Podcasts about Groucho Marx

American comedian (1890-1977)

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Latest podcast episodes about Groucho Marx

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Change of Time (09-29-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 29:17


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Our American Stories
A Place at Groucho's Table

Our American Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 20:18


On this episode of Our American Stories, in college, Steve Stoliar's dad wanted him to get a job, but Steve didn't want to work at Taco Bell… so he called up Groucho Marx. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Good Old Days of Radio Show
Episode #128: You Bet Your Life

The Good Old Days of Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 37:09


Today we say the secret word, and travel back to visit the late 1940s to another early You Bet Your Life. It's the game show that was more about the contestant's conversations with the ever-witty quiz-master Groucho Marx than the game itself. And John shares some wonderful stories about the real life friendship of Groucho and George Fenneman. Visit our website: https://goodolddaysofradio.com/ Subscribe to our Facebook Group for news, discussions, and the latest podcast: https://www.facebook.com/groups/881779245938297 If you don't do Facebook, we're also on Gab: https://gab.com/OldRadio  Our theme music is "Why Am I So Romantic?" from Animal Crackers: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01KHJKAKS/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_MK8MVCY4DVBAM8ZK39WD

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Jr is Head of Household (09-22-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 23:02


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Classic Radio Theater
Hollywood 360 11/5/22 Hour 2 You Bet Your Life

Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 49:24 Transcription Available


Carl and Lisa play Beat the Host and presents the comedy/quiz series You Bet Your Life 2/7/55 Secret Word: Show w/ Groucho Marx

The Clean Comedy Podcast
EP 306: Kendra Cunningham

The Clean Comedy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 39:41


This week we welcome Kendra Cunningham. Kendra is Boston bred and Brooklyn base. Kendra Cunningham has been named as a comic to watch by Time Out New York and has been compared to Groucho Marx and Mae West by the UK's Chortle. A regular on the New York and Boston comedy scene, she has previously been in the Montreal Just for Laughs Festival, The Glasgow Comedy Festival, and was a finalist in the Boston Comedy Festival for two years in a row. She has twice appeared on NBC's Last Comic Standing gaining two spots in the top 100 jokes of the season.Her first comedy special “On My Best Behavior” was released by DryBar comedy in 2018. Her debut album, Blonde Logic, was released in 2016 by Rooftop Comedy and in 2017, Blonde Logic a book of comedic essays was released on Kindle. Her second album “Less Bitter, More Glitter” was released in October 2019 through 800 Pound Gorilla. And her new special "Meatball Therapy" is out now! Check them out at https://www.kendracunningham.com/Shout out to this episodes sponsor: A Suite LifeChief and Malik are joined by 10-year NBA Veteran and current LA Clippers player Robert Covington and multi-hyphenate/star of MTV's Ridiculousness Sterling "Steelo" Brim for this episode.In Part 1 of this transformative conversation, they talk about the life journeys, failures, successes, and much more. Part 2 of the conversation launches next week!A Suite Life is available anywhere you get podcasts.We now have an INSTAGRAM! Check it out at thecleancomedypodcast on InstagramWe also have a PATREON! Check out patreon.com/CleanComedyPodcast for more details.Turn your funny into money! Check out the official website here: http://comedypreneur.comPick up a copy of “How To Produce Comedy Shows For Fun & Profit” here: https://amzn.to/31H4wxmDo you have a topic that you would like to hear discussed? Are you a clean comedian looking for an awesome podcast to be in? Do you have life-burning questions?Reach out to us at https://www.thecleancomedypodcast.com/contact/

Steve Dale's Other World from WGN Plus
Cabaret ZaZou presents: Luminaire! Eat, Drink and Be Amazed!

Steve Dale's Other World from WGN Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022


Frank Ferrante is the star of Cabaret ZaZou’s Luminaire show as well as an upcoming show starring him as the one and only Groucho Marx! He also talks about how he met Groucho and eventually became very close with the family. Hold onto your eyebrows! Frank Ferrante’s Groucho is for one night only on November […]

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Neighbor Feud Over Jr's Goat (09-15-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 29:49


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!
Episode 2: The Big Show Podcast 1950-11-12 (002) Tallulah Bankhead, Fanny Brice, Groucho Marx, Ezio Pinza, Jane Powell, etc (Mindi) (2022)

Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 94:14


Mindi brings us Tallulah Bankhead, Fanny Brice, Groucho Marx, Ezio Pinza, Jane Powell, etc 

Judy Garland and Friends - OTR Podcast
The Big Show Podcast 1950-11-12 (002) Tallulah Bankhead, Fanny Brice, Groucho Marx, Ezio Pinza, Jane Powell, etc (Mindi) (2022)

Judy Garland and Friends - OTR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 94:14


Our host Mindi brings us Tallulah Bankhead, Fanny Brice, Groucho Marx, Ezio Pinza, Jane Powell, etc

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Peg's Mother Visits (05-13-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 29:27


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Variety x Armed Forces Radio
Mail Call | with Groucho Marx, Betty Grable, Judy Garland, 1943

Variety x Armed Forces Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 31:58


Mail Call with episode 19 featuring Groucho Marx, Betty Grable, Jose Iturbi, and Judy Garland. This episode aired January 9, 1943.Groucho Marx insists Bill Goodwin announce him, and isn't satisfied with it. Judy Garland sings, "I Never Knew." Jose Iturbi performs a classical number, but Judy wants him to 'make with the jive,' and teaches him to swing. Groucho introduces Betty Grable as his "mom," and she goes along with the gag. Betty gets love advice from Groucho.My other podcast channels include: MYSTERY x SUSPENSE -- DRAMA X THEATER -- SCI FI x HORROR -- COMEDY x FUNNY HA HA -- THE COMPLETE ORSON WELLES.You can subscribe to my channels to receive new post notifications, it's 100% free to join. If inclined, please leave a positive rating or review on your podcast service. Instagram @duane.otrThank you for your support.This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podtrac - https://analytics.podtrac.com/privacy-policy-gdrp

Classic Radio Theater
You Bet Your Life Ep. #93

Classic Radio Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 63:04 Transcription Available


Enjoy two free comedy/quiz episodes of You Bet Your Life w/ Groucho Marx A) 4/21/54 Secret word: People B) 4/28/54 Secret word: Smile Created by John Guedel, You Bet Your Life was one of the best-loved quiz shows to air on both radio and television. It was hosted by Groucho Marx of the Marx Brothers, with announcer and assistant George Fenneman at his side. It debuted on radio in 1947 and lasted until 1960. For much of this time it was also seen on television. Contestant teams usually consisted of one male and one female, mostly selected from the studio audience. Groucho would engage in humorous conversations with the contestants and if they said the “secret word” (a common word revealed to the audience at the outset of each episode) a toy duck resembling Groucho – with eyeglasses and a mustache – descended from the ceiling to bring a $100 prize. After the conversations, the actual game began. Contestants were allowed to choose from a list of 20 available categories and try to answer a series of questions within the category to win additional money. At the end of the show, the contestants could play for a Jackpot question, risking half of their previous earnings in the hope of winning the Jackpot.

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox
Classic Radio for November 1, 2022 Hour 2 - The Secret Word is TREE

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 42:29


You Bet Your Life starring Groucho Marx, originally broadcast November 1, 1950, The secret word is tree. The first contestants are about to be married, a police officer and his fiancee. Also Claudia, originally broadcast November 1, 1948, David Returns. David returns (?) to work.Visit my web page - http://www.classicradio.streamWe receive no revenue from YouTube. If you enjoy our shows, listen via the links on our web page or if you're so inclined, Buy me a coffee! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wyattcoxelAHeard on almost 100 radio stations from coast to coast. Classic Radio Theater features great radio programs that warmed the hearts of millions for the better part of the 20th century. Host Wyatt Cox brings the best of radio classics back to life with both the passion of a long-time (as in more than half a century) fan and the heart of a forty-year newsman. But more than just “playing the hits”, Wyatt supplements the first hour of each day's show with historical information on the day and date in history including audio that takes you back to World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. FDR, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan, Carter, Nixon, LBJ. It's a true slice of life from not just radio's past, but America's past.Wyatt produces 21 hours a week of freshly minted Classic Radio Theater presentations each week, and each day's broadcast is timely and entertaining!

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Five Dollars is Missing (03-25-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 29:49


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!
Episode 4: Bing Crosby Podcast 1947-10-22 (04) Clifton Webb and Burl Ives, Al Jolson 1947-10-23 Groucho Marx (2022), Jimmy Durante 1947-10-22 Victor Moore and Jo Stafford

Jack Benny Show - OTR Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 96:50


Wow! I did a massive upgrade to the Al Jolson sound this week.  Still not perfect, but a night and day difference!  Enjoy!

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Riley is a Pal to Junior (03-18-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 30:17


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Comedy x Funny Ha Ha
Groucho Marx (You Bet Your Life) | Secret Word - Smile, 1949

Comedy x Funny Ha Ha

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 31:27


This week Groucho Marx returns to host, You Bet Your Life, the Secret Word - Smile. This episode aired October 12, 1949.: : : : :My other podcast channels include: DRAMA X THEATER -- SCI FI x HORROR -- MYSTERY X SUSPENSE -- VARIETY X ARMED FORCES -- THE COMPLETE ORSON WELLESEnjoy my podcast? You can subscribe to receive new post notices. Also, if you have a moment, please give a 4-5 star rating and/or write a 1-2 sentence positive review on your preferred service -- that would help me a lot.Thank you for your support.https://otr.duane.media | Instagram @duane.otr

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox
Classic Radio for October 21, 2022 Hour 1 - The Secret Word is...

Classic Radio Theater with Wyatt Cox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 42:29


You Bet Your Life starring Groucho Marx, originally broadcast October 21, 1953, 69 years ago, The Secret Word is NAME. A married couple walks over 2000 miles so she can lose weight. Visit my web page - http://www.classicradio.streamWe receive no revenue from YouTube. If you enjoy our shows, listen via the links on our web page or if you're so inclined, Buy me a coffee! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wyattcoxelAHeard on almost 100 radio stations from coast to coast. Classic Radio Theater features great radio programs that warmed the hearts of millions for the better part of the 20th century. Host Wyatt Cox brings the best of radio classics back to life with both the passion of a long-time (as in more than half a century) fan and the heart of a forty-year newsman. But more than just “playing the hits”, Wyatt supplements the first hour of each day's show with historical information on the day and date in history including audio that takes you back to World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. FDR, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan, Carter, Nixon, LBJ. It's a true slice of life from not just radio's past, but America's past.Wyatt produces 21 hours a week of freshly minted Classic Radio Theater presentations each week, and each day's broadcast is timely and entertaining!

Pittsburgh Sports Memories
The Pittsburgh-Detroit Connection

Pittsburgh Sports Memories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 48:28


Pittsburgh and Detroit are both blue collar, rust belt towns who had to reinvent themselves in recent years, but the sports histories of these two cities are more entwined than you may realize. Over the years there have been rivalries, allegiance switching, scandals, and multiple championships won on the other city's soil. We'll take a close look at the rich Pittsburgh-Detroit sports history which involves everyone from Ty Cobb to Marian Hossa to Groucho Marx!Connect with the show:Visit us on the webFollow us on TwitterFollow us on Facebook

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Junior Runs Away (03-11-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 29:46


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Quotomania
Quotomania 314: Groucho Marx

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 2:27


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Groucho was born Julius Henry Marx on Oct 2 1890 in New York. He was the third of the five surviving sons of Sam and Minnie Marx. He was the first of the brothers to start a stage career aged 15 in an act called The Leroy Trio. Other acts followed, but none of them was a great success. Twice the other members of the act disappeared overnight and left him penniless in places far away from home.When his Brothers came on stage they finally had success with the musical comedy called I'll Say She Is. It was at one of the performances of this show that Groucho got his painted moustache. He arrived late at the theater and used greasepaint to create a moustache. He found this so much easier than a glued-on moustache that he insisted on using this technique from then on. I'll Say She Is is was followed by two more Broadway hits - The Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers. The latter of which has the character of Captain Spaulding which remained (with the song Hooray for Captain Spaulding) a trademark for Groucho for the rest of his life.The Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers were also the first movies (except for one unreleased) made by the Brothers and were filmed in New York. The remaining movies were made in Hollywood. In the later years of the Brothers movie career Groucho started working on radio. He hosted several programmes and was a guest on many shows. His biggest success was the comedy quiz show You Bet Your Life which started in 1947. The show later moved to television and was on the air until 1961.Groucho also appeared in a few movies without his brothers. Always being a liberal, Groucho sometimes made critical remarks about politics and had friends who were regarded as communist by the US of the 1950s. This led to Groucho being investigated by the FBI.When Marx Brothers became popular again in the late sixties/early seventies Groucho made a comeback with a show in Carnegie Hall in 1972. At the film festival in Cannes in 1972 he was made Commandeur des Arts et Lettres and in 1974 he received a special Academy Award for the achievements of the Marx Brothers. Groucho died on August 19th 1977 at Cedars Sinai Medical Center. His ashes are at Eden Memorial Park, San Fernando, California.From https://www.marx-brothers.org/biography/groucho.htm. For more information about Groucho Marx:“Groucho Marx's superb letters to Warner Brothers in 1948”: https://glintoflight.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Groucho_Marx_Letters_to_Warner_Brothers.pdf“Letters of Note”: https://lettersofnote.com/2011/02/21/i-had-no-idea-that-the-city-of-casablanca-belonged-exclusively-to-warner-bros/“Groucho Marx”: https://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/person/124006%7C63642/Groucho-Marx#overview

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Expectant Fathers (03-04-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 30:46


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Programmed to Chill
Unlocked: Premium 16 - Novels as Spycraft pt. 5, the Paranoia Fulfilled, with Ira Levin, William Peter Blatty, and David St. John

Programmed to Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 62:45


Unlocked because I discuss Jeffrey Dahmer in the episode. Yes, Ira Levin and William Peter Blatty were both spies, but What Does It Mean? I go through the careers of both authors and flag the times they worked for US intelligence, then how perhaps their writing was affected by that fact, and then the reverberations their work has had on society. With Levin, we meet the Ayn Rand circle, Malachi Martin, the weirdness of Rosemary's Baby, the Stepford Wives, the Boys From Brazil, Son of Rosemary, and so on. With Blatty, we discuss USIA, the Groucho Marx connection, the Ninth Configuration, the Exorcist, Mark David Chapman, the Zodiac, the Exorcist III, Dahmer, and I cite the great pd187 and Christopher Knowles on the Exorcist film. To wrap it up, I discuss the "less well-known" David St. John, who weirdly corresponds with Candy Jones, and how the saga of Tom Dooley III shows that religious psyops are not exactly new. And the songs are pretty great this episode too, lol. Songs: Black Sabbath by Coven Pact with Lucifer by Coven Wicked Woman by Coven excerpts from the Exorcist soundtrack Room 213 by Church of Misery

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Riley Trains Junior's Dog (02-11-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 30:02


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

La Ventana
Cartagrafías | “Anoche cené con Chaplin y estaba de excelente humor, cosa rara en él”: la vida de Groucho Marx a través de sus cartas, su lado más desconocido

La Ventana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 19:37


Este domingo el cómico de los Hermanos Marx cumpliría años y lo celebramos con su extensa correspondencia en una nueva entrega de Cartagrafías con Laura Piñero

La Ventana
La Ventana de 18 a 20h | 'La Ventana de la música' con Sidecars, 'La Ventana de los viajes' y ''Cartagrafías'

La Ventana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 74:42


En este programa especial desde el faro de Fisterra dedicamos una hora de música a Sidecars, que presenta su séptimo disco, 'Trece'. Con Paco Nadal viajamos hasta el Algarve para ver su puesta de sol. Y nuestra compañera Laura Piñero se sumerge de nuevo en la correspondencia de una celebridad. Este viernes 'Cartagrafías' rinde homenaje a Groucho Marx.

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast
GGACP Classic: James Burrows

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 99:06


GGACP celebrates the 40th anniversary (premiered September 30, 1982) of the iconic sitcom "Cheers" by revisiting this 2019 conversation with the show's co-creator, Emmy-winning director James Burrows. In this episode, James talks about the importance of the “straight man,” the influence of his legendary dad Abe Burrows, the societal impact of “Will & Grace” and the winning formulas behind “Taxi,” “Friends” and “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” Also, Andy Kaufman comes to dinner, Woody Harrelson changes the game, Norman Lear writes a fan letter and James meets John Steinbeck, Truman Capote and Groucho Marx. PLUS: Sydney Pollack! Remembering Ruth Gordon! The comedy of Patchett and Tarses! The generosity of Jay Sandrich! And James directs the “All in the Family” reboot! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Little Steven's Underground garage
Celebramos el aniversario del nacimiento del genial Groucho Marx

Little Steven's Underground garage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 113:54


Topic Lords
153. I Can't Wait For My Cockroach Lipids

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 63:34


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * James * Avery Topics: * Stone paper * "The Flashing Blade" * The Number Ones * https://www.stereogum.com/category/columns/the-number-ones/ * https://www.americanpoems.com/poets/stanley-kunitz/king-of-the-river/ * BREAKING NON MAMMALIAN MILK NEWS!! Sorry mammals, cockroaches make milk and it is considered a complete food Microtopics: * The latest on whether or not you've been canceled. * Spotify rejecting your album because you don't believe in yourself enough. * Spagbol. * The very one that is being digested by you now. * thisbolognesedoesnotexist.com * Paper that is 60% stone. * The price you pay for participating in art. * Coffee that is more powerful than a laptop. * What happens if you try to shred margarine. * Documents only for the document control society. * The Novelty FBI raiding your house and confiscating your Novelty Top Secret Documents and hiding them in their fake Groucho Marx glasses. * The guy who bought the last 100 Groucho Marx glasses from Party City. * Moustache Ninja. * Why more people aren't talking about Moustache Ninja. * The height of Pirate Ninja Robot Mustache Mania. * Ankle Biter Man. * Atrocities Guide. * One of many reasons why real life superheroes are a bad idea. * Superheroes: police except there is no oversight whatsoever. * Avery's Angels on Phoenix Jones. * If Seattle police arrest you for being nude, they are legally obligated to provide you with a dinner jacket for your jail stay. * Heath Ledger instructing the audience to charge their shower. * The Masked Magician Revealed. * TV stage magic. * David Copperfield raising the Titanic. * The Cheap Trick song that got to #1. * The songs that hit #1 because General Hospital used them on the soundtrack. * An antidote to the idea that music used to be better. * Breaking Up is Hard to Do. * Finding a way to enjoy art that you didn't like before. * Getting old and liking boring music. * What radio formats overlap with Beautiful Music. * A foam snake that shoots thirty feet into the air and then drifts into a nearby tree. * Tumbling over the rocks until you paint them with your belly's blood. * That other flesh, heavy with milt, bruised, battering toward the dam that lips the orgiastic pool. * Limber and firm in the state of his shining, forever inheriting his salt kingdom, from which he is banished forever. * The most animalistic and primitive part of your consciousness. * An Atari 2600 game inspired by a poem about a fish. * The level in Dante's Inferno where you have to fight unbaptized babies. * A game with one foot in the majesty of Greek mythology and the other foot in what it's like to bash someone's head into the concrete. * A great use of thumbsticks. * Whether Wisdom Tree would've published the Dante's Inferno video game. * Spending your entire life obsessed with the pear you stole as a kid. * An illumination of someone kneeling in front of a pear tree and weeping. * Pop songs about relationship situations. * An idea that is not as old as music. * A piece of music going right for the emotion, like the Windows Startup Sound. * Melody in lyrics, in conversation with each other. * Seeing a person and drawing a stick figure. * How do I get too much into my own head? * Why you're turning into a fish, and what the fish represents. * Sea Monkeys' Garden of Earthly Delights. * Do we want to get to the Cockroach Milk? * Being accosted on the street by Topic Lords fans asking for non-mammalian milk news but you're like "sorry I'm saving this for Topic Lords" * How many cockroaches it takes to make one serving of cockroach milk. * Sobbing in front of the slab of meat that Rocky punched. * Pouring cockroach milk onto stone paper to prove its resiliency.

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: The BPLA Initiates New Member (02-04-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 24:13


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Don't Kill the Messenger with movie research expert Kevin Goetz
Andy Marx (Award-Winning Writer & Photographer) on the Beginnings of Film Testing

Don't Kill the Messenger with movie research expert Kevin Goetz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 44:34 Transcription Available


Kevin is joined by Andy Marx,  an award-winning writer and photographer, to share stories about old Hollywood, writing for Variety, and tales from growing up with Hollywood royalty.Andy Marx is a writer, producer, composer, musician, and an extraordinary artist & photographer. He is the grandson of famed television and film actor Groucho Marx of the Marx Brothers, and songwriter Gus Kahn whose hits include It Had to be You, Dream a Little Dream, and Makin' Whoopee. Andy's  work has appeared in Variety, The Los Angeles Times, and Entertainment Weekly, among others. He is also the co-founder of the comedy website, Hollywood & Swine, and author of the book, Royalties, a multi-generational, historical romance is based on the lives of his grandfathers, Groucho Marx and  Gus Kahn. The start of audience testing and research from the perspective of a young journalist (3:46)Andy shares his fascination with audience testing, and the fascination with early box office returns in the 1980s among journalists and publicists. Andy and Kevin also touch on the earliest type of audience screening where stars like Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd would take comedic sequences to Hollywood Boulevard to test them with audiences.Growing up with Groucho (7:52)Andy discusses his childhood and his relationship with his grandfather, Groucho Marx. He shares inside stories about how he became, with a nudge from Jack Nicholson, the head archivist for Groucho's hit show, You Bet Your Life.Audience test screening in early Hollywood (15:47)The Marx Brothers' A Night at the Opera is one of the Marx Brothers' all-time classic comedies. Andy tells an amazing story about how it had a terrible initial screening, but due to some brilliant behind the scenes maneuvering and a quick change of venue, the screening was saved. Andy and Kevin discuss the timeless lesson of the importance of screening with the right audience.Creative vision and the testing process (22:42)Kevin and Andy discuss how the Director's creative vision can either hurt or help the audience testing process. They delve into the difference between modern-day movie blockbuster projects and how those differ from the old Hollywood studio system.Hollywood and Swine (36:36)Andy and his writing partner, Will McArdle, were responsible for the anonymous website, Hollywood and Swine, where they lampooned Hollywood with articles like Starbucks Bans Screenwriters From All 19,435 Locations Worldwide; Writers Guild of America Vows to Fight the Decision. Andy shares stories from writing parody, and how he doesn't think he could get away with it today. It Had to be You (41:54)Andy sings and plays ukulele as he takes us out with one of his Grandfather Gus Kahn's hits, It Had to be You.Join Kevin and his guest, Andy Marx, and learn about the history of Hollywood and audience research, and enjoy some insider stories on Kevin's podcast, Don't Kill the Messenger!Host: Kevin GoetzGuest: Andy MarxProducer:  Kari CampanoFor more information about Andy's upcoming projects:Website: http://www.andymarx.com/Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/andymarx/Royalties Book: https://www.amazon.com/Royalties-Andy-Marx-ebook/dp/B08DC2RFHN/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0For more information about Kevin Goetz:Website:  www.KevinGoetz360.comAudienceology Book: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Audience-ology/Kevin-Goetz/9781982186678Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: @KevinGoetz360Linked In @Kevin GoetzScreen Engine/ASI Website:  www.ScreenEngineASI.com

Future of Coding
Structure of a Programming Language Revolution by Richard P. Gabriel

Future of Coding

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 118:07


Today we're discussing the so-called "incommensurability" paper: The Structure of a Programming Language Revolution by Richard P. Gabriel. In the pre-show, Jimmy demands that Ivan come right out and explain himself, and so he does, to a certain extent at least. In the post-show, Jimmy draws such a thick line between programming and philosophy that it wouldn't even look out of place on Groucho Marx's face. Next episode, we will be covering the Worse is Better family of thought products, so take 15 minutes to read these three absolute bangers if you'd like to be ahead of the game: The Rise of Worse is Better by Richard P. Gabriel Worse is Better is Worse, definitely not by Richard P. Gabriel Is Worse Really Better? by Richard P. Gabriel Links Phlogiston Theory Phlogiston the excellent chiptune musician. Bright Eyes - First Day of My Life, by Conor Oberst. Not to be confused with Conal Elliott, who introduced the original meaning of functional reactive programming in his work on Fran. Peter Gabriel - Games Without Frontiers Pilot: A Step Toward Man-Computer Symbiosis Jimmy's talk Paradigms Without Progress: Kuhnian Reflections on Programming Practice There's some sporadic discussion of Philip Wadler (who Ivan playfully calls "Phil"), specifically his claim that programming languages have some bits that are invented and some bits that are discovered. While we're here, make sure you've seen the best 15 seconds in Strange Loop history. Peter Naur's Programming as Theory Building Sponsors CarrotGrid — They don't have a web presence (weird, hey?) but they're working on an interesting problem at the intersection of data, so listen to the short ad in the episode to find out more. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital — Instead of running our usual sponsors today, we'd like to direct your attention to this humanitarian cause. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and our friends (can we call them that?) at Relay.fm are running a pledge drive. If you have any spare coins in your couch cushions, or a few million left over from your last exit, you'd be hard pressed to find a more deserving way to invest them. Donate here. Show notes for this episode can be found at futureofcoding.org/episodes/58See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: $5.00 Is Missing (01-28-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 30:26


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Riley Takes Phone Booth Nickels (01-21-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 30:49


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.1

De Dag
#1174 - Het tijdperk Elizabeth II

De Dag

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 21:09


Iedereen kan oud worden, als je maar lang genoeg blijft leven, zei de Britse koningin Elizabeth op haar tachtigste verjaardag naar de woorden van komiek Groucho Marx. En oud werd ze, 96. In podcast De Dag een gesprek met een generatiegenoot van de koningin: oud-correspondent voor het Verenigd Koninkrijk Peter Brusse, die zelf 86 is. Hij vertelt hoe de tijdsgeest waarin zij opgroeiden en volwassen werden het koningschap van Elizabeth heeft getekend en haar als persoon heeft gevormd. Maar of we na 96 jaar weten wát voor persoon zij was, dat is de vraag. Reageren? Mail dedag@radio1.nl

Naked Lunch
Larry Wilmore

Naked Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 61:33


Larry Wilmore has long been considered one of the quickest and most respected minds in comedy and television -- and a longtime friend of Phil's. Over sandwiches, Larry and Phil discuss lots of common ground as showrunners, Larry's experiences working with Eddie Murphy and Bernie Mac, and David reveals how Larry helped inspire him at a key moment early in his career writing for TV. Larry also does some Fab imitations of The Beatles, Muhammad Ali and Groucho Marx, and explains how co-starring with Bryan Cranston and Annette Bening in "Jerry & Marge Go Large" on Paramount + helped him find something positive to focus on in the wake the 2021 death of his brother Marc Wilmore. To learn more about building community through food and "Somebody Feed the People," visit the Philanthropy page at philrosenthalworld.com.

Dan and Jay's Comedy Hour.  The Podcast.
Episode 260 – Mootz Proshut (with Special Guest Old Groucho Marx)

Dan and Jay's Comedy Hour. The Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 64:46


Dan and Jay are back after another month-long, lack-of-AC-induced hiatus! They discuss an attempt at a fire safety video! And more kittens! Find DJCHOUR on Twitter #DJCH Do...

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
Episode 81 | Brian J. Kramp ["This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick"]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 91:44


"This band has no past" was the first line of the farcical biography printed on the inner sleeve of Cheap Trick's first album, but the band, of course, did have a past—a past that straddles two very different decades: from the tumult of the sixties to the anticlimax of the seventies, from the British Invasion to the record industry renaissance, with the band's debut album arriving in 1977, the year vinyl sales peaked.“This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick”, featuring a foreword by Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament, tells the story of a bar band from the Midwest—the best and weirdest bar band in the Midwest— and how they doggedly pursued a most unlikely career in rock'n'roll. It traces every gnarly limb of the family tree of bands that culminated in Cheap Trick, then details how this unlikely foursome paid their dues—with interest—night after night, slogging it out everywhere from high schools to bars to bowling alleys to fans' back yards, before signing to Epic Records and releasing two brilliant albums six months apart.Drawing on more than eighty original interviews, “This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick” is packed full of new insights and information that fans of the band will devour. How was the Cheap Trick logo created? How did the checkerboard pattern come to be associated with the band? When did Rick Nielsen start wearing a ballcap 24/7? Who caught their mom and dad rolling on the couch? What kind of beer did David Bowie drink? And when might characters like Chuck Berry, Frank Zappa, Don Johnson, Otis Redding, Eddie Munster, Kim Fowley, John Belushi, Jim Belushi, Elvis Presley, Leslie West, Groucho Marx, Robert F. Kennedy, Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, Lou Reed, The Coneheads, Tom Petty, Harvey Weinstein, Michael Mann, Linda Blair, Eddie Van Halen, Elvis Costello, Matt Dillon, and Pam Grier turn up? Read “This Band Has No Past” and find out and you may even get an answer to a few of those questions today with our guest Brian J. Kramp.I also ask Brian a question that has nothing to do with Cheap Trick or rock and roll, but the paranormal. Here is what his bio says: "Brian J., short for Brian James, hails from Waukesha, where he was raised in two houses, one across the street from a bowling alley, the other haunted. The bowling alley was the Sunset Bowl, where Cheap Trick were ‘discovered' by Jack Douglas. Douglas also happened to be the name of the ghost: a seven-year-old boy, one of the previous owner's nine children, who fell off the roof of a neighborhood building."In the mid-nineties, Brian attended the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where it seemed like every other person he met had a great Cheap Trick story and was eager to tell it. The band were legendary in that town, icons already, and for Brian, an ardent rock fan and budding record collector, Cheap Trick pressed all the right buttons. Thirty years and thousands of records later, here we are: Brian is now the proud author of this, his first book, about his favorite band.Brian has lived in Queens, New York, and Austin, Texas, but now resides near Madison with his wife and daughter. He has been a featured host on the long running podcasts Cheap Talk (a podcast devoted to Cheap Trick) with Ken Mills; and Rock and/or Roll, a part of the Pantheon Podcast Network.Purchase a copy of “This Band Has No Past: How Cheap Trick Became Cheap Trick” through Amazon: www.amazon.com/This-Band-Has-No-Past/dp/1911036874/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=brian+kramp&qid=1662419299&sr=8-2Visit Brian J. Kramp's "This Band Has No Past" blog: https://thisbandhasnopast.blogspot.com/Listen to Brian's podcast Rock And/Or Roll: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rock-and-or-roll/id654789361Listen to a playlist of the music discussed in this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1hLWZemL56WNyvoLilQSez?si=98d0ed9077cd4f14The Booked On Rock Website: www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/bookedonrockpodcast/?hl=enSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent bookstore here: www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Music: “Whoosh” & “Nasty” by Crowander (www.crowander.com)

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

GGACP celebrates the birthday of screen legend Alan Ladd (September 3rd) with an ENCORE of a 2017 interview with comedian and actor Ronnie Schell. In this episode, Ronnie remembers his early days on the club circuit, recalls decades-long friendships with funnymen Bill Dana, Pat McCormick and Harvey Korman and discusses his memorable role as Gomer Pyle's bunkmate, Duke Slater. Also, Ronnie reminisces about sharing the big and small screen with Andy Griffith, Redd Foxx, Rodney Dangerfield, Tony Curtis, Goldie Hawn, George Carlin and even Groucho Marx. PLUS: Billy De Wolfe! The Kingston Trio! The reclusive Jack Burns! Sinatra drops by the Blue Angel! And the prodigious talents of Theodore Bikel! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: The Wedding Anniversary (01-14-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 25:15


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

She Rises Studios Podcast
#81 - Laughing through building a business w/Kendra Cunningham & Katina Corrao

She Rises Studios Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 18:03


Boston-bred and Brooklyn-based, Kendra Cunningham has been named as a comic to watch by Time Out New York and has been compared to Groucho Marx and Mae West by the UK's Chortle. A regular on the New York and Boston comedy scene, she has previously been in the Montreal Just for Laughs Festival, The Glasgow Comedy Festival, and was a finalist in the Boston Comedy Festival for two years in a row. She has twice appeared on NBC's Last Comic Standing gaining two spots in the top 100 jokes of the season. Watch for her new special coming in October "Meatball Therapy". Katina Corrao is an actress, comedian, and writer. The New York Times calls Katina a “staple in the New York comedy scene.” She's been seen on The Daily Show, Broad City, Deadbeat, Big Morning Buzz Live, and heard on the animated series, Pinkalicious & Peterrific. Katina also makes the rounds as an enthusiastic warm-up comic and has warmed up many top shows, including Good Morning America, The Drew Barrymore Show, The Rachael Ray Show, The Big Fib, and more. She's blogged for The Huffington Post and spent a year as head copywriter at the NFL. She not only devoted one year of her life to writing about football but also accumulated an enormous amount of football swag. Game Show writing is also a passion of hers, and she wrote for several, including The NEW Newlywed Game and several "super-secret" projects. As a comedian, she has proudly performed in benefit shows for Camp Looking Glass, A Night For Dottie, A Night of Giving for Puerto Rico, and pollution awareness, to name a few. She has been featured in The New York Times, Time Out New York, Reader's Digest, Broadway World, Splitsider, Vulture, New York Women in Communications, and more. Katina is proud of her one-person show, Funky Cold Katina, because it explores the world of mediums and the afterlife. Her first comedy album, “Hot Date,” debuted at #1 on the iTunes comedy chart. Her second comedy album, Less Bitter, More Glitter, with comedian Kendra Cunningham rose to #2 in the country. She is most proud of her pandemic passion project, publishing her first children's book titled Katina von Silly! Learn more about the comedy duo here: https://www.kendracunningham.com/ https://www.katinacorrao.com/ Learn more at https://www.sherisesstudios.com/ and https://www.wealthywomenentrepreneursnetwork.com

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast
GGACP Classic: Chuck McCann

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 90:58


GGACP celebrates the birthday (September 2) of one of Gilbert and Frank's childhood heroes, actor, comedian and showbiz historian CHUCK McCANN. In this ENCORE presentation of a memorable interview from back in 2015, Chuck talks about worshipping (and befriending) Stan Laurel, Buster Keaton and Groucho Marx (among others) and his unlikely journey from obsessed movie buff to screen and stage performer and beloved kiddie show host. Also: Chuck hitches a ride on Hugh Hefner's jet, inspires a young Billy Crystal, shares the screen with Rodney Dangerfield and co-stars in a legendary TV flop. Plus: Hal Roach! Lionel Barrymore! Chuck and Groucho pitch deodorant! Mae West "works" the docks! And Chuck asks Gilbert for a lollipop! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Silver Gloves Boxing (01-07-1945)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 31:13


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.

The Film Detective Podcast
E43. The Life of Riley: Anniversary Party (11/08/1947)

The Film Detective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 32:38


Join host, Carl Amari, for a radio re-broadcast of The Life of Riley. Featuring vocal talent by William Bendix.Did you know that The Life of Riley initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, before moving over to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951? Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. Brecher then saw William Bendix as a taxicab company owner in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942), leading him to giving the leading role as Chester A. Riley to Bendix. The iconic situation comedy series was an immediate success, leading to numerous adaptions through film and television, including William Bendix's reprisal of the role throughout numerous iterations of the series.Originally airing 11/08/1947, get ready to laugh until you cry in "Anniversary Party," with Chester A. Riley!Enjoying The Film Detective?You can watch this episode here.Or connect with us here:FacebookInstagramTwitterYouTubeWant even more? Subscribe to our Newsletter here. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Our American Stories
The Boy Who Had a Seat at Groucho Marx's Table

Our American Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 38:16


On this episode of Our American Stories, the man behind Holiday Inn, Kemmons Wilson, had some hilarious interactions with Muhammad Ali, Sam Walton, McIlhenny's Tabasco, and Sam Phillips. In college, Steve Stoliar's dad wanted him to get a job, but Steve didn't want to work at Taco Bell… so he called up Groucho Marx. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)   Time Codes: 00:00 - See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio
Sunday Funnies: Life of Riley: Riley's Mash Note at Night School (12-10-1944)

Classic Streams: Old Time Retro Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 30:30


The Life of Riley is an American radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film, a 1950s television series, and a 1958 comic book. Radio: The radio program initially aired on the Blue Network (later known as ABC) from January 16, 1944, to July 8, 1945, it then moved to NBC, where it was broadcast from September 8, 1945, to June 29, 1951. Irving Brecher pitched the radio series for friend Groucho Marx under the title The Flotsam Family, but the sponsor balked at what would have been essentially a straight head-of-household role for Marx. (Marx would get his own series Blue Ribbon Town instead.) Brecher then saw William Bendix as taxicab company owner Tim McGuerin in Hal Roach's The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942). Radio historian Gerald Nachman quotes Brecher as stating, "He was a Brooklyn guy and there was something about him. I thought this guy could play it. He'd made a few films, like Lifeboat, but he was not a name. So, I took The Flotsam Family script, revised it, made it a Brooklyn Family, took out the flip-flippancies and made more meat-and-potatoes, and thought of a new title, The Life of Riley. Bendix's delivery and the spin he put on his lines made it work." The reworked script cast Bendix as blundering Chester A. Riley, a wing riveter at the fictional Cunningham Aircraft plant in California. His frequent exclamation of indignation—"What a revoltin' development this is!"—became one of the most famous catchphrases of the 1940s. It was later reused by Benjamin J. Grimm of the Fantastic Four. The radio series also benefited from the immense popularity of a supporting character, Digby "Digger" O'Dell (John Brown), "the friendly undertaker." Brecher told Brown, "I want a very sepulchral voice, quavering, morbid," and he got it right away. The supporting cast featured Paula Winslowe as Riley's wife, Peg, and as Riley's mother-in law; Brown as O'Dell and as Riley's co-worker Jim Gillis; Francis "Dink" Trout as Waldo Binny; Tommy Cook, Bobby Ellis and Scotty Beckett as Junior at various times during the show's run; Barbara Eiler as Riley's daughter, Babs; Shirley Mitchell as Honeybee Gillis; Hans Conried as Uncle Baxter; and, Alan Reed as multiple characters, including Riley's boss (Mr. Stevenson) and Peg's father. Henry Morgan voiced Riley's father in one episode. Mel Blanc provided some voices as well, including that of Junior's dog Tiger as well as that of a dog catcher who claimed to have a special bond with dogs. Mitchell's Gillis often gave Riley bad information that got him into trouble, whereas Brown's Digger gave him good information that "helped him out of a hole," as he might have put it. Brown's lines as the undertaker were often repetitive, including puns based on his profession; but thanks to Brown's delivery, the audience loved him. The program was broadcast live with a studio audience, most of whom were not aware Brown played both characters. As a result, when Digger delivered his first line, it was usually greeted with howls of laughter and applause from surprised audience members. The series was co-developed by the non performing Marx Brother turned agent Gummo. The American Meat Institute (1944–45), Procter & Gamble (Teel dentifrice and Prell shampoo) (1945–49), and Pabst Blue Ribbon beer (1949–51) took turns as the radio program's sponsor. An unrelated radio show with the title Life of Riley was a summer replacement show heard on CBS from April 12, 1941, to September 6, 1941. The CBS program starred Lionel Stander as J. Riley Farnsworth and had no real connection with the more famous series that followed a few years later.