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St. Louis on the Air creates a unique space where guests and listeners can share ideas and opinions with respect and honesty. Whether exploring issues and challenges confronting our region, discussing the latest innovations in science and technology, taking a closer look at our history or talking wi…

St. Louis Public Radio


    • Jul 1, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 21m AVG DURATION
    • 2,620 EPISODES


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    Latest episodes from St. Louis on the Air

    After abortion ban, Missouri doctors grapple with the meaning of a ‘medical emergency'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 18:31

    In the wake of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned Roe v. Wade and Missouri's trigger law — which effectively bans most abortions in the state — OB-GYN Dr. Jeannie Kelly has concerns about how the new state law will affect gynecological and obstetrics care.

    Science, history, and sound art coalesce in ‘Botanical Resonance' exhibition

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 21:43

    A new Missouri Botanical Garden exhibition examines the relationship between sound and plants. Nezka Pfeifer, the curator of “Botanical Resonance: Plants and Sounds in the Garden,” will discuss how the new Stephen and Peter Sachs Museum exhibition reveals important things about how we interact with our environment.

    From ‘Asian carp' to ‘copi,' an ugly fish gets an appetizing marketing makeover

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 13:22

    Asian carp has a new name — copi. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources poured hundreds of thousands of dollars into a rebranding effort and landed on the name “copi,” to reflect the copious amount of the fish that live in Midwestern rivers and streams. Harvest Public Media reporter Dana Cronin joins us to talk about this fish story.

    Decades of abuse at Kanakuk evangelical camp leads reporter to St. Louis ministry

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 24:06

    A series of hard-hitting investigative stories exposed a decades-long history of abuse at an evangelical summer sports camp that hosts thousands of children every year. Journalist Nancy French describes what she found as she connected with victims, former campers, staffers and parents — as well as her efforts to trace a counselor fired for abuse to a St. Louis ministry.

    Cardinals Hall of Famer Ted Simmons is a catch for St. Louis Art Museum

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 19:58

    Hall Of Famer Ted Simmons is an avid art collector along with his wife Maryanne Ellison Simmons. A new exhibition at the St. Louis Art Museum, “Catching The Moment,” is curated from the Simmons collection.

    Analysis: Breaking down Illinois' primary election results

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 10:16

    Trump-backed candidates prevailed in two key Illinois primary contests. Rep. Mary Miller bested Rep. Rodney Davis in Illinois' 15th Congressional District. That race pitted two incumbents against one another. GOP gubernatorial candidate Darren Bailey also emerged victorious by a large margin. NPR Illinois' Hannah Meisel breaks down the results.

    Missouri athletes set sights on Paralympics and powerlifting gold

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 12:14

    Para athletes from across North, South and Central America convene in St. Louis next week for the World Para Powerlifting Parapan American Open Championships. Missouri natives David Horvath and Brett Forbes discuss their love of powerlifting, what it takes to compete on Team USA, and their Paralympic dreams.

    Post-Roe, ‘both parties are hoping to mobilize their voters' says UMSL professor

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 15:48

    UMSL political scientist Anita Manion discusses the political ramifications of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

    Metro Transit sees results with health specialists along for the ride

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 21:19

    A pilot program putting teams of healthcare workers on Metro Transit is making a difference in Illinois. The program is also growing in St. Louis City and County. Chestnut Health's Emily Schwaegel and Jim Wallis discuss new data and the challenge of reaching riders experiencing mental health crises or homelessness.

    Post-Roe reality hits Missouri and Illinois

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 51:36

    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, and the end of most abortions in Missouri, Jason Rosenbaum talks with STLPR health reporter Sarah Fentem, Republican Missouri Rep. Mary Elizabeth Coleman and Bonyen Lee-Gilmore of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri.

    Why Ste. Genevieve County residents are battling to stop a silica mine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 22:37

    NexGen Silica hopes to locate a 249-acre mine next to residential homes and popular conservation areas, including Hawn State Park. Residents explain how they're fighting to protect their health and water from the mine — and the precedent they hope to set for other places with silica deposits.

    How Steve's Hot Dogs began serving St. Louis' official hot dog

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 6:54

    The St. Louis Board of Aldermen presented Steve's Hot Dogs with a resolution declaring its St. Louis hot dog as the “Official Hot Dog of St. Louis.” Owner Steve Ewing explains the impetus — and the inspiration.

    How Steve's Hot Dogs began serving St. Louis' official hot dog

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 6:54

    The St. Louis Board of Aldermen presented Steve's Hot Dogs with a resolution declaring its St. Louis hot dog as the “Official Hot Dog of St. Louis.” Owner Steve Ewing explains the impetus — and the inspiration.

    Mayor Jones sees guidance from ARPA survey — and opportunity for change

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 24:00

    In her first one-on-one interview since the indictment of three city officials, St. Louis Mayor Tishaura Jones discusses results from the city's ARPA survey, which sought input on spending the remaining $249 million allotment in COVID-19 relief funds. Jones also shares thoughts on the opportunity for incentive reform.

    Why a Missouri couple's car sex may have Geico on the hook for $5.2 million

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 51:35

    The Legal Roundtable discusses a high-profile case that could see Geico paying millions after a Missouri woman had sex in a car, as well as a lawsuit filed by a graduate student alleging Southern Illinois University Edwardsville wrongly ordered her to stay away from her classmates, and more.

    Story Stitchers continue to ‘Pick the City Up' for Juneteenth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 19:00

    For nine years, the St. Louis Story Stitchers have told stories from their lives using rap, rhythm, spoken word, singing, and dance. Youth Programming Coordinator Branden Lewis and singer She'kinah Taylor preview of the arts collective's Juneteenth performances.

    BJC surgery resident learned from the best: Her dad

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 21:17

    Dr. Sophia Roberts is a resident training to become a cardiothoracic surgeon — a rarity for females in the U.S. As if that wasn't unique enough, she's following in her dad's footsteps. Dr. Harold Roberts is himself a cardiothoracic surgeon for more than 30 years. In honor of Father's Day, the duo discussed their relationship and what it's like to work at Barnes-Jewish Hospital together.

    How scammers pretending to be St. Louis police robbed Clementine's Creamery

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 14:46

    Homegrown ice cream company Clementine's Creamery fell prey to an elaborate scam last week — one that owner Tamara Keefe explained had actually been attempted in the past at a different location. She explains how the scam artists tricked her employee — and why other businesses should be on the lookout.

    Religious colleges in Missouri have ‘a license to discriminate.' A lawsuit aims to revoke it

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 28:46

    Andrew Hartzler discusses his politically prominent aunt, U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler, and why he's joined a class-action lawsuit filed by LGBTQ students seeking to end an exemption in civil rights that allows anti-gay discrimination in religious colleges.

    New play highlights Club Riviera — one of the biggest Black nightclubs in the 40s

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 23:50

    Club Riviera rivaled the Cotton Club in Harlem and attracted the biggest jazz acts of the day, including Nat King Cole and Duke Ellington. A new play “Live at the Riviera” aims to retell its origin story before it's lost in history. Director Thomasina Clarke and Playwright Freeman Cole share how they collected oral histories to piece together events.

    How KSDK anchor Michelle Li turned the #VeryAsian hashtag into a movement

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 30:09

    After St. Louis news anchor Michelle Li mentioned eating dumplings on a New Year's broadcast, a viewer chastised her for being “very Asian.” She's now turned that viral moment into a movement with the Very Asian Foundation. She discusses the organization's push for schools and libraries to build and maintain robust Asian American youth literature collections.

    For Erin Litteken, Ukraine's history is family lore — and fodder for fiction

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 21:00

    The debut novelist and resident of Troy, Illinois, explains how family stories and the long-suppressed truth about Stalin terrorizing Ukraine led to her book “The Memory Keeper of Kyiv” — and the long process of researching and writing it.

    Officials ban scooters in downtown St. Louis in an attempt to curb mayhem

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 26:49

    Three teens were shot in downtown St. Louis at the beginning of June. 5th Ward St. Louis Alderman James Page shares what city officials are doing to bring order to the neighborhood, which includes banning scooters.

    How Cbabi Bayoc gave a 124-year-old St. Louis company a new take on stained glass

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 25:05

    Emil Frei and Associates teamed up with muralist Cbabi Bayoc for a stained glass collaboration that changes how Jesus and Mary Magdalene are portrayed in liturgical art. Bayoc and fifth-generation owner Aaron Frei discuss the art of stained glass and their unique commission.

    How Cbabi Bayoc gave a 124-year-old St. Louis company a new take on stained glass

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 25:05

    Emil Frei and Associates teamed up with muralist Cbabi Bayoc for a stained glass collaboration that changes how Jesus and Mary Magdalene are portrayed in liturgical art. Bayoc and fifth-generation owner Aaron Frei discuss the art of stained glass and their unique commission.

    For 2 vegan businesses, St. Louis proved the perfect launch pad

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 15:29

    Marc Connor of Rootberry and Rita Childers of Core + Rind both started exploring vegan food after they found it left them more energized and healthier. In this encore episode, they share their mission to bring plant-based foods to even the most stubborn carnivores.

    A St. Louis woman discovered her mom's secret past — as a Vietnamese rock star

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 37:20

    Dr. Hannah Ha recently uncovered a surprising secret about her mother: Before fleeing Vietnam, Phương Tâm had been a rock star in her native Saigon. In this encore episode, Ha and music producer Mark Gergis discuss how they compiled Tâm's decades-old recordings in a new album.

    Why ‘Severance' star Britt Lower is joining the circus in St. Louis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 15:57

    Actress Britt Lower is fresh off her starring role in the Apple TV+ series “Severance.” Before filming for the second season gets underway this fall, Lower will live in a small trailer on a St. Louis parking lot for a few weeks — playing a central role in Circus Flora's “The Quest for the Innkeeper's Cask.” In this episode, Lower explains why she chose St. Louis for her circus debut.

    How a stay-at-home Ellisville mom became a lifeline for Afghan refugees

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 17:03

    Even as St. Louisans across the metro have stepped up to help Afghan refugees, few have gone as far as Ann Wittman. She's crowd-funded to give families cars, plane tickets and washing machines. In one case, she even bought a family a house. Wittman discusses how she got involved and outlines her new goal: a capital campaign to buy 30 Afghans used cars.

    Amid baby formula shortage, milk donations flow in Missouri

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 7:01

    As baby formula shortages continue, breast milk donors like Afsheen Wira have stepped up to the plate. The St. Louis nursing student explains how she ended up with 5,000 surplus ounces of milk — and why she was happy to share it with families in need.

    The Caregiver Club helps St. Louis families deal with dementia

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 14:34

    Cousins Jodie Finney and Alicia Christopher each have a parent dealing with dementia. After bonding over their shared experiences, they formed a new nonprofit to help families dealing with the same issues — and provide practical support.

    Analysis: Lewis Reed resigns as President of the Board of Aldermen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 7:39

    STLPR Justice Correspondent Rachel Lippmann breaks down the news of Lewis Reed's resignation as President of the Board of Aldermen. He's the third St. Louis official facing federal bribery charges to resign in recent weeks. At a press conference this morning, Mayor Tishaura Jones said she expects more indictments to come.

    How Tonka the chimp was found, alive, in a Missouri basement

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 19:50

    A Missouri woman named Tonia Haddix was ordered by a St. Louis judge to relinquish celebrity chimp Tonka to an animal sanctuary. She claimed he was dead — but last week, her lies unraveled. PETA attorney Jared Goodman explains how the case was cracked in the nick of time, and the fate that could now await Haddix.

    In ‘Look at me like you love me,' St. Louis' Jess T. Dugan captures queer love, and more

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 20:44

    The St. Louis Art Museum added six images from St. Louis photographer Jess T. Dugan to its permanent collection. Dugan's work has been praised as “gorgeously sensitive portraits of queer love.” T,” but their latest photobook, “Look at me like you love me,” turns the camera on the photographer as well.

    Producers say beefalo is the meat of the future

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 10:38

    Supporters of beefalo, a cattle and bison crossbreed, say there is big potential to provide better, healthier meat by combining the best qualities of the two species. STLPR Correspondent Jonathan Ahl shares why proponents believe it's the future of U.S. meat production — and what critics have to say.

    How Charles Daniels turned American swimming from joke to juggernaut

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 21:49

    St. Louis attorney Michael Loynd's nonfiction debut, “The Watermen,” explores the birth of American swimming through the remarkable rise of Charles Daniels, an underdog from a scandal-marred background who became the first American swimmer to win an Olympic gold medal.

    How Wash U scientists — and St. Louis patients – helped perfect COVID-19 tests

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 16:32

    If you've used an at-home test to figure out whether you had COVID-19, you may have a patient at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to thank. More than 6,500 patients there were enrolled in clinical trials to evaluate COVID-19 tests. Washington University's Dr. Stacey House, the principal investigator in those trials, discusses how her team handled 24 trials in just two years.

    Episcopal Bishop Deon Johnson: ‘I've always wanted to be in a place to help people'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 19:14

    Deon Johnson became the first Black bishop and openly gay leader of the Episcopal Diocese of Missouri in 2020. He discusses his journey from Barbados to the Midwest, his push for inclusivity in the church and how he hopes to combat falling church membership.

    Rabbit rescues at capacity as pets get dumped across St. Louis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 15:19

    St. Louis residents are finding abandoned pet bunnies across the city — and few rescues have the capacity to take them in. The founder of Dolly's Dream Home rescue, Katie Kottmeyer, explains what got her into rabbits and what people should know before adopting or buying them.

    Rabbit rescues at capacity as pets get dumped across St. Louis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 15:24

    St. Louis residents are finding abandoned pet bunnies across the city — and few rescues have the capacity to take them in. The founder of Dolly's Dream Home rescue, Katie Kottmeyer, explains what got her into rabbits and what people should know before adopting or buying them.

    After 15 years on the Point, Lux says goodbye to radio and hello to medical marijuana

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 24:00

    Ashley “Lux” Elzinga spent 15 years as an on-air personality for 105.7 FM the Point. She discusses why she left her dream job, how she dealt with toxic online comments and her new direction as a social media content creator promoting medical marijuana brands.

    Lafayette Square garden tour showcases historic St. Louis neighborhood

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 16:26

    Since 1969, members of the city's Lafayette Square neighborhood have invited people into their homes and gardens as a neighborhood fundraiser. Two residents discuss how far the neighborhood has come since those days — and how even small city lots can contain amazing gardens.

    Indictments of 3 high-profile St. Louis officials shake up Board of Aldermen

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 13:45

    One day after the revelation of bribery charges against three members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen (including its president), the Board convened, with a new leader presiding. STLPR Justice Correspondent Rachel Lippmann discusses the allegations against the officials — and the response from City Hall.

    At 50, St. Louis Public Radio looks back and to its future

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 29:39

    KWMU (now St. Louis Public Radio) made its broadcast debut on June 2, 1972. In this episode, we talk with longtime STLPR staffer Mary Edwards about the history of the station, and we hear from CEO Tina Pamintuan about her vision for the future.

    Don Corrigan tells the stories of ‘Amazing Webster Groves'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 21:58

    Longtime Webster-Kirkwood Times editor Don Corrigan discusses his new book about Webster Groves, what the documentary “16 in Webster” got right about the bucolic suburb, and whether Webster citizens are right to block new development.

    New $25 million St. Louis venture capital fund to boost minority startups

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 19:36

    The venture capital space is overwhelmingly represented by white-owned companies. A St. Louis-based firm is hoping to change that by investing its millions in underrepresented founders whose ideas are being overlooked. Ascend Venture Capital founder Dan Conner and partner Yinka Faleti discuss how VC firms can increase diversity — and make huge returns at the same time.

    For one Missouri family, the joy of adoption has become a 4-year legal battle

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 18:11

    An international adoption has entangled a Missouri family into the legal systems of two countries. Adam and Jill Trower discuss their efforts to bring home a four-year-old orphan named Luke, who is currently living in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and why they're suing the U.S. government to do it.

    ‘The Karate Kid: The Musical' plans to go from Kirkwood to Broadway

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 16:32

    The musical is the first pre-Broadway tryout to come to St. Louis. Original screenwriter Robert Mark Kamen joined the show to talk about how the process of its creation sold him on musicals and whether “wax on, wax off” will get a solo track.

    Missouri lawmakers seek to gag pharmacists on ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine sulfate

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 19:51

    Missouri lawmakers recently passed a bill to restrict pharmacists from telling patients about risks around ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine sulfate — both sometimes used to treat COVID-19 despite having no FDA clearance for that use. St. Louis University sociologist Liz Chiarello explains how the bill fits into recent political battles affecting pharmacists.

    In St. Louis ERs, gunshot wounds are a daily occurrence — and a public health emergency

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 30:14

    While the nation reels from the mass shooting in an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, Dr. Kristen Mueller reflects on the amount of everyday firearm injury she sees as an emergency care physician in St. Louis — and what it would take to reduce the toll.

    Why did students' Lindenwood suit succeed where Wash U's failed? Separate online pricing

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 50:22

    The Legal Roundtable discusses how two lawsuits over the pandemic-era switch to Zoom classes turned out very differently. Panelists also discuss a pair of big jury verdicts, Sunshine law litigation involving former Gov. Eric Greitens and former Attorney General Josh Hawley, and more.

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