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Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 19, 2022: New Jaunt CEO reintroduces agency to Charlottesville City Council; Albemarle preparing for affordable dwelling unit ordinance

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 19:13


The heat is on, on the street, and this installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement is ready to get inside your head, on every beat. With apologies to Glenn Frey, this is not an 80’s music nostalgia newsletter and podcast, but the idea is to look back at some of what’s happened recently while anticipating the changes that will come this summer. It’s May 19, 2022, and I’m your host, Sean Tubbs. Sign up today to not miss a beat! On today’s show:The annual median income in the Charlottesville area has increased 19 percent over last yearAlbemarle Supervisors further discusses ways to incentivize developers to build housing for those with lower than that median incomeThe new CEO of Jaunt explains that a new page is turning toward cooperation with Charlottesville Area TransitA Pittsylvania County group seeks a second referendum on sales tax increase for education Shout-out: RCA seeks input on the restoration of Riverview ParkThe first Patreon-fueled shout-out today is for the Rivanna Conservation Alliance and their work with the City of Charlottesville on the restoration of Riverview Park. The RCA aims to restore a 600-foot section of the Rivanna riverbank in an area that’s designated for public access to the waterway as well as a 200-foot section of a dangerously eroding stormwater channel nearby. Another community meeting will be held in the near future to get your feedback on the work should be prioritized. Visit rivannariver.org to learn more about the project, which seeks to help Riverview Park continue to be a welcoming place to exercise, cool off, paddle, fish, play, explore, observe nature, and escape from the day-to-day stresses of life. Spring COVID-19 surge continuesTo begin today, a quick look at the latest COVID numbers from the Virginia Department of Health. Today the VDH reports another 3,836 positive COVID tests done through the PCR method, and a number that does not count at-home tests. The seven-day positivity rate for tests has increased to 15.2 percent. The seven-day average for new cases is now at 3,078. This surge of cases has so far not resulted in fatalities anywhere near what was seen in previous ones before vaccines were easily available. The seven-day average for new daily deaths is at three per day. According to the Virginia Healthcare and Hospital Association, there are 60 COVID patients in intensive care in Virginia, with 23 of them on ventilators. Pittsylvania County group wants to try again on sales tax referendum Last November, voters in Pittsylvania County on the south side of Virginia’s Fifth Congressional District had on their ballot a referendum on whether or not to approve a one percent sales tax increase to fund school improvement projects. The measure failed on a 23-vote margin according to election night results from the State Board of Elections. This Tuesday, the seven-member Board of Supervisors got an update on a campaign to try hold the referendum again this year, based on enabling authority that passed the General Assembly in 2020. Martha Walker is the chair of Pittsylvanians for a Brighter Future, an advocacy group that seeks passage this time around.“One cent, one penny, will generate $3.8 million each year for the 19 years that we will be allowed to have that one cent sales tax added,” Walker said. Under the same enabling authority, Danville voters voted in favor of the referendum and the sales tax increase has gone into effect. Speaking directly to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, Walker said her organization will be seeking to educate the public on what improvements would be funded. “You know that ten elementary schools will be focused on safety and getting rid of those trailers by building those new classrooms,” Walker said. Charlottesville asked the General Assembly to be allowed to hold a referendum for its school system. Legislation passed the Democrat-controlled Senate, but failed to get out of a committee in the Republican-controlled House of Delegates. There is still no state budget, an issue of increasing concern to school systems throughout the Commonwealth. Jaunt CEO talks transit with Charlottesville City CouncilThe relatively new CEO of the transit agency Jaunt introduced himself to the Charlottesville City Council Monday and also had the chance to re-introduce a public service organization plagued by recent controversy. Ted Rieck started with fundamentals. “Our basic goal is to enable people to live their lives independently and with dignity and we’ve been doing this for about 42 years,” Rieck said. (view his presentation)Jaunt serves the six localities of the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission as well as Buckingham County. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires equivalent service to fixed route transit for disabled individuals, and Rieck said Jaunt performs this role for CAT for those who live within three-fourths of a mile of a bus stop. “We also provide in some of the outlying counties circulator or intra-county service,” Rieck said. “We also provide links from the counties to Charlottesville and then we also provide commuter services into Charlottesville and [the University of Virginia].”Rieck was hired last October by Jaunt. The agency’s Board of Directors asked the previous CEO to resign after irregular transactions were reported. That continues to have an impact on Jaunt’s budget. “We had our CEO make some judgment errors in terms of spending money,” Rieck said. “That triggered an audit and that discovered some issues that Jaunt wasn’t doing very well.” Rieck said Jaunt was making progress in correcting the errors pointed out in the audit, including misapplication of funds intended for rural use for urban purposes. There were also questions about administrative costs. “We overstated some of our statistics which allowed us to get more state funding and federal funding that we were entitled to,” Rieck said. “This was an error that the prior CEO basically hoarded the data and did not share that with anybody.”Rieck said Jaunt had to pay Virginia back a over a million dollars and that has happened. Record-keeping has now been improved. The previous CEO was Brad Sheffield, who also served one term on the Albemarle Board of Supervisors. During that time, he was hired on as Jaunt’s director. Rieck said other anomalies have been discovered and Jaunt is cooperating with the ongoing investigation. He said Virginia Department of Rail and Public Transportation officials will visit Jaunt’s headquarters next week for further discussions. Better cooperation?Rieck said as the legacy of the Sheffield era continues to play out, he wants to build a partnership with Charlottesville Area Transit, and he’s in close contact with CAT Director Garland Williams.“We are working together,” Rieck said. “I don’t believe Jaunt and CAT have played very well together in the past. We are turning a new page on that I believe.” That includes more frequent meetings to discuss common issues, such as driver shortages. Another issue is how to transition to a fleet that doesn’t run on fossil fuels to meet the community’s expectations on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Jaunt is also seeking members to join an Alternative Fuel Advisory Committee to oversee a study for which Kimley Horn has been hired to run. Applications are due May 27, and the process will build off of a study that Charlottesville Area Transit is also running for their fleet. (apply)They are also building off of conversations that have been taking place at the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership. In April, that group heard from transit officials in Burlington, Vermont about how fixed-route transit can carry students to public schools. Those conversations are now occurring here, according to Rieck. “Today we discussed opportunities where we could see CAT bus routes overlapping areas where Albemarle County students live,” Rieck said. “Many of these people could conceivably take a bus to the high school, other schools as well. If that works out, we could save five or six bus operators for the school district. Doesn’t sound like much, but it’s really huge.”Other avenues of regional exploration include the creation of a Regional Transit Authority and development of an app to help people navigate public transportation. Rieck said Jaunt could also play a role in addressing the need for service to Crescent Halls, a Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority property whose residents have demanded door-to-door service be restored when the building reopens. He said the current service by Route 6 sees a large bus trying to navigate a small access road for which it was not designed. “And my understanding is that’s an awkward movement for a larger vehicle to do so the thought would be to have Jaunt provide that service instead of the main route,” Rieck said. Details to come in the future as Rieck said detailed conversations had not yet occurred. Council pressed Rieck on whether Jaunt’s troubles with the Virginia Department and Rail and Public Transportation were over. “First of all, are there any more shoes about to drop, and second, do you have a sense of when you will be past the shoe-dropping phase?” asked Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook. Rieck said the long-standing issue is a pattern of mixing rural and urban funds that dates further back into Jaunt’s recent history. He said he’s being transparent with city, county, and state officials, as well as his board of directors. “So I don’t think that there’s any more shoes to drop and if there is, that’s the one,” Rieck said. Second shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign It’s springtime, and one Patreon subscriber wants you to know the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign is a grassroots initiative of motivated citizens, volunteers, partner organizations, and local governments who want to promote the use of native plants. This spring the group is working with retailers across the region to encourage purchase of plants that belong here and are part of an ecosystem that depends on pollination. There are plenty of resources on the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page, so sign up to be notified of lectures, plant sales, and more!Albemarle Supervisors discuss incentives for housing planThe Albemarle County Board of Supervisors continued a conversation earlier this month about how to incentivize developers to build units to be sold below market value. The six-member Board last discussed the matter in February and pushed back on the idea of creating an overlay district in the county’s zoning ordinance. (previous coverage)“The main question today that we would like some feedback on after listening to the information that’s provided is [whether] an affordable dwelling unit program something the Board would be interested in and staff reviewing?” asked Stacy Pethia, the county’s Housing Policy Manager. (view her presentation)The General Assembly has already granted Albemarle enabling authority to pursue such a program, which would allow the county to require a certain percentage of units be rented or sold at affordable prices to households at 80 percent or lower than the median income. This requirement would be triggered by a rezoning or a special use permit. Supervisors adopted the Housing Albemarle plan last July but delayed much of the implementation until these details could be worked out. Before they got too deep into the conversation, Pethia said the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has now released updated calculations for area median income for 2022. “That is now $111,200 annually and to put that into perspective, that is a 19 percent increase over last year’s area median income increase,” Pethia said. The median income for the Washington metropolitan area is $142,300 and the median income for the Lynchburg metro is $78,900.  We’ll come back to this in future stories about housing. (find the calculations for your favorite metro area)Pethia said after the work session in February, staff opted to come forward with the affordable dwelling unit program that is authorized under state code. “And the enabling legislation really doesn’t place many restrictions on what the county can do and what that program looks like,” Pethia said. “It does require we provide density bonuses but beyond that we are pretty open in the percentage of the affordable unit set-asides that we may require, the depth of that unit affordability, the length of the affordability for those units, and we also have the opportunity to include additional incentives within that ordinance above and beyond the density increases.”Pethia said there are about 500 such programs across the United States. Commonalities between them include: An identification of how many units the locality needs to be affordable standardized amount per unit for developers to pay into a fund rather than build units The right for the locality or its designee to purchase or rent affordable units that are actually constructed. Several localities in Virginia have such a program, such as Loudoun County. “They adopted their ordinance in 1999 and do require 6.25 to 12.5 percent of the units in projects to be affordable housing,” Pethis said. “Those units need to be affordable for 15 to 20 years depending on whether they are for sale or rent.” Pethia said around 2,500 units have been created under this policy in Loudoun. Fairfax County has a similar ordinance and has created nearly 3,000 units. For Albemarle, Pethia said county staff are recommending density bonuses, requiring 20 percent of total new units to be affordable as per Housing Albemarle, allowing non-profits to purchase “affordable” units for which the developer can’t find a qualified buyer, and a cash-in-lieu fee is a developer doesn’t want to build the units. Such a program is not yet ready and Pethia wanted feedback on whether they should proceed. Supervisor Ann Mallek had this question. “Is there a way that we can put a hold on new applications until we get this process adopted?” Mallek said. “I’m very concerned that another 5,000 units will come in in application that we will somehow be forced to accept the applications and then we will lose the opportunity to get a much better result.” Supervisor Bea LaPisto-Kirtley said she supported the idea of the creation of a waiting list of people and families who are eligible to rent or purchase affordable units due to their income level. “The waiting list would be extremely important to have a waiting list otherwise I can see this whole project failing if we don’t have a waiting list of qualified income buyers,” LaPisto-Kirtley said. Supervisor Ned Gallaway said that he did not want to see a list of stiffly-written incentives that might preclude flexibility. “I hope we don’t get caught in the trap of saying that even if we put an example of incentives our, or encouraged incentives, or whatever the wording is, that we’re saying that that’s it, and that we have a process in place that allows for consideration of other incentives,” Gallaway said. “Each project will be different. Each spreadsheet is different.” Gallaway also supported the cash-in-lieu program in order to be able to pay more funds into the county’s affordable housing trust rather than rely on surpluses. A more detailed plan will come before the Board of Supervisors for a work session in August followed by a public hearing in September. Help Ting help support Town Crier productions!For one year now, Town Crier Productions has had a promotional offering through Ting!Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Nick Luck Daily Podcast
Ep 486 - Cobalt positive revealed in Ireland

Nick Luck Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:47


Nick is joined by journalist and broadcaster Lydia Hislop to discuss the latest news and events from around the racing world. They lead with the news that Irish trainer Kieran Cotter has been found in breach of rules on administration of cobalt. They also look at the Paddy Hayes case, with news today that he intends to appeal. Following up on the RCA awarding a betting ring administration contract to a conglomerate that includes the racecourse-owned Britbet, Nick talks to betting analyst and journalist Simon Nott and gets a response from RCA boss David Armstrong. Nick and Lydia discuss the 21 that remain in the Cazoo Derby, while trainer David Menuisier fills us in on his outsider for the race. Michelle Yu gives the lowdown on the Preakness, JA McGrath is in Hong Kong, while Thoroughbid's Will Kinsey brings news that high profile chasers Itchy Feet and Rouge Vif are set to go under the virtual hammer.

In The Money Players' Podcast
Nick Luck Daily Ep 486 - Cobalt positive revealed in Ireland

In The Money Players' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 41:47


Nick is joined by journalist and broadcaster Lydia Hislop to discuss the latest news and events from around the racing world. They lead with the news that Irish trainer Kieran Cotter has been found in breach of rules on administration of cobalt. They also look at the Paddy Hayes case, with news today that he intends to appeal. Following up on the RCA awarding a betting ring administration contract to a conglomerate that includes the racecourse-owned Britbet, Nick talks to betting analyst and journalist Simon Nott and gets a response from RCA boss David Armstrong. Nick and Lydia discuss the 21 that remain in the Cazoo Derby, while trainer David Menuisier fills us in on his outsider for the race. Michelle Yu gives the lowdown on the Preakness, JA McGrath is in Hong Kong, while Thoroughbid's Will Kinsey brings news that high profile chasers Itchy Feet and Rouge Vif are set to go under the virtual hammer.

Anhedonic Headphones Podcast 2 - Electric Boogaloo
He Looks Like A Handsome Vampire

Anhedonic Headphones Podcast 2 - Electric Boogaloo

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 74:42


In the 39th episode of the show, or the third episode of the seventh season, Kevin has a nostalgia filled conversation with composer and performer Stephanie Henry—the two discuss sharing the same earliest memory involving music, the brutality of the Home Alone films, and how Stephanie has stayed busier and more creative than ever during the last two years. For more information about the "award winning" music criticism site, Anhedonic Headphones, click here! For more information on Stephanie Henry's composition and performance work, visit her website.  Episode Musical Credits Intro Music: "Brooklyn Zoo (instrumental)," written by Russell Jones, Dennis Coles, and Robert Diggs; originally performed by Ol' Dirty Bastard. Taken from the Get On Down reissue of Return to The 36 Chambers: The Dirty Version, 2011.  Outro Music: "What Does Your Soul Looks Like (Part 4)," performed by DJ Shadow. Endtroducing..., Mo Wax, 1996. "Man in The Mirror," written by Glen Ballard and Siedah Garrett; performed by Michael Jackson. Bad, Epic, 1987. "Somewhere in My Memory" written and conducted by John Williams. Home Alone: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, CBS, 1990. Main Theme to "I Love Lucy," composed by Eliot Daniel.  Main Theme to "The Simpsons," composed by Danny Elfman.  "Tell Mama," written by Etta James; performed by Janis Joplin, recorded live at SNE Stadium in Toronto, Canada, 1970. "Fancy," written by Bobbie Gentry; performed by Reba McEntire. Rumor Has It, MCA, 1990. "Ziggy Stardust," written and performed by David Bowie. The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and The Spiders From Mars, RCA, 1972. "Steel Claw," written by Paul Brady; performed by Tina Turner. Private Dancer, Capitol, 1984. "Ice Dance," composed by Danny Elfman. Edward Scissorhands, MCA, 1990. "Thank You for The Venom," written and performed by My Chemical Romance. Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge, Reprise, 2004.

BlackFacts.com: Learn/Teach/Create Black History
May 15 - BlackFacts.com Black History Minute

BlackFacts.com: Learn/Teach/Create Black History

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 1:43


BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for May 15.Camilla Williams became the first black woman to act in a leading role in a major American opera company.She trained at Virginia State College, now Virginia State University, and received her bachelor's degree in music education. Beginning in 1944, Williams performed on the coast-to-coast RCA radio network.A noted concert artist, Williams toured throughout the United States, Latin America, fourteen African countries, as well as numerous countries in Asia.A lifetime member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), she performed in her hometown of Danville, Virginia in 1963, to raise funds to free jailed civil rights demonstrators.She also sang the national anthem before 200,000 people at the 1963 civil rights march on Washington, immediately before Martin Luther King gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.Williams retired from opera in 1970 and began teaching voice at Bronx College, Brooklyn College, and Queens College, all in New York City.Learn black history, teach black history at blackfacts.com

Nota de Voz de Mesa Central
Jueves 12 de mayo: Cancillería afirmó que la consulta ciudadana sobre los Tratados de Libre Comercio no es vinculante y que solo conducirá la política exterior

Nota de Voz de Mesa Central

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 3:17


Jueves 12 de mayo: Hoy nuevamente hay alerta ambiental en la capital y se siente el efecto de la contaminación en los virus respiratorios que circulan, es probable que los 3 millones de personas que aún no se vacunan con la cuarta dosis o segunda dosis de refuerzo comiencen a repletar los vacunatorios ya que solo quedan 3 semanas para que se inhabilite el Pase de Movilidad a quienes no han cumplido, y el Gobierno tuvo que salir a explicar en qué consiste la consulta ciudadana sobre los instrumentos de comercio exterior como los tratados y acuerdos comerciales, en ese contexto, la canciller Antonia Urrejola, de quien depende la repartición que la está llevando a cabo, sostuvo que no implicará problemas con nuestros socios comerciales porque no es vinculante, por su parte, el Ministro de Hacienda en tanto se vio algo sorprendido con la información y aclaró que revisará el diseño de la consulta, en el socialismo democrático no gustó que se usará el término “legitimar” para la consulta, pues dicen, los tratados firmados han sido aprobados por el parlamento por lo cual gozan de la legitimidad requerida, finalmente, un dia como hoy en 1965 vio la luz uno de los clásicos más grandes del rock, “I Can't Get No, Satisfaction” de los Rolling Stones, por lo tanto, la recomendación musical es este éxito que se grabó en los estudios de RCA en Hollywood.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
May 11, 2022: Green Business Alliance reports GHG emissions reductions in program's first year; Transit agencies still report shortage of drivers

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 13:56


Today marks 21 years since the death of Douglas Adams, a writer whose importance to my formation is not necessarily worth noting, but the commemoration of his passage is being noted all the same. Each of us is mortal and for the most part do not know when we will breathe our last. Until mine, I feel it is important for me to document as much as possible, and that is the mission of each and every installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a program that most definitely would not have existed if not for the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. The jury is still out on the Celestial Homecare Omnibus. Share and enjoy! On today’s program:Workers at one of Bodo’s Bagels three locations want to unionizeThe latest version of Consumer Price Index is out, and inflation is up but not quite as much as last month Area businesses involved in the Community Climate Collaborative’s Green Business Alliance report Greenhouse Gas Emissions reductionsAnd more study on future planning for transit takes place at a time when existing systems are struggling to find enough drivers Shout-out: RCA seeks input on the restoration of Riverview ParkThe first Patreon-fueled shout-out today is for the Rivanna Conservation Alliance and their work to help the City of Charlottesville with the restoration of Riverview Park. The RCA wants your input to inform a project that aims to restore a 600-foot section of the Rivanna riverbank in an area that’s designated for public access to the waterway as well as a 200-foot section of a dangerously eroding stormwater channel nearby. How should the work be prioritized? That’s where you come in with your input. Visit rivannariver.org to learn more about the project, which seeks to help Riverview Park continue to be a welcoming place to exercise, cool off, paddle, fish, play, explore, observe nature, and escape from the day-to-day stresses of life.Workers at Bodo’s franchise seek to unionizeTwo members of Charlottesville City Council will be on hand this afternoon as employees of the Bodo’s Bagels’ location on the Corner announce their desire to unionize. “Employees with the union organizing committee cite several concerns leading up to the effort, including understaffing, a lack of pay transparency, inadequate paid sick leave, and wages that aren’t keeping up with the rising cost of living in Charlottesville,” reads the press release from the United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 400.That group already represents grocery workers at Kroger and Giant Food. The release states that “approximately” 14 employees are involved and that they presented signed union authorization cards to Bodo’s management on Tuesday and seek voluntary recognition. “The employees also filed for an election with the National Labor Relations Board in the event that management refuses to voluntarily recognize the union, at which point an election will be conducted by the federal labor department,” the release continues. However, representatives from Bodo’s management said the cards were not presented. In a statement, they also said the company has always sought to set a high standard. “Bodo’s has been doing the best we can in every way we can for the Charlottesville community for over thirty years, and we've always been keenly aware that that's a moving target,” wrote Scott Smith and John Kokola to Charlottesville Community Engagement. “We support the right of our employees to choose whether or not they want to bring in a third-party representative, though we have always worked hardest to be that advocate by offering substantially above market wages, and hands on, proactive, compassionate management,” their comments continued.Both Payne and Magill are advocates for a collective bargaining agreement that would allow city employees to unionize. Municipal employees in Virginia could not do so until legislation passed the Virginia General Assembly in 2020. Last August, Council directed former City Manager Chip Boyles to pursue study of a collective bargaining ordinance. Boyles was out of office two months later. In March, the city issued a request for proposals for a firm to help establish a collective bargaining program, but so far a contract has not been awarded. (city bid page) “There will be an award forthcoming, but the process of evaluating the submissions is ongoing so there is no date that can be provided of when the contract will be awarded,” said David Dillehunt, the interim deputy director of communications. See also: Charlottesville to study collective bargaining options, August 19, 2021Bureau of Labor Statistics: Inflation continues to growThe federal agency that keeps the official metric on the cost of goods has released the numbers for April, and the Consumer Price Index rose 0.3 percent, a slower increase than reported in March. “Over the last 12 months, the all items index increased 8.3 percent before seasonal adjustment,” reads the release that was published this morning. That’s a lower number than when the numbers were reported in April, when the increase was 8.5 percent. The prices of shelter, food, airline fares, and new vehicles were the categories that increased the most. Food increased 0.9 percent over March, but the energy index actually declined in April. Gasoline dropped 6.1 percent, but natural gas and electricity increased. There are two sub categories for food. The price of “food cooked at home” increased 0.9 percent and “food away from home” increased 1 percent. Nonprofit group claims success in effort to reduce GHG emissions in business cohortLast May, the Community Climate Collaborative formed the Green Business Alliance to encourage sixteen companies to take steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The goal is to reduce their collective emissions by 45 percent by 2025, five years ahead of when both Albemarle County and Charlottesville pledged to meet the same objective. This morning the nonprofit entity reports the group has a collective 28 percent reduction in the first year since a baseline was established. “Comparing 2021 emissions to the baseline year, which varies by member, the [Green Business Alliance] Boffset a total of 4,800 metric tons of CO2-equivalent,” reads their press release. Some of the ways those reductions have been made are by relocations to new buildings. For instance, Apex Clean Energy moved to a new building that consolidated all employees in one place. “The mass-timber Apex Plaza, which features green building materials, solar power generation, and on-site battery storage, is on the cutting edge of sustainable design—mirroring Apex’s work at the forefront of the new energy economy,” reads a description of the new building on the company’s website. While the Apex Plaza building is not LEED-certified, it is one of the largest timber-built structures in the nation, and timber-built structures have a lower carbon footprint than those built of concrete or steel. Additionally, the Quantitative Investment Management moved to the CODE Building, which is LEED-certified. Other participants have moved to LEED-certified building since their baselines, including the Center and the CFA Institute. In addition, eight of the 16 companies installed over 1,600 solar panels on their properties, offsetting another 550 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. For more information, read the Community Climate Collaborative’s blog post on the topic. Watch a video with highlights of Apex Plaza: Second shout-out to JMRL’s How To FestivalIn today’s first subscriber-supported shout-out, the Jefferson Madison Regional Library will once again provide the place for you to learn about a whole manner of things! The How To Festival returns once more to the Central Library in downtown Charlottesville on Saturday, May 14 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. There is something for everyone in this fast-paced, interactive and free event!There will be 15-minute presentations and demonstrations on a diverse set of topics. Want to know how to do a home DNA test? Tune a guitar? What about using essential oils to repel mosquitoes? Visit the library website at jmrl.org to learn more. Schedule is coming soon! That’s the How To Festival, May 14, 2022. Regional Transit Partnership updated on studies and drive shortagesThe audience for Charlottesville Community Engagement may have successfully doubled the number of views for the April 28, 2022 meeting of the Jefferson Area Regional Transit Partnership. At the tail end of the program, I called upon you all to take a look at the meeting and I can successfully report there have now been 11 views. But, of course, the reason you read a newsletter like this is so you don’t have to view them. So, as promised, here are some highlights from the rest of the meeting. The Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission continues to oversee the creation of a Regional Transit Plan, and the Regional Transit Partnership will have a full review at their meeting scheduled for May 26. But, the members of the partnership had the materials in the packet for the April 28 meeting. You have access to those materials here via cvillepedia.“The project started in the fall of 2021 and the team developed a land use assessment and a transit assessment,” said Lucinda Shannon, a transportation planner for the TJPDC. “They identified community goals and solicited community input for the vision for the future of transit in the region.”The consultants are currently writing up network and corridor improvements. “And in June the team will gather public input on the proposed improvements and then will make adjustments and then the project should finish by August,” Shannon said. The vision plan will be presented to City Council and the Board of Supervisors this summer. This is not to be confused with a governance study that is in the planning stages to inform what a potential Regional Transit Authority might look like. “The governance study is more on how we’re going to pay for the vision and the projects,” Shannon said. This is also not to be confused with the draft route changes proposed by Charlottesville Area Transit that have not yet been implemented due to driver shortages. “We’re extremely limited on our driver numbers and are actually really short,” said Garland Williams, CAT’s director. “We’ve got to figure out how to get more drivers in the hopper to do the level of service that the community wants.” As of April 28, Williams said CAT needed 20 additional drivers. He said he’s lost several drivers to the private sector which have higher-paying jobs. As of today, that number is down to 17. “We currently have 3 new drivers in training,” said Kyle Ervin, the marketing coordinator for CAT. The topic of driver shortages topic came up during a recent non-RTP roundtable of transit providers. Karen Davis, the deputy director at Jaunt, said her agency has been meeting with CAT and University Transit Service to work out solutions. “Jaunt has identified some potential overlap of CAT routes with [Albemarle County Public Schools] routes which warrants discussion,” Davis said. Davis said the City of Charlottesville has also approached Jaunt to assist with better transit service to Crescent Halls when it reopens later this year. The next meeting of the Regional Transit Partnership is May 26. Until then, let’s see if we can get the number of views on the April 28 meeting up to 20! And let’s get likes up to 2! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 156 Part 2: Deconstructing Classical Art for the Modern Era

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 26:22


What you'll learn in this episode:   Why people get so concerned with categorizing art, and why some of the most interesting art is created by crossing those boundaries  How Joy balances running a business while handmaking all of her pieces What noble metals are, and how they allow Joy to play with different colors How Joy's residences in Japan influenced her work How Joy has found a way to rethink classical art and confront its dark history     About Joy BC   Joy BC (Joy Bonfield – Colombara) is an Artist and Goldsmith working predominantly in Noble Metals and bronze. Her works are often challenging pre-existing notions of precious materials and ingrained societal ideals of western female bodies in sculpture. Joy BC plays with mythologies and re-examines the fascination with the ‘Classical'. Joy, a native of London, was profoundly influenced from an early age by the artistry of her parents - her mother, a painter and lithographer, her father, a sculptor. Joy's art education focused intensively on painting, drawing and carving, enhanced by a profound appreciation of art within historical and social contexts. Joy BC received her undergraduate degree from the Glasgow School of Art and her M.A. from the Royal College of Art in London. She has also held two residencies in Japan. The first in Tokyo, working under the tutelage of master craftsmen Sensei (teacher) Ando and Sensei Kagaeyama, experts in Damascus steel and metal casting.  She subsequently was awarded a research fellowship to Japan's oldest school of art, in Kyoto, where she was taught the ancient art of urushi by the renowned craftsmen: Sensei Kuramoto and Sensei Sasai. Whilst at the RCA she was awarded the TF overall excellence prize and the MARZEE International graduate prize. Shortly after her graduation in 2019 her work was exhibited in Japan and at Somerset house in London. In 2021 her work was exhibited in Hong Kong and at ‘Force of Nature' curated by Melanie Grant in partnership with Elisabetta Cipriani Gallery. Joy Bonfield - Colombara is currently working on a piece for the Nelson Atkins Museum in the USA and recently a piece was added to the Alice and Louis Koch Collection in the Swiss National Museum, Zurich.Additional Resources:  Joy's Website Joy's Instagram Photos: Photos available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript:   While others are quick to classify artists by genre or medium, Joy BC avoids confining her work to one category. Making wearable pieces that draw inspiration from classical sculpture, she straddles the line between jeweler and fine artist. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about why she works with noble metals; the exhibition that kickstarted her business; and how she confronts the often-dark history of classical art though her work. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the second part of a two-part episode. Today, my guest is the award-winning artist and goldsmith Joy Bonfield-Colombara, or as she is known as an artist and jeweler, Joy BC. Joy is attracted to classical art, which she interprets from her own contemporary viewpoint. Welcome back.    You're alone, and it's always a challenge to me, whether you're a writer or jeweler, to find ways to get out of the isolation. You can only spend so much time alone. How do you figure out a way to do that?   Joy: I love it. I love it because I'm an only child. Often people don't think I'm an only child, but I think that's because we had so many people coming and going from our house when I was a kid. My mom would invite lots of people, and they would stay and go. They all added very much to who I am as well, all those people that came through our house. The thing with imagination, I used to spend so much time on my own. My mom and my dad were always working. They were fantastic parents, but they were oftentimes—I think also when you're a child, time is a completely different realm. You experience it in a completely different way.    I have memories of playing in the garden and looking at flowers, taking them apart, and putting together arrangements of stones or turning a copper box into a spaceship, all sorts of different objects transforming into other things. I still hold on to that aspect of being a child. I think it's important not to lose the ability to play and imagine. I spend hours doing that. I'm now in my studio, and I often really like the early mornings or rare late nights when no one is around. There's a quietness that I find quite meditative. When I'm carving, things can be going on around me, and I'm so focused that everything else disappears. So, I don't mind the isolation because I really enjoy making.   Sharon: I like when it's quiet, but I can only take so much. At some point it starts to affect me. It sounds like you handle it better. In the materials I read about you, it says that you work in noble metals and in bronze, but a lot of people don't know what a noble metal is. What is a noble metal?   Joy: It makes them great. Just the word noble I think is lovely.   Sharon: It is. What is it?   Joy: A noble metal, apart from the metal family in the periodic table, is a reluctant oxidizer combined with oxygen. I have the exact definition for you. Let me find it. “A noble metallic chemical element is generally reluctant to combine with oxygen and usually found in nature in a raw form, for example gold. Noble metals have outstanding resistance to oxidization, even at high temperatures. The group is not strictly defined, but usually is considered to include palladium, silver, osmium, iridium, platinum and the second and third transition series of the periodic table. Mercury and copper are sometimes included as noble metals. Silver and gold with copper are often called the coinage metal, and platinum, iridium and palladium comprise the so-called precious metals which are used in jewelry.”   This also goes back to the fact that I had bad eczema when I was a kid. I remember putting on a pair of costume earrings that had nickel in them and they made my whole head swell up. I don't like the smell of brass. There are certain materials I find an attraction or a repulsion to. Noble metals, because of the way they don't oxidize, can sit next to your skin, and I love the feeling of them.   Sharon: That's interesting, because I've only heard the term noble metals in a couple of places. One was at a jeweler's studio, making jewelry, but it was explained to me, “It's gold, it's silver, but it's not copper.” You said it's copper. I never realized it had anything to do with whether it oxidizes or not.    Joy: Interestingly, copper also is really precious in Japan. Some of the most expensive teapots are copper ones.   Sharon: Oh, really?   Joy: It's a type of copper where you've created a patination, which is beautiful, deep red color. This technique is quite hard to explain and is really highly prized.   Sharon: What's the name of the technique?   Joy: Shibuichi. I'm not good at the pronunciation, but I can write it down afterwards. I love metal patination and metal colors. In fact, that's why I love bronze. Bronze is mostly composed of copper as an alloy. It doesn't smell in the way that brass does, and also I love the reactions you get. Verdigris is one of the techniques I like to use a lot in my work, which is used with copper nitrates. You get these incredible colors of greens. When you think of classical bronze sculptures or bronzes that are found under the sea, they often have these incredible green colors to them. I think about it like painting or a composition, the colors you find in metal colorations. People often question what the color of metal is, but actually the different alloys or treatments you can give to metal can give you an incredible array of different colors.   Sharon: I'm curious. I agree, but I see the world through a different perspective. I might look at the statue you've taken from the under the sea and say, “Somebody clean that thing.” I don't clean things that have a patina, but that would be my first reaction, while you appreciate that right away. Why did you go to Japan?   Joy: The first time I went to Japan was through The Glasgow School of Art. There was an exchange program you could apply for, and if you were awarded, there was also a bursary that you could apply for. The first time I went, I was awarded this bursary. One of my friends while I was studying at The Glasgow School of Art was Japanese, and she said to me, “Go and stay with my grandmother. She will absolutely love you.” I went to stay in her grandmother's apartment in Japan, and I studied at the Hiko Mizuno College of Jewelry, which is in Harajuku. I don't know if you've heard about it before.   Sharon: No.   Joy: This school is really interesting. Actually, when I was there, they hired Lucy Saneo, who recently passed away. They did an exhibition of hers at Gallerie Marseille. She was there as a visiting artist, and she was lovely. We had some interesting discussions about different perceptions of materials and jewelry between Europe and Japan. I was there on a three-month exchange, and I met Lucy as well as the teachers that I was allocated.    One of them, which I mentioned before, was Sensei Ando. He taught to me how to make Damascus steel. I made a knife when I was there, but the whole process had a real philosophical theory around it, with how difficult Damascus is to make. Often in modern knife making, you have pneumatic hammers. The hammering is done by a machine, whereas we have to do everything by hand in 40 degrees Celsius with 90% humidity outside with a furnace. We had to wrap towels around our heads to stop the sweat from dripping into our eyes. It was really difficult, but the end result was amazing. He said, “Life can be hard, but if you push through it, you can find its beauties.” It stayed with me, the way he had the philosophy, that process, and what that means to put yourself into the piece.    I also did metal casting and netsuke carving with Sensei Kagaeyama. It was in Tokyo that I first saw netsuke carvings in the National Museum in Tokyo. They really fascinated me, these tiny carvings. Do you know what a netsuke is?   Sharon: Yes, a netsuke, the little things.   Joy: They're tiny carvings. If anyone doesn't know, in traditional menswear in Japan, you would have a sash that goes around your kimono to hold your inro, which is your pouch which would hold tobacco or money or medicine. You would have a sash buckle to stop it moving, which was sometimes simply carved. Other times they were incredibly elaborate and inlaid. It could be this tiny bird so that the underside of the bird, even the claws, are carved. It was only the wearer that would necessarily see those details. In the same way that really good pieces of jewelry have that quality, the back is as important as the front.   Sharon: Oh, absolutely. My mom sewed, and it was always, “Look at the back of the dress, the inside of the dress. How's the zipper done?” that sort of thing. The netsuke, they were only worn by men?   Joy: They were only worn by men. It was combs that were worn by women, which were a social hierarchical show of your wealth or your stature. They were also given as tokens of love and were the equivalent of an engagement ring. They were given in this way. A comb is something I've always found interesting. I didn't know the scope of the importance of the comb in Japan, specifically in the Edo and Meiji periods.   Sharon: Are you considering adding combs to your repertoire? Maybe the comb part is plastic with a metal on top.   Joy: Combs are one of the things I explored within my degree show. I did a modern iteration of Medusa as a body of work, 17 different bronze sculptures that were a collection of combs with all different bronze patinas, but those were sculptures. They were not actually wearable. There was a whole wall of these pieces. My whole degree show was about metamorphosis and the ability to change. It was a combination of sculpture and jewelry.    For “Force of Nature,” the exhibition Melanie invited me to do, I did one wearable comb. It was called Medusa. The bristles were moving, and they had fine, little diamonds set between all the bristles so they would catch the light in certain movement. It also had a pin at the back so you could have it as a sculpture or you could wear it.   Sharon: It sounds gorgeous. You mentioned classical art, and I know classical art is a big catalyst or an influence on your jewelry today. Can you tell us about that and where it came from?   Joy: Growing up in London, London has some of the most amazing collections of ancient art. Also modern collections, but if you think about the V&A or the British Museum, there are artifacts from all over the world which are incredible. As a child, they were something my parents would take me to and tell me stories or show me things. There was also a moment when my mom took me to Paris when I was about 13 years old, and I saw the Victory of Samothrace, which is this huge Hellenistic statue which is decapitated. She doesn't have a head and she doesn't have arms, but she has these enormous wings and retains this incredible sense of power and movement, and that stayed with me. I've always found particularly the Hellenistic—not the Roman copies, but the older pieces—incredibly beautiful. I don't why, but I've always felt this attraction to them.   When I studied at The Glasgow School of Art, there was also a collection of plasters of Michelangelo's Enslaved and the Venus de Milo. They were used since the 1800s as examples of proportions, and you would use them in your drawing classes. I used to sit with them and have my lunch and draw them and look at them. I started to look at the histories or the stories behind some of them, and I didn't particularly like how they were often silencing women. Some of the stories were quite violent towards women, so I started to deconstruct and cut apart these classical figures.    I also looked to Albrecht Durer's book on proportion, because they had a real copy of it at The Glasgow School of Art that you could request to look at. I also believe that to understand something, you can deconstruct it and take it apart. Like a clock, if you start to take it apart, you understand how it works. So, I started to take apart the proportions, literally cutting them apart, and that's how the deconstructed portrait series started. It was not just the form; it was actually what classicism stood for. Many of the collections at the V&A and the British Museum were stolen or taken in really negative ways. They're a result of colonialism and the UK's colonial past. There are often darker sides to those collections.    That was something I had to confront about this attraction I had towards these classical pieces. Why was I attracted to them? How could I reinvent it or look at that in a new way? I still love these classical pieces. My favorite painter is Caravaggio, and my favorite sculptures are the bronze and stone pieces from the Hellenistic Greek period. It didn't stop me from loving them, but it made me rethink and redefine what classical meant for me.   Sharon: Is the deconstruction series your way of coming to terms with the past? Besides the fact that they're beautiful, ancient statues, is it your way of reinventing the past in a way?   Joy: Absolutely. The past, you can't erase it. It's been done, and the fact that these pieces have survived all of this time is testament to their beauty. Something survives if it's beautiful or evocative or has a power about it. I think it's interesting that Cellini, who was a sculptor and a goldsmith, is known more famously for his bronze statue of Medusa in Florence. He made lots of work out of precious metals, but they didn't survive. It was the bronzes that survived.    Translating these works into precious metals also makes you reflect or think about them in different ways, and it makes the cuts or the breakage something positive or beautiful. The way I placed diamonds into the breakages or the cracks is also to celebrate our failures or celebrate our breakages. That moment I had the accident and everything in my life fell apart, it was also through that process that I discovered the most. We need creation and destruction, but it's a cyclical thing.   Sharon: Interesting. My last question has to do more with the dividing lines. Do you consider yourself an artist who works in jewelry, or do you consider yourself a jeweler who happens to make art through your jewelry? There are a lot of jewelers who don't consider themselves artists; they just make jewelry and that's it. How do the two rub together for you?   Joy: I see myself as an artist. I think within the arts, that encompasses so many different disciplines. A beautiful piece of literature written by Alice Walker, I think, is as moving as an artwork or a painting. The same with a composition of music. I see jewelry as another art form and expression. I don't divide them. However, I don't like all jewelry, in the same way I don't like all paintings or sculpture. The way in which we look at or define art is so subjective, depending on your norms, the way you were brought up, which part of the world you grew up in, how you have been subjected to certain things. When people ask me what I do, I say I'm an artist and goldsmith because I particularly work in noble metals and bronze. There's still a jewelry aspect of my work. It is very much jewelry. You can wear it, but it is also sculpture. It is one and the other; it's both.   Sharon: Have you ever made a piece of jewelry in gold where you said, “This is nice, but it's not a work of art. It doesn't express me as an artist; it's just like a nice ring”?   Joy: Definitely, and definitely through the period of time when I did my apprenticeship. I learned a lot. I made pieces where people would bring me albums or pieces they wanted to reinvent and find modern ways of wearing. I thought that was pretty interesting and I enjoyed that work, but I don't necessarily see it as an artwork that moves the soul or has the same effect as one of my deconstruction portraits or the Medusa series. I still think it has its place and it means a lot to that individual, and I enjoy the process of making it, but it's different.   Sharon: I know I said I asked my last question before, but I'm curious. Did your friends or colleagues or people in the street see something you had on and say, “Oh, I want that”?   Joy: Yes, definitely. I think if you like something and wear something because you like it enough that you wear it, usually someone else will like it, too. That's definitely part of it; I started making things and people still wanted them. I think my mom and dad were also sometimes the first port of call I would test things on to see whether they liked it. My dad is much more challenging because he doesn't wear a lot of jewelry. I made him a piece recently and he does wear it occasionally. He's quite a discerning artist. He won't sell his work to certain people. He's very particular about how he works and who he works with. But yes, that did start happening, and it's grown. I'm not sure how else to answer that question.   Sharon: I'm sure it's validating to have people say, “Oh, that's fabulous. Can you do one for me?” or “Can I buy it from you?”   Joy: I think that sense of desire, of wanting to put your body next to something or wear it, is one of the highest compliments. I went yesterday to a talk at the British Museum about an exhibition they're about to open called “Feminine Power: The Divine to the Demonic.” I went with a friend of mine who's a human rights lawyer. I made a piece for her recently which is very personal and is about various important things to her. Seeing her wear it made me feel really honored because she's an incredible person, and I could make her something that's part of her journey and that she loves so much that she wears it. Knowing it gives her power when she wears it is an incredible feeling. Also knowing that she may pass it down; that's another aspect with jewelry.    My mom has this one ring that was passed down in her family. My parents were struggling artists in London, and she sold most of her elegant pieces. I also find that aspect of jewelry really incredible, that it could transform by being sold so she could continue to do projects and things she wanted to do. I think jewelry's amazing in that way, that the intrinsic value can transform and be handed down and changed. I think that's interesting, but there was one ring she didn't sell because it's a miniature sculpture, and we all agree that it's incredibly beautiful. The rest of the pieces weren't things my mom or I or anyone really engaged with, but this one ring, to me, looks like a futurist sculpture in a seashell. It's a curved form. I think it's the Fibonacci proportions, and it's incredibly beautiful. Going back to your very first question, I think that may have had a strong influence in my appreciation and realization that I liked jewelry.   Sharon: It sounds like you're several years into a business that's going to be around for a long time. I hope we get to talk with you again down the road. Thank you so much for talking with us today, Joy.   Joy: Thanks for having me.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

PodCasts – McAlvany Weekly Commentary
If You're Addicted To Gain, Prepare For Pain

PodCasts – McAlvany Weekly Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 40:57


McAlvany Weekly Commentary Powell: Hawk, Dove, or maybe both? Bitcoin breaks down through major support level Momentum Speculators of today should learn from RCA of yesterday   The McAlvany Weekly Commentary with David McAlvany and Kevin Orrick If You're Addicted To Gain, Prepare For Pain May 10, 2022 “Budgets are being squeezed now. We know that. Gasoline prices, […] The post If You’re Addicted To Gain, Prepare For Pain appeared first on McAlvany Weekly Commentary.

Backyards & Bevvies
Torey And One Of Nashville's Most Iconic Recording Studios

Backyards & Bevvies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 97:10


To say Torey loves music would be an understatement because this man lives music! He is not only one of the lucky people to get to do what they love, like play guitar on stage at places like the Grand Ole Opry, but he also gets to spend his time in an old school recording studio. Torey blew my mind a few times on this podcast with his love for music but what takes this interview to the next level is his knowledge of vintage Fender Guitars but more specifically Fender Telecasters made in the 50's. This might be a long one but it is a great one where I think even a person who doesn't share his same love for the six string beauties will be able to walk away with a newfound appreciation for them. #weeklypodcast #podcastshow #backyardsandbevvies #backyards #bevvies #bottomsup #midweektreat #marriage #comedy #parenting #life #drama #interview #friends00:00 Welcome to Backyards & Bevvies Podcast00:11 Better Help #ad01:40 Hello Torey and Hello StarStruck Entertainment 02:55 Jesus take the wheel, Carrie Underwood07:05 Capitol Records studio A13:45 Knocked on the door and RCA studio opened the door20:00 Here comes the sun, In the Dolby Atmos Room28:25 When I hung with Robert Plant 38:00 I just want to go play my guitar46:30 I saw this guitar on craigslist…55:20 It happened in a time when the best components were…1:02:45 John5 is the man and loves Telecasters.1:10:55 It sounds like 50 guitar players on stage1:18:40 I got to go into the Spurs locker room one time1:24:27 Torey introduces me to his favorite guitar1:29:39 I played this at the Grand Ole Opry1:36:16 Cheers and Bottoms UP!Podcast https://backyardsandbevvies.simplecast.com/YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/c/BackyardsBevviesPodcastInstagram https://instagram.com/backyardsbevviesFacebook https://www.facebook.com/backyardsbevviesTwitter https://twitter.com/backyardbevviesTikTok https://www.tiktok.com/@backyardsandbevvies?lang=enBetter Help (10% OFF) #ad  https://betterhelp.com/backyardsEtsy https://www.etsy.com/shop/BackyardsandBevviesPatreon https://www.patreon.com/backyardsbevvies

Fifty Key Stage Musicals: The Podcast
Ch. 29- SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET

Fifty Key Stage Musicals: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 48:28


SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET COMPOSER: Stephen Sondheim LYRICIST: Stephen Sondheim BOOK: Hugh Wheeler SOURCE: Sweeney Todd by Christopher Bond DIRECTOR: Harold Prince CHOREOGRAPHER: Larry Fuller PRINCIPLE CAST: Len Cariou (Sweeney), Victor Garber (Anthony), Angela Lansbury (Mrs. Lovett) OPENING DATE: March 01, 1979 CLOSING DATE: June 29, 1980 PERFORMANCES: 557 SYNOPSIS: Sweeney Todd, a wrongfully convicted man, returns to London to reclaim his wife and daughter only to discover that his wife has killed herself and that his daughter is now the ward, and prospective bride, of the Judge who sentenced him. Vowing to take revenge by murdering the Judge, Todd begins to practice execution on his neighbors whose bodies are then baked into pies and sold to unsuspecting consumers by Mrs. Lovett.  The inspiration for Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd is examined by Alison Morooney. Fusing the passion for mystery and horror from composer/ lyricist Sondheim and the desire to comment on the oppressive political structures of the Industrial Revolution from director Harold Prince, librettist Hugh Wheeler humanizes the characters from a British urban legend. Though critics lauded the score upon its opening, the musical's mix of styles and genre-defying designs earned it mixed reviews. This episode argues for Sweeney Todd's significance as a piece of theatre which, despite its socio-political message, allows an audience to engage emotionally with the characters, contrasting it to the Epic theatre of Bertolt Brecht, which sought to distance its audience. Alison Morooney is a stage director and choreographer currently pursuing an MFA in directing at The Pennsylvania State University. She has directed most frequently at The College Light Opera Company in Massachusetts and has served as a choreographer at Priscilla Beach Theatre and for Penn State Centre Stage. She has also been on stage regionally and with national tours American Idiot and Nice Work if You Can Get It. SOURCES Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Original Broadway Cast Recording. RCA (1979) Sweeney Todd: The Demon Babrer of Fleet Street, starring George Hearn and Angela Lansbury, directed by Terry Hughes. RKO Pictures (1982) Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street by Hugh Wheeler and Stephen Sondheim, published by Applause Libretto Library (2000) Sense of Occasion by Hal Prince, published by Applause (2017) Finishing The Hat by Stephen Sondheim, published by Knopf (2010) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 156 Part 1: Deconstructing Classical Art for the Modern Era

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 25:35


What you'll learn in this episode:   Why people get so concerned with categorizing art, and why some of the most interesting art is created by crossing those boundaries  How Joy balances running a business while handmaking all of her pieces What noble metals are, and how they allow Joy to play with different colors How Joy's residences in Japan influenced her work How Joy has found a way to rethink classical art and confront its dark history     About Joy BC   Joy BC (Joy Bonfield – Colombara) is an Artist and Goldsmith working predominantly in Noble Metals and bronze. Her works are often challenging pre-existing notions of precious materials and ingrained societal ideals of western female bodies in sculpture. Joy BC plays with mythologies and re-examines the fascination with the ‘Classical'. Joy, a native of London, was profoundly influenced from an early age by the artistry of her parents - her mother, a painter and lithographer, her father, a sculptor. Joy's art education focused intensively on painting, drawing and carving, enhanced by a profound appreciation of art within historical and social contexts. Joy BC received her undergraduate degree from the Glasgow School of Art and her M.A. from the Royal College of Art in London. She has also held two residencies in Japan. The first in Tokyo, working under the tutelage of master craftsmen Sensei (teacher) Ando and Sensei Kagaeyama, experts in Damascus steel and metal casting.  She subsequently was awarded a research fellowship to Japan's oldest school of art, in Kyoto, where she was taught the ancient art of urushi by the renowned craftsmen: Sensei Kuramoto and Sensei Sasai. Whilst at the RCA she was awarded the TF overall excellence prize and the MARZEE International graduate prize. Shortly after her graduation in 2019 her work was exhibited in Japan and at Somerset house in London. In 2021 her work was exhibited in Hong Kong and at ‘Force of Nature' curated by Melanie Grant in partnership with Elisabetta Cipriani Gallery. Joy Bonfield - Colombara is currently working on a piece for the Nelson Atkins Museum in the USA and recently a piece was added to the Alice and Louis Koch Collection in the Swiss National Museum, Zurich.Additional Resources:  Joy's Website Joy's Instagram Photos: Photos available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript:   While others are quick to classify artists by genre or medium, Joy BC avoids confining her work to one category. Making wearable pieces that draw inspiration from classical sculpture, she straddles the line between jeweler and fine artist. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about why she works with noble metals; the exhibition that kickstarted her business; and how she confronts the often-dark history of classical art though her work. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Here at the Jewelry Journey, we're about all things jewelry. With that in mind, I wanted to let you know about an upcoming jewelry conference, which is “Beyond Boundaries: Jewelry of the Americas.” It's sponsored by the Association for the Study of Jewelry and Related Arts, or, as it's otherwise known, ASJRA. The conference takes place virtually on Saturday and Sunday May 21 and May 22, which is around the corner. For details on the program and the speakers, go to www.jewelryconference.com. Non-members are welcome. I have to say that I attended this conference in person for several years, and it's one of my favorite conferences. It's a real treat to be able to sit in your pajamas or in comfies in your living room and listen to some extraordinary speakers. So, check it out. Register at www.jewelryconference.com. See you there.   This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week. Today, my guest is the award-winning artist and goldsmith Joy Bonfield-Colombara, or as she is known as an artist and jeweler, Joy BC. She is attracted to classical art. She interprets it from her contemporary viewpoint, and her work has been described both as wearable art and as miniature sculptures. We'll learn all about her jewelry journey today. Joy, welcome to the program.   Joy: Thank you for having me, Sharon.   Sharon: So glad to have you all the way from London. Tell us about your jewelry journey. You came from an artistic family.   Joy: Both my parents are artists. My mother is a painter and lithographer, and my father is a sculptor. So, from a really young age, I was drawing and sculpting, and I thought this was quite normal. It was later that I realized my upbringing was perhaps a bit different from some of my friends or my peers.   Sharon: Yes, it's unusual that I hear that. They weren't bankers. Was it always assumed that you were going to be an artist or jeweler?    Joy: Not at all. The fact that my parents were artists, I saw a lot of their struggle to try and place themselves within our society. They both were part of the 1968 revolution. My mom is actually from Italy. She left a tiny, little—not a village, but a small town called Novara which is near Verona and Turin, when she was 16 years old. She came to London and fell in love with London. She went to Goldsmiths School of Art, where she met my father. My father is English, and his ancestors were stonemasons from the Isle of Purbeck. So, they both met at art school, and it was much later that they had me.   As I grew up, they were incredibly talented individuals. They also struggled with how to live and survive from their artwork. As I grew older, however, as much as I loved the creative world I'd grown up in, I was also trying to figure out which pathway was right or was going to be part of my life. I didn't necessarily want to be an artist. For a long time, I wanted to be a marine biologist because I was really good at science, in particular chemistry and biology, and I really loved the ocean. I still love the sea. Swimming is the one sport I'm good at, and I find it fascinating. I still find the sea as a source of inspiration.    So no, it wasn't an absolute given; however, as I got older and went through my education, it became evident to me that was the way I understood the world and the spaces I felt most natural in. I'm also dyslexic. I used to be in special class because I couldn't write very well, but my dyslexia teacher said, “You're smart. You just have a different way of seeing the world.” I was always imaginative. If I couldn't write something, I would draw it or make it, and I liked the feeling that would create when someone else lauded me for it. Immediately, I had this connection with the fact that I could make things that people thought were interesting.    So, I studied science and art and theater, and then I went off to travel to Cuba when I was about 18, before I moved to Glasgow. When I was in Glasgow in Scotland, I saw The Glasgow School of Art degree show, and I was taken aback by the jewelry and metalwork show in particular. I don't know if you know the Rennie Mackintosh School of Art.   Sharon: No.   Joy: It's a British Art Nouveau building. In Scotland, it was part of the Arts and Crafts movement. It was a school that was designed by Rennie Mackintosh. He's a world-famous architect.   Sharon: Is that the one that burned down?   Joy: Yes, that year. I was actually there the year the school burnt down. I went to The Glasgow School of Art and I loved it. I did three amazing years there, and in my second year, I was awarded a residency to go to Japan. We had our degree show and we were preparing for it. The night before the fire, I took all of my works home. I don't know why. I was taking everything home to look at before we had to set up for the exhibition, and the school burnt down. At the same time, I had three major tragedies in my life. My best friend passed away; the school burnt down; and my boyfriend at the time had left me. I went through this total mental breakdown at the point when I was meant to start my career as an artist. I was offered the artist residency in the jewelry and metalworking department.    When Fred died, I was really unwell. A friend of mine had offered that I go to New York. I ended up having a bike accident, which meant that I was in intensive care. I couldn't work for three years. It was actually two friends of my family who were goldsmiths who gave me a space to work when I was really fragile. It was through making again and being with them that I slowly built back my confidence. That was my journey from childhood up right until the formals of education. These three events really broke me, but I also learned that, for me, the space I feel most happy in is a creative one, when I'm carving.   Sharon: Were you in the bike accident in New York or in Glasgow or in London?   Joy: In New York. My friend Jenny, who's a really good friend of mine, was going to New York and said, “I want you to come to New York because you've had the worst set of events happen. I think it would be good for you to have some time away.” I said, “Yeah, I agree,” and I came to New York. I was in Central Park cycling. It wasn't a motorbike. I blacked out. Nobody knows what happened. I woke up the next day in intensive care at Mount Sinai Hospital. I woke up in the hospital, and they told me I had fallen off my bike and I had front lateral brain damage, perforated lungs, perforated liver.   Sharon: Oh my gosh!   Joy: I feel really grateful that I'm here.   Sharon: Yes. To back up a minute, what was the switch from marine biology? I understand you were dyslexic, but what made you decide you were going to be a jeweler or an artist? What was the catalyst there?   Joy: I don't think there was ever a specific switch. I feel like art has always been a part of my life. It was always going to be that. I was always going to draw and make. I was also encouraged to do sculpture. I remember trying set design, because I thought that married my love of film and storytelling and theater with my ability to draw and sculpt. I thought, “Theater, that's a realm that perhaps would work well.” Then I went and did a set design course. The fact that they destroyed all my tiny, little things, because they have to take them apart to take the measurements for how big certain props or things have to be, drove me mad. I couldn't deal that I'd spend hours on these things to be taken apart.    I think it was probably the exhibition I went to see at The Glasgow School of Art. When I saw the show, I was really taken aback that all the pieces had been handmade. They were, to me, miniature sculpture. I hadn't considered that jewelry could be this other type of art. Seeing these works, I thought, “Wow! This is really interesting, and I think there's much more scope to explore within this medium.” I think that was the moment of change that made it for me.   Sharon: What is it about sculpture, whether it's large or jewelry-size, that attracts you? Why that? Is it the feeling of working with your hands?   Joy: I think it's a combination of things, partly because my father's a sculptor. I remember watching him sculpt, and his ancestors were stonemasons. They were quarriers from the Isle of Purbeck dating back to the 12th century. I remember going to the quarries with my dad and thinking how amazing it was that this material was excavated from the earth. Then my father introduced me to sculpture. A lot of West African sculpture, Benin Bronzes, modern sculpture by Alexander Calder. Michelangelo and classical sculpture was all around me in Italy when we'd go and visit my grandparents.    I think sculpture has always been something I found interesting and also felt natural or felt like something I had a calling towards. My mom has always said I have this ability with three-dimensional objects. Even as a child, when I would draw, I would often draw in 3D. I do still draw a lot, but I often collage or sculpt to work out something. You often draw with jewelry designs, actual drawings in the traditional sense, but I go between all different mediums to find that perfect form I'm looking for.   Sharon: When you were attracted to this jewelry in Glasgow, did it jump out at you as miniature sculpture?   Joy: Yeah, definitely. Looking at it, I saw it as miniature versions of sculpture. I also find artists such as Rebecca Horn interesting in the way that they're often about performance or extensions of the body. Even Leigh Bowery, who worked with Michael Clark, was creating physical artworks with ballet. These interactions with the body I think are really interesting: living sculpture, how those things pass over. I don't really like categorizing different art forms. I think they can cross over in so many different ways. We have this obsession about categorizing different ways or disciplines. I understand why we do that, but I think it's interesting where things start to cross over into different boundaries.   Sharon: That's interesting. That's what humans do: we categorize. We can spend days arguing over what's art, what's fine art, what's art jewelry. Yes, there's gray. There are no boundaries; there's gray in between.    Tell us about your business. Is that something your folks talked to you about, like “Go be an artist, but make sure you can make a living at it”? Tell us about your business and how you make a living.   Joy: I felt my parents were going to support me in whatever decisions I made. My mom ran away from Italy when she was 17, and she always told me that she said when she was leaving, “You have to live your life, because no one else will live it for you.” She's always had the attitude with me. Whatever direction I wanted to go in, I felt supported. I've always thought that if you work really hard at something or you put in the hours and you're passionate about it, then things will grow from that. Every experience I've had has influenced the next thing. I never see something as a linear plan of exactly how I'm going to reach or achieve certain things. I'm still very much learning and at the beginning of it. I only graduated in 2019 from the Royal College of Art doing my master's.    As I mentioned before, these two goldsmiths had given me an informal apprenticeship, basically. They were two working goldsmiths that had a studio, and they had been practicing for around 40 years. They had given me a space to work on this skill. Even though I studied a B.A. at The Glasgow School of Art, which is a mixture of practical and theoretical, I felt that after going to Japan and working with a samurai sword specialist making Damascus steel—it took him 25 years to get to the point where he was considered a master craftsman, this master in his craft. I felt like I had just started, even though my education in making had started from birth because my parents were artists and exposed me to all these things and encouraged me to make.    Within metalworking and jewelry work, there are so many techniques and so many things you need to take years to refine. Really, it's been like 11 years of education: doing a B.A., then doing an informal apprenticeship, then doing my master's. Only now do I feel like I've really found this confidence in my own voice within my work. Now I see the reaction from people, and I can help facilitate people on their journeys. I really enjoy that aspect of what I'm doing.    I'm still trying to figure out certain ways of running a business because it's only me. My uncle runs a successful business in Italy in paper distribution, and he said to me, “Why don't you expand or mass produce your work or have different ways of doing things?” This is where I find he doesn't necessarily understand me as an artist. For me, it's about process and handmaking everything. Perhaps that might not be the way I make the most money, but it's the way in which I want to live my life and how I enjoy existing. My business at the moment is just me handmaking everything from start to finish. What's really helped me recently is having support from the journalist Melanie Grant, who invited me to be part of an exhibition with Elisabetta Cipriani. It was with artists such as Frank Stella, Penone, who's one of my favorites from the Arte Povera movement who also came northern Italy, from an area where my family is from.    Sharon: I'm sorry; I missed who that was. Who's one of your favorites?    Joy: Penone. He's the youngest of the Arte Povera movement in Italy that came out of Turin. He often looks at nature and man's relationship to nature, the influence of it or connection. The piece of his that was on display was a necklace which was part of a tree that wraps around the décolletage. Then it has a section which is sort of like an elongated triangle, but it was the pattern of the skin from his palm. It's very beautiful. His sculpture, his large pieces, are often trees forming into hands or sections of wood that have been carved to look like trees, but they're carved. There's also Wallace Chan, who is obviously in fine jewelry. Art jewelry is considered—I don't know what to say—   Sharon: That's somebody who has a different budget, a different wallet. Not that your stuff isn't nice, but the gems in his things, wow.    Joy: There was Grima, Penone, Frank Stella. It was a combination of people who are considered more famously visual artists than fine jewelers. Then there was me, who was this completely new person in the art jewelry scene. I felt really honored that Melanie had asked me to put my work forward. I've always known what my work is to me. I see is as wearable artwork. But there was the aspect of, “What do other people see in it? How are they going to engage in this?” The feedback was absolutely incredible.    Since then, the work and the business have been doing so well. I have a bookkeeper now. The one person I employ is an amazing woman called Claire. She has been really helping me understand how my business is working and the numbers. However talented you are, if you don't understand how your business is working, then you're set up to fail. It's really difficult to continue to stay true to my principles and how I want to make, and to try to understand how I'm going to be able to do that, what it's going to take. I'm right at the beginning of it. I'm only in my first two years of my business. At the moment, from speaking to Claire, she was saying I'm doing well. I feel really supported by my gallery also, and that's the big part of it. I think that's going to make the difference.   Sharon: Wow! You do have a lot of support. No matter how talented you are, you do have to know how much things cost, whether you're making by hand or mass-producing them. I've always wanted to stick my head in the sand with that, but yes, you do need to know that.    I didn't realize there were so many artists at the exhibit. I knew you had this exhibit at Elisabetta Cipriani's gallery, but I didn't realize there were so many artists there. That must have been so exciting for you.   Joy: It was super exciting, and it was really interesting. Melanie has just written this book, “Coveted,” which is looking at whether fine jewelry can ever be considered as an art form. That's a conversation I'm sure you've had many a time in these podcasts, about classification. It's what we were talking about before, about how everything becomes departmentalized. Where is that crossover? How does it work? If people say to you, “I'm a jeweler” or “I'm an artist,” you'll have a different idea immediately of what that means.    It was hard to present an exhibition which was a combination of different work with the interesting theme of “force of nature,” just as we were coming out of lockdown. These are artists who've all been working away, and we got to do a real, in-person exhibition that people could attend and see and touch. One of the most magnificent things with jewelry is the intimate relationship you have with it, being able to touch it, feel it, that sensory aspect. I think in this day and age, we have a huge emphasis on the visual. We're bombarded with visual language, when the tactile and touching is the first thing we learn with. To be able to touch something is really to understand it.   Sharon: I'm not sure I 100% agree with that philosophy. I have jewelry buddies who say they have to hold the piece and feel it. I guess with everything available online, I don't know.   Joy: Diversity depends on what your own way of experiencing things is. Also, the way you look at something will be informed by the way you touched it. Yes, we are all looking at things big picture. We know it's made of wood or metal or ceramic. We can imagine what that sensation is. Of course, imagination also influences the ability to understand something, so they work together. I think it just adds different dimensions. It's the same with music. Sound is another sensory way in which we experience things. Music often moves me and helps me relax in ways that other art forms don't do.   Sharon: Right.  

Fifty Key Stage Musicals: The Podcast
Ch. 28- AIN'T MISBEHAVIN

Fifty Key Stage Musicals: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 44:32


AIN'T MISBEHAVIN COMPOSER: Fats Waller LYRICIST: Fats Waller BOOK: Richard Maltby Jr and Murray Horwitz DIRECTOR: Richard Maltby Jr CHOREOGRAPHER: Arthur Faria PRINCIPLE CAST: Nell Carter (Nell),Andre DeShields (Andre), Ken Page (Ken) OPENING DATE: May 09, 1978 CLOSING DATE: Feb 21, 1982 PERFORMANCES: 1,604 SYNOPSIS: Using the pre-existing music of 1930s jazz pianist Fats Waller, Ain't Misbehavin uses three women and two men to sing Waller's songs in a plotless revue celebrating his music.   Richard Dueñez Morrison's highlights the significance Ain't Misbehavin' had as a highly regarded, character-driven Broadway revue. Though a comparatively simple lineup of Fats Waller songs without book, elaborate set, sizable ensemble, or major stars, the show brought the world of the Harlem Renaissance to life in a way that was both novel and accessible for largely white audiences. Director-lyricist Richard Maltby Jr., and writer Murray Horwitz abandoned the idea of crafting a conventional, dialogue-driven telling of Waller's life in favor of a more nuanced evening which showcased the diverse talents of the five Black performers in the cast, including future stars Nell Carter and Andre DeShields. Maltby carefully guided the transition of the show from its intimate premiere at Manhattan Theatre Club's off-Broadway venue to the larger Longacre Theatre, ensuring the intimacy at the heart of the piece translated to a Broadway stage. When the revue won the 1978 Tony Award for Best Musical, new avenues were opened for Broadway revues as well as Black representation on the Broadway stage. Richard Dueñez Morrison - Richard Dueñez Morrison is a music director and voice teacher in San Diego, California. He holds a bachelor's degree in Stage Management from Webster University and a master's degree in Musical Theater from San Diego State University. His favorite musicals include Sweeney Todd, Nine, Andrew Lippa's A Little Princess, The Will Rogers Follies, and Caroline, or Change. Eternal thanks to husband Kurt, parents Renee and Dennis, piano teacher Dorothy Winnard, and theatrical mentors Neil Rothschild, Debbie Luce, Mary Elledge, and Ole Kittleson.  SOURCES Ain't Misbehavin, Original Broadway Cast Recording. RCA (1978) Ain't Misbehavin, starring Nell Carter and Andre DeShields, directed by Don Mischer. NBC Television (1982) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Biblioteca Del Metal
Leño & Rosendo - (Una Antologia De Salud Y Buenos Alimentos)

Biblioteca Del Metal

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 78:10


Colabora Con Biblioteca Del Metal: Twitter - https://twitter.com/Anarkometal72 Y Donanos Unas Propinas En BAT. Para Seguir Con El Proyecto De la Biblioteca Mas Grande Del Metal. Muchisimas Gracias. La Tienda De Biblioteca Del Metal: Encontraras, Ropa, Accesorios,Decoracion, Ect... Todo Relacionado Al Podcats Biblioteca Del Metal Y Al Mundo Del Heavy Metal. Descubrela!!!!!! Ideal Para Llevarte O Regalar Productos Del Podcats De Ivoox. (Por Tiempo Limitado) https://teespring.com/es/stores/biblioteca-del-metal-1 Tracklist: 01 - Este Madrid 02 - El Tren 03 - Si Señor , Si Señor 04 - Cucarachas 05 - Sorprendente 06 - ! Que Desilusion ! 07 - Agredecido 08 - Loco Por Incordiar 09 - Crucifixion 10 - Pan De Higo 11 - Entonces Duerme 12 - El Asa Del Cubo 13 - Nada Especial 14 - Flojos De Pantalon 15 - Puede Que 16 - Borrachuzos 17 - Hasta De Perfil 18 - Vaya Ejemplar Primavera 19 - Masculino Singular 20 - Sufrido Leño fue una banda española de rock formada en 1978 por Rosendo Mercado, Ramiro Penas y Chiqui Mariscal. Mediada la grabación del primer disco, este último se marchó siendo sustituido por Tony Urbano. Bajo un estilo musical basado en el hard rock e influido por otros como el rock and roll, el blues o el rock progresivo se convirtieron en el máximo estandarte del surgimiento de un movimiento conocido como rock urbano durante la transición española. En el punto álgido de su carrera, tras finalizar una gira junto a Miguel Ríos, el grupo se disolvió en octubre de 1983. A pesar de su corta trayectoria, se convirtieron en uno de los grupos más importantes e influyentes del rock español.El nacimiento de Leño se remonta, probablemente, al 31 de diciembre de 1977, tras una discusión de los componentes de la primera formación del grupo Ñu antes de comenzar un concierto. Dice la leyenda que uno de los componentes de Ñu, Rosendo Mercado, pronunció las palabras: "Chico, hasta aquí hemos llegado...". La relación de amor-odio entre Rosendo y José Carlos Molina, el Molina, queda patente hasta en el origen del nombre del nuevo grupo formado por Rosendo "las canciones que haces son un leño, tío" decía José Carlos de las composiciones de Rosendo para Ñu. Aunque José Carlos cuenta otra versión "Bueno, Leño lo formé yo, y el nombre me lo inventé yo. Y es que cada vez que hacía una canción heavy, como la introducción de "Este Madrid", que es mía, Rosendo decía "¡vaya leño de canción que has hecho!". Empezaron bromeando y al final decidieron llamarse Leño, no quería Rosendo perder la "ñ" por ningún lado. Solo unos días después se creó plenamente el grupo. Con un viejo amigo del grupo Fresa (anterior nombre de Ñu), Chiqui Mariscal, y el ex-batería de Coz (grupo del que después saldría otro grupo de los 80 llamado Barón Rojo) debutan en la sala Alcalá Palace el 12 de febrero como teloneros de Asfalto, con cuatro temas propios. En mayo se publicó el sencillo "Este Madrid/Aprendiendo a escuchar", hoy un disco de coleccionista. Casi un año y decenas de conciertos después, exactamente en marzo de 1979, en setenta horas se graba y mezcla el primer disco de Leño, con el mismo nombre que el grupo. La portada de "Leño" muestra el adiós de Chiqui Mariscal, el primer bajista. Con el tiempo Chiqui volvió a integrarse en Ñu, grupo en el que había estado, con Rosendo, antes de que ambos formaran Leño. Para sustituirle entró en el grupo (y ya se quedará hasta el fin) Tony Urbano, gran amigo de Ramiro (ambos provenientes de Coz). Tony grabará en el disco el último tema, el himno al LSD "El tren", compuesto y no grabado, por Rosendo y José Carlos Molina en los tiempos de Ñu (como curiosidad, esta canción la grabó Ñu varios años después, con otro nombre y mucha gente pensó que estaban versionando a Leño, cuando en realidad la canción era de ambos). Era el final de una década y el principio de otra esperanzadora, con conciertos en cada ciudad y la radio sonando en español. Como declaró Rosendo, "Estábamos siempre juntos porque era la época de los festivales y en cualquier punto de España nos encontrábamos Coz, Ñu o Leño de Madrid, Bloque de Santander, Smash o Storm de Sevilla... Había algo por lo que estar ahí y pelear juntos. Estábamos abriendo hueco. Eran conciertos de cuatro, seis, ocho o hasta catorce grupos, era una locura. Los equipos eran horribles y además no los sabíamos manejar. Bloque tenían la mejor producción y equipo, también Asfalto, quizá porque fueron los que empezaron antes e iban invirtiendo. Con Ñu nunca toqué con monitores, se tocaba con los amplis de escenario. El batería se dejaba los muñones dando hostias y los demás apretábamos con los Marshall a todo volumen...". En el siguiente año llegó la movida madrileña y las casas de discos comenzaron a aumentar sus ventas. Muchos aún recuerdan como un mal sueño la aparición de Leño, los "auténticos auténticos" haciendo play-back en Aplauso, un programa musical de TVE de la época. Aunque otros recuerdan otra versión de los hechos: "Eso del play-back me recuerda cuando, en la prehistoria, Leño la armó cuando exigió (y lo consiguió) tocar en directo en el programa Aplauso" (Raimundo Amador). En julio de 1980 se grabó "Más Madera", con teclados de Teddy Bautista y un sonido casi pop. Según Rosendo: "Más Madera suena muy mal. Se hizo muy deprisa, por debajo de las cien horas de trabajo: un trío que entra en un estudio y mete elementos que no había tenido antes, con lo cual no hubo tiempo de asimilarlo. Pero nos apetecía hacerlo porque era bueno para nuestra historia" "... eres nuevo, no sabes nada, estás en un estudio de grabación y no eres consciente de muchas cosas ... cuando acabé mi parte necesitaba salir de allí porque me quemé. Dejamos a Rosendo sólo y él nos crítico tanto a Tony como a mí, pero le dije que era peor que hubiera estado allí porque habría odiado ese disco toda mi vida. Teddy hizo lo que le salía de los cojones con el disco. También hizo unas cosas curiositas pero no consiguió hacerlo sonar ... eran canciones sencillas que se pueden tocar con una guitarra acústica, tenían bonitas letras y mucho sentimiento. Rosendo escribía ya con una sensibilidad absoluta". (Ramiro Penas).Los conciertos y las actuaciones en directo, sin teclados ni arreglos, sólo tres músicos y miles de personas escuchando y sintiendo cada canción, dieron lo mejor de Leño en aquélla época. De esta forma, en 1981 se grabó "En directo". El disco se registró en las noches del 25, 26 y 27 de marzo en el barrio de Tetuán (Madrid), cerca de su local de ensayo de la calle Tablada, en la sala Carolina, Bravo Murillo. Como novedad, se introdujo un saxofón (Manolo Morales), coros (una casi desconocida Luz Casal en ellos) y cuatro canciones creadas expresamente para el evento. A pesar del sonido y que solo contuviera cuatro canciones inéditas, este disco fue el más vendido de la carrera de Leño. En los años 81 y 82 la banda continuó desmarcándose de etiquetas como "heavy" o "rock duro". Más allá de su predilección por bandas como Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple o Blue Oyster Cult, dejaban claro en sus entrevistas que ellos escuchaban a The Clash, a Joe Jackson, a Specials o Talking Heads. Como declaró el propio Rosendo "Era algo absolutamente premeditado. No queríamos quedarnos en las tachas ... Lo mismo ocurría con nuestra imagen, utilizo la ropa que visto normalmente. Veía a alguna gente y pensaba: pero cómo sales a un escenario con una ropa que te tienes que quitar luego porque no va contigo...". En mayo de 1982 se inició la "aventura londinense". Leño grabó su tercer disco, "Corre, corre", en Londres bajo la producción de Carlos Narea. Sin embargo, cuando se presentó este disco a los críticos de la revista inglesa "Kerrang", especializada en rock duro, el resultado fue pésimo. Según algunos era imposible juzgar a Leño sin entender, más allá de la diferencia de idioma, sobre qué están hablando. Según Rosendo: " En "Corre, Corre" hay muy buenas canciones. Eran temas más claros, con estribillos que enganchan. Ya no había teclados y las guitarras sonaban serias... ". Los singles fueron radiados y comenzaron a tener una resonancia más allá de los estrechos círculos del rock de la época. El disco sonó mucho en la radio, hasta en la televisión. El mítico programa "Musical Express" de Àngel Casas realizó una grabación en directo. Leño fue también el primer grupo que apareció en el programa de televisión "Tocata", cuando el grupo ya estaba cerca de su disolución.Encontrar razones para la disolución del grupo es a la vez complicado y sencillo. Algunas de las declaraciones de los componentes del grupo aclaran el tema: "Dentro de dos años esto estará muerto, no vamos a conseguir nada, solo quemar una historia que es preciosa. Estaba consiguiendo lo que toda mi vida había soñado y me daba cuenta de que ya no era lo que me había planteado … arrastrábamos a mucha gente … era una responsabilidad que no quería asumir. Fue un cúmulo de historias, aparte de peloteras personales..." (Rosendo). "Hubo muchos motivos. Entre ellos, el faltarnos al respeto aunque fuera una sola vez. No hubo problemas de comunicación porque hablamos hasta el final pero, por otra parte, ¿qué íbamos a contar a esas alturas? ...se había acabado la esencia del grupo, sentíamos que nos estábamos aburguesando en cierto modo... Ya no teníamos nada que contar, fuimos un grupo contestatario en la transición política-cultural del país... Creo que dejamos a Leño donde lo teníamos que dejar" (Ramiro Penas). El final lo marcó la gira, organizada por Miguel Ríos, "El rock de una noche de verano", que en treinta y cuatro noches del verano del 1983, dejó en oídos y almas las últimas notas y letras de la banda. Miguel Ríos estaba en su apogeo (con discos como "Rock&Ríos" y "El Rock de una noche de verano") y aquélla, según algunos, pudo ser la gira más multitudinaria y espectacular de artistas españoles de la época. Leño optó por disolverse en lo más álgido de su carrera y dieron un concierto de despedida gratuito en el Parque del Oeste en Madrid, en octubre del 1983, por considerar sus miembros que habían llegado "a un callejón sin salida a nivel creativo". En su edición del 11 de octubre el diario ABC publicó: "El grupo de rock con más carisma que haya salido nunca de los barrios madrileños se disuelve definitivamente. La muerte de la banda, que se había insinuado ya en los últimos meses, llega en un momento en el que Leño funcionaba como una máquina perfecta". Esa decisión originó la creación de una leyenda. Parece evidente que si Rosendo, líder natural de grupo, hubiese dado el visto bueno a las propuestas de reunión -algunas de gran impacto económico-, las dudas hubieran manchado la imagen de Leño. Tras su disolución, Leño se convierte un grupo de culto para muchos, sus discos se reeditan, aparecen continuos rumores de reunión, y hasta la fecha sus canciones son pedidas por el público en los conciertos de Rosendo.En 2000 el premio al mejor autor de rock, otorgado por la SGAE (Sociedad General de Autores y Editores), se lo llevó "La fina", canción que se encuentra en el último disco de Leño; el premio lo recogieron Tony y Ramiro, en nombre del grupo. En 2010, con motivo del lanzamiento del álbum tributo Bajo la corteza: 26 canciones de Leño, la banda se reunió en la Sala Caracol para dar un pequeño concierto de 5 canciones. Este concierto fue privado, exclusivo para prensa, amigos y personas que trabajaron en el nuevo álbum. En 2013 Leño se juntó por última vez en público en el Círculo de Bellas Artes de Madrid para el acto de presentación de la biografía Maneras de vivir. Leño y el origen del rock urbano de Kike Babas y Kike Turrón y una placa de reconocimiento por haber vendido más de 500.000 copias durante su carrera. Rosendo Etapa En Solitario: Algunos problemas con su anterior discográfica (Zafiro, a la que pertenecía Chapa Discos), retrasaron hasta 1985 la salida del primer disco en solitario de Rosendo, "Loco por incordiar", editado por RCA, grabado en Alemania y producido por Carlos Narea. Fue el momento de más éxito comercial de su carrera, gracias a canciones como "Agradecido", "Pan de higo" o la que da título al álbum. En cambio, "Fuera de lugar", editado al año siguiente, suscitó reacciones negativas entre los críticos de heavy.[cita requerida] Su último disco para RCA, "...A las lombrices", se publicó en 1987 y fue recibido con frialdad.[cita requerida] La producción corrió a cargo de Jo Dworniak. En este disco se incorporó al grupo el bajista Rafael J. Vegas, que ha seguido acompañándole desde entonces. Tras dejar RCA, Rosendo pasó a grabar con Twins. El primer álbum con esta nueva discográfica fue "Jugar al gua" (1988), que contenía algunas canciones con un estilo diferente a lo anterior (por ejemplo, el reggae "Del pulmón"), pero también uno de sus temas clave, "Flojos de pantalón". El segundo disco para Twins fue "Directo" (1989), que incluía canciones de toda su trayectoria hasta entonces, incluyendo dos de Leño. Rosendo volvió a cambiar de discográfica cuando Twins se unió a DRO, compañía con la que ha seguido grabando hasta la actualidad (2007). El primer álbum para DRO, "Deja que les diga que no", apareció en 1991. La producción fue compartida con Eugenio Muñoz, que también participaría en varios discos posteriores. Un año después apareció "La tortuga", disco que contiene una canción radiada con frecuencia en aquella época, "Majete", lo que le proporcionaría de nuevo cierto éxito. Con "Para mal o para bien" (1994) grabó por primera vez en el estudio de El Cortijo del Aire, en el Cabo de Gata. Algunas canciones destacadas del disco son "¿De qué vas?" y "Hasta de perfil". Este último es un tema de crítica al poder y en él cuenta con la colaboración de tres componentes de Celtas Cortos.Su siguiente álbum, "Listos para la reconversión" se publicó en 1996. Tras este disco abandonaron la banda dos músicos que llevaban acompañándole muchos años, el teclista Gustavo Di Nóbile y el batería Miguel Ángel Jiménez. Tras publicar al año siguiente la banda sonora de la película "Dame algo", dirigida por Héctor Carré, en 1998 comenzó una nueva etapa en la que utilizó el formato de trío (bajo, batería y guitarra, renunciando al teclado) y cambió temporalmente su guitarra de toda la vida, una Fender Stratocaster, por una Gibson, si bien le cambió las pastillas originales por las del modelo Stratocaster, declarando que "siendo fiel a Fender, lo que le atrae de la Gibson es la estética". Posteriormente regresaría a la Fender porque no se acostumbraba a la Gibson, especialmente por el tacto.3 El primer disco de esta nueva etapa fue "A tientas y barrancas" (1998), al que siguió en 1999 "Siempre hay una historia... en directo", que se grabó en el patio de la cárcel de Carabanchel y consiguió el primer disco de oro en la carrera del madrileño. En el año 2000 la ciudad de Leganés puso su nombre a una calle del municipio. En el acto de inauguración Rosendo declaró: «No puedo decir nada más que gracias. Estas cosas sólo pasan una vez en la vida, y si pasan. Me siento avergonzado, orgulloso y contento»."Canciones para normales y mero dementes" se publicó en 2001. Es un disco que, a pesar del endurecimiento del sonido, mantuvo el buen nivel de ventas conseguido con el directo. "Canciones para normales y mero dementes" abrió una nueva etapa que se refrendó con su siguiente álbum: "Veo, veo... Mamoneo" (2002), también disco de oro, en buena parte gracias al sencillo "Masculino singular". En 2005 se lanzó "Lo malo es... ni darse cuenta", que podría considerarse como componente de una trilogía,[¿por quién?] junto a los dos anteriores. Mientras tanto, en 2004, su discográfica puso a la venta "Salud y buenos alimentos", una caja con dos CD recopilatorios, uno de rarezas y un DVD con videoclips y un concierto grabado en México. En 2006 recibió la Medalla de Oro al Mérito en las Bellas Artes5 El 29 de mayo de 2007 vio la luz su nuevo disco, "El endémico embustero y el incauto pertinaz", grabado durante los meses de diciembre de 2006 y enero de 2007 y que constó de 11 temas. El sonido era similar al que venía esgrimiendo en sus últimos discos, si bien se buscó que los temas fueran más lentos. El disco salió en una caja similar a los libros del medievo.En 2008 se lanzó a recorrer España en una gira junto a Barricada y Aurora Beltrán (ex cantante de Tahúres Zurdos). La gira, conocida como Otra noche sin dormir, arrancó el 4 de abril en el Velódromo de Anoeta de San Sebastián, para finalizar el 26 de septiembre en la plaza de toros de Las Ventas, en Madrid. En esta gira aprovechó para rememorar todos sus grandes éxitos, tanto de la etapa con Leño como en solitario. El 2 de diciembre de 2008 se lanzaría por fin un pack con 2 DVD y un CD del concierto de Las Ventas. Tras 3 años sin material nuevo, en los que Rosendo estuvo girando con Barricada y Aurora Beltrán y preparando el disco de versiones de Leño, el 29 de junio de 2010 puso a la venta "A veces cuesta llegar al estribillo", un disco con 11 nuevas canciones. A finales de 2011 lanzó un concierto grabado meses antes en el Palau de la Música de Barcelona, en edición CD + DVD. También puso a la venta una caja que recogía todos sus discos de estudio en solitario (periodo 1985-2011), con el añadido del propio CD del Palau. Tras tres años sin material nuevo, el 1 de octubre 2013 se publicó su decimoquinto álbum de estudio, Vergüenza torera.El 27 de septiembre de 2014 realizó un concierto en Las Ventas para celebrar su 40 aniversario en el mundo de la música en el que participaron como invitados Kutxi Romero, Fito Cabrales, Miguel Ríos, Luz Casal, El Drogas, y su hijo Rodrigo. El 2 de diciembre del mismo año se puso a la venta en un doble CD + DVD. El 21 de octubre de 2015 recibe de manos de El Gran Wyoming el disco de oro por las ventas de dicho álbum, el cuarto que consigue a lo largo de su carrera en solitario.

Luck On Sunday Podcast
Luck On Sunday Podcast - Episode 122

Luck On Sunday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 59:56


Episode 122 of the Luck On Sunday Podcast. Nick was joined in the studio by The Mirror's Dave Yates, Trainer Eve Johnson-Houghton & RCA's David Armstrong. With the first classics of the season upon us, Nick reflected with his guests & spoke to Charlie Appleby following his first 2000 Guineas win.

#CareFreeBlackGirl
S7E4 -Now Viola...

#CareFreeBlackGirl

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 70:29


On the latest episode of the #CareFreeBlackGirl podcast we welcome Kiana back from her hiatus to talk about all things carefree, Black and girlllll! (STARTS AT 9:00) Our #CareFreeBlackGirl of the Week is Saucy Santana, a fab femme rapper who just signed to RCA records. Best known for songs like 'Material Girl' and his relationship with the City Girls, Saucy Santana has been putting on for the girls. (STARTS AT 15:04) GIRL - Is the segment where we talk about all the latest happenings in culture. Brittney Griner still remains in Russian custody Viola Davis plays Michelle Obama and the people are talking... Megan Thee Stallion recounts her horrific shooting encounter with Gayle King (STARTS AT 33:13) BOPS - Songs we're listening to! Kehlani - Blue What Road Lizzo adds Latto to her tour Legendary returns with Keke Palmer as a host! Rico Nasty - Vader feat. BK Tha Ruler Justine Skye - What a Lie Real Housewives of Atlanta Megan Thee Stallion - Plan B (STARTS AT 50:50) GIRLS TO WATCH - Girls you should be on the lookout for! Music curated by DJ Candy Raine. Tune in each month and hashtag #CareFreeBlackGirl to stay engaged with the conversation. Follow the hosts on Twitter; DJ Candy Raine - @mycandyraine Rebellious Kiana - @RebelliousKiana Nika - @dopeitsnika Mimi Navah - @MimiNavah Follow the Podcast on Twitter @CFBGPod Produced by Quanna Engineered by DJ Candy Raine Executively Produced by Wize Grazette Find out more at https://carefreeblackgirl.pinecast.co Check out our podcast host, Pinecast. Start your own podcast for free with no credit card required. If you decide to upgrade, use coupon code r-1aea92 for 40% off for 4 months, and support #CareFreeBlackGirl.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Does Big Government Collaboration With Big Tech Raise the Costs of Everything?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 73:14


How Does Big Government Collaboration With Big Tech Raise the Costs of Everything? We're going to talk about the Senate bill that has big tech scared, really scared. I'll talk about a new job site problem for a number of different industries because of hackers, the cloud, the cost and reliability. [Following is an automated transcript]  This tech bill. It has the Senate really scared. He is frankly, quite a big deal for those of you who are watching over on of course, rumble or YouTube. I'm pulling this up on this screen. This is an article. ARS Technica and they got it originally from wired it's it was out in wired earlier in the month. And it's pointing out a real big problem that this isn't just a problem. This is a problem for both the legislature. In this case, we're going to talk about the Senate and a problem for our friend. In big tech. So let us define the first problem as the big tech problem. [00:01:00] You're Amazon. You are Google. Those are the two big targets here of this particular bill. We're going to talk about, or maybe your Facebook or one of these other Facebook properties, et cetera. If you are a small company that wants to compete with any of these big guys, What can you do? Obviously you can do what everyone's been telling us. Oh, you don't like the censorship, just make your own platform. And there've been a lot of places and people that are put a lot of money into trying to make their own platform. And some of them have had some mild successes. So for instance, I'm on. You can watch my videos there. And there have been some successes that rumble has had and making it into kind of the competition to YouTube. But YouTube is still the 800 pound gorilla. Everybody wants to be where the cool kids are. So for most people. That YouTube. They look at YouTube as being the [00:02:00] popular place. Thus, we should be, we are obviously saw the whole thing with Elon Musk and Twitter, and the goings on there. And Twitter really is the public square, although it's died down a lot because of this censorship on Twitter. Interesting. So as time goes forward, these various big companies are worried about potential competition. So how do they deal with that? This is where the real problems start coming in because we saw Amazon, for instance, in support of an internet sales tax. You remember that whole big deal. The internet had been set aside saying, Hey, no states can tax the internet and that's going to keep the internet open. That's going to help keep it free. And people can start buying online. And that worked out fairly well. A lot of people are out there, why would Amazon support a sales tax on the internet? They are the biggest merchant on the internet, probably the biggest [00:03:00] merchant period when it comes to not just consumer goods, but a lot of goods, like a staples might carry for business. So they'd have to deal with what they're 9,000 different tax jurisdictions in the United States. And then of course all these other countries, we're not going to talk about them right now, but the United States 9,000 tax jurisdictions. So why would Amazon support an internet sales tax when there's 5,000 tax jurisdictions? The reason is it makes life easier for them when it comes to competition. So if you are a little. And do you want to sell your widgets or your service? Whatever it might be online. You now have to deal with 9,000 tax jurisdictions. It's bad enough in the Northeast. If you are in New Hampshire, if you live in New Hampshire and you spend more than, I think [00:04:00] it's 15% of your time south of the border and mass, then mass wants you to pay income tax for that 15% that you are spending your time there. Now they do that with the. Baseball teams with football teams, hockey, you name it, right? So the big football team comes into town. The Patriots are paying the New York jets or whatever it might be. The Patriots have to pay New York state taxes, income tax now because they stepped foot in New York heaven forbid that they try and do business there and help New York state out. And they now have to pay income tax. Now they only have to pay income tax for, or for the amount of time. They're more New York. Various states have various weirdnesses, but if you're only playing 1, 2, 3 dozen games a year, It isn't like your normal work here, which is 2080 hours. We're talking about their plane to New York and they're only spending maybe 10 hours working in New York, but that [00:05:00] represents what percentage, 10, 20, 30% of their income, depending on how many games they play and how they're paying. And so they got to keep track of all that and figure it out. Okay. We played in New York, we played in New Jersey. We're in mass. We were they weren't in New Hampshire, certainly the Patriots plane, but they got to figure it all out. Guess what? Those big pay. Football players, hockey, baseball. They can afford to have a tax accountant, figure it all out and then battle with them. I had a booth one time at a trade show down in Connecticut. Didn't say. Thing it was terrible trade shows, man. They aren't what they used to be. And they haven't been for a long time. This is probably a decade plus ago, maybe even 20 years ago. So I had a little booth, we were selling our services for cybersecurity and of course, nobody wanted to bother pain for cybersecurity who needs it. I haven't been hacked yet. [00:06:00] Although there's an interesting article. We'll talk about next week based on a study that shows. Small businesses are going out of business at a huge rate because of the hacks because of ransomware. And if you're worried about ransomware, I've got a really great little guide that you can get. Just email me, me@craigpeterson.com. I'll send it off to you, right? It's a free thing. Real information, not this cruddy stuff that you get from so many marketers, cause I'm an engineer. They'll go out of business. So they figured I haven't got a business yet, not a big deal. And so no body. There's big trade show. And I was so disappointed with the number of people that even showed up for this silly thing. So what happens next while I get back to the office and about a month to two months later, I get this notice from the state of Connecticut they're tax people saying that I haven't paid my Connecticut taxes yet. [00:07:00] And because I was in connected. I should be paying my income tax for that day that I spent and wasted in Connecticut. Oh. And plus every company in Connecticut that I'm doing business with now, I need to collect their taxes and pay them the taxes that I'm collecting for those Connecticut businesses are resident. I didn't sell a thing. You know what it took almost, I think it was three or maybe four years to get the state of Connecticut to finally stop sending me all of these threatening notices because I didn't get a dime from anybody in Connecticut. So I'd love the internet from that standpoint saying you don't have to collect taxes in certain cases, certain states, et cetera, unless you have a legal nexus or a legal presence there in the state. So back to Amazon, Amazon loves the idea of having everything on the internet packs. They love the fact that there's 9,000 plus [00:08:00] tax jurisdictions. When you get right down to city, state county Lilian, either local taxes, or you look at those poor residents of New York state, or they're poor residents out in Washington state that have to worry about that, right? There's county taxes, state sales tax. City sales tax, and income taxes are much the same, the, all of these crazy cities and states around the country. Yeah. The ones that are in serious trouble right now, they are those same ones. Those particular jurisdictions are hard to deal with. So from Amazon standpoint is just like the Patriots football players. We've got plenty of money. We've got teams of lawyers. We have all kinds of accountant. We can handle this and you know why Amazon really loves it because it provides another obstacle for any competitors who want to enter the business. That's the [00:09:00] real reason, so many big businesses don't go ahead and charge you serious money so that they can use that money against you. Okay. You see where I'm going with this? Because if you want to start a business that competes with Amazon, if you want to have a doilies, you're making doilies. My grandmother used to make them all the time and she had them on the toilet paper in the bathroom, little doily holders. Doilies everywhere. And then of course, the seashells shells on top of the toilet paper holders. If you want to do that and sell it, how are you going to deal online with 9,000 tax jurisdictions? All what you're going to do is you're going to go to Etsy, or you may be going to go to Amazon marketplace and sell your product there. An Amazon marketplace. So Amazon is taking its cut out of it at is taking it's cut off. And you still ultimately have some of that tax liable. [00:10:00] Amazon loves it. It's the same reason you see these groups forums, right? Barbers saying, oh, we've got to be regulated. Really you need to have a regulation in place for barbers. You need to have licensing for barbers. Why do they do that? They do that. Not just barbers, right? It's all of these licensures and various states. They do that really to keep people. To keep their prices high. That's why they do it because someone can't just put up a sign and say, Hey, I am now a barber. Come get a haircut. And if you don't like the barber, if they do a lousy job, you go elsewhere. We don't need all of the bureaucracy on top of this to enforce licensure. Anyways, when we get back, let's talk about that Senate. It's a big deal. And I am coming down in the middle of this thing. Hey, visit me online. Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com and get my special report on passwords.[00:11:00] We just talked about how big business uses its advantages to crush potential competition. Crush them. And it's a shame and it's happened to me and many people I know, and now the Senate's getting involved and making things worse.  This is a huge problem. This happened to me a number of years ago, and I will never forget it. It was a really big lesson for me. I had designed and written a computer system that would take the code that it was written for a much older system. And run it for much less money. So bottom line here, this was a system called Cade computer assisted data entry that was made by Sperry way back in the day. Yeah. I've been in there for that long and they had little programs, so they would not punch cards, but punch right on two tapes, those big [00:12:00] nine track tapes and that information would then be used for processing later on then. People, big businesses grocery stores, you name it. We're using that Sperry system. And I designed a system that would take their COBOL is what it was. It was a form of COBOL code from this cage system. And you could use my code to compile it and run it on a Unix system. So the cost involved here was that it would be cheaper to buy a whole new Unix computer and buy new terminals and do some slight training changes. But the key punch operators would be exactly the same keystrokes as they were already used to. Okay. So you know how fast they were, so it wouldn't slow than none at all. And their cost would be. Then just the maintenance contract on the old Sperry cage. Very [00:13:00] cool stuff. And I worked really well. Then I worked with a couple of sales guys at spirit because Barry had a Unix tower system. It was a mini computer that was Unix space. And I had one, I had saved up my money. We bought this thing. It was a lot of money nowadays. It'd be about a hundred thousand dollars I spent on that system and it was really great. Cool. So some grocery stores started using it. They used it to build the space shuttle to design it and send it into space. RCA, Astro space used it, my system, which is all really cool. So Sperry was interested in it saying, okay let's do this. Now. I had flown myself across the country too, because I was in California at the time to do some of this work for. The for RCA Astro space for the space program and help make sure it was working and get it installed, help them configure it and everything else. So [00:14:00] I had a lot of time, a lot of money, a lot of effort into this. It was a big venture. So Sperry invited me down to their headquarters down in blue bell, Pennsylvania to talk about this. And I was so excited because their sales guys wanted to sell it. They gave me some free space in a booth in Las Vegas. So I was in the Sperry booth with them and, say, yeah, you can buy this. And you're using the Sperry, the new Sperry hardware. And I went down there and talked with them. They never did anything with me, or, here's a huge investment young guy. And all of this stuff just worked and they had proof of concept. They had a couple of customers already using the system and it never materialized. And then about a year and a half later, I found out Sperry had tried to duplicate my system and had messed it up terribly. It [00:15:00] wasn't keystroke compatible. So anyone using the new Sperry system, they had to learn. Okay. So I got to hit this and I got to go over here and I got to click on this. Are you kidding me using a mouse? Aren't you not? These are data entry operators. They just go all day long, just typing and. They had stolen my ideas. They messed it up. They didn't do as good a job as I did, which turns out it's pretty common. And they had stolen it. They stolen years of my life. So I've seen that before with me. I've seen Microsoft do that with friends of mine, and I've seen apple do it with various products that they've decided to release. They all do it. Why do you think these businesses can not spend money on research and development, and yet at the same time, stay in business as technology's continuing to move forward? Why? The reason is. They don't have to do, or why [00:16:00] would we do T wait a minute. Now, all we have to do is either buy the company or steal the product just re-engineer. Oh. And if we want to buy the company, we can do what Microsoft has been accused of doing again and again, which is. We'll just Microsoft. Let's see here. I like that database is pretty darn cool. So here's what we're going to do. So Microsoft announces, Hey, we're going to have a competitor to that in coming out soon. And then they sit there and they wait and they say, okay, how many people are going to ask about, oh wow. A lot of people asking for it. In the meantime, that company that had that great little database soft. Trying to sell it. And people are saying, wait, Microsoft is going to come up with a version of this. I'm just, I'm going to wait. We can wait a few months. Let's see what Microsoft. So that poor company is now seriously struggling because this big company came out and made the announcement that they're going to do something like this. And then that small company gets a [00:17:00] knock on the door. Hey, we're Microsoft or company X. And we like your product. Wow. Okay. So we're going to do a buyout. We're going to we're just, oh, this is going to be fantastic. I might have to sign what a two year contract non-compete and help them manage it. Okay. We can deal with this. And then they find out that company X says Your company is not worth that much anymore. Your sales look at their sales here, man. They've gone way down. Okay. So let me see let's do a nickel on every dollar evaluation you had a year ago. This happens every day, worldwide in America, it should never happen to anyone. And as you can tell, it upsets me. So what are Klobuchar and Grassley doing here? Amy, when she was running for president, she made this big deal. I'm going to pull us up on my screen. Those of you who are watching [00:18:00] on rumble or YouTube. And you can find all of that in my website, Craig peterson.com can see here. So they are trying to protect the American consumer, right? Yeah. Yeah. That's it. They're gonna protect us. And so what they're doing is saying that. Would a rule ruin Google search results because that's what Google says. Is it going to bar apple from offering new features, useful ones on the iPhone? How about Facebook? Will it stop them from moderating content? So the legislation's core idea is we will just. The marketplace take care of things. We're not going to let Amazon put their products in the product listings before third parties, but how are you possibly going to be able to regulate that stuff you can't, you can regulate it [00:19:00] talking about a bureaucracy. You'd probably need one about as big as the federal government is right now. And the federal government needs to be cut back in a major way. There's this two months. How about the 150 million Americans? This article brings that up to that are currently using Amazon prime, even though the price one hump. And they have it free to prime members. It's this is a big deal. The bill doesn't mention prime. Doesn't mention Google by name, Amazon. But this is going to be a nightmare to enforce the bill is not specific enough. It should be voted down. And between you and me, I don't know what can be done about this other than to have additional marketplaces show up online. And you know what the conservative social media sites are starting to win. So maybe there's hope. We've got two things we're going to talk about right now. One of them [00:20:00] is tech jobs. And man, is there a lot of scamming going on there as you might expect in the second is cloud, are you looking at cloud services? Hey, a home or business.  You can see this. I'm going to pull this up on my screen for those watching on rumble or on YouTube, but this is a big problem. And we've seen this again and again right now, they're going after certain workers in the chemical. The sector, but it isn't just the chemical sector. What we've seen is the bad guys going after anyone that's applying for a job. So let me give you a few tips here. First of all, you should not be pain to apply for a job. We see that all of the time when it comes to the head hunting firms, what. Is, they will charge the business who is looking to hire someone [00:21:00] that makes sense to you. They'll hire they'll charge the business. So oftentimes it's a percentage of the annual salary committee where from usually 20% up to a hundred percent or more, depending on the position. And boy can, they make a lot of money, but they don't necessarily place. People, but you know how it is right now, there, there can be quite a few. So people have been applying for jobs to make a lot of money and not realizing that fee that supposedly they have to pay is illegitimate. So remember that. Okay. The second thing has to do with this particular scam, because what they're trying to do is. Into some of these companies. So they will send a thing out saying, Hey, on my head hunter, I'm here for you. We're going to get you this job you need to apply. Are you interested in a new job now? I've seen some stats online saying [00:22:00] that somewhere around 30 plus percent of people are looking or at least open to. Take getting a new job, which means a lot more are looking for jobs. Now I have to add to that, that the people who have jumped ship over the lockdown period really are not happy. The majority of them wish they had stayed where they were at. So keep that in mind too. But what they'll do is they'll say, Hey, listen. Oh, there's this new feature on LinkedIn. By the way, you can say y'all are, I'm interested in looking for a job. I forget exactly what it says, but it goes around your picture and I have it up there because I'm a contractor, I go to businesses and I'm. To harden their cybersecurity. And we usually start slowly, especially with some of these startups we're doing work with right now where they won't, they go from a completely flat network and [00:23:00] it's all engineers and I don't want anything hindering anything. And so you got to work with them and it's just, we had a time sort of a thing. Okay. I just had this one thing this week. And then move on to one thing next week as well. So that's what I do for a living. And a lot of people are looking on LinkedIn and other places to find people who can be a chief information security officer. So I'm what you call a fractional chief information security officer. I do this under contract and I've been doing contracts and contract work for. I don't know if I shouldn't be on the air, but my gosh it's been now I guess it's 40 years right now. So I've been doing this for a long time. So I'm familiar with some of these scams, so they didn't take my word on some of this stuff. So what they do is they say, Hey, we've got a potential job opening. Are you in interested now? When we talk about 30 plus percent of people polled [00:24:00] say that they're looking interested in a new job, the numbers are probably a little higher. Not that everyone's going to jump ship. Some people will, but there are a lot of people that if they get this email, they're going to open it up. And so what'll happen now is this group out of North Korea called the Lazarus group? And we've talked about them before. We'll go ahead and say yeah, the here's, what's going to happen here. Let's just send you this thing. You can open it up. You can look at it and see if it's really a fit for you. I love this graphic that they have. This is from dark reading. I have it up on the screen again. Rumble and YouTube. What should we do now? Should I open this up? Should I not open it up? It turns out that what's happening is that Symantec and Broadcom, both have noticed this and stated in an advisory a couple of weeks ago. Be very careful [00:25:00] because what it's going to do is install a Trojan horse on your computer. So let's think about this. You're talking about the chemicals. You have a lot of people who are very technical. And if a company wants to get some new technology, we talked about this earlier in the show, what did they do? Do they just go and say, oh, okay, let's get some R and D going here. Let me research and development. Let's hire some scientists and do some pure science here, which are almost never happens anymore. No, what they do is they either buy a company, they steal a company's idea. If you are like the communist, you try and steal the technology directly. And that's exactly what these guys are doing. They put a Trojan on your machine because you open that file and that Trojan then gives you. Oh, excuse me, gives them access to your machine. Now this particular Trobe Trojan is a malicious [00:26:00] web file. Disguises. This job offer and your machine gets comparable. They attempt to compromise it, right? It's not always successful. They're not as many zero days out there for these lower level actors like North Korea, but they've been able. Now, they're not just going after chemical sectors, they're going after it service providers. So companies like mine that provide managed security services for businesses, they are being attacked. So that's a problem too, isn't it? Because if you can compromise. A nine company and we've seen this all the time. It's getting reported like crazy. You now have access to all of their customers because the it service company has passwords, et cetera. And they're probably using. Industry is number one or number two products for managing the customer's computers, neither of which are secure. [00:27:00] And that's the biggest problem that we've had. We use some of these things before, I'm not going to name them right now because it wouldn't mean anything to you anyways, but we had to get. We worked with our, it people inside the software companies that make the software that are used by the managed services providers. And we'd talked with their developers and said, Hey, listen, this is a serious problem. That's a serious problem. You've got to change this. You got to change that. And what ended up happening? We left them because they weren't doing what they were supposed to be doing a very big deal. So they're targeting defense, contractors, engineering firms of any sort. They want to steal IP, intellectual property, pharmaceutical companies. Yeah. Very big deal. These third hunting teams, including Cisco's, which are the guys that we use. Tallow sets again, an example of a big company buying a smaller company called telos that does threat intelligence and it looks at stuff. They're all reporting to this. [00:28:00] So high level jobs in an industry or what you have to watch out. It'd be very careful. Now, earlier this year, Lazarus group, again, North Korea went after some of these jobs people 250 that were identified working in the news media, software vendors, internet infrastructure providers, using job offers that appeared to come from. Disney, Google Oracle by the way, that was according to Google who tracked the campaign. They know what their employees are doing, where they're going, what emails coming in. It's crazy. We're looking a lot of stuff. Okay. So I want to move on to the next topic here. Last one, this hour, but I'm gonna pull this up right now on my screen. You can have a look at it there. Of course, if you are at home. You can or you really can't on the road. You can see this on rumble and also see this on the YouTube [00:29:00] site. At least for the time being until I get kicked off right. Kicked off again. That seems to be the word of the hour, but cost reliability are raising concerns in. Again, this is a dark reading article, came out a couple of weeks back here, but the biggest concerns about cloud computing to what is cloud computing. Let's talk about that first for a minute. Cloud computing is going online using something like salesforce.com. People don't think of that as cloud computing. But you have in Salesforce, all the communications with all of your customers, et cetera, that's an example of a platform as a service, basically. So they're providing you with everything and it's up in the cloud, nothing to worry about here, folks, but of course you have the same potential problems. You do outs where people use what's it called now? Microsoft 365. Which Microsoft disclaimed [00:30:00] any liability for any problems they cause for anything customers it's really crazy, but again, what are the problems there? Reliability slash performance, 50% of the people, 50% applaud on the screen. Again here worried about reliability and performance, because if your business is relying on cloud computing, What, how is the security any good? That you could use something, as I mentioned Salesforce, and just picking them out of a hat and not, they haven't been like a terrible provider by any stretch. But how about if you're going to Azure and you're using a workstation news here? How about if you're going to some other place, right? It could be Amazon web services. Google also has data processing services. Security's huge issue. Cost is a huge issue, reliability, performance, all of those. We're issues with more than 50% of the it [00:31:00] professionals. I'm surprised that this next one, which is our staff skillset on dealing with cog computing 26%. The reason I'm surprised by that is hardly anybody knows enough about cloud computing. Do we really confident about it? I'm serious about that. There's some companies right now, we're talking with a company called Wiz and they audit Azure configuration. So be very careful if you're using. Particularly if you're a business, it may not work out well for you. Hey, make sure you go online right now. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Sign up. You'll get my newsletters. You'll get all kinds of great information. Absolutely free Craig peterson.com including my special report on passwords. Now, if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [00:32:00] There is a whole bunch going on when it comes to Russia, of course, invasion of Ukraine. We're going to talk about that. And what is I can, how does this domain system work and why are people calling to have dot R U deleted? This is really a big deal. And if you're watching from home, I'm going to go full screen on this article. This is an article from ARS Technica, and I've been talking about it all week, which is that I can won't revoke Russian in Jeanette domains, says the effect. Devastating. This is frankly pretty darn fascinating to me because I can, as this international organization, it was put together in order to help make the internet international. And I'm not talking about the data international, but control of it. A lot of countries work. Because of [00:33:00] course the internet was created in that states. It was created by us tax payers, money for the DOD. And it was designed to be very resilient, in fact, so resilient that there could be a nuclear blast and that nuclear blast and. Causing problems, but yeah. Yeah, the internet is still going to work. And the whole idea behind it was you could have multiple routers. They're all talking to each other nowadays. They're talking BGP four and they can say, how can I get from here? To there. And so the idea behind BGP is they all share this information once the least cost way. What's the easiest way to post way. If you will, for me to get from point a to point B and it changes all the time. So you might be on a phone conversation. You might be listening to me right now, online streaming or watching the video you might be doing, who knows what [00:34:00] out there with digital communications. But the communications channel that you think you're using, where the data is going from, let's say my microphone, ultimately to your device, your ears, that data path, once it becomes dated. Can be changing multiple times a second. Now it actually changes quite a bit. Initially as these internet backbone routers, send the least cost, routing information back and forth to, and fro a very good thing, frankly, because it helps to speed everything up. And there's other tricks that we're using you. Might've seen. For instance, Akamai and some of the URLs before have sites that you've gone to, and that's called a content delivery network and that helps get the content to be closer to you. So if you're on a website in California and you're in New Hampshire, that website video, that website graphic, et cetera, is going to be coming from [00:35:00] a server local to me here in New Hampshire. All right. That's how that all is supposed to work. So we have names you guys know about that internet, domain names and those domain names. You already know those are turned into internet addresses, and those addresses are then used by the routers to figure out where to go, how to get the data. The problem that we're having right now, of course, is Russia seems to be substantially abusing the intranet Putin, put a kill switch on to the Russian internet sometime ago. And the idea behind the skills, which was, Hey, listen, if we don't want the world to be talking to us, we'll just cut it. Now he's tested it a couple of times, but what he has not done is shut it down and he hasn't shut it down. As part of this Ukraine, more, what they did is they passed laws saying, Hey, if you publish something that [00:36:00] disagrees with what we're saying, you get 15 years. And even these people who've been protesting on the streets, they're getting a bound 60 days, 30 to 60 days in jail, just for protesting what's going on. So a lot of people have been saying why don't we just, we turn off the Russian internet now we're not going to use Putin's kill switch in order to shut it all off. We're not going to do a well, a few things. She decided not to do, denial of service attacks, et cetera. Although there are hackers doing that and we are going to talk about that today, but they're saying what? Let's just go ahead and let's kill their dot R E. The country domain. And I can, the guy who heads it up said, Hey, listen our mission is just to make sure that the internet works. So shutting off the dot R U domain so that no one can go ahead and. We send right. A [00:37:00] request out to the domain name servers and get a resolution to an IP address. So if you try and go to Kremlin dot REU or something, you will get blocked and you will get blocked. Not blocked. No, I like the great firewall of China or of Russia. Now they've got one going pretty good. Yeah. Thank you. You ain't using us technology. It's crazy. What we've. But what it does is it says, oh, I hide dot, are you, I don't know. What are you talking about? So there have been a lot of people who have been pushing for it. And you'll see, on my screen here, that Ukraine is requested to cut Russia off from some of these core parts of the internet. And I can, which is the internet corporation for assigned names and numbers. I couldn't remember what that was earlier said that I can must remain neutral and their mission they say is not to take punitive actions. It's to make sure the internet works. So are they really taking punitive actions [00:38:00] of the cat Russia off? It's really interesting to me because look at what has been going on. You've got companies like Facebook as the great example who has gone ahead and just shut off people. They didn't like what they were saying. My goodness. At one point of you said you should wear a mask during this pandemic. You would be cut off from Facebook. And then of course, if you said, no, you don't, you shouldn't don't need you, you shouldn't wear a mask that at that point you would be cut off, because science right. Sciences, we know exactly what we're doing now. It goes on and on. If you said that it came from a lab in China, you would have your account suspended. Now of course their whole tune has changed and yeah probably came from a lab in China. It's crazy what these people have been doing. So we have arbiters of truth, who are some contractors sitting in their home or wherever it is the contractors for Facebook [00:39:00] that are going through posts that people are flagging as Incorrect as fake news. So what happens is people say fake news and then that goes off to their team that then looks at it and says okay. Yeah, fake news because we disagree with it. It just blows my mind. We have to have free and fair and open discussions. Don't we. You have that line at Facebook and Google does some of the same. A lot of these sites do a lot of the same. You get our major media outlets that are all deciding what they want to report on and what they want to label as fake and fake news. I'm just shaking my head because it's hard. It's hard to believe. What about. Russia is putting out fake news, as I've said many times before the first casualty in war, this isn't my quote. The first casualty in war is what, it's the truth. So if [00:40:00] truth is the first casualty, then that means we've got a lot of propaganda going on. We had propaganda coming out of Ukraine. We've caught some of those, like the, what was it? The. Chat goes, fighter, pilot, whatever it was who had killed, what was it? Five Soviet or Russian jets, Soviet era using silver deer, techno era technology on the part of the Ukrainian turns out well. Okay, that, that was false news. That was fake news. The whole thing about snake island, where you had that Russian military. I know what it was a frigging but anyways boat sitting there saying we are a Russia. Warship, you will surrender or, whatever. Do you remember that snake on just the small place, 13 guys and supposedly they shelled it and they killed all 13 turns out that was probably fake news as well. So that's from the Ukrainian side and on the Russian side they hardly reported I as to how many.[00:41:00] The we're in fact, initially for quite a while, they were saying there are no desks. Then at the same time, the Ukrainians are saying they're 2,500 Russians dead. And that number keeps going up, who knows what it is today. It gets really crazy in the time of war. So if Facebook is going to stop someone from saying don't wear masks or do wear masks, depending on what day of the week it is basically right. Wednesday. It's okay to say that Thursday is not okay to say that we're back. No it's not. Or then why can't that type of censorship? Move on to the next. I that's a big question I have now. Should we be shutting it off? I'll pull this back up on the screen again. And it, this article from ARS, Technica is saying that experts have warned, whoever they are that shutting down the dot R U domain. Is going to cause just incredible problems [00:42:00] for Russians, which man would it ever talking about a major blow to the economy. And it would also cause problems for people who are trying to find out more truth about. Russia cause you couldn't get to their site. Now we've seen some amazing things in Russia. We had the Russian, one of the Russian news agencies T, which is broadcasting and here in the U S that their entire staff just walked out saying, forget about it. We're not going to promote this fake news, but this is a little bit different question. Me personally. I don't think anybody should be censoring any. For almost anything. Yo, there are some limits, but they're pretty extreme in my book. I'd rather know someone is an idiot because they're allowed to say stupid things, and counter, counter it, counter their arguments. You've got to have discussions anyways, stick around. We'll be [00:43:00] right back. Microsoft. Yeah, they've been around a long time. They've been helping us. They've had lots of cybersecurity problems. People use Microsoft software on their desktop. Some people use it for servers, which is crazy, but listen to what they're doing now. This is a little concerning. I'm going to pull this article up on the screen. For those of you who are watching a long, either on rumble or YouTube ARS, Technica article, they have some really great articles. This particular one is about our friends at Microsoft. This is cool. Microsoft announced today? This was like a week or so ago that Microsoft would be suspending all new sales of Microsoft products and services in Russia. Following the countries, unjustified, unprovoked, and unlawful invasion of. Now Microsoft [00:44:00] didn't give any specifics about the products, but it really is likely to be a blanket ban of all of the Microsoft products. This is very cool because Microsoft has taken an approach I've never seen them do before, which is okay. When. Gets hacked. You get our friends at apple, putting together patches and getting them out. They get them up pretty quick. Microsoft had been doing much the same. The problem was some months there were patches every day that you had to apply. That's how bad this software is. And they decided that man, let's be like politicians here. Let's release some very damning news Friday. At about 4:30 PM before a long weekend. So no one will notice. Yeah. Y'all are friends of politicians do that all the time. What Microsoft decided they do is, Hey, wait a minute. We know we're going to have patches. [00:45:00] It's not going to slow down. And because our code is terrible. So what we're going to do, let me see here. How about we just release all of them at once and we'll just call it patch Tuesday, right? Because people were complaining about how much work it was, how much effort was effort. It was to try. They hate them. These machines apply these patches every day. Huge problem for everybody from home users to big companies out there. So Microsoft has said, okay let's do that. Let's burry it. So nobody will notice okay that's what Microsoft does. And now we've gotten used to that. Now we have. We remember two guys, right? Bill gates followed by Steve Ballmer. Steve Bohmer was a nut job. Bill gates was a bad man. I think he's just been trying extra hard to compensate for all of the evil he did over the years. But what we're looking at now is new management and that he's been in [00:46:00] there now for a few years, doing a great job, cleaning up Microsoft, making it a very competitive company. He has done some amazing things. One of the things that he has decided to do, that's been very effective is how about this? How about we go ahead. And we work with various governments to help stop these Russian hackers. And I mentioned this a couple of weeks ago, what was happening and the Microsoft had reached out to the white house and said, Hey, listen. What we have been looking at the hacks that have been coming from the Russian hackers, and we've been preparing fixes for some of those hacks. How about we work directly with some of these other countries? This reminds me a whole lot of the lend lease program in world war two. You might remember this thing, but the [00:47:00] us of course, initially was not involved in the war and they decided, okay we've got to help the United Kingdom. How are we going to help them? The UK doesn't have the money to buy ships, to have us make weapons, bullets know. What they did is they had people donate the rifles, the guns ammo from home. Plus they made them the government, instead of selling them to the UK, they lent them to the UK because the UK could not afford everything that it needed in order to fight a war against the national socialist in Germany. So what did they do? We just shipped the stuff over there and called it a lend slash lease. I think that's a great idea. And what Microsoft is doing is also great idea. They have been decoding, reverse compiling, if you will, and interpreting the code, looking at what some of the ransomware and other malicious code the Russia has [00:48:00] been using against Ukraine, and they have been providing. All kinds of insight information to these other countries. Now, this is a great idea for a few reasons, one of the reasons, and I think maybe the biggest reason is that the ransomware, the viruses, all of this malware that they're producing is. Not particularly discriminating. Do you guys remember maybe I dunno, what was it? Six months ago, I taught, told you how to avoid getting most of this Russian ransomware. And it was as easy as just installing. Yeah, installing a keyboard on your computer windows or Mac, windows. Those are the machines are always getting attacked quite successfully most of the time, but the windows keyboard. Russian language. Now you didn't even have to use it. [00:49:00] You don't have to have a keyboard, right? This isn't a Russian keyboard that I'm holding up here on camera. This is just a regular us keyboard. You can just install a virtual, Russian keyboard. And once that keyboard was installed, you're pretty safe. Why? Because Vladimir poop. Dictator for life of Russia decided he would just go ahead and stop anybody that was trying to hack Russian. Companies businesses, government agencies and what's the best way for the hackers to do that. Cause they didn't want to end up in Siberia for the rest of their lives because of a hack. Now they went ahead and said, okay if there's a Russian Cyrillic keyboard on the machine, we're not going to activate. So if the software, the malware on your computer, all you need to do is have a Russian keyboard. Yeah, that's it pretty simple. I told you that months ago, now what we're seeing is these indiscriminant [00:50:00] types of software that are being used in Ukraine. Why doesn't the keyboard trick work while some of Ukrainians peak Russian, we could go in. To the background on that of the massacre, the starvation purposeful starvation of Ukrainians by the Soviet union over many years ago. And how they then gave their property, their homes to Russians to move into in order to occupy Ukraine. So there's people in Ukraine who are Russian speaking of course. Now we're talking two or three generations, four, maybe down the road from when the Soviet union killed all of those millions of people. But there are some fights that to say, there's Russians, Russian speaking people there. Let me put it that way. Perfectly. In Southeastern Ukraine anyways I'm going on and on I, this is not an education on war or history. This we're talking about [00:51:00] cyber security. So the, they have, they been, Microsoft found many cases of Russians putting destructive. And disruptive or even more than that data wiping malware onto computers, it spreads indiscriminately. So Microsoft looking at what's happening, you crane, trying to get patches together for all of us, letting other countries know about what's going on is going to be. Amazing because this malware, which is wiping computers, primarily, it's not really just straight up ransomware give us money and we'll give you your data back. This is just showing your data, that malware is going to leak outside of Ukraine. Yeah. Cause us all kinds of book tension, probably. When we get back, I want to talk about this here. This is our friend Ilan Musk, and we've been following [00:52:00] along with some of the stuff been going on with his new satellite system in Ukraine. Stick around. The whole concept of these satellites and circling the earth, providing us with internet, just regular guides. It's going to be in our smartphones is changing everything. We're going to talk about Elon Musk and what's happened over in Ukraine.  Our friend Elon Musk has done a lot of things over the years. He has really helped us for frankly, the Tesla and what's been happening there. SpaceX, his main concern being let's get off of a single planet on to multiple planets, right? The movement to Mars, NASA's working on a serious moon base. I reminded him of space 1999. You guys remember that show, but yeah, we're going to have a moon base by then [00:53:00] and it makes a lot of sense. So who's going to go to these well, there's some interesting lotteries people have to apply and everything else, but he's done so much, right? He's got the boring company you'd already know about Tesla and boring company in case you didn't know makes underground tunnels. He has also. A few other things has got a huge battery manufacturing facility. They're working on new battery technologies to make all of our lives a little bit better, particularly if we have an electric house or electric car, because this is what good is it to have electricity that you can't use. And that's really what they're trying to do is make it so that electricity is available 24 7 for you. And. Those space X, which is what I mentioned as well as what we're going to talk about right now. I'm going to pull this up on my screen. For those of you who are watching over on rumble, or of course, YouTube, this is fascinating. He [00:54:00] said there's a high probability of Russian attacks on Starlink in Ukraine. Now that is fascinating because what he's done is he has sent over truckloads. I'm showing a picture of a truck. In fact, with these Starling terminals in it, that's from ARS Technica. Just double-checking it here, but this is very cool. This is posted by the vice prime minister over there in Ukraine. And they are talking about these terminals. Now a terminal in this case is something that allows your devices to talk to the Starlink satellites, or there's going to be a huge constellation. They've got 2000 satellites up and they're putting another 12,000. These types of satellites are much different than what we've been used to over the years. We were typically, we've had these massive things sitting up in space. [00:55:00] I worked with RCA Astro space many years ago and I saw. They're testing facilities, which are just incredible. They had this huge vacuum chamber that they brought me in to see as we were working on space shuttle software. Yeah. I wrote software that they used to put the space shuttle together yeah. Way back in the day. So that was a pretty proud moment. Anyways. It's we're not talking about these huge satellites, like they used to launch, we're talking about very small cell. And they're not just sitting way, way up there. These are in basically in low orbit around the earth and they're geostationary. In other words, they stay in one spot. I believe this is the way they've got these things set up. So these satellites then allow because they're so close to the earth, allow them to use less power. And also the other advantage to that is.[00:56:00] The delay, right? The delay between having to send it all the way up and back down, because electricity takes time, right? Yeah. Travels at the speed of light. But nowadays you might've noticed it can take your quarter second, half a second. When you're talking to someone, when I'm on the radio with some of these radio stations or the delay can be absolutely incredible. Like I half second to a second sometimes. And that's just because they're being cheap. This type of technology where you have these constellations and it isn't just Elon Musk. It isn't just Starling, but constellations with will ultimately we'll have tens of thousands of satellites up there. Not, there's all kinds of other potential problems not getting into that right now. But what it does mean is yes. Can communicate and we've never had this sort of thing before we had the us military, the Navy in fact, put together a communication system that [00:57:00] lives on top of the internet and called nowadays. Generically the dark web. And it was set up to allow our military, our state department to be able to communicate with people in countries that are back in the day under Soviet control, all kinds of potential problems. So whenever those problems existed, they just went ahead and used this onion network, which is a part of the dark web, et cetera, et cetera. So let's say we had before. Now what happens if you're a country like Ukraine, where 100% of your internet comes from Russia, Russia obviously can sit there and listen in. Hopefully your encryptions. Good. A lot of Russians have been using telegram and already get real news about what's happening in their country and other places. And Della Graham is not that secure, frankly. WhatsApp pretty secure signal is the [00:58:00] one you want to pay close. Attention to signal is considered to be the most secure of all of these secure communications apps. But there's a level above all of that, because if they can tell that you're communicating, even that is enough to give them some information. So they might not know what was in that transmission, but if the transmission is all of a sudden, a tons of activity coming over, lots of data, lots of messages going back and forth, they can say maybe there's something about to happen. That came out. You might remember the old orange book for security way back in the eighties, I think is when it came out. But part of what you had to do was cover up your. Actual real communication. So it's one thing to have the communications encrypted, but you wanted to always have about the same amount of communications going back and forth. So people couldn't figure out what you're doing now with these types of devices. That [00:59:00] kind of problem still exists. And this is part of what Elon Musk is warning about here. Pull it up on my screen again, for those people who are watching Elon Musk is urging users of his satellite system to put their Starlink antennas as far as. From people as possible. Now, why would he be doing that? Because frankly, that terminal is transmitting to the satellite as well as receiving from the satellite. And it is entirely possible that there could be some evil software that is listening in for the satellite transmissions and sends a little missile your way. Also, of course the Russians have satellites in space that can look down on the ground. Now it's something as small as a terminal four Starlink, little hard to see, but Elon Musk is saying, Hey, listen guys, [01:00:00] go ahead and camouflage it. You might want to spray paint. It just don't use metallic paint so that they can't see it and place it as far away from where people are as post. So you can still use it and only use it when you need to use it. Don't keep it up and running all the time. But this is the start of something great. Something where you can't easily block people's communication. So Russia has tried to do. And they have been jamming the Starlink satellites. So what did must do? He delivered all of his engineers to working on how can we get around the Russian Jack? And according to Elon Musk, they have gotten around it and they now have their satellite systems completely jammed free from the Russians. I think that's fascinating. They're probably using some good spread spectrum technology that was actually known about it and world war II. And then we can talk [01:01:00] about that for a long time. Heady, you might remember her anyways, skip that for now. Stick her out. We got more when we. A whole bunch of pandemonium out there because of what Russia's been doing in Ukraine and how it's flowing over to us as well. Hey, this is not great news. Pandemonium is the name of the game over there in Russia. And they are being very successful. We're going to talk about what happened in Bella ruse. We'll talk a little bit about what happened in Ukraine with cybersecurity and what's happening right here right now.  I'd also like to invite you guys to listen to me on all kinds of apps out there, including the tune-in app and many others. Let me get my screen set up because now you can also catch me on. And on YouTube, this is almost [01:02:00] a complete, let me pull this up for you. There we go. Complete ARS Technica today. They've got some great articles this week, looking into the Russians. What are they doing? What kind of problems is that causing us? But we are seeing some interesting attacks back on. And back in very big way. Russia has been going after you crane in the cyberspace for a long time, we spoke a few years ago about what Russia had been doing with the tax software for Ukraine. We don't do this in the us or in Canada, but my number of European countries do you, where you have to have. The old official tax preparation software put together by the government for your business or for your person, depending on the country you're living in [01:03:00] France is a great example of this. And Ukraine is another one. So Ukraine says, Hey guys, you got to go ahead and use our software. That means every business in Ukraine is using their software. To manage their tax payments and their accounts, frankly. And that wonderful little piece of software was hijacked by our friends in Russia. So they grabbed a hold of it. They in. Did some code into it that added rent somewhere to the software. So now all of the businesses in Ukraine are pretty much guaranteed to be using this hacked software. We have a client who has offices over in France, and we found a really interesting problem with them because. The French software that was being used for taxes for French businesses had an extra little [01:04:00] problem. And that extra problem was, it was insecure as can be whoever wrote this, must've taken a Microsoft programming course and had no idea DIA about the consequences of what they were. So it was very insecure. The, it was using a version of SSL, which is an encryption that's based on another type of increase. I don't want to get too wonky here, but that was just one of its many problems and bad keys, et cetera, et cetera. And keys by the way, was using keys that had been revoked, which you should never do. Bottom line. Oh my gosh. Hey, if you want more information on this, just drop me a note. me@craigpetersohndotcomandyoucanalsogetmynewsletterwithallkindsofgreatlittletipsmeatcraigpeterson.com. Just let me know. So in this case, we had to help that company in [01:05:00] France. Ignore the security restrictions that were on their systems so they could use the French tax system. So anyways, I told you that, so I could tell you that the same thing happened to Ukraine. In a different way, their software was pre infected. So when they downloaded it, ta-da. They got that piece of ransomware that virus had spread. It was just a nightmare. And of course it robbed. If you will, Ukraine, government of funds, that would have been. So we had now a bit of a shift. I'm going to pull this up on the screen again, this article, because what this shift has shown is that the hackers are now operating on the side of you. Crazy. Which is just fascinating. So the group called anonymous, you might be familiar with them. Of course, they've been doing a lot of hacking for a [01:06:00] lot of years, releasing private information, government and information. All of that sort of stuff. And they have a mast what they're calling a volunteer. It. And this it army has been going and doing what well hacking Russian sites apparently. So this article is just absolutely fascinating and they pulled some of from wired as well, but the Russian space research Institute, their website was hacked, leaked files that were stolen from the Russian space agency, made it all the way on to the. The space agency was hacked in their website said, leave Ukraine alone, Alto anonymous. Will you up even more? They also did. What's called a D O S. Which is a distributed denial of service attack. Those can be [01:07:00] very difficult to protect against unless you're set up in advance to help protect yourself. And that pretty much destroyed Russia's dot are you top level domain? So we've talked about how domain services work, right? So Doug are, you is like.com except dot R U is for running. And so the domain name servers that handled our, you were knocked off the air because no one could really get to them. They used amplifying attacks and stuff without getting into all of the details. So basically they were trying to cut off access and they did for a lot of people to any. That ended in, are you? It's great. These are just some of the latest in this surge of hacktivism. That's been going on one of the ones I mentioned a couple of weeks ago with the Belarusians deciding they were going to hack the Belarus railroad, which was being used. To bring Russian [01:08:00] troops, supplies, tanks, et cetera, all on rail, right on down right to the border of Ukraine. So that was hacked so that they couldn't use it in order to go after. Of course Russia was able to get to Ukraine, but there's also been protests around the world. 48 Russian cities raise millions of dollars through cryptocurrency donations. Now, I'm not a big cryptocurrency guy and I'm not a big crypto currency guy because while. Cryptocurrency is likely to be outlawed by most, if not all governments. And they certainly could shut it down and it is not anonymous. All right. So using cryptocurrency does not mean it does not equate to completely anonymous. They have done a lot of donations. They're big companies including, we [01:09:00] just talked earlier about Microsoft, but also apple shell, BP, a McDonald's Starbucks. And these hacktivists have really joined in. And w we talked about a couple of other things, so this is messy. Because even more than in peace time, these active combat that are really hacking happening right now, rendering, hacktivism, any effectual and largely just distracting because we are now in a hot war right now. Maybe we don't have our. Eric planes bombing Russian movements or other things, but there is a kinetic war going on over there. There are bullets, et cetera, mean exchanged. So the hacktivist efforts have been, visible. There's no question about that. But what have they done? See, [01:10:00] that's an advantage to being a country like Russia, or like the Ukraine, or excuse me, Ukraine, because both of those countries there, their industrial base, the military industrial base is not heavily automated unlike ours. What could you do? What can you shut down? So what you shut down the Russian space agency's website, how far did you get into it? Probably not very far. We also have a couple of groups and we talked about these guys many times the Conti group, which has been. Terrible and hurting us businesses, individuals, government agencies, and stuff, the Cuming project, both of them have declared their allegiance to Russia. You might remember a few weeks ago, we talked here about how we have had some researchers track down most of these Russian hacker groups and their money. And they all ended up in one building in Moscow. [01:11:00] No, that should tell you something, right? In fact, the most expensive real estate right there in downtown Los gal, the tallest building, et cetera. So these groups getting together in order to protect the father land there in Russia. Ah interesting problem. How much of this is really controlled by the Kremlin? It's a very good question. Context. Was dismantling its infrastructure. It, some of their top people were arrested by Putins military. Not military, but police state over there. And that was interesting too. That was again before the invasion, but why would Putin be shutting them down at all? Apparently they said some things. That they shouldn't have said. So now they've come out and have decided they're going to support Russia in its entirety. Now we mentioned Microsoft and how [01:12:00] Microsoft has decided they are going to protect other countries. As well as you crane, at least as far as the Russian malware goes, and they've been very active in that. And there are a number of cybersecurity companies and other organizations that have released free versions of some of their software, these digital defense tools. Free offerings. Our big cranes defend the networks. Google says it's human rights focus de dos protection service project shield is now in use by more than 150 Ukrainian websites. So it's very good. Bottom line propped up by the way, published this massive trove of personal data. Allegedly identifying 120,000 Russian soldiers deploy. In Ukraine that was Ukrainian prov, not the old good old Russian Sophia Pramata man. I [01:13:00] remember I bought one of those on new standing Canada once. And I had a friend who was from Yugoslavia and he said, oh, can I show that to my wife? He showed it to his wife. She tore it up. I said, I want my Pramata, Craig Peterson got calm.

Queer News
Lesbian podcast Cruising is worth checking out, Brooklyn Public Library is fighting back against banned books, Saucy Santana signs with RCA & Legendary is set to premiere on May 19th - Friday, April 29, 2022

Queer News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 7:20


It's Friday which means Anna is dropping a podcast recommendation. I decided to close out lesbian visibility week stories with a lesbian podcast you need to check out called Cruising. The Brooklyn Public Library is fighting back against the far-right book banning mission with an initiative of their own. In entertainment, Sauncy Santana & KeKe Palmer drop big news.  00:00 - Welcome & Intro 00:50 - E3 Radio Ad, Tune-in at https://e3radio.fm #QueerRadioDoneRight  01:14 - Intro Music by Aina Bre'Yon 01:54 - It's Friday which means Anna is dropping a podcast recommendation, Cruising 03:18 - The Brooklyn Public Library is fighting back against the far-right book banning mission with an initiative of their own 05:22 - In entertainment, Sauncy Santana & KeKe Palmer drop big news 06:09 - Anna's Got A Word  Things for you to check out  Cruising https://www.cruisingpod.com/episodes  Brooklyn Public Library offers young readers free library cards and access to banned books https://www.cnn.com/2022/04/26/us/brooklyn-library-banned-books-access  Saucy Santana signs to RCA  https://www.instagram.com/p/Cc5gfTClp-Y/  Legendary Season 3 https://www.instagram.com/p/Cc4K8EqMiS1/   About Queer News An intersectional approach to daily news podcast where race & sexuality meet politics, entertainment and culture. Tune-in to reporting which centers & celebrates all of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & comrade communities. Hosted by Anna DeShawn. 7 minutes a day, 5 days a week. We want to hear from you. Tune in and tell us what you think. email us at info@e3radio.fm. follow anna deshawn on ig & twitter: @annadeshawn. and if you're interested in advertising with “queer news,” write to us at info@e3radio.fm.

Recovery Rocks
Episode 117: Episode 117: Special Guest Deni Carise, Ph.D.

Recovery Rocks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 38:27


Tawny and Lisa talk with Deni Carise, Ph.D., a founder and the Chief Science Officer of Recovery Centers of America (RCA). Tawny recently met Deni at RCA's Break Free sober fashion event (yes, a sober fashion event!). At 18, Deni left home to pursue modeling and fell into cocaine addiction. Once she got sober, Deni went back to community college and chased her studies the way she had chased her addiction. Throughout her career, she has helped people all over the world find treatment and recovery. And to cap it off, she finally got to walk the runway at New York Fashion Week! Music Minute features Freddy Mercury and Queen. The girls also share controversial music takes.More about Deni: https://recoverycentersofamerica.com/leadership/team/#DeniCarise,Ph.DCheck out RCA: https://recoverycentersofamerica.com/

Groove Therapy
Episode 44: Life Lessons from the Stage with Rob Compa

Groove Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 70:52


In this episode, Taraleigh and Dr. Leah talk with guitarist Rob Compa from Dopapod about how he's evolving as a musician and a human and the practices that help him find presence, cope with emotions, and get out of his head. He shares about his meditation practice and a hilarious story about his first silent retreat. During the discussion, Rob makes connections from his childhood and how much about life he has learned from the stage. Also included is a special treat Dopapod has incorporated into their upcoming album. For the “Did you Know,” Dr. Leah shares a technique for coping with overwhelming emotions and Taraleigh puts her own personal spin on it in the “Daily Jam.” Rob Compa is the guitarist for the nationally touring progressive rock jamband Dopapod, who over the last 14 years has toured in every nook and cranny of the US and elsewhere, and recorded seven albums of original material. When not busy with Dopapod, Rob fills his time with his trio, RCA, solo acoustic shows, and numerous other musical acts as a sideman. He is also a passionate guitar instructor, with a constantly growing roster of students. Find out more at https://robcompaguitar.com/. This podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating or review on iTunes and join our Facebook group to dive deeper into the conversation of live music and health and wellness.Groove Therapy is brought to you by Osiris Media. To discover more podcasts that connect you more deeply to the music you love, check out osirispod.com.Visit SunsetLakeCBD.com and use the promo code GROOVE for 20% off premium CBD products. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Priorité santé
Journée mondiale du paludisme: de la prévention à la recherche

Priorité santé

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 48:30


À l'occasion de la Journée mondiale de lutte contre le paludisme, nous faisons un point sur cette maladie infectieuse parasitaire. Transmise à l'humain par des piqûres de moustiques, le paludisme est une maladie potentiellement mortelle qui a causé 409 000 décès en 2019, dont 94 % en Afrique. Après un recul sensible ces dix dernières années, les progrès enregistrés sur le front de la lutte contre le paludisme marquent le pas. Comment poursuivre la prévention ? Quels sont les traitements efficaces ? Quelles sont les avancées de la recherche ? Pr Olivier Bouchaud, responsable du Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales au CHU Avicenne à Bobigny en région parisienne et président de l'Association d'Accueil aux Médecins et Personnels de Santé Réfugiés en France Mokobé, le rappeur du groupe 113 a contracté un neuropaludisme et s'est retrouvé dans le coma Dr Matthieu Coldiron, médecin épidémiologiste à Épicentre, une unité de recherche liée à Médecins Sans Frontières. Il est basé à New-York aux États-Unis d'Amérique Pr Jean-Chrysostome Gody, directeur et pédiatre au Complexe pédiatrique de Bangui en RCA.

This is Vinyl Tap
No. 69: Harry Nilsson, Aerial Ballet

This is Vinyl Tap

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 120:26


On this episode, we look at Harry Nilsson's 2nd album for RCA, 1968's Aerial Ballet.  After signing with RCA, he received adulation from many of popular music's most notable figures, including the Beatles who called him their “favorite band” during a press conference. The man never toured or even really played in front of a live audience. Instead, he found solace in the studio where he could rely on his real strength: his 3 and 1/2 octave voice and his ability to create what was at the time, pioneering vocal overdub experiments.Nilsson was a bit of an anomaly in that he found greater success with other people's songs, while he watched other artists' versions of his tunes sore up the charts.  . This album is a prime example. It features one of his biggest hits, a cover of Fred Neal's "Everybody's  Talking" (used in the movie, Midnight Cowboy), and his own song “One,” which became a huge hit for Three Dog Night just a year later. Musically, Aerial Ballet draws on several influences, including jazz, 60s pop, and the Great American Songbook tradition. Yet it is a deeply personal and confessional album, with songs about his estranged father, the longing for permanence in a changing world, and love's pitfalls.