Podcasts about Orson Welles

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

American actor, director, writer and producer

  • 1,840PODCASTS
  • 3,220EPISODES
  • 56mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jul 3, 2022LATEST
Orson Welles

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022



    Best podcasts about Orson Welles

    Show all podcasts related to orson welles

    Latest podcast episodes about Orson Welles

    The Opperman Report
    Winter Kils Writer / Director William Richert

    The Opperman Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 63:40


    New Hollywood Maverick: Wild Bill Richert - Film Society of Lincoln Center A bold, brash uncompromising figure in the tradition of Orson Welles and John Cassavetes, William Richert burst on to the Hollywood scene near the end of the storied 1970s, first as a screenwriter and then as director of the dazzling conspiracy opus Winter Kills. A critical triumph abandoned by its studio, the movie set the tone for Richert's career to come-a quartet of highly original, idiosyncratic American features that have maintained an almost clandestine existence, subject to poor distribution and myriad unauthorized versions.

    Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
    Piranha Women and Indie Filmmaking Secrets! w/ Fred Olen Ray

    Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 68:06


    On this edition of Parallax Views, July 4th is just around the corner. What better way to celebrate than hitting the beach! Of course, if you're not careful in that water you could get munched up by a shark like in JAWS. Or worse... PIRANHA WOMEN! Piranha Women is the latest effort of Charles Band's long-running horror/fantasy/sci-fi factory Full Moon Features. It's also a return to said genre for it's director, the legendary independent filmmaker Fred Olen Ray. For a number of years now Fred has been working on TV, including making Hallmark Christmas movies with Chevy Chase and Lifetime thrillers. For him filmmaking is not merely some hobby, but a profession. Simply put, he's a working class filmmaker. Prior too much of his television work, Fred directed a great number of horror, sci-fi, action, and fantasy pictures during the VHS boom in the 1980s and a number of erotic thrillers during that genre's popularity in the 1990s. Among some of the cult classics Fred has directed are Hollywood Chainsaw Hookers, The Tomb, Biohazard, Cyclone, Evil Toons, Inner Sanctum (one of the most successful video rentals of the 99s), Beverly Hills Vamp, Witch Academy, Alienator, Deep Space, Star Slammer, Bad Girls from Mars, Mind Twister, Attack of the 60 Foot Centerfolds, Inferno, Possessed by the Night, and countless others. Through it all he's worked with such well-known actors as Ice-T, Don "The Dragon" Wilson, David Carradine, Sybil Danning, Martin Landau, Nightmare on Elm Street's Heather Langenkamp, Eric Roberts, Gunna Hansen (Leatherface in the original 1974 Texas Chainsaw Massacre), Morgan Fairchild, comedy movie legend Eddie Deezen, Bond girl Britt Ekland, Twin Peaks' Russ Tamblyn, Sid Haig, and many, many others. A monster kid that grew up on drive-in horror movies, Piranha Women marks Fred Olen Ray's returns to the type of fun genre fare that's made him a cult figure amongst cinema buffs. And it stars such beauties as Carrie Overgaard and Keep Chambers as the deadly titular fish women. In this conversation Fred and I discuss a number of topics including: - The secrets of indie filmmaking from matching shots to filming big name actors on a schedule - Working with classic actors like John Carradine, Aldo Ray, and Cameron Mitchell - The tricks he used to film the animated monster in the ambitious low-budget live-action horror Evil Toons - Working with Full Moon and thoughts on the promotional wizardy of Charles Band - Filming nude scenes with actresses - How to make films on low-budgets and tight-schedules - The craft of filmmaking - Orson Welles' cinematographer Gary Graves and his sabotaged film Moon in Scorpio - How he began working on Hallmark and Lifetime movies; what TV networks expect out of him as a director and why he gets the job - Filmmaking as a job rather than a hobby - The killer ta-tas gag in Piranha Women - The rise and fall of the "Scream Queen" cycle of films in the 1980s directed by Fred, Jim Wyrnoski, and David DeCoteau starring actresses like Linne Quigley, Michelle Bauer, Brinke Stevens, and Kelli Maroney - Advice to young filmmakers and what Fred looks for in young filmmakers (including discussion of Fred's producer credits for Steve Latshaw's Jack-O, which was recently re-released on Blu-Ray by Fred's Retromedia company, and Henrique Couto's Bigfoot web-series Boggy Creek) - And much, much more!

    Sonic The HedgePod
    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Part 2: "Orson Welles Reads Vogon Poetry"

    Sonic The HedgePod

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 92:12


    Chapters 5 through 11! Thank you for your patience! Back on our regularly scheduled reading, TV's Kevin & Daddy Host experience the grim wonders of the Vogons en route to discussion of Ultimate Gossip Orson Welles. Next week: The Starship Heart of Gold! 21:51 H2G2 www.patreon.com/tvskevin

    The History of Bad Ideas Podcast
    Predator Catching Predators!

    The History of Bad Ideas Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 120:01


    The HOBI Gang is almost at full strength this week as they review/rant the Obi-Wan season finale, Umbrella Academy is back, the gang gets military call signs, and the Predator is in trouble! Plus the guys give Nick Cannon advice, Top Gun Maverick ties Elvis at the box office, Orson Welles' favorite game gets a sequel and we list our Top Five Activities We No Longer Enjoy! This episode is sponsored by the Cincinnati Comic Expo.

    Breaking Walls
    BW - EP128: June 1954—The End as We Knew It

    Breaking Walls

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 182:47


    In Breaking Walls episode 128 we wrap up our six month look at 1954 by ending in June with network cancellations. —————————— Highlights: • The State of Radio and The Union • The End of Escape with John Dehner • News with Frank Edwards on Mutual • Let's Pretend with Arnold Stang • Autolite Drops Suspense • Goodbye To Jack Benny (For Now) • What's At Stake in the Fall 1954 Midterm Elections • CBS Cancels The Lux Radio Theatre • The End of James Stewart's The Six Shooter • Looking Ahead to July and Roswell —————————— The WallBreakers: http://thewallbreakers.com Subscribe to Breaking Walls everywhere you get your podcasts. To support the show: http://patreon.com/TheWallBreakers —————————— The reading material used in today's episode was: • On the Air — By John Dunning • Network Radio Ratings — by Jim Ramsburg • The Complete Escape and Suspense Logs — By Keith Scott As well as articles from: • Broadcasting Magazine • LIFE Magazine • Newsweek • Radio Guide —————————— On the interview front: • Parley Baer, Ken Carpenter, Elliott Lewis, and Paula Winslowe spoke to Chuck Schaden. Hear their full chats at SpeakingOfRadio.com. • Herb Ellis, Virginia Gregg, Jack Johnstone, Elliott Lewis, and Herb Vigran spoke to SPERDVAC. For more info, go to SPERDVAC.com. • John Gibson, Elliott Lewis, Vincent Price, and Arnold Stang spoke to Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio. Hear these full interviews at Goldenage-WTIC.org. • John Dehner and Vic Perrin spoke with Neil Ross at KMPC. • Dennis Day spoke with John Dunning for 71KNUS. • Morton Fine was with Dan Haefele. • Orson Welles with Johnny Carson. • Jimmy Stewart with Larry King. • Jack Benny spoke with CBS. —————————— Selected music featured in today's episode was: • Living Without You and Too Much Between Us — By George Winston • The Last Rose of Summer — By Tom Waits • Seance on a Wet Afternoon — By John Barry —————————— A special thank you to Ted Davenport, Jerry Haendiges, and Gordon Skene. For Ted go to RadioMemories.com, for Jerry, visit OTRSite.com, and for Gordon, please go to PastDaily.com. —————————— Thank you to: Tony Adams Steven Allmon Orson Orsen Chandler Phil Erickson Jessica Hanna Perri Harper Briana Isaac Thomas M. Joyce Ryan Kramer Earl Millard Gary Mollica Barry Nadler Christian Neuhaus Aimee Pavy Ray Shaw Filipe A Silva —————————— WallBreakers Links: Patreon - patreon.com/thewallbreakers Social Media - @TheWallBreakers

    RADIO Then
    THE SHADOW "The Death House Rescue"

    RADIO Then

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 29:13


    Episode 87 September 26, 1937 Mutual Radio. A man who's looking for a job mistakenly becomes involved with a bank robbery. He is later sentenced to death for a cop killing he didn't commit. The Shadow investigates and locates a missed piece of evidence, which helps free the wrongly accused man. Orson Welles as The Shadow (Lamont Cranston) (1st radio origin). Agnes Moorehead as Margot Lane (1st appearance).

    Lit for Christmas
    Episode Five: Spiked Eggnog & Fried Dachshund

    Lit for Christmas

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 82:31


    Welcome back to this Lit for Christmas vacation party! In this episode, Marty and his wife, Beth, drink way too much spiked eggnog, reflect on whale sperm, and talk about writer/producer/director John Hughes' short story "Christmas '59," which was adapted for the silver screen into National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation. BONUS POINTS: Count how many times Marty says "whale penis." SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS PRESENT: SPIKED EGGNOG Ingredients: 4 shots Butterscotch Schnapps/Peachtree Schnapps/Bailey's Irish Cream/Rum/Whiskey of Choice 4 oz. eggnog 6 oz. heavy cream (or half-and-half, or milk) Directions: Mix eggnog and heavy cream. Pour over ice, if you like. Add liquor of choice and stir. SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS PRESENT NONALCOHOLIC ALTERNATIVE: Eggnog Lit for Christmas Party Hosts: Marty has an Master's in fiction writing, MFA in poetry writing, and teaches in the English Department at Northern Michigan University in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. He served two terms at Poet Laureate of the Upper Peninsula, and has published the poetry collection The Mysteries of the Rosary from Mayapple Press. For more of Marty's thoughts and writing visit his blog Saint Marty (saintmarty-marty.blogspot.com) or listen to his other podcast Confessions of Saint Marty, also on Anchor.fm. Marty is a writer, blogger, wine sipper, easy drunk, and poetry obsessor who puts his Christmas tree up in mid-October and refuses to take it down until the snow starts melting. Beth has a BS in English Secondary Education. She has worked as a substitute teacher, medical transcriptionist, medical office receptionist, deli counter attendant, and Office Max cashier. Currently, she is the front desk clerk at a hotel and enjoys discussing/arguing about literature with her loving husband. Music for this episode: "Jingle Bells Jazzy Style" by Julius H, used courtesy of Pixabay. "A Christmas Treat" by Magic-828, used courtesy of Pixabay. Other music in the episode: "Christmas Vacation." Staples, Mavis. Warner Bros. Records, September 1989. A Christmas Carol sound clips from: The Campbell Theater 1939 radio production of A Christmas Carol, narrated by Orson Welles and starring Lionel Barrymore. This month's Christmas lit: Hughes, John. "Christmas '59." National Lampoon, 1980.

    MukPod
    Doug McFarlane chats about being Ginger, Vegan and Multitalented

    MukPod

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 94:45


    Doug McFarlane is an animator, actor, artist and singer for his all-ginger metal band BLOODNUT. He chats with us about what it's like being a jobbing extra for film and TV, how there's never been a better time to be a vegan and how fanart mashups are art too. We also spend time yarning about Mike Flanagan, Orson Welles and Betty White. Now THERE'S a comedy team! Follow Doug for original memes and artwork @dugmcfug on Instagram, @Dug_McFarlane on Twitter For wicked apparel designed by Doug check out https://teesbydug.printmighty.co.nz/ And listen to Doug's band BLOODNUT here: https://bloodnut.bandcamp.com/ Follow Josh @joshuamartian_art on instagram and @joshuamartian_art Follow Simon @sickyfondue on Instagram and Twitter Follow Mukpuddy Animation @Mukpuddy on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and TikTok Watch Mukpuddy original series on TVNZ OnDemand (New Zealand region only) The opinions expressed by the hosts 100% reflect those of Mukpuddy Animation and any disagreements should be taken up with management.

    Almost Cult Classics
    Sidetracks - Other Silent Movies

    Almost Cult Classics

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 57:48


    Following our discussion on Silent Movie (1976), we wanted to profile some more acclaimed silent movies, including Harold Lloyd's Safety Last (1923), Buster Keaton's The General (1926), Charlie Chaplin's City Lights (1931), and lastly The Artist (2011). We also surprisingly have a lot to say about Orson Welles via our mediocre impressions.

    Drew and Mike Show
    Drew And Mike – June 22, 2022

    Drew and Mike Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 175:29


    Bigfoot spotted in Macomb County, the 'whatabout guy' always has an answer, Jussie Smollett doubles down, Bill Cosby wins by losing, BranDon doxxed, Drew v. CVS reaches a conclusion, celebrity outtakes, and we issue a BOLO for Todd Rundgren.It's officially summer.BranDon is selling his house and has been doxxed on the fan page.Amber Heard is shopping a tell-all book to raise money to give to Johnny Depp. She'll probably get sued again for defamation.The Obama's strike another podcast deal. This time with Amazon's Audible for $20 million.David Dobrik is being sued by a buddy for a stunt gone wrong. He's going to have to sell a lot of tequila.Bigfoot has been spotted in Shelby Twp. We check in with the UP Bigfoot Research Organization for full comment.Todd Rundgren is missing... and doesn't own a phone.Waiting of Todd leads to a Badfinger deep dive.The Rules of Attraction divides the studio.Details of Dan Snyder's '09 sexual assault allegation and NDA emerge.Who is worse: Jon Gruden or Deshaun Watson? Randal33243720 is Deshaun Watson's greatest champion.Trudi Jasinas into the show... defeated and victimized.Brittney Griner's wife is sick and tired of the US government.Fake news vs. Joe Biden.Jussie Smollett declares himself "not a piece of s#!t". He also claims he didn't lie even after being found guilty of lying.Bill Cosby is thrilled that he only owes $500,000 to Judy Huth. Cosby loses, yet wins. He still has 10 honorary doctorates.Drew v. CVS: Part IV. Drew has been BANNED from CVS.Love is dead as Rupert Murdoch and Jerry Hall are divorcing. Jerry Hall is a hall of fame wallet-sniffer.JLo is going to be angry after learning that Gloria Estefan almost joined her and Shakira at the Super Bowl Halftime Show.Yet another FAKE GoFundMe story.Bob Dylan wished Brian Wilson a happy birthday and NOT Paul McCartney.Jeff Bridges is... The Old Man.The Greatest Hits of celebrity outtakes: Orson Welles. Jack Palance. Floyd Mayweather. Paris Jackson.Enjoy an encore of Drew & Mike investigating a turd in a pool.Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

    Jughead's Basement
    Episode 127: Episode 127: Victor DeLorenzo of Violent Femmes, Nineteen Thirteen, & Night Crickets on LoFi Interviews with HiFi Guests

    Jughead's Basement

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 83:53


    Episode 127: Victor DeLorenzo of Violent Femmes, Nineteen Thirteen, and Night Crickets talks to us about Orson Welles, Reinvigorated sparks of creativity in aging musicians, Theater and how it affected The Violent Femmes, Busking and Intimacy, Opening for The Ramones, The Night Crickets with David J and Darwin Meiners, Dinner with Willem Dafoe, Nineteen Thirteen and loop pedals, plus much much De much Lorenzo more!​Nineteen Thirteen (Victors current band)

    Creaky Chair Film Podcast
    #55 - "You told me not to think" - Top Gun: Maverick

    Creaky Chair Film Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 63:10


    We are back after a brief hiatus! Join us this week as we discuss the eagerly-awaited summer blockbuster 'Top Gun: Maverick' with Tom Cruise reprising his iconic role as Captain Pete 'Maverick' Mitchell. As well as discussing recent movie news, we also chat about Orson Welles' 1942 masterpiece 'The Magnificent Ambersons', the life-affirming 2014 film about gays and lesbians supporting the striking miners 'Pride', the very much not life-affirming 2019 real-life drama 'Dark Waters' from director Todd Haynes, and Rob Savage's new found-footage movie 'Dashcam'.

    Crossroads of Rockland History
    Prof. David Bisaha on Millia Davenport - Crossroads of Rockland History

    Crossroads of Rockland History

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 30:18


    Episode originally aired on Monday, June 20, 2022, at 9:30am, on WRCR 1700AMWe turned our attention to the life and legacy of Millia Davenport. David Bisaha, Assistant Professor of Theater at SUNY Binghamton joined host Clare Sheridan to discuss this remarkable and trailblazing woman who lived most of her life in Rockland County. Among her many contributions include writing the definitive book of theatrical costume history, The Book of Costume. Published in 1948, it remains the gold standard. (Royalties from the book were donated to the New City Library.)Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on March 31, 1895, to Charles B. and Gertrude Crotty Davenport, Millia Davenport lived in New City for more than 70 years. Her father and mother were biology teachers at Harvard and Radcliffe, respectively. They were genetic researchers and helped establish the Station for Experimental Evolution of the Carnegie Institute of Washington in Cold Spring Harbor, NY.After attending Barnard and Parsons, Millia Davenport created artwork for and edited The Quill, a literary magazine. Later, she became one of the first female scenic design painters in America. She worked as a costume designer for a number of Broadway theater companies, including Maxwell Anderson's Playwrights Company and Orson Welles's Mercury Theater.In 1981, she received an honorary doctorate in fine arts from the Parsons School of Design in Manhattan the same year that she received the highest honor given by the United States Institute for Theatre Technology for a lifetime of distinguished contribution to the performing arts. In 1991 the Costume Society of America established the Millia Davenport Publication Award recognizing excellence in costume scholarship.Davenport died in 1992.David Bisaha is a scholar and practitioner who studies performance design, theatrical space and architecture, and the history of theatrical creativity. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Theater at SUNY Binghamton. He specializes in the history of scenic design in the United States, mostly in the first half of the twentieth century, and in the more recent history of immersive and participatory performance. His other research interests include theatre historiography, cognitive sciences and performance, directing theory, and memory studies.Bisaha's current book project, American Scenic Design and Freelance Professionalism, is a cultural labor history of scenic designers and designing in the United States. At Binghamton, Bisaha teaches theater and performance history, dramaturgy, and theater theory in the MA and BA programs. He is the Curator of the Theatre Collection of the Department of Theatre, and is affiliate faculty and a steering committee member of the Material and Visual Worlds Transdisciplinary Area of Excellence (TAE).  The Millia Davenport papers are housed there.***Crossroads of Rockland History, a program of the Historical Society of Rockland County, airs on the third Monday of each month at 9:30 am, right after the morning show, on WRCR Radio 1700 AM and www.WRCR.com. Join host Clare Sheridan as we explore, celebrate, and learn about our local history, with different topics and guest speakers every month. We are pleased to announce that we have begun loading our archived podcasts to all major Podcast platforms.The Historical Society of Rockland County is a nonprofit educational institution and principal repository for original documents and artifacts relating to Rockland County. Its headquarters are a four-acre site featuring a history museum and the 1832 Jacob Blauvelt House in New City, New York.www.RocklandHistory.org

    Hitchcock Happy Hour
    Citizen Kane (1941)

    Hitchcock Happy Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 61:01


    It's martini time folks! We're talking about the movie many filmmakers call the greatest movie ever made...Citizen Kane. Praised for it's technical achievements and allegory to the life of William Randolph Hearst, Orson Welles made his Hollywood debut by directing, producing, and co-writing one of the most famous films ever made. This movie inspired many directors to come and also has a scene with pterodactyls (you read that right). Produced by Orson Welles, Directed by Orson Welles, written by Orson Welles (and Herman Mankiewicz), and starring, you guessed it, Orson Welles. Cheers!

    That Thing with James J. Asher II
    S1E136 - Orson Welles Talking Sh*t

    That Thing with James J. Asher II

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 38:10


    Orson Welles. Legendary filmmaker. Big personality. Sassy man. Support an artist and get lots of bonus episodes: https://www.patreon.com/ThatThingWithJames TikTok-Twitter-IG: @jamesjasher Reddit: r/ThatThingWithJames  Help me harvest content for the show. Articles, videos, memes, topics, questions. Send your submissions to: ThatThingWithJames@gmail.com

    The Power Trip
    HR. 3 - Greasy Joker - The Power Trip

    The Power Trip

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 38:36


    Mark Rosen takes a stand against women wearing a dress, Cory has Headlines which features news about how people are keeping their dogs company after returning to the office, and Hawk has old audio from Orson Welles!

    Hashtag History
    EP 101: The 1938 War of the Worlds Radio Broadcast

    Hashtag History

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 46:15


    Welcome back for Season Eleven! This week on Hashtag History, we are discussing War of the Worlds. And not necessarily the novel, The War of the Worlds, written by H.G. Wells, which is about aliens from Mars invading the Earth. No, more specifically, we are discussing an incident that occurred the day before Halloween in 1938 when actor Orson Welles (no relation to author H.G. Wells) read aloud an adaptation of The War of the Worlds on live radio. Innocent enough, right? HOWEVER, Welles delivered this adaptation of the story in a “breaking-news”, news-reporting alert type method. So when he told of Martians landing on Earth, Americans took him seriously. When this radio program - in the style of a news broadcast - played audio from people who appeared to be live witnesses to aliens landing on the Earth and using a heat ray to burn up American citizens, listeners went nuts. Americans became so alarmed that the results of this broadcast led to traffic jams, an outrageous amount of calls to local law enforcement, and a significant fleeing from the site of the alleged invasion, New Jersey. Following the incident, when it was realized that this had all just been a fictional tale (that all of these witnesses had actually been paid actors), there was complete outrage directed at the radio program for what many perceived to be a deceptive delivery of the tale of the War of the Worlds. It is worth noting though that more modern historians believe that this was not quite as large-scale as was originally reported. Many believe now that the mass hysteria resulting from this incident was actually grossly exaggerated by the media. But regardless, this whole thing - however big or small - was a hot mess. Follow Hashtag History on Instagram @hashtaghistory_podcast for all of the pictures mentioned in this episode. Citations for all sources can be located on our website at www.HashtagHistory-Pod.com. You can also check out our website for super cute merch! You can now sponsor a cocktail and get a shout-out on air! Just head to www.buymeacoffee.com/hashtaghistory or head to the Support tab on our website! You can locate us on www.Patreon.com/hashtaghistory where you can donate $1 a month to our Books and Booze Supply. All of your support goes a long ways and we are endlessly grateful! To show our gratitude, all Patreon Supporters receive an automatic 15% OFF all merchandise in our merchandise store, bonus Hashtag Hangouts episodes, a shoutout on social media, and stickers! Check out Macy's delicious wine here → https://glnk.io/rpln/hashtaghistory-podcast #macyswineshop THANKS FOR LISTENING!

    Classic Radio Theater
    Suspense Ep. #62

    Classic Radio Theater

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 57:52


    Enjoy two free mystery episodes of Suspense w/ Ronald Reagan A) 3/8/54 Circumstantial Terror B) 4/5/55 Zero Hour Conceived as a potential radio vehicle for Alfred Hitchcock to direct, Suspense was a radio series of epic proportion. Hitchcock directed an audition show but was unable to avail himself for its radio run on CBS (1942-1962). Considered by many to be the best mystery/drama series of the golden age, Suspense was known as “Radio's Outstanding Theater of Thrills” and focused on suspenseful stories starring the biggest names in Hollywood. Early in the run, the episodes were hosted by “The Man in Black” who, from an omniscient perch, narrated stories of people thrown into dangerous or bizarre situations with plots that, at the very end, usually had an unseen twist or two. Suspense had the ability to “stir your nerves and withhold solutions until the last possible moment.” Hollywood's finest actors jumped at the chance to appear on Suspense, including Cary Grant, James Stewart, Alan Ladd, Henry Fonda, Ronald Colman, Judy Garland, Humphrey Bogart, Frank Sinatra, Glenn Ford, Robert Montgomery, Bette Davis and Orson Welles. Agnes Moorehead was dubbed “The First Lady of Suspense” for having starred in more episodes than any other actor. Music for Suspense was by Bernard Herrmann (Lucille Fletcher's husband from 1938-1948) and scripts were by John Dickson Carr, E. Jack Neuman, Robert Tallman, Mel Dinelli, Lucille Fletcher, James Poe, Ray Bradbury and many others. Running more than 20 years, Suspense aired nearly 1,000 radio broadcasts. It made the transition to television in 1949, but it was much better suited for radio, where thetheatre of the mind could run free.

    Classic Radio Theater
    The Black Museum Ep. #61

    Classic Radio Theater

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 61:24


    Enjoy two free true-crime episodes of The Black Museum w/ Orson Welles A) 5/10/53 The Brass Button B) 3/18/52 The Pink Powder Puff Produced in the UK and starring Orson Welles, The Black Museum specialized in recreating colorful true murder cases taken from the annals of Scotland Yard. At the real Black Museum, located at the Metropolitan Police headquarters in London, artifacts from famous criminal trials are displayed. These curious and sometimes gory relics – a yellowed tooth, a battered trunk, a blood-stained knife – gave Welles the opportunity to dramatize the murder cases in which they played vital roles. The series, which emphasized crime-solving techniques, offered American listeners the chance to observe how British “Coppers” tracked down culprits. Released through MGM Radio Attractions and broadcast over Mutual, the series eventually gained a sponsor, General Mills. NBC was initially approached by the producer, Harry Alan Towers, but decided to create its own in-house version, Whitehall 1212 – the phone number of Scotland Yard. Wyllis Cooper, the writer and director of the NBC series, beat Mutual to the punch and Whitehall 1212 went on air two months before The Black Museum. For a period of six months, radio listeners could hear two semi-documentary murder stories from the case files of Scotland Yard, on two separate networks. Gripping and well-paced, The Black Museum outranked its competitor, with its horror value upped by Welles' portentous narration, which bridged the plot sequences. Recording the program in the UK, with British actors playing all the roles also gave authenticity to the dramatizations of crimes that took place abroad. Producer Harry Alan Towers maintained a high level of consistency and quality throughout the series, and the venture was profitable enough for him to convince Welles to star in another radio vehicle, The Lives of Harry Lime.

    Woman in Revolt
    E3 Deep Dive: Maila Nurmi AKA Vampira

    Woman in Revolt

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 111:07


    TW: This episode involves some discussion of sexual assault and disordered eating (not heavily, but they are mentioned). Maila Nurmi AKA Vampira was best known for hosting The Vampira Show on KABC-TV, a Los Angeles affiliate of ABC, from 1954-1955. While the show was short-lived, it received international attention and pioneered the concept of themed movie hosts. In other words, it was a big fucking deal but because it was a live broadcast and none of the episodes were properly archived, it's a bit lost to the annals of film history. In 2021, Nurmi's niece, Sandra Niemi, published a biography of her aunt called "Glamour Ghoul: The Passions and Pain of the Real Vampira, Maila Nurmi." We can't recommend this book highly enough. It really got us both interested in learning more about Nurmi so that we could put together this episode and hopefully spread her legacy to other people who might not know much about her (or even worse, have her confused with Elvira). Here are a few other books/articles we recommend reading: “Vampira: Dark Goddess of Horror” (2014) by W. Scott Poole "The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror" (1993) by David J. Skal Interview with Maila Nurmi on Please Kill Me: Part 1 and Part 2 And here are some movies where you can either see Vampira in action or learn more about her: "Plan 9 from Outer Space" (1959), streaming free for Amazon Prime members "Ed Wood" (1994), streaming on Disney+. Nurmi isn't in this, but Lisa Marie plays her. I recommend watching it after "Plan 9 from Outer Space" because this movie is a biopic (sort of) on that movie's writer/director, Ed Wood. It does unfortunately feature Johnny Depp, so ... proceed at your peril. "Vampira and Me" (2012), streaming free (with commercials) on Tubi. If you search YouTube, you can find some small clips from "The Vampira Show." I am so fucking angry that these weren't archived, but what are you gonna do? If anyone knows of any good sources we haven't considered, please let us know! Because I am a long-winded bitch, here are some interesting tidbits that did not make it into the episode but that I think people should know: One episode of "The Vampira Show" featured a disguised James Dean as a naughty schoolboy who had his knuckles rapped by Vampira. In 1987, at sixty-four years old, Nurmi cut two singles with Satan's Cheerleaders, a band fronted by her friend Jane Satan. After the punks came the goths and then the fanatics of "Plan 9 From Outer Space." Nurmi was proud of her creation and made paintings of her alter ego, which she sold online later on in life. In the 2008 LA Times article which was published within a week of her death, she was quoted as saying, “I don't have any babies or any social history that's remarkable, so I'm leaving something behind, you know, when the time comes to say goodbye, I'm leaving something.” Here's a local news interview with David Putter, Nurmi and Orson Welles' son. Here's the clip of Nurmi in "The Beat Generation" (1959) with a rat on her shoulder.

    They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!
    TMBDOS! Episode 256: ”Velvet Goldmine” (1998).

    They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 82:37


    Lee and Leah return this week to cover a listener request. This time out it is a film featuring thinly-veiled fictionalized versions of David Bowie and Iggy Pop (and some Lou Reed) in the height of the Glam Rock era of the 1970s - told in the same fashion as a certain specific Orson Welles film - the Todd Haynes written-and-directed-"Velvet Goldmine" (1998). The conversation focuses around the look of the film and the performances; if the way the story is told is effective; the LGBTQ representation; Ewan McGregor's cock and balls; and collecting albums back in the day, to just name a few topics. Lee also introduces Leah to a fun new movie-related game that will pop up on the show again in the future, and they play a few rounds of it. So put on your shiny jumpsuit, throw on some glitter, and come rock with us for a while, why don't you? "Velvet Goldmine" IMDB  Stattogories.com's "Which Movie Has a Higher Rating on IMDB" game  Featured Music: "Coz I Luv You" by Slade 7 "Baby's on Fire" by The Venus in Furs.

    Uncle Erich Presents™ - Classic Radio Shows, Crime, Suspense, Murder Mysteries
    Uncle Erich Presents™ - The Shadow - "The Hospital Murders."(1938)

    Uncle Erich Presents™ - Classic Radio Shows, Crime, Suspense, Murder Mysteries

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 28:50


    Welcome back folks to yet another exciting episode from the Uncle Erich Presents™  Classic Radio Series !I sure do hope you're enjoying these great classic crime murder mysteries, and I thank you for stopping by again.This episode is from the classic The Shadow Series and is titled  "The Hospital Murders."  This episode originally aired in 1938 starring Orson Welles as The Shadow.When remastering this episode, I left in the original commercials from the original episode to preserve the authenticity of this broadcast, thereby giving you a more authentic listening experience, the way is was back in 1938.This exciting episode is brought to you by our good friends at BoomerFlix.com.At BoomerFlix.com,  you can watch thousands of the old classic television shows and the classic horror movies you grew up with!.If you're a classic television show, or classic movie fan, then BoomerFlix.com is just for you.  Give BoomerFlix.com a visit.Also, please visit UncleErich.com to listen to all the currently available radio podcast categories and episodes. There are also hundreds of classic crime and detective television shows you can watch as well. They're really a hoot to watch !If you liked this episode, please consider buying Uncle Erich  a cup of coffee at the support link below.  Thanks a million !Now, Enjoy this great episode of The Shadow titled  "The Hospital Murders."Fairy Tales with Granny MacDuff Podcast Join Granny MacDuff as she reads classic children's fairy tales in this award...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifyRESOURCES ON COPYRIGHTS I want to say Thank You to Patreon supporters for helping to keep Uncle Erich Presents™ online. Your support is truly appreciated !If you liked this episode, please consider buying Uncle Erich a cup of coffee at the support link below. Thanks a million ! https://buymeacoffee.com/ClassicRadio Support the show

    Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)
    Episode 290 - George Coulouris

    Stars on Suspense (Old Time Radio)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 94:51


    George Coulouris arrived on the Broadway stage from London and soon struck up a friendship with a young Orson Welles. It led to a long professional relationship as Coulouris appeared in Welles' plays, his radio dramas, and his classic film Citizen Kane. Outside of his work with Welles, Coulouris found success on stage and both the big and small screens in the States and in England. We'll hear him as a professor caught in a murder plot in "The Last Detail" (originally aired on CBS on July 5, 1945). Then, he's a con man with his eye on an inheritance in "The Long Shot" (originally aired on CBS on January 31, 1946). We'll also hear him as debonair detective Bulldog Drummond in the 1941 audition recording that brought the character to radio.

    The Smokin' Hot Toddcast
    S8 E24: 7th Anniversary Special

    The Smokin' Hot Toddcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 76:11


    TIME TO WRAP UP SEASON 8 AND CELEBRATE 7 YEARS! Join us this week for our SEASON FINALE as we look back at some of our favorite moments from season 8 AND as we celebrate 7 years of this crazy monstrosity we call The Smokin' Hot Toddcast! And, as it always seems to be on our season finales, ANYTHING can happen! So sit down and enjoy The Smokin' Hot Toddcast 7th Anniversary Special! Ollie, D.A. Williams and Orson Welles intro sketch based on a sketch from Mystery Science Theater 3000

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 050 - Suspense - The Dark Tower - Orson Welles 05-04-44

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 29:54


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    il posto delle parole
    Paolo Mereghetti "Il posto delle fragole" Ingmar Bergman

    il posto delle parole

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 17:43


    Paolo Mereghetti"Il posto delle fragole"Ingmar BergmanIperborea Edizionihttps://iperborea.com/"Il posto delle fragole" il testo di Ingmar Bergman, diventato film, è stato chiuso il 31 maggio 1957, a Stoccolma.Sono 65 anni di un testo straordinario che fa scendere nella profondità dell'animo umano.Esiste forse per tutti un posto delle fragole, un luogo dove rimane intatto l'incanto dell'infanzia, l'io che eravamo, con la semplicità, l'autenticità e le speranze di quando la vita era davanti, un luogo, che forse c'è ancora dentro o fuori di noi, dove qualcuno può metterci davanti uno specchio e farci vedere quello che siamo diventati, quello che abbiamo perduto, quello che forse possiamo ancora ritrovare. Sono le fragole selvatiche colte nel giardino della casa d'infanzia la madeleine di Isak Borg, vecchio professore egoista e misantropo, in viaggio da Stoccolma a Lund per la celebrazione del suo giubileo all'Università, coronamento della carriera di medico e ricercatore. Da lì i ricordi prendono a intrecciarsi alla realtà, trasformando il viaggio verso Lund in una sorta di pellegrinaggio, in cui gli episodi, i sogni, gli incontri sono come tappe di un percorso catartico all'interno di se stesso. Il vedersi attraverso gli occhi degli altri, l'incidente con la coppia in eterno reciproco tormento, la visita alla madre gli lasciano intravedere i suoi fallimenti, il vuoto della sua solitudine e quella verità che sembrano volergli comunicare i suoi incubi: «Sono morto. Anche se sono vivo.» Mentre la presenza della nuora Marianne, la freschezza dei tre ragazzi cui offre un passaggio, Victor e Anders con i loro litigi su Dio, e Sara, così lieve e piena di voglia di vivere, così simile all'amata cugina Sara che ricompare nei suoi sogni, gli aprono la via verso una riconciliazione. La vecchiaia, l'infanzia, la giovinezza, l'esistenza di Dio, le occasioni perdute, la nostalgia, l'amore sono i temi intorno a cui si gioca ancora una volta la partita a scacchi tra la morte e la vita per il possesso di un'anima.Ingmar Bergman (1918-2007), è uno dei maestri indiscussi della cinematografia internazionale. Figlio di un pastore protestante della corte reale, debutta come drammaturgo negli anni Quaranta, dando espressione al clima angoscioso del periodo con una serie di drammi che si riallacciano alla tradizione di Strindberg, H. Bergman e Lagerkvist. Ma l'affermazione giunge a partire dagli anni Cinquanta, con l'attività di regista di cinema e di teatro, due ambiti che si intrecciano continuamente nella sua opera.Paolo Mereghetti (Milano 1949), giornalista e critico cinematografico per il Corriere della Sera e il magazine Io Donna, ha scritto su Ombre rosse, Positif, Linea d'ombra, Reset, Lo straniero e tiene una rubrica su Ciak. Ha pubblicato per i Cahiers du Cinéma e Le Monde un volume su Orson Welles, poi editato in Italia, Spagna e Gran Bretagna. Nel 2012 ha curato per Contrasto il volume Movie:Box, tradotto in sei lingue. E' stato consulente per la Mostra del cinema di Venezia durante le direzioni di Lizzani, Rondi e Barbera. Ha pubblicato, tra gli altri, saggi e volumi su Arthur Penn, Marco Ferreri, Bertrand Tavernier, Sam Peckinpah, Yervant Gianikian e Angela Ricci Lucchi, Serge Daney e Jacques Rivette. Nel 2001 ha vinto il Premio Flaiano per la critica cinematografica.IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEascoltare fa pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

    Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!
    Episode 3: Movie Night (03) 1947 Lady From Shanghai, Son of Zorro Chapter 1, Newsreel Princess Elizabeth Weds

    Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 164:39


    Here is our Movie Night on YouTube https://youtu.be/Kv_0HaFgUFU We've got a Movie - Lady From Shanghai with Orson Welles, three trailers, Serial Cliffhanger Son of Zorro Chapter 1,  a Newsreel about the wedding of Princess Elizabeth, and a Cartoon all from 1947! Here is the whole Serial Cliffhanger Son of Zorro Chapter all chapters https://youtu.be/RH444i3GWsE

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
    Afrs 048 - Suspense - The Marvelous Barastro - Orson Welles 04-13-44

    Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

    Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 29:59


    The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless AFN programmes were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programmes available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Entertainment Radio Stations Live 24/7 Sherlock Holmes/CBS Radio Mystery Theater https://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441 https://live365.com/station/CBS-Radio-Mystery-Theater-a57491 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    WDR ZeitZeichen
    Romy Schneider, Schauspielerin (Todestag, 29.05.1982)

    WDR ZeitZeichen

    Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 14:55


    "Auf der Leinwand kann ich alles, im wirklichen Leben nichts", hat Romy Schneider einmal über sich selbst gesagt. Als Sissi verzaubert sie in den 1950er Jahren ihr Publikum. Dann bricht sie mit dieser zuckersüßen Welt und beginnt in Frankreich ihre zweite, eigentliche Karriere. Autorin: Andrea Klasen Von Andrea Klasen.

    Shuttle Pod - The TrekMovie.com Star Trek Podcast
    All Access: Review Of ‘Strange New Worlds' 104 “Memento Mori”

    Shuttle Pod - The TrekMovie.com Star Trek Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 56:55


    [Strange New Worlds news and review starts at 10:24] Tony and Laurie start with the latest updates from Terry Matalas on season three of Star Trek: Picard, along with the news of a comic book that will bridge seasons two and three. They discuss Denise Crosby’s TrekMovie interview about the 25th anniversary of Trekkies and her thoughts on leaving TNG. Plus a quick reminder The Orville's third season premieres on Hulu June 3 and Tony’s cast and crew interviews will arrive on TrekMovie over the upcoming week. Then, they quickly discuss comments from Rebecca Romijn and Strange New Worlds writers about how Number One’s big secret will play out through season two, before they take a deep dive for their review of the newest episode, “Memento Mori.” They wrap up with a look at how Bloomington, Indiana celebrated Katrhyn Janeway’s birthday (with help from some Voyager cast) and look back at Orson Welles’ narration of Star Trek: The Motion Picture teaser trailers.

    All Access Star Trek - A TrekMovie.com Podcast
    All Access: Review Of ‘Strange New Worlds' 104 “Memento Mori”

    All Access Star Trek - A TrekMovie.com Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 56:55


    [Strange New Worlds news and review starts at 10:24] Tony and Laurie start with the latest updates from Terry Matalas on season three of Star Trek: Picard, along with the news of a comic book that will bridge seasons two and three. They discuss Denise Crosby’s TrekMovie interview about the 25th anniversary of Trekkies and her thoughts on leaving TNG. Plus a quick reminder The Orville's third season premieres on Hulu June 3 and Tony’s cast and crew interviews will arrive on TrekMovie over the upcoming week. Then, they quickly discuss comments from Rebecca Romijn and Strange New Worlds writers about how Number One’s big secret will play out through season two, before they take a deep dive for their review of the newest episode, “Memento Mori.” They wrap up with a look at how Bloomington, Indiana celebrated Katrhyn Janeway’s birthday (with help from some Voyager cast) and look back at Orson Welles’ narration of Star Trek: The Motion Picture teaser trailers.

    The Official Bettie Page Podcast
    Mark Talks Bettie on Inspired Minds Podcast

    The Official Bettie Page Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 34:59


    Mark Mori, co-host of the Official Bettie Page Podcast, recently switched seats and became a guest on the Inspired Minds podcast to discuss his creative process and fascinating body of work, including Bettie Page Reveals All!  Episode description courtesy of Inspired Minds: Twice Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award-winning director/producer Mark Mori explores the documentary side of Hollywood. His harrowing, world-renowned films, "Building Bombs," "Kent State, The Day the War Came Home," "Blood Ties: The Life and Work of Sally Mann," "The Atlanta Child Murders" and "Bettie Page Reveals All" have been both controversial and widely acclaimed. Earlier this year, his master catalog was released to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and Music Box Films Home Entertainment libraries. Mori has also made documentaries for National Geographic, MTV, Discovery, Animal Planet, HBO, BBC, Fox TV and Turner Classic Movies. Future projects include: the COVID-19 social impact documentary "Blue Collar America" and "The Lost Print: The Making of Orson Welles' The Magnificent Ambersons." Listen here on Podbean: https://bit.ly/3MTnIu6   Also available on most podcast apps including Apple, Google, Spotify, Audible and more! Find us on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BettiePageRevealsAll https://www.facebook.com/groups/BettiePageMovie https://www.facebook.com/BettiePageFitness    Instagram: @bettiepagerevealsall @bettie_page_fitness   Twitter: @BettiePageMovie

    El Contador de Películas
    Una voz, un destino: la historia de Maurice LaMarche

    El Contador de Películas

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 9:21


    El asesinato de su padre y la repentina muerte de su hermana, llevaron a Maurice LaMarche a abandonar la comedia y los escenarios. Sin embargo, la tragedia daría paso a una brillante carrera como actor de voz. Su trabajo es reconocible en series animadas como “El Inspector Gadget”, “Pinky y Cerebro” o “Rick and Morty”, y en producciones como “Ed Wood” o “Love, death and robots”. Entre otras cosas, LaMarche hizo fama en series y películas por su memorable imitación de Orson Welles.

    Cellini and Dimino
    Beyond the Goatee (5-26-22)

    Cellini and Dimino

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 18:02


    Jack Nicklaus to Jeff Bagwell.  Justin Timberlake to Paul Newman.  Chris and Nick are getting ready to watch the new TOP GUN movie, so Dimino has a lot to cover.  Enjoy! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Encore!
    Cannes 2022: Festival hosts gala ceremony to mark its 75th anniversary

    Encore!

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 6:14


    At the Cannes Film Festival on Tuesday, prizewinners, jury presidents and the great and the good of world cinema gathered on the red carpet to celebrate the 75th edition of the event. Olivia Salazar-Winspear tells us more about that gala ceremony and we take a look back at the history of the festival. We also learn more about the "Cannes Classics" sidebar section, which is showing a lovingly-restored version of Orson Welles' 1962 film "The Trial", as well as a number of remastered screenings of some of the 20th century's cinematic masterpieces.

    From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy Podcast
    A Conversation with Millicent Souris

    From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 62:20


    You're listening to From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy, a food and culture podcast. I'm Alicia Kennedy, a food writer based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Every week on Wednesdays, I'll be talking to different people in food and culture, about their lives, careers, and how it all fits together and where food comes in.This week, I'm talking to Millicent Souris, someone I have long wanted to make my friend. Millicent is to me just wildly cool. She talks about food equity and drinking bourbon, and there was no one I would rather talk to you about the dichotomy of being politically engaged with food justice, and also stocking your pantry with very nice olive oil. She's also one of my favorite food writers period; her pieces in Brooklyn Based, Bon Appetit, Diner Journal—they kind of redefined the genre. As a longtime line cook who now runs a soup kitchen and food pantry in New York City, she's someone who simply knows food—its highs and lows and is cool as hell. Did I say that already? Alicia Kennedy: Hi, Millicent. How are you, Millicent?Millicent Souris: I'm doing all right. How are you, Alicia?Alicia: Did I say your name right? Millicent: Yep! Alicia: Actually, we should have done that before. [Laughs.]Millicent: I know. Yeah, my name is Millicent. And is Alicia correct for you?Alicia: Yes. Alicia is correct. Millicent: Great.Alicia: Yeah, I'm Alicia sometimes, but only if you're a Spaniard. [Laughs.]Millicent: Fair, I'm not going to pretend…Alicia: Yeah, yeah…well, can you tell me about where you grew up and what you ate?Millicent: Yeah, I grew up in Baltimore County, north of Baltimore City, and in Towson, Maryland, and Lutherville, Maryland—which is of course home to John Waters and Divine, and also in North Baltimore County. So my dad's parents had immigrated from Greece, so I grew up eating Greek food. And then my mom's family had a dairy farm, so I grew up drinking—when I was up there—unpasteurized milk, which I would say about 10 years ago, I made the connection was raw milk. And country food, you know—my grandfather would grow his own corn and tomatoes and zucchini, and that would be summertime. We ate a lot of crabs in the summer, because it's Maryland, and then also, like, oysters were definitely a part of my mom's family. Like we'd have oysters stuffing and raw oysters at Thanksgiving, because her dad would bring them and shuck them. But then also because it's the ’70s and ’80s, straight-up shitty American processed food, was a gift, you know, for our household because my mom worked and my dad worked, and there's three of us. And, you know, even on the farm, my uncle and his wife, they would buy Steak-umms, even though they had ground beef from the steers that they sent to slaughter. You know, we would drink Tang, and we ate Stouffer’s lasagna, so it was a real hodgepodge, I think, of all that stuff. And then there was, when my mom left my dad and there was the episode called “divorce food,” which was Lean Cuisines and Hamburger Helper and La Choy and a lot of Mandarin oranges in tins. Alicia: Wow. Yeah. Was that on behalf of your mom’s side?Millicent: That was on my mom's side. And then my dad would just take us to his friends’ restaurants or bars and we’d eat there. Alicia: [Laughs.] My parents, when they got divorced, I always say, when I knew something was going wrong was when my mom started to make instant mashed potatoes. Millicent: Yeah…Alicia: I was already like, 20. So it wasn't like I was a kid. But you know it was always seared in my mind that the instant mashed potatoes were the beginning of the end.Millicent: It's the tell…it’s the tell… except I, when I did eat instant mashed potatoes and I think I was 21 I first had them, I was like, What is this magical stuff that just turns into mashed potatoes? Alicia: No, it's super cool. Millicent: It's…I mean, science. It's science. Alicia: Yeah, well, you know, as you were just talking about the dairy and also your family had a bar as well, you know, how did you end up in food, personally? Millicent: I ended up in food…uh, I mean, my Yaya would cook—Souris’s started as a restaurant in 1934. And so it was a classic Greek restaurant, which is American food and then Greek specials. And then when my dad made it a bar, there was a grill, but there was a flattop behind the bar, and so my Yaya would make totally frozen hamburgers, but she'd also have really good Avgolemono soup. But I didn't—I was just a kid and I didn't really take in all of that. So I don't have that—it would be really cool if I could lie and be like, and then yeah, romantic version of food. I got a job at the Royal Farm Stores, it was my first job on the books, when I was 14. And that was the convenience store that had fried chicken and Joe Joe's, and then you take the leftover fried chicken and break it up and make chicken salad. So that was my first job in food and everyone who worked there hated it. And, it was cleaning cases of frozen chicken thighs and cutting potatoes and deep frying a lot of stuff. And then our neighbors owned a luncheonette in a pharmacy and I remember working there and being blown away by making salad dressing from scratch. So, what I knew is that I would always have a job in food because I was willing to do that hard work and for girls like, and teenage girls, I would never be hired to be the counter person or a waitress, because I wasn't cute; I was tall and big and strong and fat, you know. And this is not now—this was the late ’80s. And like, no one was…no one would hire me to be their waitress, but I could always work in the kitchen. And so I—it's not anything I verbalized; it's just something that I knew, that I could always get kitchen jobs. I know that's not really passionate, but you know, you got to make money…Alicia: Right, well did passion emerge for it? Millicent: Yeah, I mean, I think for me I found a land that made sense to me. You know, I remember living one summer, and working um, finding a job at—I lived in Portland, Maine. And I was in this place Greedy McDuff’s, which was a brew pub, and it's still there, and English-style pub food and just working; you're just working with a bunch of heshers, you know, and a bunch of—you're hanging out listening to music, you're working hard, you're kind of gross, your skin's not great, you didn't get a lot of sleep, because you had to work the prep shift…But, you know, I remember working with a guy where when Black Sabbath would come on, we’d take the melted butter and dip a brush in it and turn off the lights and hit the grill and the flames would come up. And it just, I don't know, it was that moment: It's just fun—somewhere that felt free when there's not a lot of places to be free, you know? And so I knew that. And then, when I moved to New York, 17 years ago, I helped someone open a restaurant. And I've just always been like, I'm a good worker—everything made sense for me. So I do, when I talk about food, a lot of it, I talk about work, but there has to be a sustained level of the community of people that you're working with and that you're buying from, and that you're feeding. And also the food itself, that is passionate. It's just, that's not just, I'm not one of those people who like has that language, you know, who’s just—I'm not very over-the-top with language about myself and what I like, but don't worry, there's plenty people who have that covered, you know…Alicia: I'm one of them…so… [Laughter.] Millicent: I don't think so.Alicia: Well, you know, yeah, you've worked in restaurant kitchens for years, you write, you've curated social justice film series, you've been a DJ, now you're cooking. You know, well, how would you describe what you do now?Millicent: Right now, I mean, I work at a food pantry in a soup kitchen. And before the pandemic, I'd been there for over five years and I came on as a consultant to do a culinary job training program. We didn't—it didn't work, and it didn't get more funding, but I was I was the only person there who had worked in restaurants. So I kind of had an eye for the food. And I was like, I can work here part time, and we can get more produce and rescue food and things like that, get more produce to people, take care of the food better, increase our capacity for produce.And then I did that, and then the pandemic hit, and then it was that times a million with just the whole world shut down, so where's all the food gonna go? And all the pantries shut down, so we just got dropped all this food. So then I became—then it just became something different. So now, I mean, I don't even cook there. I just, I'm the facilitator of the pallets, you know, and trying to—There's a good grant that came out of the pandemic called the Nourish New York grant. And I think that's permanent now. And it was to really just keep the state going. And you have to spend it on New York State products. And this grant, the director and the head of the pantry, they were just like, What are we going to spend this money on? I was like, I got this, I got this, give it to me please—let me, let me have, let me buy things and not have it all just be like, donated Tyson evil meat. So those grants I take care of and I like to think it balances out all of the super-gross food bank tax writeoffs for giant companies and really just, because I've consulted on restaurant kitchens, I have a good eye for logistics in space. And so we just had to switch our entire building over to be a warehouse and I was like, the chapel can hold pallets and the waiting area can hold pallets. And if we open this up, we can fit pallets through here—so just really nerdy s**t, you know, and also where all the food goes. So that's what I'm working on. That's what I'm working on now. And now hopefully something new will happen. Alicia: Well, that grant is really interesting. Living here in Puerto Rico coming from New York, I'm always thinking about how—well, I never know if it's enough, or if it's actually good, what New York State has done to support local agriculture around the state and craft stuff. I know, I'm like, well, they support it in some way, so that's good. Whereas here, you have, there's nothing there, you know? So this grant sounds really great.But what more should the state be doing, in your mind, to kind of help that?Millicent: Well, this grant is great. Also, because I still remember the moment of, you know, you're talking about farmers or processors, or bakers, and truckers, and people were like, Thank you, you know, because there was nothing, and for all the people making food and growing food, all the restaurants were closed so there was nowhere for any of it to go. I mean, you never forget, I'll never forget, the first couple of times at different truck drivers were just like, Thank you for being open. So that grant is permanent and that's a really important grant, because in terms of, you know, everyone's like ‘supply chain supply chain,’ and then we see what horrible things happen when we're dependent upon such a consolidated supply chain and how, you know, the Trump administration got OSHA to lift their f*****g regulations and Tyson poultry workers had to process more chickens and there was no safety for them. And also, that was all the fear of, This is America, everyone has to have chicken, no one can go hungry. Where actually it's like, no, tons of people will go hungry. But to be able to have, the means, the tangible food system that you can see, I think more so, is so important. In terms of the state. I mean, I do see some holes in what's available, you know, and I do have some ideas, but I don't want to share them here, because, you know—Alicia: —you need to get paid for them. [Laughter.]Millicent: But we can't just—it can't just be restaurants and people who shop at the farmers’ market to support farms. Because those people have summer homes somewhere else. And they also have the ability to just pick up and go somewhere when the s**t hits the fan.Alicia: Yeah, no, it's very complicated. But I'm glad to hear that that's happening. That's—that's…yeah, I wish… [Laughs.]Millicent: It's also, I'll say also for a lot of farms and things like that, it has skewed their—and I work with a headwater hub; there's more infrastructure for schools, and food pantries and institutional food, which also because of brigade is turning into something that's so much more important in terms of like school foods and things like that. And we need that—we can't just be like, f*****g neoliberal people who care about what they eat and are—it's so short-sighted, the food, the food scene, which sometimes feels like the food system is so short-sighted and individualistic, it's gross.Alicia: Yeah. Well, you did write an essay sort of about this in Bon Appetit in 2019. You know, where you wrote about finding kind of about—I don't know if it was about you finding a balance, but what is that balance that between the olive oil and hunger and—I think about this, of course, as a food writer, where it's, you know, what am I selling people on? Like, what is it that I want to sell people on basically, when it comes to food? Is it just that having a good olive oil is sufficient? Of course it's not, you know. But for you, what are the gaps here that need to be filled in when we talk about food?Millicent: I mean, the gaps are major. Well, I feel there's personal consumption, right? And there's personal consumption that I prefer, and I know that, man, I know on paper, and if I told any of my co-workers the price of a glass of wine that I drink—I'm just some bougie white person, you know. Also, personal consumption is not about production and politics and everything like that—I don't quite know how to say that great.But look at how much food writing there is, look at how people's lives are curated. And the people who have the most influence and are influencers, they only talk about political issues when they need to, to stay relevant, or unless it's something that they actually care about where they're like, Abortion…Abortion. You know, ‘Black Lives Matter,’ when you know, especially two years ago—But the amount that we discuss food in conjunction with the amount of people who are hungry—and hunger can be such a vague thing, especially in this country, right? Like before, generally, it was like 10 to 12 percent [in] America, you’re like, all right. But to me, in New York, your neighbor is hungry, you know? You are moving into a neighborhood, you are opening a restaurant in a place where you have to just, where so many people are just, That's just what that corner is like. And I think that there's ambition and I think this city begs people, if you have ambition, to willfully ignore things, but the amount that food is written about… And like, I would say now, like Grub Street and Eater, and those places, now they're all also consolidated under the same media group, right? Before it used to be more competitive and they used to just be kind of a real content machine. And more 24/7, you know, because everyone's like, I can be on the internet all the time. And once it's out of the bag, then you're stuck with it. Let’s just say Salt Bae, he'll never go back; he’ll never go away, because someone's just like, Look at this guy. And then now he's there and he's validated. But think of all the people who got validated and all the s**t that we talk about. And we can choose so much of what we want to consume now, everywhere, and it's great to read about things that don't ultimately matter, because the things that matter are so painful. And it's only during a shutdown that we actually have this bandwidth to care about it. I mean, the food media is just, they're just—most of them are content creators. They shouldn't be able to write about anything that has any politics or systematic issues and anything to do with like actual workers, you know, who are they? They're not journalists.Alicia: No, it's an interesting thing, because I think right now, everyone is always asking me—like, well, asking me personally—do I consider myself a food writer and then asking, what is a food writer? And I think that it's important to, I mean, I'm aware of the market forces that create certain types of content and how you have—you have to do things in order to have a career at all. Of course, you have to then ask the question, if I have to do this, why do I want this to be my thing that I do all the time? Why don't I do something else? And so it's difficult, because you know a lot of food writers will say, I just want to write a recipe and then just look cute, and like, get things sent to me, and that shouldn't be a problem. And I'm like, for me it, you know, it is a problem. And I've written about this, that food writers don't, at large, have even a basic consciousness that comes through in their work around climate change, around hunger, around, you know, conditions of factory farming, around like any ecological significance to anything.Millicent: It’s sheer consumption. Alicia: Exactly. And that's becoming more and more, I think, because we're in this vague post-pandemic moment, so things are sort of going back to normalcy in terms of what gets covered. And it's just restaurants, restaurants, restaurants, like cookbooks, cookbooks, cookbooks. And then there's that moment where we were going to talk about the conditions, the labor conditions and the supply chains. And that moment seems like it's just going away. Now it's no longer relevant.Millicent: It's gone. And I mean, you and I both really love Alice Driver, and she's working—she and her partners are working on that book. And I am kind of stunned by the consistency in which that topic, because I thought it would be one article, one out, and if you all don't know about Alice Driver—you gotta sign up for her. She's an amazing writer. And she has interviewed poultry workers, and consistently interviewed them. And she's worked with a photographer who takes portraits of them, and she has been reporting this since the beginning. I mean, I think for her kind of a bunch of b****y dilettantes, you know, and I think that we have been taught that you cannot hold all of this and, you know, I don't really believe in balance because nothing seems to be balanced—But like, but what you were talking about before, like, How do I do these things and I know I have to do this—well, we certainly have to have joy. You know, and sometimes joy can't be just like—and trust me I know because I've been doing—working on a food pantry in the last two years during COVID. Like, there has to be joy. It's too hard to live like this all the time. But the sheer consumption and the way that the world is created, it's so easy for us on phones and the internet, of everything, is so unsustainable, climate wise, food wise, content wise. And our escapism isn't escapism anymore—it's our reality. And that's a problem. Because if everyone can be some f*****g content creator and influencer, is it possible that everyone's ability to figure out a way to survive like this means that we don't have anyone actually doing the real work? And that's why this world sucks so hard?Alicia: I mean, the fact that Alice Driver didn't have a column immediately, you know, reporting ongoingly about the conditions when she was on the ground in Arkansas with the workers at Tyson—that is such a damning fact of food media, is that that wasn't some editor's dream to have someone on the ground—Millicent: Just be like, Alice Driver, tell us about this, you know? And because—you guys, the answer isn't for all of us to buy sustainably raised chicken; the answer is for the conditions to be better for all workers and all chickens, you know? And that individualist notion of shopping, which you know, was in the early aughts was really just like, You're not going to change the world—it's such a neoliberal approach towards eating that your trip to the farmers’ market is changing systems. It's only changing you, your system, your house. And that's all part of it. You know, we're so broken right now. I mean, I think we've always been broken. But we're so broken, because the people who think that they're doing good work kind of really aren't, and they're like—I think of them as really affluent people and they walk amongst us. I am around them in New York all the time. I'm friendly with a lot of them or I might be friends with them. They might think I'm their friend. But they're not the one-percenters, so they don't think they're part of the problem. But they are part of the problem, because they're not doing anything. And their comfort is what allows so many things to happen. Like, if they actually wanted change to happen, it would happen more, because the one-percenters are untouchable to us, you know, unless there's crazy, systematic governmental and worldwide changes—that's why they're one percent. They're like, I have so much money, I'm gonna be on the moon, you can't touch me. But the affluent people who are never, still are never rich enough and someone already always owns one more house than they do: They're the ones who pat themselves on the back, because they read all the books, they went to some marches, their kids have Black friends, you know, they're doing all the good stuff, and they care. But they're not really sacrificing anything, they're not really doing anything to really change stuff. And right now, sometimes I hope, you know, I get a little tunnel vision, but I'm like, you guys got to do some s**t. And it's not what you think you should do. Because it’s never what you think you should do, because you're still very self—centered—Alicia: This is—I'm reading a book called The Imperial Mode of Living, which is what you're describing basically, which is that the way we live in the West, or you know, the global North is on the backs of so much exploitation and ecological destruction that we don't see. And then, yeah, and it doesn't matter what class you are, necessarily, and exporting also the idea of this mode of living as the good life quote, unquote, being basically a means of ecological destruction. Like, our way of living and consuming and just thinking about things is part of climate change, part of destruction, like people—and I understand that, but people, when I've written or said anything about the way people will regard their access to the tropical as sort of a human right, just when they need the release or the idea of a vacation to buy a cocktail or a piece of fruit that they probably just shouldn't have, and so, or vacation, etc., but like, people do treat that as though it is their God-given right to have that.Millicent: Yes, for sure. And they do it, they're like, I mean, that Noma pop-up in Mexico City was or—no, it wasn't it—it was in Tulum. Tulum has no infrastructure for what it has now. It certainly doesn't for a bunch of people who need to go to that. Look at all the people who have moved to L.A. I mean, look at California—we just have a straight-up fire season and all the people who moved to L.A., it's like, did you move to L.A., because you like the weather and because then you can have tomatoes all year round? It's kind of a bratty existence.Alicia: It's very—Millicent: To think it's a very—I don’t know if you can hear my neighbors come home from school—it's still consumption, you know? But also, what's fascinating is that this is all also done under the mode of “health,” you know, wellness and health and like, Oh, I get these mangoes or I have to go here. And the rest of us were just having drinks, and maybe there's a cigarette, or maybe there's some weed and more drinks. But we're not doing it for—we're not like, Well, I mean, it's wellness for a lot of us, but we're not lying to ourselves about that pedestal of wellness. Alicia: Yeah, it's no, it's interesting. Well, because especially here, here in Puerto Rico, where, you know, there's so much gentrification and displacement, because of people who come and get tax breaks for starting their businesses here. But it's been restructured so that some actual Puerto Ricans can take advantage in some ways. But for a long time, it's been, you have to have not lived in Puerto Rico for this consecutive amount of years before 2019, or [something] like it was like, or it went into effect in 2012. But you pay like a four, zero to four percent tax rate, and you don't pay federal taxes, because you become a bona fide resident of Puerto Rico. And then these are the people paying $2,000 for a studio, so that like now, none of our friends live anywhere near us because they've been completely priced out, you know— Milicent: It's all the loopholes. I mean, it's like everyone who holds on to their apartment even though they moved upstate, because it's their Airbnb, and you're like, or someone could live there.Yeah, you know, my old apartment in Greenpoint. I've had the lease on that—I'm pretty sure my old landlord is not listening to this. Since I moved here, and when I moved out, my friend lives there. And yeah, because I'm like, You're not gonna find anything. It's rent stabilized, you're like, you're not gonna find anything this affordable. I mean, and that's also interesting, because I think about that—I thought about that before the pandemic, where the food pantries in Bed-Stuy, you know, and we're across, there's a rehab across from us. And then there's like, to the right of us, there's a lot of brownstones that a lot of like gentrifiers live in, and it's like, You're the ones who moved here, because this soup kitchen has been here in this building for like, over 14 years, and the rehab has been here, you know, but also what happens when people become displaced further and further away from the place that gives them the food that they need, and the services that they need? And where are they going? And how much further displacement can the city handle or Puerto Rico? Or, you know…Alicia: Yeah, everywhere.Millicent: Everywhere. And then I think, I mean I think about that so much is how, and I have moved in my life, like being able to move freely, and kind of make decisions based on you know, where you're trying to, just moving around, is such a privilege and we don't actually talk about that. I think that the people who—the media voices that we hear the most are the worst representational voices of who most of the people are. I think that most of us are living pretty fraught financial lives. I think that if you actually have student loans— I think that we're haves and have-nots now, you know, and if you have student loans, you have to actually work for money and not just work for what you hope your life is. But the voices that we hear the most that tell us like, where to eat, what Airbnb to [stay in], you know, who have like, the most exposure, are the people we should listen to the least.Alicia: The least, yeah. [Laughs.]But it's really interesting, because people—those people are successful. People want—they have a huge audience; people want that. And that's what's troubling to me. Like, I as a person, who does, who's a writer, and then like, I have to sell myself a little bit. I think I've come around now to being like, I'm done even trying to sell myself, you know, I'm like, What is is and whatever will be will be and so—but the idea that that's a popular mode of engaging with the world is so troubling to me, existentially, because it's just like, we don't want to grapple with reality—we don't, and it becomes increasingly more necessary to do so.Millicent: Well, it's the question of do we not want to grapple with reality or are we still having problems with—because people are drawn to your work, you know. People are drawn and there's this, people would be like, That person is so real, but people are definitely drawn to it, you know. Which came first: is it like the influencer, or the following or the escapism and the inability to deal with reality.Alicia: Yeah, no, it's definitely a chicken or egg thing.Millicent: It's a chicken or egg thing. But I was reading an older essay that was in the Times, written by a woman who had moved upstate before the pandemic. And I was like, New York Times, isn't it time to stop just publishing this voice? Because this voice—do we really have that many white women in their 40s who we should be listening to about moving upstate and how they're ahead of the COVID people, because there's a slight patting on the back of like, I wasn't part of that wave. And it's like, Well, are you actually doing something or are you writing about it? But I'm like, it's the Times’ choice. And I'm like, don't do that. And then I saw that—was it the Times? They published something by a Chinese-American person who—it was all about the subway. And it was great. It was about the Sunset Park shootings, but just how this person has taken the subway his entire life, and how that mode of transportation is important. But for a moment, I was just like, Oh my god, they got an op-ed by someone who lives on the subway and don't take that away from him—Eric Adams and the NYPD, you know… And we're, I mean, look at it—media and all the people up top, how many people do they know? They just know—it is still super gatekeeper-y.Alicia: Yeah, yeah. No, it's hard. And I mean, I wanted to ask, too, because, you've written that Brooklyn is such a place of stark dichotomies, in terms of, you have the new restaurants and the extreme wealth, and you have—20 percent of its population [was] food insecure before the pandemic. And, you know, there was this moment of like, kind of what we were talking about, but there was also this moment where hunger was on the forefront of the conversation like community fridges, and mutual aid, and that sort of thing. Like, has that died down? Or, you know, what is the conversation? What is the landscape like?Millicent: That has definitely died down, and it started to die down when people had to go back to work. And like, but also like, the community fridges kind of blew too big too fast. You know, like we worked with a bunch of community fridges, and there was a lot of in vogue writing about them and anyone could open them, but they also need a community to sustain them. So, that kind of ballooned and, and some have closed.Mutual aid—there's still smaller groups that are really dedicated to their mutual aid and working with people and especially working with people who are being kicked out of shelters and all the really terrible things that the city is doing in different tenants unions. I feel like what really emboldened me over the past two years was how radicalized a lot of people became, like younger people. I'm 48, okay, so I'm Gen X. I think we've got—the boomers can move on, you know. Gen X, we're gonna die before the boomers because that's just—they got all the good stuff and we're just depressed, but it feels like a lot more people have been radicalized. But now the question is—I mean, it's a small percentage that I feel like is left because now that people are kind of going back to their really kind of decadent, made-for-Instagram ways. But things are really bad for people in this city, and there's not a lot of support. And I guess that's the part where I'm like, you have to be so willfully blind to people as you walk by them to not think that there's problems and to still stay so committed to whatever you think your life is supposed to be. And for me, I was just really tired of feeding rich people. You know, like working in restaurants, it was always a community and feeding friends and feeding community and whatever. And then it just became rich people, and I don't like rich people.Alicia: When did that shift happen? Do you feel like you felt that shift, in terms of who was able to go to restaurants?Millicent: I don't think so. I mean, I think that I challenged myself to work outside—like, I worked in Brooklyn restaurants for a while and it was when there were a lot of artists opening things because the rents were low. And then that slowly changed and I was really tired of how homogenous the kitchens were, where it was just this is all the same guy with the same liberal arts education and everybody's the same. And then I would go—and then I went to Manhattan, and I tried to learn more and it was way more intense. It was all—it's all intense, but I think there was just a point where, I don't like anyone here anymore. I'm not looking for validation from food-obsessed—I don't know. Because also when I moved here, it's not like I went out to restaurants all the time; I just worked in one. And I knew that when I was in the kitchen, friends that would come in, or people in the neighborhood that would come in and different kitchens and things like that. But through elevating or going into different restaurants or whatever, even just the concept of elevating, I just didn't—it wasn't for me. And I don't care for the status of it. You know, and also I was never the person who got the status of it, because I wasn't the chef or I wasn't the owner or I wasn't anyone.You know, for me what's always been so confusing about food—I read Kitchen Confidential when I worked in a kitchen when I was 27 and I totally got it because I also grew up going to bars, like my dad's place. And when we would go to Rehoboth Beach, we would go to the Rusty Rudder and count the bartender's tips. I've been going to bars since I was born, so I got Kitchen Confidential. And then I just didn't understand when I moved here why no one—you know, I grew up on a farm, I grew up in the business and I've worked, but no one was ever interested in me, in writing about me or talking to me, or anything that I wrote. I mean, I can only assume it's because I'm not making anyone feel good about anything, you know?Alicia: [Laughs.] They don't like that.Millicent: They don't like that! Or the way that they like it is that you have to be—it has to make people feel edgy and you have to be super charming. And, yes, I'm really charming, but I'm not going to blow smoke up anyone's ass to make them feel better about how hard it is to be a farmer or work the line or anything.Alicia: Yeah, yeah—no, that's so interesting. I feel like for me, I think leaving New York and kind of getting away from it made it a lot easier for me to divest from traditional notions of success as a writer or as a food writer. And so you know, it's been so freeing, which is great. But you know, yesterday, the James Beard media nominations came out or whatever, and someone was like, I can't believe Alicia Kennedy's newsletter hasn’t been—I didn't submit. I didn't pay $150. [Editor’s note: It’s now $100 per entry.]Millicent: Right? You have to submit, right? Oh my god, I gotta say that I learned about that through one of your podcasts about submitting and how you have to pay, because I was like, I'm sorry—are you telling me that neither you nor I, in the year 2020 of what we wrote about food, are you saying that wasn't, that shouldn't be in an anthology? I mean, I'm not a very hubristic person. But that s**t that I wrote about the partially dried duck that I got during shutdown, that two-part thing and like, nobody's writing that, okay? Nobody's writing that. Nobody is coming at it from that—nobody's experiencing that dystopia and writing about it. There were plenty of people experiencing dystopia, for sure. But it's—you gotta pay to play. And how do you—so if you always have to pay to play, then you just have the same people in the room, and even if they're different people, they have to do the same things, so how are they ever going to be different? Or there's a f*****g scholarship, you know, but you're still working with the same systems of like, restaurants are perfect. You just want them to be perfect, so you can always go to them and feel good about stuff. But they're based on ultimately exploitative work. They're based out of people who couldn't afford servants, but didn't want to cook all the time. That's what restaurants are. And the systems are all the same and the people who try to keep opening the systems up, they still want themselves to be the gatekeepers, you know, and that's the media—that is totally the media, that the person who was criticizing all the memoirs by white chefs, white female chefs. And it's like, Well, you're still here, because you're gonna gatekeep who? The Black female chef whose memoir you're gonna do? You know, yeah, you guys still just want to be the gatekeepers and make sure that you stay relevant—because you have to stay relevant, so you have status—so that you stay relevant, so you have status, so you can still make money. And your perspective of moving to Puerto Rico kind of broke that. And for me, I feel I was still trying to chase that to be an outlier. But I was still—the only reason why I was in Bon Appetit is because a friend of a friend. My friend was having a pie contest at his shop, to raise money where I worked. It wasn't because anyone at Bon Appetit was interested in me: It was a friend of a friend who's connected who hooked me up with someone. And then anytime I pitched to them, they were like, No, no, no, but they were like, Tell us about the poor people, how's it going? So I had access, but only in one way. And then I feel the pandemic kind of—I was like, Millicent, you're part of the problem, because you want to be invited to everything. I mean, I'll spite-crash any party, you know, it's fun. But I wanted to be the kind of classic—I mean, this is a very white male thing, outlier, you know, but who's still invited to everything, and has status.And like—Alicia: But you only get to be that if you're a white male.Millicent: You only get to be that if you're a white male or there's a couple, there's a couple of females—there's one who's grandfathered in. But you only get to be that. And I was like, my desire for status is not helping me and it's not helping anything. And so I'm like, f**k status. It's more freeing. But it's also something I have to keep in check. I mean, I'm always interested when you write about like, Vogue or the New York Times, and I think for a lot of us who feel like we're outside, how do we participate in these institutions? Like, man, if I was ever in the New York Times, my mom would be so excited. I've been a part of restaurants that are in the New York Times and I've never been mentioned. And it's so meaningful to our family when that happens. And also, I would imagine, for me at some point, but I'm not going to pretend that's ever going to happen. There's such weird relationships with those institutions. Alicia: Oh yeah, super weird. Like I—yeah, for me, it's always like, okay, it's nice to be seen, because it just allows me to keep doing my work. You know, if everyone stopped seeing me, then I don't get to do it anymore. And for me, and I've been really lucky, of course, like I wrote—my book will come out eventually, who the hell knows.Millicent: Supply chain issues, right? Alicia: Supply chain issues and edit—like issues of… The funny thing is to have your book sort of pre-mentioned in the New York Times, like in the T magazine by Ligaya Mishan, who's a fantastic food writer, but my publisher doesn't talk to me, so I don't actually know anything. [Editor’s note: It’ll be summer 2023.] You would think they'd want to get the book out by me because I have had moments of success and should ride it. But no, they're making you have to keep it—yeah, I have to just keep going and—Millicent: They're making you doggy paddle. They're like, when you've stuck your head up, keep your head up. And then right when you're like, I can't do this anymore, they're like, Don't worry, we got you a PR person. [Laughs.]Alicia: Exactly, exactly. But until then I must just—doggy paddling is the best f*****g metaphor for that, for how it feels, because it's, you know, I don't want to be a food writer because I want everyone to look at me. I just want to talk about things. You know, that's what I like to do! [Laughs.]Millicent: Well, and I really like how you've loosened that up for you. I mean, two years ago, we both know Melissa McCart from—she's an editor and she's great. And I had written some things for Heated. And she was like, You should be writing all the time. And I was also like, Oh, I'm out working during a deadly virus pandemic and trying to not kill my partner, or anyone I work with, and trying to figure out like, we're nowhere and we're everywhere. And I couldn't—and I had to let go of that feeling that I need to capitalize on this moment, because I had to figure out a new way to take care of myself or else I wouldn't have been able to do what I do. And it was also so physically brutal, just moving food. And I kind of gave that to myself instead of being like, I could have been somebody—because, yeah, I was like, I just I can't—I’ve just got to survive this. Alicia: Yeah, yeah. It's a hard negotiation. Millicent: It definitely is. It definitely is. I mean, hopefully I can change that. I mean, my goal is to write more and to actually have a newsletter. I've just, I think, two months ago I was like, Shut up, Millicent, just stop qualifying it and being like, there's too many newsletters and what if—just do it.Alicia: Yours would be wildly different from anyone else’s, so.Millicent: Well, because I'm writing anyway, you know, yeah. But they make it. They make it hard, does it ever—I mean, how does anyone read all the newsletters?Alicia: I do. I mean, because I was a copy editor at New York Magazine, a digital copy editor, I became a very, very fast reader. Millicent: You're such a good reader, too. Alicia: But the reason I can read fast is because of that job. Like I would have to read 10,000 words of TV recaps before 9 a.m. So, like… [Laughs.]Millicent: I mean, let's just talk about that for a second. When I was in my 20s, there was one person who had a job doing TV recaps, Heather—what's her last name? She's a great writer. She writes for…Heather Havrilesky? I'm not sure.Alicia: Oh yeah yeah yeah, Ask Polly.Millicent: Yeah, she would write about it. Now that can be a job for everyone. But shouldn’t someone who has a job writing TV recaps be in charge of making society better instead of writing TV recaps?Alicia: I think—who is, uh Mindy Isser, she did—she is a great human, she's a great writer, too, but I think she's a labor organizer. But she was on Twitter the other day, quote-tweeting someone who was like, ‘Every job deserves, deserves respect,’ it's like, or ‘every job is a valid job,’ something like that. And she's like, Actually, a lot of people should be doing something else. Like, instead of being on their computers, they should be planting trees. And I agree for myself even. The nice thing about having the freedom of what I do, and now that my book is done, and so I don't feel like I'm going to die every day—because that's how that felt—but I'm like, I need to put my energy, my excess time and energy and fruits, you know, existence into doing something to make the world better, not to make anything better for myself, because things for me are as good as they're probably gonna get. Unless, you know—Okay, I have extra time and extra, so I gotta put that energy somewhere where it'll do good for the world, like and I'm gonna figure that out. [Laughs.]Millicent: I'm always—I feel like that always, that's the balance, you know? And like, when people are like, Don't you feel good about yourself? And I was like, No, I don't feel good about myself—the world is hell. But we can't all just write TV recaps. Sorry, TV recap people, I read you, but that used to be 20 years ago; there was only one, and now it's just too much.Alicia: Yeah, yeah. No, there needs to be a big transfer of energy for doing things that actually matter. And I feel it for myself, and I feel it for the world. And I think a lot of people feel it, you know. I mean, even before, years ago, a lot of people find a lot more satisfaction in jobs that are physical, like in jobs or doing work that is not considered prestigious, than they do find in the job they do that gets them more money. And of course, you want to make an amount of money that makes you comfortable. I mean, there's a difference obviously between being comfortable and being a hoarder. But, you know, there's a reason for that. You want to—it's a way of protecting yourself and it’s way of protecting your loved ones, is to have a job that pays you a salary that is comfortable, and that's an ever-changing goalpost, especially with inflation, etc. But like, how much more satisfaction in my life did I get when I was baking, or when I was bartending, than I get from tapping on a computer? I mean, I don't know.Millicent: The visceral aspect, and I think it's also, because I feel the same. I can be a real heady person, but that's why I liked line cooking. There's a certain point where—I love working with my body and it's a different relationship with it, because it's also a relationship not built out of being seen and how do you look, but how do you function and what can you do and how strong are you? And that's such a better way to live in your body, for me, which is also—so the work I've done, you know, I had moments of being a real egghead. But I've taken care of cows. You know, I've worked in restaurants. When I worked at a record distributor, there was certainly a lot of moving of boxes of records. And like, that is—whenever I'm living like that, it's better. But then there's also the capitalist exploitative line where you're like, And you crossed it, and now I'm crumpling, which is something that restaurants are really good at doing.Alicia: Well, I mean to talk about your writing work, the issue of Diner Journal: Dear Island about doing private chef work upstate. I think upstate, right? When I say upstate, I mean New York.Millicent: It was in the Adirondacks, so it's upstate, but not like upstate—it's like closer to Canada, around Lake Placid. Alicia: Oh okay, wow, that’s up there.Millicent: It was great because it was mainly free of anyone from New York.Alicia: [Laughter.] Yeah. Well, you know, it's such a—it's so good. And like, I meant to ask you more specifically about your writing in this conversation, but I was just kind of winging it. But you know, it's such—you really are such a brilliant writer—like self-reflection, humor, the self-awareness that I think anyone listening to this is understanding exists, which is always refreshing.Millicent: I'm so red with anxiety and like, thank you!Alicia: No, it's absolutely brilliant. And I was actually, I was super floored reading it. I just read it like a book and was like—holy s**t. I knew you were great from what you wrote on the internet, but then I was like, but here you're getting like—Millicent: But the internet wasn't funny, that was COVID. That was like, Listen, and this is, What the f**k am I doing here? Who is this Wes Anderson family?Alicia: And I think that's—I'm so excited for you to launch your newsletter because I would hope to see kind of that mix a bit. Millicent: For sure. I mean, I think I've just been real—I mean, the whole reason I started an Instagram account when I started that job, and it was private chef but it wasn't like private chef money, like what private chefs would make like, and of course, I have to qualify that because I'm all—‘I’m working class,’ but not really. But it was such a weird and interesting place. But I started my Instagram account, because I was like, I'm going somewhere very strange. And I just say that because then, if anyone follows me, and then they're like, Wow, she's so intense about politics and hunger over the past two years. And well, it's been a pretty intense past two years, but I am a funny person.Alicia: Yes, yes. [Laughter.]Millicent: Not that statement. No one ever believes that when someone says it like that. Alicia: No, no, no, but I mean, I think for me, I want to be thought of as funny, which is a terrible thing to want, I guess. Because it's corny. But for me, it's funny, because I'll make jokes, or what I think are jokes on Twitter, and people will just be so serious in the replies and I'm like, Forget it. But then I did see a comedian today make a joke and people be very, very serious in the replies. And I was like, All right, like this is just, this is the environment in which we’re living in…Millicent: Our way of communicating—and you actually wrote about this, where it's like people are like, That person's right and I agree with all of it, or That person's wrong. And it's like, jokes never come across in texting. And it's real, it's real hard in any version of social media. It just doesn't work like this, and also, then that beg to—like we're communicating mostly with a really terrible means of communication, if these things aren't conveying humor and nuance, it's pretty shitty. Alicia: What good are they for? Yeah.Millicent: Fights. They’re good for fights.Alicia: Good for fights. [Laughs.] Well, I wanted to ask, because in the introduction to that, you wrote about choosing which cookbooks to take up with you and you wanted to bring Prune, and then you decided not to, and I wanted to ask, you know, what cookbooks you would take now to an island?Millicent: I mean, I've thought about this, because I was also like, I don't feel like I've purchased a lot of new cookbooks. I would take—I did just get the Gullah Geechee Home Cooking… Alicia: Oh, nice. Yeah.Millicent: Well, first of all, it's a matriarch of an island. And that is, you need someone who is on an island, because it's very specific. You don't have access to everything. Also, all of this, Emily Meggett, all of this is in my wheelhouse, of kind of like very country cooking. There's stuff, you know, there's crabs, I'm there. I would say the Olia Hercules books. Those are, I think this is what I know about cooking on an island, is that when you want to spread out a little bit, or any kind of like cooking that you're doing for hire, you don't want to like, jump to who you aren't, you need to kind of, for me, I need to have different ideas of variations on a theme and like I do, I can bake. I make pie crust, like I have variations of crust and ideas of things that I do. And I think that this cookbook, the Gullah Geechee and Olia Hercules. There's always variations on—she has so many doughs, you know, and things stuffed, greens and things like that. And I'm like, all right, that's a variation I can do. I always take a version of The Flowering Hearth, because I just want to live there. And then, I always take The Saltie Cookbook—I don't know if you have that one. Alicia: I need it! It was out of print.Millicent: It’s out of print, you better find it because—Alicia: I know, I have to buy a copy. Millicent: I use that one the most, because it's vinaigrettes, bread, desserts, and like, it's the most cross-referenced for everything. And then I always take—you ever read the Jim Harrison, the writer, Jim Harrison?Alicia: I have one of his books on my shelves, but I haven't read it yet.Millicent: You know, he's a big cook and hunter, and he had a column in Esquire called “The Raw and the Cooked”—the book is all of his essays. And for Saltie and for Jim Harrison, I always take them with me and whenever I've opened a restaurant and I haven't been able to see any friends forever, I read them because they're my friends’ voices. It's like Caroline, and A.D., and Rebecca, and Elizabeth and Saltie…And then Jim Harrison. I mean, he is—whatever. He's an old white American male; there are going to be problems. But also, he was a screenwriter, along with a fiction and poetry writer. He has an amazing essay about eating with Orson Welles where they try to like both jump out of a check, and I think there's lines of cocaine somewhere during the meal. There's an essay about a gout flare-up in the airport wearing his favorite leather boots, you know. And so, for me, cookbooks, sometimes I feel like I don't cook from them, I just like to read from them. And then also, I would totally go with vegan or vegan baking because you can really stuff someone on an island. And so I think vegan baking, also because you can have more shelf-stable things to substitute. And I don't do it enough but I like cooking with different grains, just because it gives different textures and like AP flour, just—AP flour, sugar, butter, like, we've all done that, you know?Alicia: Yeah, yeah. Yeah. I'm in a big flour moment right now—Millicent: What does that mean?Alicia: [Laughs.] It means that, it means that people were upset that I am always doing recipes with AP flour, and not with whole grains. But I don't have access to a whole grain flour here. So I, now I have to, I'm trying to get into working with different root vegetable, quote, unquote, flour. Millicent: Oh, fascinating!Alicia: Which is cool—and it's, but at the same time, I can't, you know, when I write a recipe for a cake, it's still gonna just have AP flour in it, you know. It's just because I need other people to make it.Millicent: It's also about access, you know, and that's something that people don't talk about that much. And when you write about food accessibility in Puerto Rico, and when people write about Cuba and food accessibility there, that's really important, but also the access of people anywhere, you know? And we can get anything, I mean, this is—we talked about this—we can get anything all the time; we shouldn't be able to get anything all the time now. Things should be harder for us.Alicia: In general, things need to be harder. And that's a hard thing to tell people, but I think if my writing has a thesis point that I haven't explicitly articulated, it's: things need to be harder.Millicent: Things need to be hard, because guess what, they're hard for a lot of people. And we're—how many people for you to lead your life are exploited so you can do what you want to do? I mean, people—and I'm not, listen, there's nothing exploitation-free about me. But I think about it a lot. And consumption for me now, I’m finding how there's a shift in me where it's just what used to be satisfying isn’t necessarily satisfying for me. Alicia: No, absolutely. Millicent: I drink tea now.Alicia: Instead of coffee?Millicent: Yeah, I mean, now I think I'm back to a cup of coffee a day, maybe. But I have—that was just like the past two days. I was like, come on, let's get some life back into us. But yeah, COVID in December, and I had it again and I was like, Tea tastes so nice! But I used to drink so much coffee and smoke a pack a day and drink bourbon you know, but some things—and that wasn't right before the pandemic, but I'm just saying, I've noticed the things. I liked shutdown. I'm gonna say something real unpopular: I liked shutdown. I liked being—I also had a different life for everyone where I went outside and worked and my partner's a musician, so I had live music every week for his Instagram show. But the stretching everything and being really intentional and all of that, and not getting to have whatever, and really having social interactions sustain me—and for longer than they used to. Everything was way more meaningful. And I really appreciate that. And I hope that some of that has stayed with me, you know? Alicia: Yeah, yeah. Well, how do you define abundance?Millicent: I think—enough, you know? The feeling of enough, because I think the feeling of enough is kind of contentment. Because abundance is dangerous, look at all—everyone who has abundance, it's never enough, you know?Alicia: Right. Right. No, yeah. I think this question is about being, you know, redefining abundance to me and I have enough because, we're talking about so many people do not have enough. And so trying to reframe the thinking around what that means is, I think, a powerful tool, imaginary tool for reconsidering. Millicent: I think what they're calling it now, Alicia, is a perspective shift.Alicia: Yes, a consciousness shift or consciousness raising. [Laughs.]Millicent: I am not going to say that working at a food pantry makes me feel good about myself or like I've done anything good, but it has recalibrated what I think about my life. Alicia: Yeah, well, and for you, and in general, is cooking a political act?Millicent: I don't think cooking is but I think feeding is, and I think that they're different. And that's got to be talked about more because cooking is—no. I think people pat themselves on the back too much thinking they're doing something political. And I know, years ago, a friend of mine, we were catering—it was a social justice food award that this Episcopal Church in Long Island gave out. And I was all, I work in restaurants; we buy from farms, and I grew up on a farm and I know—and I remember one of the farmers, he was from Iowa, and he was talking about how worried they were because they'd heard that white supremacists had moved into the neighboring county and so they're just really worried about the people who worked on their farm. And I heard his speech and I was just—and this was before Trump was in office, you know, this was, this was in—let's just say before Trump was in office. And I remember feeling humbled and being like, You don't know s**t, Millicent. You know, and money's politics, but systems or—money needs to be systematic for it to be political, you know.Alicia: I think that's so important and that you allowed yourself to be humbled and have that change your approach to things is such a rare, I think, a rare characteristic to encounter.Millicent: I'm humbled all the time. [Laughter.]Alicia: Well, thank you so much for being here. This has been so, so great. And yes, it's been interesting of course, that I just get to meet people over Zoom and record it, that I've just wanted to talk to, and this was one where I've just—I just really want to talk to the person and so here we are.Millicent: Well, you know, when you, when you come to town, we'll get some tea, or a martini.Alicia: Okay!Thanks so much to everyone for listening to this week's edition of From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy. Read more at www.aliciakennedy.news or follow me on Instagram, @aliciadkennedy, or on Twitter at @aliciakennedy. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.aliciakennedy.news/subscribe

    Lit for Christmas
    Episode Four: Scotch and Soda & Phonies

    Lit for Christmas

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 126:18


    Welcome to this Mental Health Awareness Month Lit of Christmas party. In this episode, Marty is joined again by his friend, Madeline, as they get blitzed on scotch and sodas, talk about J. D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, and all that David Copperfield crap. BONUS POINTS: Count how many times Marty says he's sweating. Marty would like to dedicate this episode to his good friend, Lon Emerick, who was NOT a phony. Godspeed, my friend! RECIPE FOR SCOTCH AND SODA: Ingredients: 4 oz. of scotch of choice 4 oz. of soda of choice (Diet Coke, club soda) Fill a high ball glass with ice and add scotch. Top with soda and gently stir. RECIPE FOR VIRGIN SCOTCH AND SODA AND TONIC: Follow recipe above, but substitute non-alcoholic whiskey such as Spiritless's Kentucky 74 for scotch. Marty has an Master's in fiction writing, MFA in poetry writing, and teaches in the English Department at Northern Michigan University in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. He served two terms at Poet Laureate of the Upper Peninsula, and has published the poetry collection The Mysteries of the Rosary from Mayapple Press. For more of Marty's thoughts and writing visit his blog Saint Marty (saintmarty-marty.blogspot.com) or listen to his other podcast Confessions of Saint Marty, also on Anchor.fm. Marty is a writer, blogger, wine sipper, easy drunk, and poetry obsessor who puts his Christmas tree up in mid-October and refuses to take it down until the snow starts melting. Madeline has a BA in English Creative Writing and gin drinking. Currently, she works the Reference Desk at a library, but she will soon become a graduate student studying for her Masters of Library Science. In her spare time, she enjoys reading eco-lit, true crime, and Alice Hoffman books. Music for this episode: "Jingle Bells Jazzy Style" by Julius H, used courtesy of Pixabay. "A Christmas Treat" by Magic-828, used courtesy of Pixabay. A Christmas Carol sound clips from: The Campbell Theater 1939 radio production of A Christmas Carol, narrated by Orson Welles and starring Lionel Barrymore. Other music in the episode: "Comin' Thro the Rye." Siobahn Miller. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLrIG51x3Jg) This month's Christmas lit: Salinger, J. D. The Catcher in the Rye. Little, Brown, 1951.

    Regular Features
    489: Orson Welles' Mucky Bins

    Regular Features

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 49:42


    This week the fellas are joined by two very special guests Orson Welles and one other person whom I shall not be naming here lest I rob you of the excitement we all felt in the room when he showed up.

    Moonlight Audio Theatre
    DRACULA: A TALE IN BLOOD

    Moonlight Audio Theatre

    Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 58:03


    MINDSTREAM PLAYERS PRESENT:  DRACULA: A TALE IN BLOOD A tale of horror in the theater of the mind. Starring Pete Handelman, Jude Gerard Prest, Vernon George Wells, Theresa Ireland, Tanya Johnson, Kurtis Bedford, and Tom Konkle as Dracula. Directed and edited by Tom Konkle. Produced by Kurtis Bedford and Tom Konkle. Inspired by Orson Welles. Special thank you to Vincent Colavitti for sound design, mix and effects.

    Ron's Amazing Stories
    RAS #543 - The Case Of The Three Frightened Policemen

    Ron's Amazing Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 59:30


    On we have a torso-less set of legs walking around. Not something you see every day! We review Andy Weir's novel Artemis. Then we play an episode from the classic radio series The Shadow, which has one amazing ending. We will end with a brand new Johnny Is It True - Did You Know Edition. So to get this all going all you have to do is press that play button. Featured Story - The Case Of The Three Frightened Policemen Our featured story for this time comes from the classic radio series The Shadow. The title alone should make you want to listen. The Case Of The Three Frightened Policemen. This is a really good story and lends more to the original concept of The Shadow, which is the man about town sworn to protect the little guy. In this episode The Shadow is played by William Johnstone who happens to be my favorite with Orson Welles as a close second. The Case Of The Three Frightened Policemen first aired on November 16, 1941. Other Stories Include - The Masquerade, Artemis, Disappearing White Ghost Legs, The Case Of The Three Frightened Policemen, and Johnny Is It True - Did you Know. Ron's Amazing Stories Sponsored by: Audible - You can get a free audiobook and a 30 day free trial at   and - Good Treats for your dog to eat. Social Links:Contact Links:

    Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

    May's Jewish Heritage Month continues as GGACP revisits one of their funniest interviews out of 400+ with veteran comedy writer Ron Friedman (“Get Smart,” “The Odd Couple,” “All in the Family,” "Barney Miller") who worked with (and wrote for) everyone from Lucille Ball to Milton Berle to Danny Kaye to Orson Welles -- and has the war stories to show for it. Also, Herve Villechaize packs heat, Sammy Davis meets Charlie's Angels, Ron writes “Murder Can Hurt You!” and Pat McCormick takes a…”dip” in Jonathan Winters' pool. PLUS: Vaughn Meader! Stump and Stumpy! Christmas carols for Jewish people! Forrest Tucker introduces “the General”! And Ron creates Paul Lynde's Uncle Arthur! (Special thanks to Gino Salomone!) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

    GGACP celebrates the 60th birthday (May, 14, 1962) of actor-director Danny Huston (“The Aviator,” “Hitchcock,” “Wonder Woman”) with this ENCORE presentation of a 2019 interview. In this episode, Danny regales Gilbert and Frank with stories about meeting Orson Welles, directing Robert Mitchum, getting inside the heads of big-screen bad guys and growing up with (and working alongside) his legendary father, John Huston. Also, Hal Roach cozies up to Mussolini, Katharine Hepburn makes like Eleanor Roosevelt, George Raft turns down the role of a lifetime and Danny reflects on the career of his grandfather, Oscar-winner Walter Huston. PLUS: “The Other Side of the Wind”! Remembering Robert Evans! The mystery of B. Traven! The punk rock cinema of Bernard Rose! And Danny and Gilbert reenact a scene from “Chinatown”! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices