Podcasts about Estonia

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Baltic country in Northern Europe

  • 1,860PODCASTS
  • 4,071EPISODES
  • 49mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
Estonia

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Best podcasts about Estonia

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Latest podcast episodes about Estonia

Ice Talk
A Stop in Estonia

Ice Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 54:57


In an unusual turn of events, both the European and Four Continents Championship events are taking place in Estonia this season - one last weekend, one upcoming. And, both events have the potential to significantly impact the Olympic Games just a few short weeks away.  In this Episode, Tara talks with Jackie about the European results, some changes to the event planning in Beijing, and what to watch for as Four Continents gets underway.  Then, Tara sits down with US Olympic Team members Kaitlin Hawayek and Jean Luc Baker to revisit the moments leading up to a phone call that changed their lives forever. 

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
January 15, 2022 - PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 26:36


On this edition for Saturday, January 15, Omicron infections continue to spread nationwide as the roll out of free home testing kits is set to begin. Also, inside Estonia's tactics to combat Russian disinformation, and celebrating dance legend Alvin Ailey. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Inside Estonia's approach in combating Russian disinformation

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 10:08


Russian disinformation is rife in countries formerly ruled from Moscow. Some ex-Soviet states have tried to suppress it altogether by banning Russian television stations and even limiting the use of the Russian language on their own domestic channels. Special Correspondent Simon Ostrovsky visited Estonia, which is trying a different approach. The story was produced in partnership with the Knight-Wallace Reporting Fellowship. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Doomsday Watch with Arthur Snell
The War in Your Living Room

Doomsday Watch with Arthur Snell

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 56:41


The digital Utopia we were promised has given us a desperately vulnerable world where we depend on a global internet with a billion badly-protected backdoors. Today's cyber-war battlegrounds aren't on bank servers or Government databases. They're in your smart fridges, doorbells and security cameras. Arthur Snell traces a path from the first-ever co-ordinated cyber-attack (on Estonia in 2007) to a world of invisible weapons and relentless probing conflict – where hostile governments can target your own phone anywhere on earth. How do you defend democratic societies when everything has become a computer?  “As soon as we discover something convenient for our lives, we become dependent on it… We're now as dependent on connectivity as we are on electricity.” – Mikko Hypponen “Most people just don't understand how much their devices leak about them… We are all carrying tracking devices with us.” – Eva Galperin “You can't see a cyber weapon on a military parade ground… Countries are putting billions into these weapons and nobody knows about them.” – Mikko Hypponen “Is it really wise for any country to establish a Νational Registry of Persons, and keep most of your personal data in one place?” – Ciaran Martin “We are turning everything into a computer… If it's smart, it's vulnerable.” – Mikko Hypponen Want to help us make future seasons of Doomsday Watch? Support us from as little as £3 a month to get early episodes ad-free, merchandise and a chance to choose the episodes we make. DOOMSDAY WATCH was written and presented by Arthur Snell, and produced by Robin Leeburn – with assistant production from Jacob Archbold. Theme tune and original music by Paul Hartnoll. The group editor is Andrew Harrison. DOOMSDAY WATCH is a Podmasters production. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

EVK Podcast
Esimene Kolmapäev / First Wednesday - Jan / Jan

EVK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 70:35


Meie armastav Jumal armastab kõiki inimesi ja Ta saatis Jeesuse, et meid põrgust päästa. Aga kes tahes Jeesuse hülgab, on kadunud. Nagu me näeme Joona loost, armastab Jumal isegi neid inimesi, keda meie oma vaenlasteks peame. Kogudusena tuleb meil Jumalat maailmale paremini esindada, mitte kohut mõistes, vaid armastaval viisil.     -----     Our loving God, loves all people, and He sent Jesus for save us from hell. But whoever rejects Jesus is lost.  As we see in the story of Jonah, God loves even the people we consider enemies.  As the church, we need to do better to represent God to the world, not with judgment, but in a loving way.

C.O.B. Tuesday
C.O.B. Tuesday Ep. 96 Featuring Rob West

C.O.B. Tuesday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 61:40


For our first COBT episode of 2022, we had the great pleasure of hosting Rob West, Founder and Lead Analyst at Thunder Said Energy. With the ongoing crisis in European gas markets and the tense uncertainties over Russian troop deployments along Ukraine's border, it was rather fitting that Rob joined us live from Estonia for our global energy and energy transition discussion. Rob shared the background story on how and why he founded Thunder Said Energy in 2019. One of his main objectives is to identify and track already-existing technologies that could realistically decarbonize the global economy at acceptable cost in coming decades. Then he estimates the optimal mix to accomplish that goal and shares his findings with his clients. To that end, he presented some of the core cost and risk findings from his year-ahead outlook, published yesterday: "Energy crisis: ten themes for 2022?". It was a fantastic and timely conversation and one we know you will enjoy as much as we did!To start the show, Mike Bradley provided a substantial overview of key energy themes for 2022 and reviewed this week's developments in OPEC+ governance and oil production strategy. Matt Portillo shared the TPH Research outlook for natural gas and crude oil in 2022. Colin Fenton bended our minds with a journey from how the multiverse plot device in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) franchise is starting to shape other cultural conventions (including energy policy) to yesterday's data on Tesla vehicle inventory currently in stock within 200 miles in Boston. (The punchline is the inventory is scarce, very expensive, and mostly located in New York and New Jersey).​​​​As you all likely know, my official last day at TPH is this Friday, January 7th. My experience at TPH has been a once-in-a-lifetime endeavor and I thank all of you and our past and present TPHers who made it possible. TPH is a special organization and I expect it to continue to thrive.​​​​​As of this Friday, we are spinning out COBT into a new business called Veriten, taken from "veritas" and energy to represent "truth in energy." This new energy information platform will have one key mission: to improve the quality and purpose of current debate around the future of energy and the environment. Like you, we want to see a meeting of the minds on climate, economic development, national security, and technology that is as productive and civil as the issues are serious.

Without the Footnotes
S3 Episode 16 - WtF Happened in Estonia?

Without the Footnotes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 11:59


This week we're in Estonia. Perfect. We've been to Lithuania and Latvia it's only fair we now visit Estonia. Check out the British Library's oral history archive. Contact: info@withoutthefootnotes.org Music: @feryl

Bitcoin Feniks - 90% Bitcoin
#DDK | 03.01.2022 | ESTONIA I KOREA POŁUDNIOWA - NOWE REGULACJE? MAGICZNA RĘKA NADAL W GRZE? WYNIKI ZBIÓRKI DLA...

Bitcoin Feniks - 90% Bitcoin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 33:15


Wszystkie dobre podcasty o kryptowalutach https://darmowekrypto.org.pl/podcasty——————————————————#DDK | 03.01.2022 | ESTONIA I KOREA POŁUDNIOWA - NOWE REGULACJE? MAGICZNA RĘKA NADAL W GRZE? WYNIKI ZBIÓRKI DLA...Zapraszam na stronę sklepu internetowego książki "W Głowie Twórcy Bitcoina" https://www.wglowietworcybitcoina.pl/Poznaj Ekipę Krypto Narodu: https://krypto-narod.pl/

EVK Podcast
EVK Visioon - EVK Vision 2022

EVK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 71:58


Pastor Barry selgitab meie koguduse EESMÄRKI ja FOOKUST, mille Jumal on andnud meile plaani saavutamiseks. Need on asjad, millest koosneb meie VISIOON, kui me teeme koos tööd selleks, et muuta elusid Isandale.     -----     Pastor Barry shares our churches PURPOSE and FOCUS that God has given to us, to help us accomplish the plan.  These things are what gives us our VISION as we work together to change lives for the Lord.

Listening Party Revelations
Episode 30 - I had blood all over the guitar...

Listening Party Revelations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 18:30


Sooz and Trudy had a chat with another of Tim's Listening Party regulars - we chat with Kath, who is based in Estonia but visits UK and sees lots of bands playing live. She tells us about her favourite Listening Party finds including Penfriend and how much she enjoys the community aspect of the Listening Parties. To visit the British Music Experience in Liverpool visit their website here: www.britishmusicexperience.com

Talk Eastern Europe
Episode 85: Estonia grapples with its Soviet past

Talk Eastern Europe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 44:55


*** Support Talk Eastern Europe. Become a Patron at www.patreon.com/TalkEasternEurope The final episode of 2021 once again takes us to Estonia. This time the context is a discussion on the removal of the Soviet-era “Bronze Soldier” statue in Tallinn which took place in April 2007. As a result of the government's decision, violent protests broke out in Estonia – unprecedented for the small Baltic state.The incident exemplifies the complexity of memory in this region but also illustrates how memory is used to manipulate and incite violence. To revisit this discussion and take stock on the current state of inter-ethnic relations in Estonia, Adam and Maciek sit down with Karsten Brüggemann Professor of Estonian and General History at Tallinn University.This episode is being produced within the framework of the project titled “Contested Histories Onsite”, a project which aims to place Europeans in discussions and debates on multiple historical perspectives and to activate citizens in public involvement of memory-constructions. As part of the EU's Europe for Citizens programme, the project's aspiration is rooted in a shared conviction that raising critical questions about the past is fundamental for citizens to develop a critical attitude towards the narratives that are competing with each other in contemporary politics.For more information on the project visit: -Contested Histories Onsite: https://contestedhistories.org/onsite/-Memory Studies Association: https://www.memorystudiesassociation.org/contested-histories-onsite/-EuroClio: https://www.euroclio.eu/project/contested-histories/- Listen to our previous episode on the Warsaw Uprising Museum: https://www.spreaker.com/user/talkeasterneurope/tee-77 ****Check out our special podcast series on Polish Science Fiction and Fantasy / 100 Years of Stanislaw Lem. Available here: https://apple.co/3d6ToM8

Darling, Why?
39: Disco Elysium

Darling, Why?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 56:49


Louis and Kate explore the weird and wonderful world of Revachol, setting for the 2019 gaming spectacular Disco Elysium. A detective thriller quite unlike most others, Disco Elysium came out of nowhere (if by nowhere, we actually mean Estonia) to take the gaming world by storm. Content warning: alcohol abuse, depression, suicide If you live in England, you can find your local NHS urgent mental health helpline here: https://www.nhs.uk/service-search/mental-health/find-an-urgent-mental-health-helpline Helplines Samaritans (available 24hrs) - 116 123 The Mix (under 25s) - 0808 808 4994 (Sunday-Friday 2pm–11pm) Papyrus HOPELINEUK (under 35s) 0800 068 4141 (weekdays 10am-10pm, weekends 2pm-10pm and bank holidays 2pm–10pm), email pat@papyrus-uk.org or text 07786 209 697. Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) (for those who identify as male) - 0800 58 58 58 (5pm–midnight every day) SOS Suicide of Silence - 0300 1020 505 (8am to midnight every day) Shout Crisis Text Line - Text “SHOUT” to 85258 linktr.ee/louistsangarides INSTAGRAM @l.a.tsang TWITTER @l_a_tsang --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/louis-tsangarides/message

Mehed ei nuta
"Mehed ei nuta": Kotsarist saab Euroliiga kuum kaup? Mis on Team Estonia?

Mehed ei nuta

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 75:22


"Mehed ei nuta" peateemad 28. detsembril: - Ajakirjanikud valisid ja avaldasid oma aasta sportlaste valikud, jättes muuhulgas Tänak-Järveoja välja esikolmikust. Õigustatud? - Kas keegi saab aru, mis moodustis on Team Estonia? - Maik Kalev Kotsari kõrge lend – Euroliiga klubid oleks valmis teda Saksamaalt välja ostma. Millal on minek Euroliigasse? - Ott Tänak: uus Hyundai on paljulubav! Kust selline kannapööre? - Karel Tilga saatis USA ülikooli kuradile: tahan saada tiitlivõistlustel tulemusi.

EVK Podcast
Jõulusõnum - Christmas Message #2

EVK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 66:49


Jõulud räägivad kahest kreekakeelsest sõnast - Kenos ja Periousion. Tühjendama - Teha sind enda omaks.    -----     Christmas is about 2 Greek words, Kenos and Periousion.  To make empty — To make your very own.

War College
ICYMI: Fake Journalists Are the Latest Disinformation Twist

War College

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 57:25


Last week The Daily Beast broke some bizarre news. Several news outlets, including The Washington Examiner, RealClear Markets, and The National Interest, had been running op-eds of journalists that did not exist. AI generated photos attached to profiles and credentials that, once scrutinized, collapsed. It was a massive effort at digital propaganda and questions still remain about its provenance and purpose.Here to explain just what is going on is Marc Owen Jones. Jones is an assistant professor in Middle East Studies and Digital Humanities at Hamad bin Khalifa University and an expert in social media disinformation who helped sound the alarm about this campaign.Recorded 7/13/20Fake journalists have joined the frayTracking response of the dupe outletsThe difference between misinformation and disinformationMedia literacy in Estonia and FinlandA website that generates people who don't existWar College has a substack! Join the Information War to get weekly insights into our angry planet and hear more conversations about a world in conflict.https://warcollege.substack.com/You can listen to War College on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play or follow our RSS directly. Our website is warcollegepodcast.com. You can reach us on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/warcollegepodcast/; and on Twitter: @War_College.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/warcollege. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hoop Heads
David Cooks - Author, Speaker, and Former High School & College Basketball Coach - Episode 572

Hoop Heads

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 77:07


David Cooks is an author, speaker, voice talent, podcast host and management consultant.   At the age of 15, David experienced a Spinal Aneurysm, leaving him a T-6 paraplegic and a wheelchair user. Almost in the blink of an eye, David's world went from a rising star in high school basketball to living in a rehab facility facing a lifetime of paralysis. David chose not to be a victim, rather accepting and embracing his new reality as a paraplegic to face life head on. David has spent nearly 25 years in Education, including 17 years teaching at his alma mater, Marquette University High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin where he taught Economics and also served as the Director of Diversity, The Coordinator of Academic Support, and served 11 years as the Head Varsity Boys basketball Coach with a record of 155-92. ​David served as an assistant coach at Concordia University in Mequon Wisconsin from 2013-2018. The highlight of David's coaching career is his time spent at Duke University working for Hall of Fame Coach Mike Krzyzeswki, and being a member of the coaching staff for USA East Coast Basketball in the summer of 2014, joining Frank Martin and Guy Rancourt in Estonia and Finland.  If you're looking to improve your coaching please consider joining the Hoop Heads Mentorship Program.  We believe that having a mentor is the best way to maximize your potential and become a transformational coach. By matching you up with one of our experienced mentors you'll develop a one on one relationship that will help your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset.  The Hoop Heads Mentorship Program delivers mentoring services to basketball coaches at all levels through our team of experienced Head Coaches. Find out more at hoopheadspod.com or shoot me an email directly mike@hoopheadspod.com Follow us on social media @hoopheadspod on Twitter and Instagram and be sure to check out the Hoop Heads Podcast Network for more great basketball content. Take some notes as you listen to the inspiring story of author, speaker, and coach, David Cooks. Website – https://otterbeincardinals.com/sports/mens-basketball (https://davidcooksspeaks.com) Email - david@paralysis2purpose.com Twitter - https://twitter.com/cbates_wmu (@dcespeaks) Visit our Sponsors! https://www.drdishbasketball.com/ (Dr. Dish Basketball) Mention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine! http://www.fastmodelsports.com/ (Fast Model Sports) Use Code HHP15 to get 15% off the number one play diagramming software for coaches. https://www.qwikcut.com/basketball/ (QwikCut) QwikCut is all cloud-based, and comes packed with features to help high schools and youth programs - STORE, SHARE, and ANALYZE game film.   Make the switch, get double the storage, and save your program up to 50% on the fastest-growing video editing system in the country.    Twitter Podcast - https://twitter.com/hoopheadspod (@hoopheadspod) Mike - https://twitter.com/hdstarthoops (@hdstarthoops) Jason - https://twitter.com/jsunkle (@jsunkle) Network - https://twitter.com/HoopHeadsPodNet (@HoopHeadsPodNet) Instagram https://www.instagram.com/hoopheadspod/ (@hoopheadspod) Facebook https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/ (https://www.facebook.com/hoopheadspod/) YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDoVTtvpgwwOVL4QVswqMLQ)   Support this podcast

Focus
Post-Soviet Estonia: From collective farms to digital powerhouse

Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 4:58


This is our fourth episode on the fall of the Soviet Union. Today we go to Estonia... the former Soviet republic which has undergone the fastest and most radical modernisation. The country is now a digital powerhouse where almost everything can be done from a smartphone. France 24's Sylvain Rousseau and Achraf Abid report from Tallinn.

EVK Podcast
Jõulusõnum - Christmas Message #1

EVK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 75:13


Kogu Jõululugu oli otsast lõpuni Jumala plaan! See, et karjased leidsid vastsündinud Jeesuse, ei olnud juhus. See, et Siimeon läks templisse, kui Jeesust Isandale pühitseti, ei olnud juhus. Ei olnud juhus, et Anna sisenes täpselt hetkel, kui Jeesus seal oli. Jeesus tuli sinu pärast, sest Ta armastab sind!     -----     The Christmas Story was all God's plan!  It was more than a coincidence the shepherds found the baby Jesus.  It was more than coincidence that Simeon went to the Temple as Jesus was being presented to the Lord.  It was more than a coincidence that Anna came in at the moment Jesus was there.  Jesus came for you, because He loves you!

SITB
SITB 189 feat. Janika Tenn (DJ/Producer)

SITB

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 99:01


Episode 189 features the incredibly talented DJ/Producer Janika Tenn! Janika and I have been trying to line up an interview date for awhile and I'm so glad we finally got a chance to get her full story.

The Cipher Brief Open Source Report
The Cipher Brief Open Source Report for Wednesday, Dec 15, 2021

The Cipher Brief Open Source Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 13:40


A very big national security news day.  US Air Force discharges 27 for COVID vaccine refusals; Space Force begins 10 days of war games; US House passes bill to ban imports from Xinjiang; Britain releases new national cyber strategy; German court sentences Russian to life over 2019 Berlin killing of Chechen; Estonia's PM sounds alarm on Putin's Ukraine trap; Kremlin says US given concrete proposals to de-escalate while Putin touts Russia's relationship with China as a 'model' of cooperation.  A lot more in this episode. 

Thrive With Asbury Seminary
Dr. Ken Collins: Jesus the Stranger

Thrive With Asbury Seminary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 46:14


Overview Dr. Ken Collins, Professor of Historical Theology and Wesley Studies, joined the podcast today. He joined the Asbury Seminary faculty in 1995 and received the Professor of the Year Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in 2008. Prior to coming to the Seminary, he was recognized for exemplary teaching in a national competition among United Methodist schools in 1994. Dr. Collins is a past president of the Wesleyan Theological Society and a member of the editorial board of the Asbury Journal. Beyond this, he currently serves on the faculty of the Baltic Methodist Theological Seminary in Tallinn, Estonia. He has lectured and taught throughout the world and is known for his engaging, critical-thinking style. Dr. Collins serves as the Director of the Wesleyan Studies Summer Seminar which fosters research, scholarship and publication globally in the broad field of Wesleyan studies. The program began in June 2011 and continues today. Dr. Collins is a member of several professional organizations and has published a host of books and scores of articles exploring topics ranging from Wesleyan theology to Christian spirituality. In today's conversation, we talk about Dr. Collin's most recent book Jesus the Stranger that takes readers through a journey that allows us to see the love, beauty, goodness, and yes, suffering of Jesus in a new way. Let's listen!

America's Roundtable
Steve H. Hanke | Message to the Fed on Highest US Inflation Surge in Four Decades | Remembrances of Senator Robert Dole

America's Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 30:17


The brilliant economist Dr. Steve Hanke, professor of applied economics and founder and co-director of the Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health, and the Study of Business Enterprise at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, joins America's Roundtable co-hosts Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy in a timely conversation on the U.S. Labor Department's report on the rising inflation rate - now at 6.8%, the highest in nearly four decades, the talks about increasing interest rate and how it will impact hard working and decent Americans, families and small and medium private enterprises. The conversation will also focus on Dr. Hanke's recent piece in The National Review (https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/12/remembrances-of-senator-robert-dole-and-a-russia-story/#slide-1) on the passing away of one of America's greatest heroes and public servants, former Senator Bob Dole: Remembrances of Senator Robert Dole — and a Russia Story (https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/12/remembrances-of-senator-robert-dole-and-a-russia-story/#slide-1). We also delve into the serious implications of the Covid-19 lockdowns impacting America and countries around the world, with the exception of places like Sweden which upheld its constitution, respected individual liberty, and chose a laissez-faire approach. Dr. Steve H. Hanke is a leading world expert on currency boards, measuring and stopping hyperinflation, privatization, currency and commodity trading, water resource economics, and other topics. As a senior fellow and director of the Troubled Currencies Project at the internationally recognized Cato Institute in Washington, D.C., Hanke studies countries unable to maintain a stable domestic currency. Often, it is difficult to obtain timely, reliable exchange-rate and inflation data for these “troubled currencies.” Full bio: https://engineering.jhu.edu/ehe/faculty/steve-h-hanke/ Relevant reading materials: The Wall Street Journal | The Monetary Bathtub Is Overflowing (https://www.wsj.com/articles/monetary-bathtub-overflowing-inflation-drain-transitory-11634847429) Many economists say inflation is transitory. It will be persistent. By John Greenwood and Steve H. Hanke “Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon,” Milton Friedman said. Inflation isn't caused by temporary supply-chain disruptions. Take Japan during the 1979-80 oil crisis: Oil prices surged, but consumer prices remained stable. In China today, raw-material prices are soaring, but consumer prices have hardly budged. To explain what is happening in the U.S. economy, we present the bathtub theory of money and inflation. Money flows into the tub through the faucet. The bathtub has three drains." Full text: https://www.wsj.com/articles/monetary-bathtub-overflowing-inflation-drain-transitory-11634847429 The Wall Street Journal | Freedom and Sweden's Constitution (https://www.wsj.com/articles/freedom-and-swedens-constitution-11589993183) The country's laissez-faire response to the coronavirus pandemic has deep roots in both culture and law. By Lars Jonung and Steve H. Hanke "In most countries, the tool of choice to “flatten the curve” of the coronavirus pandemic is the lockdown. Not in Sweden, which has chosen a rather laissez-faire approach. The borders have been kept open, and Swedes are free to travel within the country, visit bars and restaurants (with some restrictions), parks, hairdressers, gyms and most other places. The cornerstone of the Swedish response is its constitution's most important part, the Regeringsform. Chapter 2, Article 8 states: “Everyone shall be protected in their relations with the public institutions against deprivations of personal liberty. All Swedish citizens shall also in other respects be guaranteed freedom of movement within the Realm and freedom to depart the Realm.” Full text: https://www.wsj.com/articles/freedom-and-swedens-constitution-11589993183 The Financial Times | On a long enough timeline is all inflation transitory? (https://www.ft.com/content/88111d60-52de-4341-9351-c48db837f30f) "Inflationistas like Steve Hanke were indignant that US inflation was not a transitory supply chain problem. “Shifts in consumer spending have resulted in broad-based price increases across expenditure categories” because “the incompetent Fed has produced a massive amount of excess money,” he proclaimed." Full text: https://www.ft.com/content/88111d60-52de-4341-9351-c48db837f30f https://ileaderssummit.org/services/americas-roundtable-radio/ https://ileaderssummit.org/ | https://jerusalemleaderssummit.com/ America's Roundtable on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/americas-roundtable/id1518878472 Twitter: @steve_hanke @ileaderssummit @NatashaSrdoc @JoelAnandUSA America's Roundtable is co-hosted by Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy, co-founders of International Leaders Summit and the Jerusalem Leaders Summit. America's Roundtable from Washington D.C. informs, educates, empowers and challenges the listening audience about the importance to restore, strengthen, and protect our freedoms, the rule of law, and free markets. America's Roundtable advances the ideas of freedom, the significance of freedom of speech, limited government, and the application of free market principles to solve problems. America's Roundtable presents in-depth analysis of current events and public policy issues while applying America's founding principles. America's Roundtable radio program - a strategic initiative of International Leaders Summit, focuses on America's economy, healthcare reform, rule of law, security and trade, and its strategic partnership with rule of law nations around the world. The radio program features high-ranking US administration officials, cabinet members, members of Congress, state government officials, distinguished diplomats, business and media leaders and influential thinkers from around the world. America's Roundtable is aired by Lanser Broadcasting Corporation on 96.5 FM and 98.9 FM, covering Michigan's major market and the upper Midwest, SuperTalk Mississippi Media's 12 radio stations and 50 affiliates reaching every county in Mississippi and also heard in parts of the neighboring states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Tennessee, and through podcast on Apple Podcasts and other key online platforms.

History of Estonia Podcast
Episode 46 : The Estonian SSR as an Exemplary Union Republic

History of Estonia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 29:53


In this episode, we take a look at the political leadership of the Estonian SSR during the 1950s-1970s. We learn about the Komsomol student groups and how they made their impact felt in Estonia. We also learned a little about how the suppression of the Prague Spring put a stop to liberalization in Estonia.

Brave Bold Brilliant Podcast
Follow Your Passion and Curiosity to Lead a Fulfilling Life with Yulia Denisyuk

Brave Bold Brilliant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 46:16


In this episode, Jeannette talks to Yulia Denisyuk who is an award-winning travel photographer and writer with a special interest in stories about artisan crafts and ancient traditions. She explains why despite having an MBA in marketing and strategy and a highly successful career working for large corporations, she gave it all up to put travel, her passion, at the centre of her life. Yulia and Jeannette talk about how to find the courage to make transformative changes in your life. How to develop the resilience and tenacity to stop listening to the negative voices of others and to deal with imposter syndrome. So that you can switch to doing work that feeds you rather than drains you. Yulia talks about her Genius Women masterclass and the role mentors have played in her life. As well as providing advice to help anyone who wants to make a living from writing, photography, or their travels, to do so.   KEY TAKEAWAYS We all tend to automatically follow the most clearly defined path – get good grades, take a corporate job, get a mortgage, etc. Social pressure plays a big role in pushing us to do what everyone else does. Everyone is different. For some people doing well at a corporate job is their passion. Don´t compare yourself to others – row your own boat. Not doing something that you are passionate about is soul-destroying. Role models and mentors help you to get to where you want far faster. Imposter syndrome can really hold you back. Don´t give up too early. Be consistent, stubborn, keep going and keep learning. Remember how you spend your days is how you spend your life. Travel writers need humility, curiosity, tenacity, and the ability to pursue the story. In the podcast, Yulia explains how to get started in the field. Believe in yourself, follow your why, and take action consistently. If you do not yet have a passion. Follow your curiosity instead. Everyone has something special to offer – jewels inside. Recognise them and share them with everyone.   BEST MOMENTS ‘I left my corporate life behind, and I dedicated all of my subsequent journey to figuring out how I can do the lifestyle where travel is at the centre of it. ´ ‘When you try something new, it's important not to get discouraged too soon.' ‘The only way to get that experience is to start doing.' This is the perfect time to get focused on what YOU want to really achieve in your business, career, and life. It's never too late to be BRAVE and BOLD and unlock your inner BRILLIANCE. If you'd like to join Jeannette's FREE Mastermind just DM Jeannette on info@jeannettelinfootassociates.com or sign up via Jeannette's linktree https://linktr.ee/JLinfoot   VALUABLE RESOURCES Brave, Bold, Brilliant podcast series - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/brave-bold-brilliant-podcast/id1524278970   EPISODE RESOURCES Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Big-Magic-Creative-Living-Beyond/dp/B012Y8IXNG/   ABOUT THE GUEST Yulia Denisyuk is an award-winning travel photographer and writer with a special interest in stories about artisan crafts and ancient traditions. For past assignments, she's shared a roof with nomads in Mongolia, traced the origins of Iznik tiles with artisans in Turkey, and learned the art of imigongo with artist collectives in Rwanda. Yulia was born in Kazakhstan, grew up in Estonia, and is based in the United States.  She has traveled the world extensively and turned to a travel journalism career after getting an MBA and working more than a decade for large organizations—first as a Navy Sailor, then as a brand manager at Fortune 500 companies.  Her work appears in TIME, National Geographic Traveller, Conde Nast Traveler, BBC Travel, AFAR, Lonely Planet, and more. Yulia is a member of the Society of American Travel Writers (SATW) and a three-time winner of Muster Awards, the SATW's annual photography competition. Yulia is one of the founders of NOMⴷD + JULES, a small-group travel company with trips to the Middle East and North Africa. She also runs Genius Womxn, a platform for womxn in travel media. Yulia is based in Chicago, but she is rarely there.   ABOUT THE HOST Jeannette Linfoot is a highly regarded senior executive, property investor, board advisor, and business mentor with over 25 years of global professional business experience across the travel, leisure, hospitality, and property sectors. Having bought, ran, and sold businesses all over the world, Jeannette now has a portfolio of her own businesses and also advises and mentors other business leaders to drive forward their strategies as well as their own personal development.   Jeannette is a down-to-earth leader, a passionate champion for diversity & inclusion, and a huge advocate of nurturing talent so every person can unleash their full potential and live their dreams.    CONTACT THE HOST Jeannette's linktree  https://www.jeannettelinfootassociates.com/ YOUTUBE LinkedIn Facebook Instagram Email - info@jeannettelinfootassociates.com   Podcast Description   Jeannette Linfoot talks to incredible people about their experiences of being Brave, Bold & Brilliant, which have allowed them to unleash their full potential in business, their careers, and life in general. From the boardroom tables of ‘big' international business to the dining room tables of entrepreneurial start-ups, how to overcome challenges, embrace opportunities and take risks, whilst staying ‘true' to yourself is the order of the day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Smart Community Podcast
Summer Series - Smart Digital Societies: Lessons from Estonia, with Calum Cameron

The Smart Community Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 59:12


Hi #smartcommunity friends! Welcome back to the Summer Series here on the Smart Community Podcast. As you know, we're taking a little break from new content over the Australian summer holidays, and instead we are sharing the replays of a few of your all time favourite episodes. This week we're sharing my interview with Calum Cameron, from way back in episode 185 which was released in August of 2020.In this episode of the Smart Community Podcast, I have a really interesting conversation with Calum, an Aussie based in Estonia, which is the world's first digital society and Europe's favourite startup ecosystem. Responding to the COVID-19 lockdown in Estonia he helped trigger the Hack the Crisis movement and was an organiser of The Global Hackathon which combined, connected more than 250k people from over 100 countries to develop and implement immediate solutions to the crises, which we talk about in this episode. We start by discussing Calum's background in IT helping the financial services digitalise, and how he came to be in Estonia. Calum then shares with us a history of Estonia, why they focused heavily on digitalisation in the 1990s, plus some of the interesting ways that manifests, like their digital citizen or e-residency program. Calum tells us how he got into this Smart Community space and why a diverse cross section from society is so important in getting different perspectives and different skill sets to best leverage the technology that's out there to solve community problems. We talk about how Smart concepts are understood by the general public in Estonia, including how data sharing works between agencies to make renewing your drivers licence a smooth process. Calum and I talk about the importance of trust and the social license to operate in digital societies, and how both public and private sectors in Estonia have intentionally invested in the affordability and reliability of digital infrastructure, as well as dedicated digital education and engagement programs to improve digital literacy in the whole population. We finish our chat discussing the opportunities and challenges of e-learning and digital collaboration, including his work with the recent digital hackathons, plus Calum's favourite resources in the Smart Community space. At one point we also mention Smart Community festivals and I say in the interview that I discussed it with Martin Tomitsch in his episode but no, it was actually Heath Raftery who I spoke to in Episode 113 about Smart Regions, so we've linked all those episodes up in the show notes too.We'll be sure to get Calum back on the show in the future for a full update about what he's been up to and also how our thinking has progressed since this conversation. But in the meantime, we hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we enjoyed making it!Find the full show notes at: www.mysmart.communityConnect with Calum on LinkedIn or via calum@digitalpath.eeConnect with me via email: hello@mysmart.communityConnect with My Smart Community via LinkedIn or Twitter and watch on YouTubeThe Smart Community Podcast is produced by Perk Digital.

EVK Podcast
Ära anna alla - Never Stop 5

EVK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 97:27


Üks viisidest, kuidas oma vastupidavust üles õhutada, on aidata teisi nende koormaid kanda. Nagu paljud eeskujud piiblist, võime me edasi minna ka siis, kui me vastuseid veel ei näe. Me ei anna alla, sest me teame, et oleme teel Jumala õnnistuste juurde!     -----     One way to stir up our endurance is to help others with their burdens.  And like many examples given to us in the bible, we can keep going even though we do not see the answers yet.  We don't quit, because we know we are on the way to God's blessings!  

Aussievision - Eurovision from Down Under
Eurovision Weekly Update - Estonia, Czech Rep, Spain and Jaguar Jonze interview

Aussievision - Eurovision from Down Under

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 46:22


We go through the week's news and results from Eurovision including Estonia's Eesti Laul quarter-final results, our Czech Republic favourites, artists out for Spain and Lithuania and an interview with Australia Decides legend Jaguar Jonze (from 38:50). Vote in ESCZ: https://escz2022.com/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/aussievision

MMA Lock of the Night
UFC 269: Oliveira vs Poirier Predictions & Betting Tips | The MMA Lock-Cast Ep #146

MMA Lock of the Night

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 58:17


⬇️⬇️TIME STAMPS BELOW⬇️⬇️⬇️ MMALOTN is back to give you Predictions, Picks, and Bettings Tips on UFC 269: Oliveira vs Poirier. Check out my Patreon where I have plenty of perks such as: Early access to each breakdown Best Bets/Props article Hail Mary Patreon Parlay Discord Channel All Official bets (even when charging the public) PPV Parlay for the Patrons (winnings from this parlay given to a random Patron) $5/month on Patreon @ https://www.patreon.com/mmalotn My bets can also be found @ https://www.mmalotn.ca/picks My 3rd party tracked record can be found at: https://betmma.tips/lockofthenight Never take someone's word for how often they hit their bets unless they are 3rd party tracked. It's easy to fool people by just claiming all you do is win. Transparency is key! I've secured a deal with Coolbet. They are a Toronto-based bookie that has won a ton of awards due to their sleek/stylish layout and great odds that they offer. Use my promo code "MMALOTN2" under their Bonuses section and get your initial deposit 100% matched up to $200 free roll (6x rollover). They are accessible in the following countries: Canada, Chile, Peru, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Estonia, and Iceland. For those unfamiliar with my Paid picks vs. Free Picks policy, after winning 3 straight events, I switch to paid picks until I hit my next losing event. If you research fights on your own, the Tape Index is a MUST! We take the time out of browsing for fights so you have more time to study. Everything you need to prep for an upcoming card (and every matchup currently announced) is on one page and just a click away. Check it out! Tape Index: https://www.mmaplay365.com/product/tape-index Twitter: https://twitter.com/mmalotn *****PICKS NOT BETS*****DISCLAIMER: though I'm picking these fighters to win each matchup, I may have a bet against them due to value and fights being closer than odds may suggest. Listen to each matchup breakdown to get how I truly feel about it. TIME STAMPS WILL BE ADDED SHORTLY (0:00) Intro (1:23) UFC Vegas 44 Betting Recap (6:40) Robertson vs Cachoeira (9:45) Costa vs Kelley (13:24) Hall vs Minner (16:34) Perez vs Schnell (19:08) Blanchfield vs Maverick (22:46) Muniz vs Anders (24:50) Wright vs Silva (26:44) Tuivasa vs Sakai (29:39) Cruz vs Munhoz (33:44) Emmett vs Ige (36:43) O'Malley vs Paiva (40:03) Garbrandt vs Kara-France (44:07) Neal vs Ponzinibbio (48:16) Nunes vs Pena (51:39) Oliveira vs Poirier (56:03) Outro 2021 Prediction record: 290-178 (62%)

Partido Podcast
Ep 731 | Football Fever 10x21: Hammer Time a todo gas para cambiar de líderes

Partido Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 141:45


Episodio emitido en Twitch durante la mañana del martes 7 de diciembre. - Twitter: https://twitter.com/FFevermedia - Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/footballfevermedia - Juego de pronósticos: https://www.kicktipp.es/footballfever/ https://www.kicktipp.es/ffeverucl/ - Contacto: footballfeverradio@gmail.com - Canal de Telegram: https://t.me/FFeverMedia Contenido: - La voz del pueblo, noticias y Kicktipp - Resumen de competiciones y segundas categorías de: - Premier League (7') - Serie A (44') - Bundesliga (1h10') - Ligue 1 (1h38') Repaso al resto de competiciones (1h49'): Portugal, Rusia, Ucrania, Eredivisie, Jupiler belga, Escocia, Turquía, Grecia, Chipre, Austria, Suiza, República Checa, Croacia, Serbia, Estonia, Brasil, Chile, Ecuador, y playoffs de Liga MX y MLS Con Xapa Red (@Xapa_red) y Santi Boix (@SantiBoix_) Audio de Juan Carlos Molero con el derby eterno de Croacia Presentado y editado por Javier Quirós Sánchez (@JavierQS21)

Tribucasters, el podcast para los podcasters
Curar información y cobrar por ello con Pau Ninja

Tribucasters, el podcast para los podcasters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 64:11


En este episodio hablamos con Pau Ninja sobre multipotencialidad, curación de información, podcasting y gestión de comunidades entre otras muchas cosas.  Hoy tenemos con nosotros a un invitado a quien seguimos desde hace tiempo y que tiene muchas cosas que contar. Se trata de Pau Ninja. Con Pau hablamos de:  Multipotencialidad. Proyectos actuales. Las herramientas que usa Pau en sus proyectos. Por qué tienes una asistenta. Cómo monetiza sus proyectos. Por qué un modelo de monetización basado en suscripción y no en lanzamientos. Su experiencia emprendiendo en Estonia. Qué papel juega el copywriting en todos sus contenidos. Qué importancia ha tenido el podcasting en su camino como creador. La curación de información y las obsesiones.  Cuáles son las cifras de sus proyectos ahora mismo. Las claves para gestionar una comunidad. Y mucho más.  Puedes encontrar toda la información de Pau y los enlaces a todos sus proyectos en pau.ninja  Si aún no estás suscrito al podcast premium, es aquí: mumbler.io/podcast 

the artisan podcast
ep24 | the artisan podcast | jaime levy | ux strategist, author, speaker

the artisan podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 44:41


Jaime Levy, Ux Strategist, Speaker and author of UX Strategy: Product Strategy Techniques for Devising Innovative Digital Solutions available in 6 languages and now also on Audible You can find Jaime on LinkedIn and on jaimelevy.com   ----------------- Katty: I've been watching your career trajectory, and I was super excited to see that you had written a book, UX Strategy and that the audio version has just come out. So I wanted to have a conversation about you, about the book, and how you started your path. One thing that I've noticed is this trend of reinvention with you from a designer to a strategist to an author to a public speaker to a professor, and how all of that's going to come together for you. I just found that fascinating, so I'd love for you to talk about your origin story and what's steps you've taken to come here. Jaime: Let's see. Well, I guess it started even before the browser when I was creating my floppy disk magazines, and I was a graduate student at NYU, and just really interested in nonlinear storytelling.  And then trying to invent this new medium like it was just this total insane dreamer thing. And I guess because of the floppy disk I made, I actually finished it, and then I successfully brought the product to market by selling it. A floppy disk that opened into a HyperCard or Director presentation. I know for all the newbies, they're like, “What are you talking about?” Don't worry, you don't need to know this old-school stuff.  But you know it used to be really hard to make interactive presentations, but the upside of all of that was that you could be the first or you could do something that is only mediocre in design. But because it was the first it was like “yay.”  That was how I started out. I was a horrible interface designer and a horrible coder. But I just kept pounding on these floppy disks, and then, the short version of it is Billy Idol bought one, and then it got launched as a commercial endeavor and then I got my gigs at EMI records and Viacom. And it all just kept going from there you know to eventually, doing an online magazine, and then getting a creative director role and just constantly working.  I really believe that if you just keep working, and applying yourself, and learning new things, that eventually you'll connect and get whatever it is that you want. Some job, or some gig, or an opportunity. And I think that relentlessness to persevere was something that has stayed with me, and I actually need to kind of manifest it now as I'm starting the next chapter of my career.  Before UX, it was called interface design and then after interface design, then it was web design and then after web design, then we had information architecture and interaction design. And by the time I got back to LA after 9/11 and the dot com thing crashed in New York, as well as, San Francisco and LA, I came back here and it seemed at that point I needed to focus.  And I should mention early on as a result of the (floppy) disk I was asked to be a part-time professor at NYU, and I did get flown around the country and the world, to speak at conferences, and I think like when you have that success when you start out you think that's normal. And so for me, it's just been catching up with my old normal, and it's a curse and a blessing, and the blessing is obvious because you're like, oh, I just want to continue to be a public speaker, I want to continue being known or recognized for my work. But the negative consequences, it's an addiction, it's like a high that you set here and you think, Oh, I always have to be at this level of an overachiever. And so, you know, in that sense I feel like I didn't engage in my own personal life, you know because I sacrificed it for my career so much and didn't really like relax into it until my 30s when I got back to Los Angeles. Katty: Interesting. I saw you actually speak about it in one of your talks. I think was your Brazil talk about being an overachiever and what that means and constantly trying to do things, new things, or do things in a new way. I found that fascinating, it went through that same reinvention theme that I recognized in what you were talking about. So thanks for sharing that. So you mentioned, the new chapter, a new iteration of Jaime. Jaime: New? It's in progress. So, you know, I did my first book and I did really well with the first book. I was insane to write a book. That was so crazy. But I just felt like UX strategy was so interesting and even though nobody was paying me to write it, you certainly don't make money off of the book. I just was like okay I'll take a year and a half and spend my savings and write a book and sit in the library. And it was really rewarding.  And so then when it came time to do a second edition, if I want to be current I did that. And I did it during the lockdown so that was kind of a good thing to do when you can't really go teach in a classroom or go run workshops in a public space. But basically, my book is now out in the second edition and is being translated into languages, and I just found out it's in German and Italian, and Portuguese this time, you know, on top of the other six languages and that's really exciting.  But the thing with the book is you need to promote it, and you know and you need to go do things to market it. Whenever you make anything whether it be a floppy disk or a website or an app or a book or you're marketing yourself as a public speaker, it's one thing that you do it, but the other half of it is in order to be successful, you just got to market yourself or your product. And it's fine when I get paid to do growth design and markets and run experiments to market other people's products. But I think, I'm kind of at least right now, I feel I'm just kind of over-marketing myself. All of a sudden I feel like, ah, can't life just be simple again? Let me just get a job ideally as a UX strategist and, you know, and that's it, let things quiet down.  And so you can say it's an existential post-midlife crisis, or maybe it's a phase but I just had a job interview with a company that I hope I get, and they were telling me that they just had written an article related to this subject about so many people basically looking at their careers and saying, “Do I even want to do this?”  I feel like COVID Hit the reset button for a ton of people and so now I'm less killing myself about, “Oh wow, I'm really not going to go crazy promoting this book because I don't feel like it? Is there something wrong with me? Or is it just like maybe I just have to accept to let people read the book. I hope they like it.” And if people ask me to speak fine, but you know, I think it's like at a certain point you have to say okay where's friction and friction is trying to go tour and do workshops at what we hope might be the end of the pandemic but isn't. You know, it's like I suffered the same fate as people who, you know we're in an orchestra, you know, or who had movies that came out. So I'm in great company of people who made their money by doing things for the public and in person and now that you know, there's no UX conferences really planned. I'm speaking at the one in Estonia, one, this year, zero last year zero the year before, you know. So it makes you say what am I going to do now? Katty: You're right, it definitely has been a reset button on many fronts. We've seen this so much with so many other candidates that we work with who are re-evaluating “I've been doing XYZ until now, do I still want to do it, do I still want to live here?” Just really evaluating everything, but I totally hear you about the book because I also wrote a book during this pandemic. I had been working on it for three years, which was far too long but that's just the length of time that it took. The circumstances where we found ourselves allowed me to finish it, so I am grateful for that. That was the silver lining in this crazy year and t it allowed me to finish it and get it out. But it's just sitting there and it's nowhere near where it needs to be... but it is what it is. It's a story I needed to get out. I got it out. Now, if people find it, awesome, and if they don't then we'll cross that bridge.  Jaime: What's your book called? Katty: It's called The Butterfly Years, and it's just my personal story dealing with grief and has nothing to do with Artisan Creative and it has everything to do with me. Obviously, as somebody who's running a company, it is going to have to come to grips with having to manage grief and make that work otherwise it permeates everything. Katty: If it helps people out there, it's there. If somebody is going through it and they need to hear somebody else's story who's been in the same boat. Then I've done my job.  Katty: Yeah, So when I heard that you had done your second edition and you had just done an audiobook. I thought you know I want to talk to her and see how that whole process was for her.  Katty: Congratulations on your interview and I hope that it ends up being the right next thing. Jaime: I hope so too. That would be great if my first interview turned into a job offer. Katty: Putting out the good vibes. Jaime: They were very surprised because it was a UX strategy position and I didn't have anywhere in my portfolio that I wrote it. I didn't want to say that I literally wrote the book on UX strategy because then they think oh she's not humble or she's too experienced so I didn't mention it. They saw something in there and I'm like, “Oh yeah, I wrote a book kind of related to UX strategy.” and they're like what's it called, I'm like, UX Strategy. I can't even own it. I can't even own it, you know, I'm just like, ahh so shocking. Yeah, you know, I want the opportunity to practice what I preach. Enough, running around with the same lectures and enough training.  I've done so much training in the last year, I think sometimes we just need to go back and forth and be okay with it. I'm not saying I'll never do workshops again, I just need to take a break from that part of it or and pursue it. So yeah hopefully something will come up for me that is enjoyable. Because I think it's important to have a job if you like and what I was shocked by when I looked at the job market this time was, oh my god there's 8,624 UX jobs in this country and 30 or 40% of them are remote, and there's actually jobs advertised for UX strategist title. It used to just be me and two other people. I don't know if my book helped define the industry but it seems like when I read the job description, it had everything that I wrote about in my book so it's a really exciting time that there's so much opportunity out there. Katty: Yeah, for sure. I'd love for you to maybe help define that a little bit, because obviously, we hear you know there's on the design side of it, UX there's XD. Now it's customer experience, employee experience. Can you talk a little bit about that I know for just what I've heard you talk about before, it's really the research and the strategy is the precursor before you even get into the design part of it. And I learned that thinking time is so important to be able to do that? Can you talk a little bit about that? Katty: A little bit of both, actually. Jaime: Sure. So I basically define UX strategy as the intersection between product design and business strategy. So business strategy is the top-level vision of an organization. How do we make money, who are our customers? You know business is defined, ultimately by their customers.  So they have a vision and the vision might be a platform, multiple products, a suite of products, or one product. And then it's like how do you really elevate that product, and bring it to market? So that when people have that first whiff of it, they're like, smells awesome. And so when I started doing discovery phases back in 2008, 2009 for Schematic and for Huge, I really fell in love with it. Because I love doing competitive research. So interesting, I mean who doesn't want to get paid to research the marketplace? And I loved the idea of finally getting to do user research. And so that was when I really became interested in it and realized that there was nothing out there that told us how to do it. I would just make things up as I went along and as I moved from different organizations, I would clean up my deliverables and take them to the next level.  And then when Lean Startup came out--People don't think of Lean Startup, as a product strategy methodology but I certainly do. It's this idea to build the smallest version of your product, get it in front of your target customer, learn from it, whether it be an alpha or prototype, extract data from these learnings and learn from it, and then iterate.  All of a sudden the discovery phase became not something like Waterfall; first, we do discovery, then we do the implementation, then we do usability testing and find out at the very end that not only does our product suck but nobody wants it. It was insane. And now all of a sudden, the discovery phase became something that can be iterative and cross into the implementation phase, and you can start building products and doing strategy, and testing it and validating it in much smaller loops all along the way. So that's what's really exciting is an opportunity to run some kind of experiments to knock out, to do rapid prototyping, to use whatever it is like sketch XD, other prototyping tools to get business concepts in front of the target users, and start doing user research that's more focused on validating a value proposition, versus, you know, is this thing usable? Even if it's really usable, but nobody wants it, then who cares if it's usable, right? Katty: Yep. Very good, and with plenty of products out there with great usability but they're sitting on the shelf. I probably have a few of them. Katty: Fantastic. You talked a little bit about this but I think, given where you are going, pivoting, and where you see the future to be for you at this juncture. What can you share with people who are either just starting out in their career path? And/or because of this past year, lost their positions, and they have to reinvent themselves. Where is it that you dig down deep to find that inspiration and that determination to just say you know what, this isn't working, let me figure out where it is that I want to go? Jaime: Yeah, I think just to be honest it's very different for someone like me with two to three decades in the industry versus somebody who's starting out. So I wouldn't give someone the same advice I would give myself, there's definitely different things going on. I can remember very well when I was starting out and the same feelings that I have now are similar. My dad gave me this great advice. When you're looking for a job, or when you're starting on your career, and when you interview with people, you want to be careful that you don't have this flashing L on your head. Loser, loser, loser.  Because people will spot this lack of confidence or low self-esteem, you know, and it doesn't matter how successful you are, or have been, like me. Because you can still have low self-esteem or imposter syndrome, and so, it's like you need to somehow put all of these fears of I suck;. I'm not gonna make it; I'm an imposter;I am so crazy that I thought I could do this film, to begin with. I'm too old or I'm too young or my portfolio doesn't have X, X, X.  I have to constantly work on this, to this minute, which is spinning a much more positive narrative in my head that, “No, no, I have something of value to give”. And then putting that negative energy into therapy, exercise, whatever you need to do to take care of yourself, but I still to this day, put it into how can I showcase my work, what's missing? You know, look at my portfolio. Okay, it has all this but it's missing, you know, this one deliverable. Well, I better make it, fake it till you make it, you know, and figure out a way to like get it in there.  And the funny thing is is they may not even ask for it on that job interview, but if it's like this thing that you think is missing, then it's going to be flashing the L on your forehead and so to me, it's like puffing yourself up and what is it going to do to make you confident for these interviews and if showing your portfolio and getting excited around the storytelling of your UX design which, it still is for me, then get that into your portfolio and any missing things.  Don't spend eight hours a day looking for a job, spend four hours and the other four hours teaching yourself a new tool because there's always going to be new things to learn. And if you're not open to learning new things, up until, you know, your 50s and 60s, then whenever that is where you're not open to new things, you better be at that last job that you're going to station yourself at, because the industry, I promise you, just keeps on changing. You know it's amazing. Katty: Gosh. Great advice. I think for all levels of career and years in the industry and also not even to have to do with business. I think for anything where we tend to sometimes focus in on the thing we don't have versus on the things that we do have it's just such a great lesson to say you know what to say we have to reshift that mindset.  There's a great book that I read a couple of years ago by this woman called Sally Helgason, and it's called How Women Rise, and she talks a lot about specifically women and how we get into this mindset of, oh, but you know what, let me work harder because I'm missing this 10% thing and not focus on the 90% that I have and it's just crazy. I see it all the time. I see it, not just in candidates I see it in myself. And putting myself out for a conversation or a talk or something and if I don't get it's like, oh, that's because I didn't talk about this. You know what, maybe just wasn't the right thing. So, yeah, great lesson. And I think also that that whole thing also speaks of desperation, and I think that that comes through, so loud and clear, it erodes the confidence that would naturally be there if somebody has worked on their craft. Jaime: Yeah and we need to in this field of product design or research, ultimately we're making something that we need to upsell, at the very end, even if it's to our boss and say yeah this is awesome, you know, and it's like, oh my gosh if we come to it from this place of fear, we're never going to sell it.  So I think it's easy to focus on the negatives for a lot of us, and we can't afford to do that in our field because we're always upselling our work. Katty: Yeah. Have you ever taken the StrengthsFinder assessment? Have you ever done that?  Jaime: No, I don't even know what that is. Katty: It's similar to a DISC or Myers-Briggs. But it focuses on your strengths. The reason I like it, we do it for our company and we talk about our strengths all the time. Its created by Don Clifton, and is now as part of Gallup and it's a personality assessment. The reason for him creating this was that he felt people focused on their weaknesses, and not on their strengths. The whole thing is about what are your top five strengths and let's lead with your strengths and not focus on a thing that is number 30 something for you, let's focus on the things that you're really good at and then find someone else who your bottom five is their top five and then collaborate. So it sounds like it's just human nature that we go there. If we could learn not to go there, it would be less, I think less of a headache for all of us. Katty: Crazy. So, I know you're teaching, you're doing online courses, you mentioned that you're doing a talk in Estonia. Are you doing that in person, are you doing that virtually? How are you managing your time and all the different places you need to be, or how did you manage your time and all the different places you need to be? Jaime: Yeah, I don't know how I'm managing my time right now yet. I'm still waiting to see where a bunch of things land. But the Estonia conference is the first onsite conference since COVID, since March of 2020. Well, basically there's very few conferences in the beginning of the year for the first quarter anyway.  So, anyway, it's Web Usability Day I think is their legacy name. But it's a one-day conference and then there's workshops, three days prior to it. It's in Estonia, it's very affordable, it's gonna bring in like a massive crowd of UX professionals. A lot of new ones but people mid-level and all over the place. And they're coming from Estonia, but they're also coming across the Baltic from Finland, and a couple of other Baltic states. So, I'm closing the conference, I guess I'm kind of headlining it, and then my workshop is one day right before that. So November 25th,iis my UX Strategy Workshop and then November 26th is the conference. It's a Thursday, Friday, so but I'll be in Berlin back in November, and then I'm doing a couple of talks, just private ones where I'm flying in. And then going back to Berlin and then I'm going to do this thing in Estonia.  I am so over this idea of more online workshops. I think they're a joke, sorry guys, but the whole point of conferences was to get people together physically in a space to network and touch base with other people and build relationships. And it seems I've done a bunch of these fake conferences, and it doesn't feel the same, they never pay and it's a joke. So I'm not into those anymore.  I'm really stoked that these people you know, the COVID cases are extremely low [in Estonia]. I've had my third vaccine. already so I'm totally going. I won't be taking too much risk but definitely, I'm really excited to be around humans and doing my thing. Katty: Yeah, humans, human connection. I'm traveling internationally for the first time since March of last year as well, and I'm going to Mexico and then to Dubai. But, I have to navigate the whole PCR test thing because I'm not going to be in the States for three days before I go so I got to figure that part out. Jaime: Yeah. It's a crazy time. I can't believe really what happened. How much the pandemic just changed everything, it's just, it's shocking. Katty: Are you seeing that in the world of products, are you seeing what's happened with a pandemic impact, whether it be design thinking or about how people are approaching research. I would imagine that it's changed how people are looking at how they go forward. Jaime: Yeah well, everything's online now. When I left Huge back in 2009, 2010. It was because I didn't want to drive in my car in rush hour to agency land in Culver City, and I didn't want to work in person, I wanted to work from home. So I've been working remote since 2010 and it's not new to me, and Cisco Systems when I worked for them as a UX strategist, everybody was a remote workforce. So finally, the rest of the world is catching up with us and learning that it is possible, and even outside of product so I think it's opening up opportunities in many ways. But, the negative consequence, and I felt this when I taught my last course at Claremont University, was that my students who were graduating, were just getting internships, but they're online.  At Facebook or wherever, and at any point in your life where you need human contact, and you need the nuance of someone kind of seeing that you're confused, and you need mentoring or you need to get the confidence to ask for help, we need that to be in person. I feel like the people that are getting the worst end of the deal is the college graduates, the people who are just starting their career who have to start it by themselves in Zoom rooms. Hopefully, there's going to be some way that it isn't just this experience of online collaboration, because I just feel even when I had my second or third cat life of getting into the UX world, I can't even imagine that I would have had the trust and camaraderie that I had with people at Schematic who came over and showed me how to wireframe when nobody was looking. So hopefully maybe there's some way that people can reach out and have people to connect with for that kind of support since they can't get it in person. Katty: The whole mentoring piece of it. Yeah, taking somebody under your wing. It's harder to do it this way. Yeah, you're absolutely right. I have some nieces and nephews who started their first year in college last year. You've worked really hard to get into the school of your choice, but you don't get a chance to really experience that. So now as a sophomore, they're getting to experience it for the first time because now some other classes are in person. So really interesting to kind of watch this new generation of those who are starting and those who are graduating, it's just a very different world, for sure. Jaime: Yeah it's crazy. It's really crazy and maybe five years from now we'll look back on that and go, Oh man, it was so great, why didn't we just do all that remote work and it was so easy. But it is weird, I just got off the phone with a client and he's just saying that he's not leaving the house and he doesn't want to get the vaccine because he almost died from a vaccine from something else a long time ago, so he's just like staying in his house for his whole life. And I just, I feel in our field where we're designing products for customers and users, it's like, “Nah, we need to have human contact and get out there.” When I'm feeling really low, I reach out to a friend and I have to dump, and say “Ugh”, and have them tell me. I just hope we don't lose everything as a result of this, online world that we live in now. Katty: I don't think so. I mean I certainly hope not. I do feel that there's a hybrid version of it that's going to be more pronounced. I mean we went to such an extreme this past year, I do think there's going to be a hybrid world in front of us. I haven't quite figured it out yet, but little by little I think we'll fall into place. Let's end on a couple of inspiration pieces. Where do you get your inspiration? Jaime: My inspiration now is probably-- I consume a lot of film. I like to have a big impact. I actually went to the movie theater, on Sunday, by myself, bought a ticket to go see Ich bin dein Mensch, I'm Your Man, a German film about a man robot who was built to learn on what a woman wants and then they program him to be the perfect partner. It was amusing, to walk into it, to have it open up and see all of Mitte Berlin and see the TV tower and see the food and see inside the flat. I miss Berlin so much right now, I felt like when I got out of there  I had just gone to Berlin. It just reminded me of all these tiny little things. So I get a lot of inspiration from being able to transport myself into different realities physically and through film, and right now, traveling is limited,but I definitely get my inspiration from seeing other cultures, other ways to live.  I lived in Berlin for most of the pandemic, and it took months, but after being there and away from here for so many months it really-- when you experience other cultures, it makes you appreciate and also find things you don't like about your own culture. But I feel like having perspective is what inspires me. Katty: Love that, and for creativity to bloom, do you need that spark of inspiration for creativity to happen, or is there another thing you tap into when you sit down to write or to do another wireframe or to create, what would you tap into for that? Jaime: I don't know, I wish I could answer that. I don't know. I spend my days at the computer then I go and walk on a trail. It's extremely important for me to get out and walk in nature and I do that every day and I listen to the same 3 podcasts. The New York Times Day thing, The Berlin Briefing, and then Doug Rushkoff's Team Human And that stuff, while I'm like in nature and walking around listening to these podcasts, again, I guess I feel transported and I feel immersed. I think that when I leave the house, and when I come back, whether I'm jogging or listening to music and weird experimental atonal music that nobody would like unless they're into weird music. That helps me really reset the crazy stuff we're telling ourselves in our head or just like being in a mundane moment. I think sitting at a computer for more than four hours, not healthy for me.   Katty: I love that. Both for creativity and inspiration, it's not going to happen nine to five necessarily looking at a little screen. To be able to get out of this and just get other influences. I find nature so healing in so many ways and my ideation just goes off the roof when I'm out and about. Jaime: Where do you go, where do you get your nature?  Katty: My favorite place is Point Doom in Malibu. It's a very easy little hike, but you are at eye level of the pelicans flying by. It's just the most incredible sensation sitting there and you see these majestic birds flying right at your eye level. So whenever I can, whether it's a birthday or an anniversary or something special, that's where I like to go.    Jaime: Nice. Yeah.   Katty: Well Jamie where can people find you?   Jaime: People can find me on LinkedIn, @Jaimerlevy. I'm on Twitter, I'm not tweeting so much. I was told I need to get on Instagram but I'm like, “What?”. And then Jaimelevy.com and then the book userexperiencestrategy.com. I'd love to just mention if people don't like to go walk in nature. I recorded my audible book at this great studio in the valley, where I grew up, and it's me reading my book and doing some impressions of myself, and it's a lot of stories and so far the reviews have been really favorable. And so if you're not a big reader like me I hate it, I don't really like reading. I can read an article but long-format, not so good. Check out my audible book if you're not sure go to userexperiencestrategy.com and listen to the first two chapters and try it on. But I'm really excited about the audible, you know for my book I self-produced it, paid for it, and it's mine. So that was important to me, you know.      

Of Course I'm Not OK: The Podcast
65. Navigating The Fire

Of Course I'm Not OK: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 34:21


Welcome back, Listeners! In today's show, Karen & Katie chat about how to deal when the universe seems to continue piling on not-so-ideal scenarios into our lives. The duo goes deep into talking about strategies that help them mentally and physically, and explore dark dumpster metaphors. Additionally, they chat about Katie's experience with the COVID booster and Karen's blissful reunion with Erin from Estonia (check out episode #5 for our fun interview with her!). Thanks for listening, Friends, Enjoy!

Aussievision - Eurovision from Down Under
Eurovision Weekly Update - Bulgaria, Estonia, Albania, Italy, Sweden and Sheldon Riley interview

Aussievision - Eurovision from Down Under

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 44:08


In a huge week we cover the first Eurovision song of the season from Bulgaria, today's results from Eesti Laul in Estonia, touch on the songs released for Albania's national final, discuss the artists announced for Sanremo in Italy and Melodifestivalen in Sweden and finish with a portion of our interview with Australia Decides artist Sheldon Riley. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/aussievision

Whiskey Riff Raff
Charles Wesley Godwin

Whiskey Riff Raff

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 52:33


The very talented Charles Wesley Godwin discusses his phenomenal new album 'How The Mighty Fall,' John Denver and growing up in West Virginia, playing his first gig in Estonia, the meteoric rise of Zach Bryan, fly fishing, college football, and more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Bunker
Daily: Clean Hands, Dirty Money – Transparency International's Frank Vogl on Corruption

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:19


Laundering the dirty cash of kleptocrats is labour-intensive work. So who are the Western bankers, lawyers, accountants, and realtors enabling corruption across the world? Frank Vogl, co-founder of Transparency International, talks to Alex Andreou about his latest book, The Enablers, cleaning up the City of London, how cash launderers still lurk in the least corrupt countries …and why stunning artworks often conceal the ugliest of transactions. “We never have petty corruption without widescale corruption in place.” “The art market is the most opaque of all markets.” “Enablers aid and abet the kleptocrats to make their investments.” “The amount of money that Denmark has laundered through Estonia is larger than Estonia's entire economy.” “Even in countries that are perceived not to be corrupt, the enablers are at work.” Presented by Alex Andreou. Produced by Andrew Harrison. Assistant producers: Jelena Sofronijevic and Jacob Archbold. Music by Kenny Dickinson. Audio production by Alex Rees. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin
Paavo Järvi Conducts Beautiful Music

Here's The Thing with Alec Baldwin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 52:51


(Recorded June 2021) Estonian conductor Paavo Järvi is one of the most in-demand maestros in the world, and one of Alec's favorite conductors. Järvi is currently the chief conductor of the NHK symphony orchestra in Tokyo and the Tonhalle Orchester-Zürich. Over his career, he's led orchestras in Paris, Frankfurt, Stockholm, Malmö, and, for the decade between 2001 and 2011, here in the United States, as the musical director of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. He and his musical family are pillars of the thriving classical music scene in his home country of Estonia. Paavo Järvi talks to Alec about how slowing down in the pandemic offered Paavo time to think, his early love of music, what it was like to come to the United States from Soviet-era Estonia as a 17-year-old, and what he took away from a decade of conducting the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 14:13


Anthony Fauci is laughing … and more on today's CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Tuesday, November 23, 2021. Find all our shows at Crosspolitic.com and download the Fight Laugh Feast App at your favorite app store so you don't miss anything. And if you're not yet a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member, let me just encourage you to consider it today. We are seeking to build a Rowdy Christian Network -- news, sports, talk shows, even sitcoms that celebrate the good life and give liberals the proverbial whim-whams. If you'd like to help us do that, join the club. We love our sponsors, but the heartbeat of CrossPolitic is individual members supporting the work. Join today. Fauci & Ted Cruz Spar Play Audio Cruz responded to Fauci's remarks in a series of tweets late on Sunday afternoon, calling Fauci “an unelected technocrat who has distorted science and facts in order to exercise authoritarian control over millions of Americans.” “He lives in a liberal world where his smug ‘I REPRESENT science' attitude is praised,” Cruz said. Cruz then laid out four “facts” related to his call for the DOJ to investigate Fauci: On May 11, Fauci testified before a Senate Committee that “the NIH has not ever and does not now fund gain-of-function research in the Wuhan Institute of Virology.”On October 20, NIH wrote they funded an experiment at the Wuhan lab testing if “spike proteins from naturally occurring bat coronaviruses circulating in China were capable of binding to the human ACE2 receptor in a mouse model.” That is gain of function research.Fauci's statement and the NIH's October 20 letter cannot both be true. The statements are directly contradictory.18 USC 1001 makes it [a] felony, punishable by up to 5 years in prison, to lie to Congress. What does Fauci think of all this? Piers Morgan added his voice to the criticism of Fauci in his column in the Daily Mail: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10254589/PIERS-MORGAN-Faucis-political-point-scoring-shows-hes-interested-promoting-himself.html I've never heard Dr Anthony Fauci's cell phone voicemail greeting, but I imagine it says: 'Yes, I'll come on your show.' For someone whose day job is supposed to be leading America's scientific and medical war against Covid-19, he seems to have an incredible amount of spare time for self-promotional media interviews… The most egregious came on CBS's Face The Nation when Fauci burst out laughing after he was asked about Republican senator Ted Cruz calling for him to be prosecuted over his links to the Wuhan Institute of Virology from where many think the coronavirus outbreak leaked. 'I should be prosecuted?' he chuckled. 'What happened on January 6th, senator?' The interviewer, Margaret Brennan, then asked if he thought he was being used as a scapegoat to deflect attention from President Trump's culpability over the Capitol riots. 'Of course!' Fauci smirked. You have to be asleep not to figure that one out!' 'Well,' pressed Brennan, 'there are a lot of Republican senators taking aim at this.' 'That's okay,' replied Fauci, 'I'm just gonna do my job. I'm gonna be saving lives, and they are gonna be lying.' Brennan then said: 'It seems another level of danger to play politics around matters of life and death.' To which Fauci, without a trace of self-awareness, nodded: 'Exactly. And to me, that's unbelievably bad, because all I want to do is save people's lives.' Right, and the best way to do that is to alienate half the country from listening to you by trading in political point-scoring! It's always a worrying indicator of rampant egomania when a public figure starts talking about themselves in the third person, and sure enough that's what Fauci then did. 'Anybody who's looking at this carefully realizes that there's a distinct anti-science flavor to this,' he said. 'If they get up and criticize science, nobody's going to know what they're talking about. But if they get up and really aim their bullets at Tony Fauci — people could recognize there's a person there, so it's easy to criticize. But they're really criticizing science, because I represent science, and that's dangerous.' Wow. He sounds more like a religious leader berating non-believers than a scientist trying to grapple with a pandemic that has seen more scientific flip-flopping than any global medical crisis in my lifetime. The parallel is apt because the more he's been attacked, the more self-righteous, zealous and preachy Fauci has grown. The problem with Fauci saying he IS the Science is that so often in the pandemic, he's got the science plain wrong. In January 2020, when Covid first erupted in China, Fauci declared the virus was 'not a major threat for the people of the United States and this is not something the citizens of the United States right now should be worried about.' Fauci then said Covid was less concerning than the flu, which again was proven to be total nonsense. In subsequent weeks, Fauci repeatedly said the public shouldn't bother buying masks as they were ineffective. 'If you look at the masks that you buy in a drug store,' he said, 'the leakage around that doesn't really do much to protect you.' He also told 60 Minutes: 'People should not be walking around in masks.' Three months later, he conceded masks do work, and since then has demanded everyone wear them, though his guidance on when and where people should wear them has changed more often than a chameleon having an acid trip. Fauci initially opposed President Trump's China travel ban, then later said it had saved lives. He's also long dismissed the theory that Covid could have leaked from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, insisting it had natural origins. Yet now many top scientists believe the lab leak theory is far more likely. More damagingly for Fauci, it transpired that the Wuhan lab received $600,000 in funding from the NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health and run by Fauci) and emails were revealed showing he was informed early into the pandemic that experts were suspicious of the 'natural origin' theory. Fauci's links to the lab may be even murkier. Republican senators including Ted Cruz and Rand Paul have called for him to be investigated over suggestions that NIH money went towards funding risky 'gain of function' research to modify coronaviruses at the Wuhan lab. Back in May, Fauci testified that the NIH 'has not ever and does not now fund gain of function research in the Wuhan Institute of Virology.' However, he also said during that same hearing that there was no way to know if Chinese scientists working at the lab had lied and conducted gain of function experiments on bat coronaviruses using U.S. tax dollars. 'There's no way of guaranteeing that,' Fauci admitted. Given this response, the gravity of the claims, and the consequences for the whole world, it doesn't seem unreasonable for Fauci to be properly investigated as to exactly what did go down at that Wuhan lab involving US funding. And his furious reaction to any suggestions he's not being entirely transparent about it raises more suspicion than it dampens. Other Fauci pandemic flip-flops include saying he didn't believe in federal vaccine mandates, then recently endorsing some, and telling Americans in October to be wary of gathering for Christmas before performing an immediate U-turn after his comments provoked outrage and telling Americans to have a 'good normal Christmas'. Morgan concludes: And the more he contradicts himself on TV, the more he erodes public trust. If, as he insists, his only interest is in saving lives, then it's time Anthony Fauci put his ego away, stayed off TV and shut the f* up. Werkz: DNB Shan and his team at Werkz specialize in concealed carry holsters for pistols with lights. They believe every defensive pistol should have a light and a holster. They currently offer holsters for 1,274 pistol and light combinations, plus can help outfit your pistol with a light. Use their holster finder at Werkz.com/CrossPolitic and be prepared to defend day and night. EU & Taiwan https://apnews.com/article/europe-china-estonia-taiwan-latvia-de0c6b41ad5a50e9d4089ad9bb2c144d TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Lawmakers from all three Baltic states met with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen on Monday in a sign of further cooperation between European Union nations and Taiwan. It is the first joint visit to Taiwan by members of parliament from Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, Tsai said. She welcomed the lawmakers, who are attending the 2021 Open Parliament Forum, hosted by Taiwan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. China claims Taiwan is its own territory and rejects any attempts by the self-ruled island to participate in international forums or establish diplomatic relations with other countries that would give it international recognition. Tsai noted the values and experiences that Taiwan has in common with the three countries. “Taiwan and the Baltic nations share similar experiences of breaking free of authoritarian rule and fighting for freedom. The democracy we enjoy today was hard earned,” Tsai said. “This is something we all understand most profoundly.” Matas Maldeikis, head of the Lithuanian delegation, said he hopes to see even stronger ties with Taiwan. “We are here to express our solidarity with you. We hope the soon-to-be-open Lithuanian trade office in Taiwan will help to expand the partnership between Taiwan and Lithuania and contribute to a closer relationship with Taiwan and the whole European bloc,” he said. Earlier in November, Taiwan opened a de facto embassy in Lithuania under the name of Taiwanese Representative Office. Lithuania also plans to open a representative office in Taiwan. In response, China reduced its level of diplomatic relations with Lithuania to below ambassador level and also recalled its ambassador. Earlier, China expelled the Lithuanian ambassador from Beijing. Finland Persecuting Christian Pastor https://thefederalist.com/2021/11/23/in-case-with-global-implications-finland-puts-christians-on-trial-for-their-faith/?fbclid=IwAR28pclcdbcX-7Zxa3HzBjsQIL4p6MWPrNi4Pnzyd6CXvfN3XlJ1T8MnxyI Juhana Pohjola This is the man who appears to be the first in the post-Soviet Union West to be brought up on criminal charges for preaching the Christian message as it has been established for thousands of years. Also charged in the case that goes to trial on January 24 is Pohjola's fellow Lutheran and a Finnish member of Parliament, Paivi Rasanen. Rasanen's alleged crimes in a country that claims to guarantee freedom of speech and religion include tweeting a picture of a Bible verse. Potential penalties if they are convicted include fines and up to two years in prison. Rasanen and Pohjola are being charged with “hate speech” for respectively writing and publishing a 24-page 2004 booklet that explains basic Christian theology about sex and marriage, which reserves sex exclusively for within marriage, which can only consist of one man and one woman, for life. The Finnish prosecutor claims centuries-old Christian teachings about sex “incite hatred” and violate legal preferences for government-privileged identity groups. Ghislain Maxwell Trial Beginning https://thehill.com/regulation/court-battles/583301-trial-of-ghislaine-maxwell-alleged-accomplice-of-jeffrey-epstein-set The trial of British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, who is accused of helping her close confidant Jeffrey Epstein recruit and sexually abuse underage girls, is set to begin on Monday, more than two years after the convicted sex offender's sudden death in prison. A jury of 12 individuals and six alternates will be empaneled at the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, where they will hear testimony in what is expected to be a six-week trial, according to The Washington Post. Maxwell, 59, has been charged with six counts for allegedly helping Epstein facilitate a sex trafficking scheme: conspiracy to entice a minor to travel to engage in illegal sex acts, enticing a minor to travel to engage in illegal sex acts, conspiracy to transport a minor with the intent to engage in criminal sexual activity, transporting a minor with the intent to engage in criminal sexual activity, conspiracy to commit sex trafficking of minors and sex trafficking of minors. Maxwell, who has pleaded not guilty to all charges, is facing a maximum of 70 years in prison, according to the Post. This case is of particular interest as many celebrities and politicians have had ties to Epstein and Maxwell over the years, including former presidents Clinton and Trump. Epstein was famously found dead in his jail cell in August 2019. His death was ruled a suicide under very suspicious circumstances, sparking the cultural epitaph “Epstein didn't kill himself.” Psalm of the Day: Psalm 61 by Jamie Soles Play audio: 0:00-1:28 Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. This is Toby Sumpter with Crosspolitic News. A reminder: Support Rowdy Christian media, and share this show or become a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member. For a limited time, we're offering a Christmas Man Box for new subscribers at the Silver level and above, and if you're already a club member, you can purchase the CrossPolitic Christmas Man Box for just $50 while supplies last. Remember if you didn't make it to the Fight Laugh Feast Conferences, club members have access to all the talks from Douglas Wilson, Joe Boot, Jeff Durbin, Glenn Sunshine, Nate Wilson, David Bahnsen, Voddie Baucham, Ben Merkle, and many more. Join today and have a great day.

Aussievision - Eurovision from Down Under
Eurovision Weekly Update - Australia, Estonia, Bulgaria and Sweden

Aussievision - Eurovision from Down Under

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 29:45


We run through the three acts announced for Australia Decides, the results of this morning's Eesti Laul quarter-final in Estonia, the Eurovision artist announcement from Bulgaria and the first 14 Melfest participants in Sweden. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/aussievision

The History Hour
The assassination of the Mirabal sisters

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 50:10


The three Mirabal sisters were leading figures in the Dominican Republic's opposition movement against the dictator General Rafael Trujillo. They were all killed on the 25th November 1960. We hear from the daughter of one of them, Minerva, who tells us about her family and from Professor Elizabeth Manley on the Mirabal sister's legacy in the Dominican Republic. Also in the programme, the last case of Smallpox in Europe, the woman who helped her mother to die and laid the groundwork for the Netherlands becoming the first country in the world to legalise euthanasia. Also how Estonia led the way on connecting up schools to the internet and the painting by Gustav Klimt which was stolen by Nazis and only returned to its Jewish owners after a lengthy legal battle. Photo: The three Mirabal Sisters, Patria, Minerva and Maria Teresa (Credit: Mirabal family collection)

ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast
Eurovision Insight Podcast: Saying Goodbye To Our First Songs

ESC Insight: The Eurovision Song Contest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 17:03


Winners and losers in Estonia, returning heroes in Sweden, another chance to talk Toto, and more, in the latest Insight News podcast. The post Eurovision Insight Podcast: Saying Goodbye To Our First Songs appeared first on ESC Insight - Home of the Unofficial Eurovision Song Contest Podcast.

Witness History
Estonia's internet ‘Tiger Leap'

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 8:57


Estonia started connecting all its schools to the internet very early. In 1996 less than two percent of the world's population had access to the web but Estonia's initiative, known as ‘Tiger Leap' captured the imagination and the hopes of the whole country. Estonians became early adopters of all sorts of digital services, from online banking to digital ID cards. However, a decade later Estonia was one of the first places in the world to suffer a sustained cyber attack. Caroline Bayley has been speaking to one of the founders of ‘Tiger Leap'- former government minister Jaak Aaviksoo. Photo credit: Getty images

A Small Voice: Conversations With Photographers

Born in 1961 and completing her degree in Audio Visual studies at The Surrey Institute, Farnham in 1986, Anna Fox began her career as a documentary photographer. Influenced by the British documentary tradition and the USA's ‘New Colourists', she chronicled new town life in Basingstoke (locally known as ‘Doughnut City') and went on to publish the monograph Work Stations (1988), a study of London Office life in Thatcher's Britain. These works were exhibited extensively as far a field as Brazil and Estonia and in Through the Looking Glass, at the Barbican Art Gallery in 1989 curated by David Mellor and Ian Jeffrey, establishing Anna as a significant figure within the field of new colour documentary.In later projects, made in the 1990's, In Pursuit (1990), The Village (1991-1992 Cross Channel Photographic Mission commission), Friendly Fire (1992) and Zwarte Piet (the Netherlands 1994-1999) Anna created a new direction inventing innovative approaches and raising questions regarding the problems of documentary practice. These projects were exhibited in a number of solo exhibitions including The Photographers Gallery, London and The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago.By early 2000 Anna produced two autobiographical works: Cockroach Diary and My Mothers Cupboards and my Father's Words which completely turned on its head the notion of the documentary photographer as outsider. These new works investigated the personal and difficult world of domestic households and relationships bringing together a mix of image and text in two miniature book works. Later in 2003 the series Made in Europe questioned further the power relation between subject and photographer by handing over power to the subject in whork that portrayed a vision of contemporary Europe through the eyes and voices of teenagers. The projects Country Girls (1996-2001) and Pictures of Linda (1983-ongoing) introduced a collaborative element to Anna's practice: by working in partnership with the singer/songwriters Alison Goldfrapp and Linda Lunus the relationship between subject and photographer was being explored from a new perspective.Anna was shortlisted for the 2010 Deutsche Borse Photography Prize and the 2012 Pilar Citoler Prize. Her later projects, Resort 1 and Resort 2 are published by Shilt, Amsterdam, Loisirs is published by Diaphane and an new book, BLINK, will be published by Central St Martins.Anna is Professor of Photography at the University for the Creative Arts in Farnham and leads the Fast Forward Women in Photography research project.On episode 166, Anna discusses, among other things:Reflections on the past 18 monthsWhat she's been working on during that periodHaving a lot of ideasMoving away from a ‘project based mentaility'The influences of people who taught her: Graham, Parr and KnorrThe exploration of the every day41 Hewitt Road and the transition to focusing on domestic photographyHer use of text in conjunction with imagesMoving to and working in an English country villageHer project Zwarte PietMy Mothers Cupboards and my Father's WordsFast Forward Women in Photography Referenced:John DillwynMary DillwynPaul ReasPaul SearightAnthony HaugheyTessa BunneyDavid MoorePaul GrahamMartin ParrKaren KnorVal WilliamsJane AustenGilbert WhiteWilliam CobbettRaymond WilliamsMieke BalMark Sealy - AutographNaomi Rosenblaum Website | Instagram | Facebook“It's the discovery of the personal voice, I suppose, and the personal stories that you want to tell, that you can't articulate. That's why someone becomes a photographer or a filmmaker… you use photography because you can't speak it.”

Taxgirl
72: International Tax Competition & the Impact of a Global Minimum Tax

Taxgirl

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 34:18


The recent agreement on a global minimum tax, and other changes to tax rules around the world, have called into question the future of tax competition. Each year, The Tax Foundation puts out their International Tax Competitiveness Index. The Index seeks to measure the extent to which a countries' tax system adheres to important aspects of tax policy. Among so many changes and the global minimum agreement, is the annual index still relevant today?  International tax policy is heating up in the wake of the OECD's global minimum tax agreement. Listen to Kelly and Daniel Bunn tease out the details of tax competitiveness and the global tax agreement in plain English.On today's episode of the Taxgirl podcast, Kelly is joined by Daniel Bunn to discuss the relevance and nuance of the International Tax Competitiveness Index. Daniel is the VP of Global Projects at The Tax Foundation, where he researches international tax issues with a focus on tax policy in Europe. Prior to joining The Tax Foundation, he worked in the US Senate at the Joint Economic Committee as part of Senator Mike Lee's social capital project. He was also on the policy staff for both Senator Lee and Senator Tim Scott. During his time with the Senate, Daniel developed legislative initiatives on tax, trade, regulatory, and budget policy. Listen to Kelly and Daniel talk about the OECD and the Tax Competitiveness Index:Daniel recently penned an article (linked below) about whether or not the Index and “competitiveness” models will matter in years to come as the OECD deal moves forward. What is a quick synopsis on today's status on the OECD deal? How does a tax rate factor into tax competition? Daniel explains the nuances surrounding tax rates, and how The Tax Foundation generally considers them as a means to fund various public programs, which can affect tax competitiveness in many different ways.  One word that comes up a lot in discussions of tax policy is “distortion.” Daniel explains what distortions are in the realm of tax policy, and how they factor in to the big picture of the global tax landscape. When talking about the global tax agreement, Daniel says a lot of the implementation over the next few years will come down to behavior changes on both the company side and the government side.  A big sticking point during international discussions pertaining to the OECD was the digital services tax, and how different countries and governments will shift as a result of doing away with the digital services tax long term. How does Daniel anticipate governments may react as a result? One of the interesting premises of the deal is that everyone has to cooperate in order for it to work as intended. So far, a majority of countries (more than 130) have signed on in agreement, but not yet all of them. Is Daniel concerned by lingering resistance down the road? Is there any fear that all the agreements carefully laid today could be undone by future elections? Daniel unpacks the roles that diplomacy and politics play in the OECD as well as in compiling the Tax Competitiveness Index. For someone who's never seen the annual index before, Kelly says she would expect people to assume the larger global powerhouses to be at the top of the tax competitiveness rankings. However, this is certainly not always the case. Daniel explains why this happens and how some of the smaller countries get placed toward the top of the list. In general, it seems the index rewards simplicity in tax policy in favor of high complexity, which is likely why the US is ranked lower than many others. What are Daniel's thoughts on the US's ranking and what are the factors that contributed to its place in the index? How does remote work tie into tax competitiveness? In Daniel's tax writing he discusses how some of the smaller high-ranking countries, like Estonia and Latvia, are trying to “woo” remote workers with their tax policies.  Kelly says one of her favorite pieces of the

The Economist Morning Briefing
The Economist Morning Briefing, November 18th, 2021

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 3:48


Protests in Sudan and military exercises in Estonia  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Red Line
56 - Could NATO Defend the Baltic States Against Russia?

The Red Line

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 77:58


With Russia becoming increasingly brazen on NATO's Eastern flank, the Baltic nations aren't looking as safe as they once were. Could we see another unofficial invasion of the Baltic states by Russia's little green men, and if so how would NATO respond? This week we sit down with our panel and talk through NATO's Baltic defence plan, and what needs to change to be able to guarantee the safety of NATO's Eastern frontier.  On the panel this week.  - Mathieu Boulegue (Chatham House) - Thomas Graham (CFR) - David Shlapak (RAND) Follow the show on @TheRedLinePod Follow Michael on @MikeHilliardAus For more info please visit - www. theredlinepodcast.com