and it's, “Cool. Now, do all the things that you said you would do. Put up or shut up.”And it turns out that there's a lot you don't see that our strategic considerations. I completely avoided things like managing up or managing laterally or balancing trade-offs in different ways. Yeah, you're right. If you view the role of management as strictly being something that is between you and your direct reports, you can be an amazing manager from their perspective, but completely ineffective organizationally at accomplishing the goals that have been laid out for you.Wesley: Yeah. The good thing about being head of and the first head of is that you help establish those goals. And so, when you take a role with another company saying, “Hey, we have headcount for this,” and it's an established role, then you're kind of like streamlining into a process that's already underway. What's good about this role specifically, a ‘head of,' is that I help with not only designing what are the goals and the OKRs but deciding what the teams and what the team structure should look like. And so, I'm hiring for a specific position based on how it interacts with everything else.So, when I'm coming in, I don't say, “Well, what do you do?” Or, “How do you do it?” I said, “This is what needs to be done.” And that makes it so much easier just to say that if everything is working the way it should and to give marching orders based on the grand vision, instead of hitting the numbers this quarter or next quarter. Because what is core to my belief, and what's core, too, of how I approach things is at the heart of what I'm trying to do, which is really great, in terms of making something that didn't exist before.Corey: The challenge, too, is that everyone loves to say—and I love to see this at different ways—is the evolution and understanding of the DevRel folks who I work with and I have great relationships with realizing that you have to demonstrate business value. Because I struggle with this my entire career where I know intrinsically, that if I get on stage and tell a story about a thing that is germane to what my company does, that good things are going to happen. But it's very hard to do any form of attribution to it. In a different light, this podcast is a great example of this.We have sponsors. And people are listening. Ideally, they aren't fast-forwarding through sponsor messages; I do have interesting thoughts about the sponsors that I put into these ads. And that's great, but I also appreciate that people are driving while they're listening to this, and they are doing the dishes, they are mowing the lawn, and hopefully not turning up the volume too loudly so it damages their hearing. And the idea that they're going to suddenly stop any of those things and go punch in the link that I give is a little out to lunch there.Instead, it's partially brand awareness and it is occasionally the, “Wait. That resonates exactly with the problem that I have.” So, they get to work or they get back in front of a computer and the odds are terrific they're not going to punch in that URL of whatever I wound up giving; they're going to type in whatever phrases they remember and the company name into Google. Now—and doing attribution on something like that is very hard.It gets even more hard when we're talking about something that is higher up the stack that requires a bit more buy-in than individual developers. There's often a meeting or two about it. And then someone finally approaches the company to have a conversation. Now, does it work? Yes. There are companies that are sponsoring this stuff that spend a lot of time, effort, and money on that.I don't know how you do that sort of attribution; I don't pretend to know, but I know that it works. Because these people whose entire job is making sure that it does tell me it does. So, I smile, I nod, and that's great. But it's very hard to wind up building out a direct, “If you spend X dollars sponsoring this, you will see Y dollars in response.” But in the DevOps world, when your internal doing these things, well, okay because to the company, I look an awful lot like an expensive developer except I don't ever write production code.And then—at least in the before times—“So, what does your job do? Because looking at the achievements and accomplishments last quarter, it looks an awful lot like you traveled to exotic places on the company dime, give talks that are of only vague relevance to what we do, and then hang out at parties with your friends? Nice job, how can I get that?” But it's also first on the chopping block when okay, how do we trim expenses go? And I think it's a mistake to do that. I just don't think that story of the value of developer relations is articulated super-well. And I say that, but I don't know how to do a much better job of it myself.Wesley: Well, that's why corporate or executive buy-in is important because if they know from the get-go while you're there, it makes it a little bit easier to sell. But you do have to show that you are executing. So, there are always two parts to presenting a story, and that's one, the actual quantitative, like, I've done this many talks—so that output part—I've written this many blog posts, or I've stood up this many events that people can attend to. And then there's the results saying, people did read this post, people did show up to my event, people did listen to my talk that I gave. But you also need to give the subjective ones where people respond back and say, “I loved your talk,” or, “I heard you on Corey's podcast,” or, “I read your blog posts,” because even though you might not understand that it goes all the way down in a conversion funnel to a purchase, you can least use that stand-in to say there's probably, like, 20, 30 people behind this person to have that same sentiment, so you can see that your impact is reaching people and that it's having some sort of lasting effect.That said, you have to keep it up. You have to try to increase your output and increase your sphere of influence. Because when people go to solve their problem, they're going to look into their history and their own Rolodex of saying what was the last thing that I heard? What was the last thing that's relevant?There is a reason that Pepsi and Coke still do advertising. It's not because people don't know those brands, but being easily recalled, or a center of relevance based on how many touchpoints or how many times that you've seen them, either from being on American Idol and the logo facing the camera, or seeing a whole display when you go into the grocery store. Same with display advertising. All of this stuff works hand in hand so that you can be front-of-mind with the people and the decision-makers who will make that decision. And we went through this through the pandemic where… that same sentiment, it was like, “You just travel and now you can't travel, so we're just going to get rid of the whole department.”And then those same companies are hunting for those people to come back or to rebuild these departments that are now gone because maybe you don't see what we do, but when it's gone, you definitely notice a dip. And that trust is from the top-up. You have to do not just external advocacy, but you have to do internal advocacy about what impacts you're having so that at least the people who are making that decision can hopefully understand that you are working hard and the work is paying off.Corey: Since the last time that we spoke, you've given your first keynote, which—Wesley: Yes.Corey: Is always an interesting experience to go through. It was at a conference called THAT Conference. And I feel the need to specify that because otherwise, we're going to wind up with a ‘who's on first' situation. But THAT Conference is the name.Wesley: Specify THAT. Yes.Corey: Exactly. Better specify THAT. Yes. So, what was your keynote about? And for a bit of a behind-the-scenes look, what was that like for you?Wesley: Let me do the behind-the-scenes because it's going to lead up to actual the execution.Corey: Excellent.Wesley: So, I've been on several different podcasts. And one of the ones that I loved for years is one called This Week in Tech with Leo Laporte. Was a big fan of Leo Laporte back in the Screen Saver days back in TechTV days. Loved his opinion, follow his work. And I went to a South by Southwest… three, four years ago where I actually met him.And then from that conversation, he asked me to be on his show. And I've been on the show a handful of times, just talking about tech because I love tech. Tech is my passion, not just doing it, but just experiencing and just being on either side of creating or consuming. When I moved—I moved recently also since, I think, from the last time I was on your show—when I moved here to Wisconsin, the organizer of THAT Conference said that he's been following me for a while, since my first appearance on This Week in Tech, and loved my outlook and my take on things. And he approached me to do a keynote.Since I am now Wisconsin—THAT Conference is been in Wisconsin since inception and it's been going on for ten years—and he wanted me to just basically share my knowledge. Clean slate, have enough time to just say whatever I wanted. I said, “Yes, I can do that.” So, my experience on my end was like sheer excitement and then quickly sheer terror of not having a framework of what I was going to speak on or how I was going to deliver it. And knowing as a keynote, that it would be setting the tone for the whole conference.So, I decided to talk on the thing that I knew the most about, which was myself. Talked about my journey growing up and learning what my strengths, what my weaknesses are, how to navigate life, as well as the corporate jungle, and deciding where I wanted to go. Do I want to be the person that I feel like I need to be in order to be successful, which when we look at structures and examples and the things that we hold on a pedestal, we feel that we have to be perfect, or we have to be knowledgeable, and we have to do everything, well rounded in order to be accepted. Especially being a minority, there's a lot more caveats in terms of being socially acceptable to other people. And then the other path that I could have taken, that I chose to take, was to accept my things that are seen as false, but my own quirkiness, my own uniqueness and putting that front and center about, this is me, this is my person that over the years has formed into this version of myself.I'm going to make sure that is really transparent and so if I go anywhere, they know what they're getting, and they know what they're signing up for by bringing me on board. I have an opinion, I will share my opinion, I will bring my whole self, I won't just be the person that is technical or whimsical, or whatever you're looking for. You have to take the good with the bad, you have to take the I really understand technology, but I have ADHD and I might miss some deadlines. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word.Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: I have a very similar philosophy, and how I approach these things where it's there is no single speaking engagement that I can fathom even being presented to me, let alone me accepting that is going to be worth me losing the reputation I have developed for authenticity. It's you will not get me to turn into a shill for whatever it is that I am speaking in front of this week. Conversely, whether it's a paid speaking engagement or not, I have a standing policy of not using a platform that is being given to me by a company or organization to make them look foolish. In other words, I will not make someone regret inviting me to speak at their events. Full stop.And I have spoken at events for AWS; I have spoken at events for Oracle, et cetera, et cetera, and there's no company out there that I'm not going to be able to get on stage and tell an entertaining and engaging story, but it requires me to dunk on them. And that's fine. Frankly, if there is a company like that where I could not say nice things about them—such as Facebook—I would simply decline to pursue the speaking opportunity. And that is the way that I view it. And very few companies are on that list, to be very honest with you.Now, there are exceptions to this, if you're having a big public keynote, I will do my traditional live-tweet the keynote and make fun of people because that is, A, expected and, B, it's live-streamed anywhere on the planet I want to be sitting at that point in time, and yeah, if you're saying things in public, you can basically expect that to be the way that I approach these things. But it's a nuanced take, and that is something that is not fully understood by an awful lot of folks who run events. I'll be the first to admit that aspects of who and what I am mean that some speaking engagements are not open to me. And I'm okay with that, on some level, I truly am. It's a different philosophy.But I do know that I am done apologizing for who I am and what I'm about. And at some point that required a tremendous amount of privilege and a not insignificant willingness to take a risk that it was going to work out all right. I can't imagine going back anymore. Now, that road is certainly not what I would recommend to everyone, particularly folks earlier in their career, particularly for folks who don't look just like I do and have a failure mode of a board seat and a book deal somewhere, but figuring out where you will and will not compromise is always an important thing to get straight for yourself before you're presented with a situation where you have to make those decisions, but now there's a whole bunch of incentive to decide in one way or another.Wesley: And that's a journey. You can't just skip sections, right? You didn't get to where you are unless you went through the previous experience that you went through. And it's true for everyone. If you see those success books or how-to books written by people who are extremely rich, and, like, how to become successful and, like, okay, well, that journey is your own. It doesn't make it totally, like, inaccessible to everyone else, but you got to realize that not everyone can walk that path. And—Corey: You were in the right place at the right time, an early employee at a company that did phenomenally well and that catapulted you into reach beyond the wildest dreams of avarice territory. Good for you, but fundamentally, when you give talks like that as a result, what it often presents as is, “I won the lottery, and here's how you can too.” It doesn't work that way. The road you walked was unique to you and that opportunity is closed, not open anyone else, so people have to find their own paths.Wesley: Yeah, and lightning doesn't strike in the same place twice. But there are some things where you can understand some fundamentals. And depending on where you go, I think you do need to know yourself, you do need to know—like, be able to access yourself, but being able to share that, of course, you have to be at a point where you feel comfortable. And so, even if you're in a space where you don't feel that you can be your authentic self or be able to share all parts of you, you yourself should at least know yourself and then make that decision. I agree that it's a point of privilege to be able to say, “Take me how I am.”I'm lucky that I've gotten here, not everyone does, and just because you don't doesn't mean that you're a failure. It just means that the world hasn't caught up yet. People who are part of marginalized society, like, if you are, let's say trans, or if you are even gay, you take the same person, the same stance, the same yearning to be accepted, and then transport it to 50 years ago, you're not safe. You will not necessarily be accepted, or you may not even be successful. And if you have a lane where you can do that, all the power to you, but not everyone could be themselves, and you just need to make sure that at least you can know yourself, even if you don't share that with the world.Corey: It takes time to get there, and I think you're right that it's impossible to get there without walking through the various steps. It's one of the reasons I'm somewhat reluctant to talk overly publicly about my side project gig of paid speaking engagements, for instance, is that the way to get those is you start off by building a reputation as a speaker, and that takes an awful lot of time. And speaking at events where there's no budget even to pay you a speaking fee out of anyway. And part of what gets the keynote invitations to, “Hey, we want you to come and give a talk,” is the fact that people have seen you speak elsewhere and know what you're about and what to expect. Here's a keynote presented by someone who's never presented on stage before is a recipe for a terrifying experience, if not for the speaker or the audience, definitely [laugh] for the event organizers because what if they choke.?Easy example of this, even now hundreds of speaking engagements in, the adrenaline hit right before I go on stage means that sometimes my knees shake a bit before I walk out on stage. I make it a point to warn the people who are standing with me backstage, “Oh, this is a normal thing. Don't worry, it is absolutely expected. It happens every time. Don't sweat it.”And, like, “Thank you for letting us know. That is the sort of thing that's useful.” And then they see me shake, and they get a little skeptical. Like, I thought this guy was a professional. What's the story and I walk on stage and do my thing and I come back. Like, “That was incredible. I was worried at the beginning.” “I told you, we all have our rituals before going on stage. Mine is to shake like a leaf.”But the value there is that people know what to generally expect when I get on stage. It's going to have humor, there's going to be a point interwoven throughout what I tend to say, and in the case of paid speaking engagements, I always make sure I know where the boundaries are of things I can make fun of a big company for. Like, I can get on stage and make fun of service naming or I can make fun of their deprecation policy or something like that, but yeah, making fun of the way that they wind up handling worker relations is probably not going to be great and it could get the person who championed me fired or centered internally. So, that is off the table.Like, even on this podcast, for example, I sometimes get feedback from listeners of, “Well, you have someone from company X on and you didn't beat the crap out of them on this particular point.” It's yeah, you do understand that by having people on the show I'm making a tacit agreement not to attack them. I'm not a journalist. I don't pretend to be. But if I beat someone up with questions about their corporate policy, yeah, very rarely do I have someone who is in a position in those companies to change that policy, and they're certainly not authorized to speak on the record about those things.So, I can beat them up on it, they can say, “I can't answer that,” and we're not going to go anywhere. What is the value of that? It looks like it's not just gotcha journalism, but ineffective gotcha journalism. It doesn't work that way. And that's never been what this show is about.But there's that consistent effort behind the scenes of making sure that people will be entertained, will enjoy what they're seeing, but also are not going to deeply regret giving me a microphone, has always been the balancing act, at least for me. And I want to be clear, my style is humor. It is not for everyone. And my style of humor has a failure mode of being a jerk and making people feel bad, so don't think that my path is the only or even a recommended way for folks who want to get more into speaking to proceed.Wesley: You also mention, though, about, like, punching up versus punching down. And if you really tear down a company after you've been invited to speak, what you're doing is you're punching down at the person who booked you. They're not the CEO; they're not the owner of the company; they're the person who's in charge of running an event or booking speakers. And so, putting that person and throwing them under the bus is punching down because now you're threatening their livelihood, and it doesn't make any market difference in terms of changing the corporate's values or how they execute. So yeah, I totally agree with you in that one.And, like you were saying before, if there's a company you really thought was abhorrent, why speak there? Why give them or lend your reputation to this company if you absolutely feel that it's something you don't want to be associated with? You can just choose not to do that. For me, when I look at speaking, it is important for me to really think about why I'm speaking as well. So, not just the company who's hiring me, but the audience that I'll be serving.So, if I'm going to help with inspiring the next generation of developers, or helping along the thought of how to make the world a better place, or how people themselves can be better people so that we can just change the landscape and make it a lot friendlier, that is also its own… form of compensation and not just speaking for a speaker's fee. So, I do agree that you need to not just be super Negative Nancy, and try to fight all fights. You need to embrace some of the good things and try to make more of those experiences good for everyone, not just the people who are inviting you there, but the people who are attending. And when I started speaking, I was not a good speaker as well. I made a lot of mistakes, and still do, but I think speaking is easier than some people think and if someone truly wants to do it, they should go ahead and get started.What is the saying? If there's something is truly important, you'll be bad at it [laugh] and you'll be okay with it. I started speaking because of my role as a developer advocate. And if you just do a Google search for ‘CFPs,' you can start speaking, too. So, those who are not public speakers and want to get into it, just Google ‘CFP' and then start applying.And then you'll get better at your submissions, you'll get better at your slides, and then once you get accepted, then you'll get better at preparing, then you'll get better at actually speaking. There's a lot of steps between starting and stopping and it's okay to get started doing that route. The other thing I wanted to point out is I feel public speaking is the equivalent of lifting your own bodyweight. If you can do it, you're one of the small few of the population that is willing to do so or that can do it. If you start public speaking, that in itself is an accomplishment and an experience that is something that is somewhat enriching. And being bad at it doesn't take the passion away from you. If you just really want to do it, just keep doing it, even if you're a bad speaker.Corey: Yeah. The way to give a great talk because you have a bunch of terrible talks first.Wesley: Yeah. And it's okay to do that.Corey: And it's not the in entirety of community. It's not even a requirement to be involved with the community. If you're one of those people that absolutely dreads the prospect of speaking publicly, fine. I'm not suggesting that, oh, you need to get over that and get on stage. That doesn't help anyone. Don't do the things you dread doing because you know that it's not going to go well for you.That's the reason I don't touch actual databases. I mean, come on, let's be realistic. I will accidentally the data, and then we won't have a company anymore. So, I know what things I'm good at and things I'm not. I also don't do hostage negotiations, for obvious reasons.Wesley: And also, here's a little, like, secret tip. If you really want to do public speaking and you start doing public speaking and you're not so good at it from other peoples' perspective, but you still love doing it and you think you're getting better, doing public speaking is one of those things where you can say that you do it and no one will really question how good you are at it. [laugh]. If you're just in casual conversation, it's like, “Hey, I wrote a book.” People like, “Oh, wow. This person wrote the book on blah, blah, blah.”Corey: It's a self-published book that says the best way to run Kubernetes. It's a single page; it says, “Don't.” In 150-point type. “The end.” But I wrote a book.Wesley: Yeah.Corey: Yeah.Wesley: People won't probe too much and it'll help you with your development. So, go ahead and get started. Don't worry about doing that thing where, like, I have to be the best before I can present it. Call yourself a public speaker. Check, done.Corey: Always. We are the stories we tell, and nowhere is it more true than in the world of public speaking. I really want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to speak with me about this for a second time in a single year. Oh, my goodness. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, where can they find you?Wesley: I'm on Twitter, @wesley83 on Twitter. And you can find me also on PolyWork. So, polywork.com/wesley83. Or just go to wesleyfaulkner.com which redirects you there. I list pretty much everything that I am working on and any upcoming speaking opportunities, hopefully when they release that feature, will also be on that Polywork page.Corey: Excellent. And of course, I started Polywork recently, and I'm at thoughtleader.cloud because of course I am, which is neither here nor there. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak about this side of the industry that we never really get to talk about much, at least not publicly and not very often.Wesley: Well, thank you for having me on the show. And I wanted to take some time to say thank you for the work that you're doing. Not just elevating voices like myself, but talking truth to power, like we mentioned before, but being yourself and being a great representation of how people should be treating others: being honest without being mean, being snarky without being rude. And other companies and other people who've given me a chance, and given me a platform, I wanted to say thank you to you too, and I wouldn't be here unless it was people like you acknowledging the work that I've been doing.Corey: All it takes is just recognizing what you're doing and acknowledging it. People often want to thank me for this stuff, but it's just, what, for keeping my eyes open? I don't know, I feel like it's just the job; it's not something that is above and beyond any expected normal behavior. The only challenge is I look around the industry and I realize just how wrong that impression is, apparently. But here we are. It's about finding people doing interesting work and letting them tell their story. That's all this podcast has ever tried to be.Wesley: Yeah. And you do it. And doing the work is part of the reward, and I really appreciate you just going through the effort. Even having your ears open is something that I'm glad that you're able to at least know who the people are and who are making noises—or making noise to raise their profile up and then in turn, sharing that with the world. And so, that's a great service that you're providing, not just for me, but for everyone.Corey: Well, thank you. And as always, thank you for your time. Wesley Faulkner, Head of Community at SingleStore. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a rambling comment telling me exactly why DevRel does not need success metrics of any kind.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.