Podcast appearances and mentions of sam lazaro

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  • 13PODCASTS
  • 57EPISODES
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  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about sam lazaro

Latest podcast episodes about sam lazaro

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Uganda's Batwa tribe, considered conservation refugees, see little government support

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:19


The Batwa people are one of the oldest surviving Indigenous tribes in Africa. They live high in the mountain forests, straddling several East African countries. The Batwa are now also called conservation refugees, as governments scramble to cope with the pressures of population growth and climate change. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from western Uganda. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Uganda's Batwa tribe, considered conservation refugees, see little government support

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:19


The Batwa people are one of the oldest surviving Indigenous tribes in Africa. They live high in the mountain forests, straddling several East African countries. The Batwa are now also called conservation refugees, as governments scramble to cope with the pressures of population growth and climate change. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from western Uganda. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Pilot oxygen backup system offers new hope for Ugandan hospitals plagued by power cuts

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 5:09


The pandemic is bringing new attention to a critical health care challenge plaguing many countries: A shortage or unreliable supply of medical oxygen. It's also prompting many medical providers to look at ways to fix the problem. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one example in Uganda. This report is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Pilot oxygen backup system offers new hope for Ugandan hospitals plagued by power cuts

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 5:09


The pandemic is bringing new attention to a critical health care challenge plaguing many countries: A shortage or unreliable supply of medical oxygen. It's also prompting many medical providers to look at ways to fix the problem. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one example in Uganda. This report is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Pilot oxygen backup system offers new hope for Ugandan hospitals plagued by power cuts

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 5:09


The pandemic is bringing new attention to a critical health care challenge plaguing many countries: A shortage or unreliable supply of medical oxygen. It's also prompting many medical providers to look at ways to fix the problem. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one example in Uganda. This report is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Many Ugandan children forced into hard labor, sex trafficking as COVID closes schools

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:01


The effects of the pandemic on children vary dramatically depending on the country. With schools still shuttered in Uganda and other developing nations, many children have no choice but to work to survive. In Africa, more than one-fifth of children -- around 87 million kids -- work. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Many Ugandan children forced into hard labor, sex trafficking as COVID closes schools

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:01


The effects of the pandemic on children vary dramatically depending on the country. With schools still shuttered in Uganda and other developing nations, many children have no choice but to work to survive. In Africa, more than one-fifth of children -- around 87 million kids -- work. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Many Ugandan children forced into hard labor, sex trafficking as COVID closes schools

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 9:01


The effects of the pandemic on children vary dramatically depending on the country. With schools still shuttered in Uganda and other developing nations, many children have no choice but to work to survive. In Africa, more than one-fifth of children -- around 87 million kids -- work. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Lack of access, infrastructure and government accountability hurt Ugandan vaccine goals

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:28


The U.S. plan to donate 500 million vaccines to developing countries aims to address the lopsided distribution and exacerbated impact of the virus. In Africa, Uganda is still struggling to vaccinate those most at-risk. It has recorded more than 120,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 3100 deaths, but the true toll is likely much higher. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Lack of access, infrastructure and government accountability hurt Ugandan vaccine goals

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:28


The U.S. plan to donate 500 million vaccines to developing countries aims to address the lopsided distribution and exacerbated impact of the virus. In Africa, Uganda is still struggling to vaccinate those most at-risk. It has recorded more than 120,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 3100 deaths, but the true toll is likely much higher. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Lack of access, infrastructure and government accountability hurt Ugandan vaccine goals

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 8:28


The U.S. plan to donate 500 million vaccines to developing countries aims to address the lopsided distribution and exacerbated impact of the virus. In Africa, Uganda is still struggling to vaccinate those most at-risk. It has recorded more than 120,000 cases of COVID-19 and over 3100 deaths, but the true toll is likely much higher. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Kampala. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
This dissolvable pacemaker could make heart surgery less invasive

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 6:10


Millions of Americans spend weeks recovering from heart surgery and other operations to repair brain and bone injuries every year. As special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Chicago, researchers are working on a novel approach to aid in that recovery. The story is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
This dissolvable pacemaker could make heart surgery less invasive

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 6:10


Millions of Americans spend weeks recovering from heart surgery and other operations to repair brain and bone injuries every year. As special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Chicago, researchers are working on a novel approach to aid in that recovery. The story is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Science
This dissolvable pacemaker could make heart surgery less invasive

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 6:10


Millions of Americans spend weeks recovering from heart surgery and other operations to repair brain and bone injuries every year. As special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Chicago, researchers are working on a novel approach to aid in that recovery. The story is part of our "Breakthrough" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How the Twin Cities is trying to close the racial gap in home ownership

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 7:20


The Twin Cities is one of the most affordable metropolitan areas of the country. Its longstanding racial disparities in home ownership are also among the worst. Just 25 percent of Black residents in Minneapolis and St. Paul own their homes, compared to 75 percent of white residents. Special Correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro explores why -- and what's being done to change it. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Minnesota students come together to bring water to schools in the developing world

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 6:12


Drinking water and restrooms are readily available to most school children in America. That is not the case across the developing world. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on schools coming together around water as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Minnesota students come together to bring water to schools in the developing world

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 6:12


Drinking water and restrooms are readily available to most school children in America. That is not the case across the developing world. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on schools coming together around water as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What Chauvin's 22.5 year sentence could mean for changing police behavior

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 4:20


More than a year after George Floyd's murder set off national protests and a racial reckoning, former police officer Derek Chauvin was sentenced to 22.5 years in prison by a Minnesota judge Friday. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro begins our report from Minneapolis on the sentence and emotional hearing. Then, William Brangham looks at the continuing reverberations of this case. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Could a land bridge project help minority communities recover from displacement?

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 7:20


President Joe Biden has proposed using some of the $2 trillion of his infrastructure plan to repair harm done to America's minority communities when highways were originally built through them. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro has the story of one such example from Minnesota's capital, St. Paul, where the ReConnect Rondo project wants to build a land bridge to support the Black community. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Examining efforts toward police reform in Minneapolis amid crime spike

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 8:45


Voters in Minneapolis will be asked to approve a measure in November that could dismantle the police department, which is also the subject of an investigation by the Justice Department, and fold it into a department of public safety. But a spike in violent crime has led the city to seek assistance from state and federal law enforcement agencies. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
George Floyd died last year. Here's what has changed since then

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2021 4:44


This week marks one year since George Floyd, an unarmed Black man was killed by then police officer Derek Chauvin, who held his knee on Floyd for nearly nine minutes. His death, recorded on video by a bystander, sparked widespread protests globally, and reignited the Black Lives Matter movement and conversations around race. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro joins to reflect on the past year. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Art Beat
How George Floyd's image became an icon for artists and helped communities mourn

PBS NewsHour - Art Beat

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 7:44


Next week marks the anniversary of George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis. His death at the hands of police touched off global protests and a worldwide artistic response. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Minneapolis for our series, "Race matters: America After George Floyd," and our ongoing arts and culture coverage, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How George Floyd's image became an icon for artists and helped communities mourn

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 7:44


Next week marks the anniversary of George Floyd's killing in Minneapolis. His death at the hands of police touched off global protests and a worldwide artistic response. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Minneapolis for our series, "Race matters: America After George Floyd," and our ongoing arts and culture coverage, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How colorism haunts dark-skinned immigrant communities

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 8:20


The death of George Floyd last year has shone a spotlight on what it means to be Black, and especially, to be dark-skinned in America. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro has our report from Minnesota, home to a growing population of African and other immigrants. It is part of our continuing series "Race Matters", and Fred's series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Indian doctors in the US have deep ties to India. Here's how they're helping from afar

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 7:33


As India suffers through a devastating surge in COVID-19 infections, the 4.2 million members of the Indian diaspora in the U.S. are stricken with panic, pain and grief. Many are volunteering to help. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the efforts of Indian American doctors to help mitigate the crisis in India. It's part of our "Agents for change" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Indian doctors in the US have deep ties to India. Here's how they're helping from afar

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 7:33


As India suffers through a devastating surge in COVID-19 infections, the 4.2 million members of the Indian diaspora in the U.S. are stricken with panic, pain and grief. Many are volunteering to help. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the efforts of Indian American doctors to help mitigate the crisis in India. It's part of our "Agents for change" series. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Minnesota on edge following the police killing of Daunte Wright

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2021 5:01


The death of George Floyd and the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin has kept the state of Minnesota in the national spotlight. Now the death of Daunte Wright near Minneapolis has led to new protests and opened long-standing wounds over policing and race. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Minneapolis on edge as the trial in the police killing of George Floyd approaches

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 6:38


The trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is set to begin soon. Chauvin is accused of murder in last May's killing of George Floyd -- a death that set off nationwide unrest. As special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, the city is bracing for what's to come. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Health officials try to rebuild trust of vaccines among Indigenous Americans

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 7:03


Native Americans have been among the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, but a history of medical mistreatment has led some Indigenous leaders to brace for challenges in vaccinating their communities. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on those efforts. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Indian farmers converge on Delhi to protest agricultural deregulation

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 6:55


For more than two months, farmers in India have camped just outside the capital, Delhi, demanding the repeal of new laws that deregulate agriculture, which directly employs near half the country's 1.3 billion people. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports in partnership with the Under-Told Stories Project as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Indian farmers converge on Delhi to protest agricultural deregulation

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2021 6:55


For more than two months, farmers in India have camped just outside the capital, Delhi, demanding the repeal of new laws that deregulate agriculture, which directly employs near half the country's 1.3 billion people. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports in partnership with the Under-Told Stories Project as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Fatal shooting by Minneapolis police prompts protests and questions about transparency

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2020 3:43


Minneapolis police fatally shot a man during a traffic stop Wednesday night, the first killing by a member of the department since George Floyd's death in May, which spurred nationwide protests. Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said the suspect had fired on officers first. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
With few resources, Senegal emerges as a leader in the fight against COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 6:27


For much of the pandemic, New Zealand has often been praised for the effectiveness of its response. But despite few resources, the small African nation of Senegal has also become a leader in curbing the COVID-19 pandemic within its borders. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
With few resources, Senegal emerges as a leader in the fight against COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 6:27


For much of the pandemic, New Zealand has often been praised for the effectiveness of its response. But despite few resources, the small African nation of Senegal has also become a leader in curbing the COVID-19 pandemic within its borders. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
With few resources, Senegal emerges as a leader in the fight against COVID-19

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 6:27


For much of the pandemic, New Zealand has often been praised for the effectiveness of its response. But despite few resources, the small African nation of Senegal has also become a leader in curbing the COVID-19 pandemic within its borders. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Native Americans renew decades-long push to reclaim millions of acres in the Black Hills

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 6:45


President Trump's visit this year to Mt. Rushmore has drawn new attention to a decades-long battle between Native Americans and the federal government over millions of acres in South Dakota. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the campaign to reclaim that land. This report is in partnership with the Under-Told Stories Project and is part of the series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Native Americans renew decades-long push to reclaim millions of acres in the Black Hills

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2020 6:45


President Trump's visit this year to Mt. Rushmore has drawn new attention to a decades-long battle between Native Americans and the federal government over millions of acres in South Dakota. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on the campaign to reclaim that land. This report is in partnership with the Under-Told Stories Project and is part of the series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Six months after George Floyd's death, what has changed in Minneapolis?

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2020 8:36


Six months ago, George Floyd was killed under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, triggering protests and spasms of property destruction in cities across America. The Minneapolis Police Department is now facing calls for its abolition while struggling with high attrition and low morale. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Six months after George Floyd's death, what has changed in Minneapolis?

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2020 8:36


Six months ago, George Floyd was killed under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, triggering protests and spasms of property destruction in cities across America. The Minneapolis Police Department is now facing calls for its abolition while struggling with high attrition and low morale. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports as part of his series, "Agents for Change." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
In Pakistan, 1 of 20 kids dies before age 5. This group is trying to change that

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2020 7:33


In Pakistan, one out of every 20 children dies before age five. Now, childhood immunization rates -- already low -- have dropped sharply during the pandemic, raising fears of a looming increase in infant mortality. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro began reporting on the issue early this year, examining one group seeking to improve child health in Pakistan, for his series Agents for Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
In Pakistan, 1 of 20 kids dies before age 5. This group is trying to change that

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2020 7:33


In Pakistan, one out of every 20 children dies before age five. Now, childhood immunization rates -- already low -- have dropped sharply during the pandemic, raising fears of a looming increase in infant mortality. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro began reporting on the issue early this year, examining one group seeking to improve child health in Pakistan, for his series Agents for Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
In Pakistan, 1 of 20 kids dies before age 5. This group is trying to change that

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2020 7:33


In Pakistan, one out of every 20 children dies before age five. Now, childhood immunization rates -- already low -- have dropped sharply during the pandemic, raising fears of a looming increase in infant mortality. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro began reporting on the issue early this year, examining one group seeking to improve child health in Pakistan, for his series Agents for Change. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
India's poor find themselves even more desperate amid the pandemic economy

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 6:05


India ranks second only to the U.S. in total COVID-19 cases. Although there has been a decline in infections recently, officials worry the onset of winter could bring new surges. Another concern is the economy, the world's fifth largest, which has yet to show any signs of recovery -- compounding the suffering of millions of the poorest residents. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
India's poor find themselves even more desperate amid the pandemic economy

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2020 6:05


India ranks second only to the U.S. in total COVID-19 cases. Although there has been a decline in infections recently, officials worry the onset of winter could bring new surges. Another concern is the economy, the world's fifth largest, which has yet to show any signs of recovery -- compounding the suffering of millions of the poorest residents. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Communiversity
Fred de Sam Lazaro in Conversation with Knute Berger

Communiversity

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2020 80:58


In a time of newsroom layoffs, hot takes, "fake news" and intense political polarization, it can be difficult to find in-depth journalism that takes the time to explore underrepresented communities or attempt to tackle the world's toughest questions. But Fred de Sam Lazaro is someone who's been doing just that for over three decades. Lazaro is the executive director of the Under-Told Stories Project, a journalism and teaching endeavor that documents the consequences of poverty around the world and the work being done to address them. He is an award-winning journalist who's been a correspondent with the PBS Newshour since 1985. He's reported from over 70 countries on topics such as labor, sex trafficking, public health and immigration, and directed films from India and the Democratic Republic of Congo for the acclaimed documentary series, Wide Angle. He talks with Crosscut editor-at-large Knute Berger as part of the Communiversity series hosted by Centrum, a Port Townsend-based nonprofit arts organization. The event was held February 3, 2020, at the Salish Coast Elementary School.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How Minneapolis is trying to reimagine the future of policing

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2020 7:26


Since the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, calls have grown for that city to overhaul its police department. Now, the effort to "dismantle the police department as we know it" has gained the support of a majority of city council members. What does that mean in terms of actual policy? Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
Densely populated Bangladesh faces immense infection control challenge

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2020 7:55


Bangladesh is about the size of Iowa, but it has 50 times as many people. That extremely high population density makes containing coronavirus a huge challenge -- as does the recent influx of a million refugees from neighboring Myanmar. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on how one non-governmental group is trying to tackle the problem. It's part of his series Agents for Change.

Crosscut Talks
PBS Newshour’s Fred de Sam Lazaro on the Power of Under-Told Stories

Crosscut Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2020 81:02


In a time of newsroom layoffs, hot takes, "fake news" and intense political polarization, it can be difficult to find in-depth journalism that takes the time to explore underrepresented communities or attempt to tackle the world's toughest questions. But Fred de Sam Lazaro is someone who's been doing just that for over three decades. Lazaro is the executive director of the Under-Told Stories Project, a journalism and teaching endeavour that documents the consequences of poverty around the world and the work being done to address them. He is an award-winning journalist who's been a correspondent with the PBS Newshour since 1985. He's reported from over 70 countries on topics such as labor, sex trafficking, public health and immigration, and directed films from India and the Democratic Republic of Congo for the acclaimed documentary series, Wide Angle. For the latest episode of the Crosscut Talks Podcast, he talks with Crosscut editor-at-large Knute Berger as part of the Communiversity series hosted by Centrum, a Port Townsend-based nonprofit arts organizations.

Under Construction with Marilyn Strickland
Who should lead Seattle? A special episode on the 2019 Seattle City Council elections

Under Construction with Marilyn Strickland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2019 34:24


In a special episode diving into the 2019 Seattle City Council races, Richard de Sam Lazaro, Manager of Government and Corporate Relations at Expedia Group, Erin Goodman, Executive Director of the SoDo BIA, and Rachel Marshall, Founder of Rachel’s Ginger Beer, join Seattle Metro Chamber CEO Marilyn Strickland – to discuss the upcoming elections, what makes a good leader, and effective city governance.

Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly
Looking Back: Fred de Sam Lazaro

Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2017 3:58


https://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/2017/02/17/looking-back-fred-de-sam-lazaro/34646/feed/ 0 00:03:58 “Many of my stories have concerned human suffering,” says correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro, “and one of the most effective ways t

Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly
Looking Back: Fred de Sam Lazaro

Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2017 3:58


https://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/2017/02/17/looking-back-fred-de-sam-lazaro/34646/feed/ 0 00:03:58 “Many of my stories have concerned human suffering,” says correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro, “and one of the most effective ways to te

Focus on Flowers
PBS Correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro

Focus on Flowers

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2016 2:00


Sumit Ganguly speaks with Fred de Sam Lazaro, special correspondent for PBS NewsHour.

Global Health – PBS NewsHour
As epidemic escalates, can U.S. aid for Ebola be deployed quickly enough?

Global Health – PBS NewsHour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2014 10:21


Watch Video | Listen to the AudioRELATED LINKSCuba pledges 165 healthcare workers to combat Ebola outbreak U.S. offers support to fragile, West African health systems to combat Ebola Why Ebola is proving so hard to contain JUDY WOODRUFF: Let’s dive deeper now into the president’s plan to ramp up the response to the Ebola outbreak and to try preventing a humanitarian catastrophe. It comes amid prior criticism of the administration, along with the WHO and of other countries, for not doing more and for not getting it done faster. We turn back to two who have been closely watching this and speaking with government officials in recent days. Laurie Garrett of the Council on Foreign Relations, she has written widely about Ebola, including the books “Betrayal of Trust” and “The Coming Plague,”and Lawrence Gostin of Georgetown University.  He’s the director of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. And we welcome you — welcome both of you back to the program. Laurie Garrett, to you first.  What is your assessment of the president’s plan that he outlined today? LAURIE GARRETT, Council on Foreign Relations: Well, it’s a bold step forward.  I’m delighted it’s actually taking place. But I think everything depends on the haste with which we can mobilize.  And I am afraid a lot of people don’t understand that committing troops and saying you’re going to build a hospital are all very good steeps, but it takes weeks to execute these things.  And, in the meantime, the epidemic is doubling every 10 to 20 days.  We don’t have a lot of time.  We’re racing against a clock. JUDY WOODRUFF: Lawrence Gostin, do you have the same concerns?  What’s your assessment? LAWRENCE GOSTIN, Georgetown Law: I think Laurie is right about timing. First of all, I am very proud of my country.  I mean, we have stepped forward when no one else would or could.  But there are major unanswered questions.  It’s not just timing, but also command-and-control.  There’s chaos on the ground.  It’s uncoordinated. I was very pleased to see the president say that we have a command post, but how are we going to command Chinese or Cuban workers?  I do think we need a U.N. Security Council resolution to actually have the kind of international legitimacy that we need. JUDY WOODRUFF: So going beyond what the U.S… LAWRENCE GOSTIN: Yes, the U.S. can’t do it alone. JUDY WOODRUFF: Well, let me just go further here with what the U.S. is doing.  You said you’re proud of your country.  What specifically do you think is going to make the most difference here? LAWRENCE GOSTIN: Well, I think the most difference will be training health workers, although — and building health facilities in the community, contact tracing.  All of those things are very important. JUDY WOODRUFF: Meaning going back and finding out where… LAWRENCE GOSTIN: Meaning going back, finding out who has been in contact with whom, and quickly isolating them in safe conditions. One of the big problems, though, is, is that even once we have built these treatment facilities, it’s going to be handed over eventually to the Ministry of Health in Liberia.  And they just don’t have the health workers.  The doctors and the nurses have been decimated.  And so we really do have a huge infrastructure task. JUDY WOODRUFF: Laurie Garrett, you laid out your concerns, but of what has been announced, how do you see this unfolding and making any difference? LAURIE GARRETT: Well, first of all, we don’t have any commercial flights landing in the area now.  And so just getting doctors on the ground, getting medical supplies, keeping stocks in place of such simple things as latex gloves to protect you from infection have all proven daunting, in the absence of real solidarity from neighboring countries and the willingness to have planes land and commercial flights. So one huge role for the U.S. military is going to be helping Ghana, which has very kindly and generously agreed to be the air bridge for all supplies and human movement into the area, to extend their runway, build their airport up, have logistic and supply operations in place, and then to have smaller flights go from Ghana into specific targeted areas carrying supplies with them as needed. But Larry points out a crucial problem with all of this.  We don’t have a central command, which means we don’t even have a centralized list of what’s needed.  Who needs latex gloves where?  Is the situation more dire in this county in Sierra Leone or in this county in Liberia?  Where do we need to deploy people first? We don’t have that kind of operation in place.  And our U.S. military is not going to play that role.  We will have a central command, but it will be commanding U.S. military personnel, not people from other countries and certainly not the Liberians themselves. And we also see that the response is not a regional one.  We are, unfortunately, dividing our response according to kind of old colonial ties.  So the French are focusing on Guinea, which used to be a French colony.  The United Kingdom is focused on Sierra Leone, which is settled by the descendants of British slaves who came from the Caribbean, and we’re focused on Liberia, which is settled by former American slaves. And so there’s this sort of distasteful neocolonial feel to things, and it means that the responses are not unified.  They are very divided by country.  So you have heard of 165 Cuban responders and 59 Chinese.  They’re all going to Sierra Leone, where they will be under we don’t know what kind of command, loosely coordinated by the Sierra Leone government. JUDY WOODRUFF: And, Lawrence Gostin, this is sounding like a very complicated effort, which we already knew, but it sounds even more complicated listening to the two of you. What about the timing of this?  How long is it going to take to begin to make a difference, to begin to get to the people who need treatment and are not receiving it? LAWRENCE GOSTIN: Well, first of all, we are very late to the game.  The fire has nearly burned the house down, and we have arrived.  The cavalry has arrived. It will take a long time, I think, to build the kind of facilities that we want.  I mean, the whole idea, for example, that we’re sending 500,000 home kits suggests that we can’t get people into hospitals quick enough to treat them and isolate them, and people who… JUDY WOODRUFF: These are self-testing kits? LAWRENCE GOSTIN: These are self-testing kits or self-protecting kits.  I’m not sure the community will know what to do with them when they get them. And so this is a — this is a makeshift response to a huge humanitarian crisis.  I don’t think it had to come to this, but now that we’re there, I’m really glad the see the United States military involved. JUDY WOODRUFF: So, Laurie Garrett, should we be pleased that this is happening or more worried because it’s not the holistic response that I heard you describing that’s necessary? “…if we can’t get a response on the ground immediately, effectively, across the region … then we’re talking about something equivalent to the Black Death’s impact on Tuscany and Florence in 1346. “ LAURIE GARRETT: Look, I’m delighted, like Larry, to see my country step up to the plate and play a role.  And I’m hoping that we can save lots and lots and lots of lives and bring this epidemic under control. But I agree completely we’re late to the game.  And if you just do the math, based on the statement made today by WHO, a doubling time every 10 to 21 days, and you take the number of actually identified and suspected cases existing now and do your math, you can see that if we can’t get a response on the ground immediately, effectively, across the region, we will be looking at a quarter of a million cases by Thanksgiving, and 400,000 by Christmas if this is not abated and brought under control. And then we’re talking about something equivalent to the Black Death’s impact on Tuscany and Florence in 1346. JUDY WOODRUFF: Sobering, sobering any which way you look at it.  We appreciate both of you joining us. Laurie Garrett, Lawrence Gostin, thank you. LAWRENCE GOSTIN: Thank you. JUDY WOODRUFF: And one country in West Africa that has had relative success in controlling this virus so far is Nigeria. While this nation has had 21 confirmed and suspected cases of the Ebola virus, including seven deaths, it has not had an explosive surge and spread since its first victim was reported in late July. Our special correspondent, Fred de Sam Lazaro, is on assignment in Lagos, and he checked in with us earlier today. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Nigeria is Africa’s most populous country.  It has the largest economy on the continent and its commercial capital, Lagos, has 20 million inhabitants, all of which have raised concerns that an Ebola outbreak would be catastrophic. But that hasn’t happened, in part due to an early break, and in large part due the a good public health response, experts say.  The virus was first brought to Nigeria by a Liberian traveler who fell ill at the airport, and, in a peculiar twist of fate, medical doctors were on strike when he was taken in for health care. That exposed far fewer health workers to the virus, and health care workers have been especially hard-hit during this epidemic.  They have contracted the virus and they have passed it on to their patients.  Despite its reputation for chaos and dysfunction, Nigeria has launched a very sophisticated response to Ebola. Everyone entering the country, including this reporter when we arrived yesterday at the airport, is screened for any symptoms.  Those with an elevated fever, for example, are taken in for secondary screening to make sure it’s not related to Ebola. There’s a call center where people can report suspected cases, and a concerted public awareness campaign that has kept fear from turning into panic.  And a sophisticated surveillance system has enabled this country to trace and keep track of all cases and people with whom they came into contact. All of these cases have been directly traced to that original index case, the Liberian traveler.  This is reassuring, but at a time when there’s so much travel and when the virus is running amuck in other parts of West Africa, Nigeria is nowhere near being able to declare victory.  A lot of fingers are still crossed tightly here. JUDY WOODRUFF: And we will have more of Fred’s reporting from Nigeria in the coming days. The post As epidemic escalates, can U.S. aid for Ebola be deployed quickly enough? appeared first on PBS NewsHour.

Global Health – PBS NewsHour
One family’s quest to unite orphaned Chinese girls with a happy home

Global Health – PBS NewsHour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2014 9:30


Watch Video | Listen to the AudioRELATED LINKSRwanda’s government moves to close orphanages Meet Agnes: orphan, student, survivor of sexual violence in Sierra Leone Detention of Americans in Haiti renews adoption concerns JUDY WOODRUFF: Finally tonight, one woman’s efforts to transform the way orphans are cared for in China. “NewsHour” correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports as part of his Agents for Change series. A version of Fred’s story aired on the PBS program “Religion & Ethics Newsweekly.” And a warning:  This piece contains some disturbing images. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: For the Bowen family, this was a huge day. MAN: She got the international baccalaureate diploma, and then she got the biliteracy medal, as opposed to bilingual. It’s like she can read and write and talk. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: That 18-year-old Maya Bowen can talk, let alone graduate with honors, seems both natural and unlikely, given her early childhood in a distant orphanage. Richard and Jenny Bowen adopted her when she was two. Jenny Bowen, Half the Sky Foundation: No one had ever talked to her and, you know, language develops when people talk to you. That’s how you learn to speak, so she had no language at all. WOMAN: OK. Daddy is going to take pictures of you. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Jenny Bowen recently published a book called “Wish You Happy Forever,” chronicling how Maya and later Anya came to be part of the family. The California couple were already in their 50s, with grown children, but they were moved by reports of child neglect on a vast scale in China. WOMAN: Here, we found toddlers tied to bamboo seats, with their legs splayed over makeshift potties. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: This 1995 film, shot undercover, called “The Dying Rooms” showed orphanages filled with girls, abandoned in a country that had begun restricting families to one child in a culture that traditionally favored boy children. JENNY BOWEN: We thought the thing we could do was save one life. So that’s what we did. We went to China to save a life. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: But she found it impossible to ignore the conditions Maya would escape, but where millions of others still languished — in the custody of indifferent or untrained workers, invisible in a nation focused on industrializing its way out of Third World poverty. Sixteen years later, Jenny Bowen heads a group called the Half the Sky Foundation that’s helping transform the way orphans are cared for across China, with the blessings of and often in partnership with the government. The name derives from a Chinese proverb that says women hold up half the sky. The group has so far trained 12,000 teachers and nannies in 27 provinces. We visited in the northeastern city of Shenyang. JENNY BOWEN: All these children are abandoned. Many of them are abandoned because they have what are called special needs. Before Half the Sky, children are tied to their chairs. They were lying in bed. You could see the tragedy. You walk into a room, and you were just confronted with the tragedy. Here, it’s invisible. These children are going on with their lives. They’re being treated like their lives matter. And they know it. They know they’re loved, and so they thrive. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: She says children need a sense of being part of a family, in whatever shape family takes. JENNY BOWEN: It doesn’t mean that they have to be back with their birth families or permanently adopted or anything. They just need to have the love that a family gives naturally to a child, and, to me, it was like a no-brainer. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: It was not a no-brainer to get her ideas across in an opaque state-run welfare system. What’s more, the publicity about orphanage conditions was deeply insulting to a government highly sensitive about China’s image. Zhang Zhirong works for Half the Sky’s China offices. ZHANG ZHIRONG, Half the Sky Foundation: China always want to tell the world she is the best, everything perfect. We are serving the people. We are helping the people. That’s China politically. But, as you know, China is such a big country. At that time, it was difficult to let people, especially foreigners, to come in to see some of the problems, to see some of the dark side. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Zhang was a key early ally, an English professor and official interpreter well-versed in the culture and politics of the bureaucracy. She was convinced of Bowen’s sincerity. ZHANG ZHIRONG: I really feel she had the heart. She wanted to help. No other intentions. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Did it help that she had Chinese daughters as well? ZHANG ZHIRONG: That’s also — we would tell — she always says, “I’m half-Chinese. My daughters are all Chinese.” JENNY BOWEN: I know that resonated. Certainly, the international criticism let them know that something had to be done. I probably was the least threatening of the options out there. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Bowen began by seeking guidance from child development experts. She raised funds in Hollywood, where she was a screenwriter and filmmaker, and from American couples who’d adopted Chinese daughters. She organized volunteer trips to train caregivers and spruce up the environment in which orphans spent their days. Children who once sat impassively are now in busy preschools. Walls that had generic cartoon images now display the children’s own artwork and pictures. JENNY BOWEN: Children in institutions, in traditional institutions, they move in packs. They all eat at the same time, they all sleep at the same time, they all pee at the same time, and they don’t separate themselves from each other. So we use a lot of mirrors, we use things like this, where they can identify themselves and their friends, and it’s a way for them to start knowing who they are, and that’s the beginning of developing intellectual curiosity and opinions. I can tell you already have opinions, right? FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Teacher Lin Lin says Half the Sky’s approach, called responsive care, is tailored to children’s individual learning interests — a far cry from the previous rote learning. LIN LIN, Schoolteacher, Half the Sky Foundation (through interpreter):  Kids were asked to recite a lot of things, old poems and literature, which they did not understand, they weren’t interested in. Now we’re doing things that are interesting to them. Gradually, you build a trust with these children, and they begin to consider you as part of their family. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: That’s a key goal: to make such caregivers part of the child’s understanding of family. But Half the Sky is also building so-called family villages, a more traditional setting. Couples, most with grown children, like Liu Peng Ying and her husband, Chen Yung Chang (ph), are given housing and a small stipend to raise their young orphaned charges. It’s an easy sell in a country where large families used to be the tradition. LIU PENG YING, China (through interpreter): These are like my own children, like my grandchildren. My husband likes children even more than I do. That’s why we decided to apply for this program. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: In today’s wealthier, more urbanized China, Bowen says fewer healthy female babies are abandoned. About three quarters of a million children are in state custody. They are more likely to be from impoverished rural areas and more likely to have congenital or medical conditions their families cannot afford to treat. JENNY BOWEN: So, in this room, we find children who have pretty severe special needs. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: For them, Half the Sky runs a care center in Beijing, with corporate foundation and government support. It provides care for children as they await or recover from surgery or as, in the sad case of 4-year-old Pin Pin, chemotherapy JENNY BOWEN: She has cancer in both of her eyes? WOMAN: Yes, and eight times chemo. JENNY BOWEN: Eight times chemo. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: For the weeks or months Pin Pin will spend here, a teacher will help her adjust to the loss of her sight. JENNY BOWEN: You need to have a teacher, because you have a lot of things you have to learn. We don’t just worry about your eyes. We have to worry about your brain, huh?  Yes. MAN: Maya Bowen! (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE) FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Maya Bowen plans to become an elementary teacher. She and Anya, a high school junior, have gone from being thankful to impressed. MAYA BOWEN: I did a paper and we could — at school, and it was a research paper, and we could do it on anything, so I chose my mom, because I thought that would be an easy topic. But then, when I started researching and learning everything she did, I was like, wow, like, this goes way farther than I thought. She has, like, a much bigger influence than I ever thought. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: Jenny Bowen is now 68 and CEO of a now $7 million-a-year enterprise that she hopes to expand beyond China to neighboring countries in Asia. She has no plans to retire. JUDY WOODRUFF: Fred’s reporting is a partnership with the Under-Told Stories Project at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota. The post One family’s quest to unite orphaned Chinese girls with a happy home appeared first on PBS NewsHour.

Global Health – PBS NewsHour
Persistence is key to wiping out polio outbreaks in fragile nations

Global Health – PBS NewsHour

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2014 8:52


Watch Video | Listen to the AudioGWEN IFILL: Public health officials around the world are sounding the alarm this week about the return of polio. It’s a big shift from just two years ago, when some experts thought they were on the verge of eradicating the disease. RELATED LINKSPolio vaccine campaign faces extemist opposition, public apathy in Pakistan Will polio outbreak inspire international community to do more about Syria? Program on polio eradication suspended in Pakistan after 9 aid workers killed Jeffrey Brown has the story. JEFFREY BROWN: The World Health Organization calls it an extraordinary event that threatens the decades-long battle to wipe out polio. On Monday, the agency declared an international public health emergency. Bruce Aylward is leading the WHO polio effort. He spoke during a teleconference from Geneva. BRUCE AYLWARD, World Health Organization: While the virus has resurged, I think it reminds us that, until it’s eradicated, it is going to spread internationally and it’s going to find and paralyze susceptible kids. Indeed, it could become endemic again in the entire world if we do not complete the eradication of this disease. JEFFREY BROWN: Worldwide, there have been 74 confirmed cases of polio this year, three times as many as the same period in 2013. They’re focused in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. In all, the outbreak has spread across at least 10 countries. The WHO singles out Syria, Cameroon and Pakistan as the main sources of the disease. Of those three, the vast majority of cases have been in Pakistan. FRED DE SAM LAZARO: This slum in Karachi is one of the last places in the world where polio is still a threat. JEFFREY BROWN: The NewsHour’s Fred de Sam Lazaro visited the country last August. He found Islamist militants have spread propaganda that the polio vaccine makes boys sterile and violates religious values. Moreover, Taliban militants have killed dozens of polio workers in Northwestern Pakistan. Dr. Anita Zaidi, a pediatrician, cited a fake vaccination campaign that the CIA used in the hunt for Osama bin Laden. DR. ANITA ZAIDI, Pediatrician: Which has hugely damaged public health programs, not only in Pakistan, but in many, many countries, because people ask all kinds of questions. They now think that they might — the vaccine programs might be actually spy operations. JEFFREY BROWN: Now a monitoring board set up by the WHO is warning that Pakistan is a — quote — “powder keg for polio” that could spread the virus on a global scale. And for a closer look at the outbreak, we turn to Dr. Jon Andrus, deputy director of the Pan American Health Organization, which is part of the WHO. Welcome to you. DR. JON ANDRUS, Pan American Health Organization: Thank you. JEFFREY BROWN: So, declaring a health emergency is a major step. Why now, exactly? DR. JON ANDRUS: The current situation is a public health emergency of international concern that is going to require a global response in order to prevent the global polio eradication initiative from sinking. This is going at a time when, in three different countries in three different parts of the world have had importations of wild polio virus due to low levels of coverage and having large outbreaks of paralyzed children. JEFFREY BROWN: You said wild polio. Explain what that means. DR. JON ANDRUS: Wild polio is the endemic virus that occurs in nature that paralyzes children. So, we now have a very good vaccination strategy, but, unfortunately, in these countries, they’re fragile. They may have fragile infrastructure. They may have civil strife. And the countries bordering them are also fragile. JEFFREY BROWN: What’s striking about this is that, not that long ago, this eradication process was going very well, right, sort of on schedule. So this is relatively new. DR. JON ANDRUS: Well, it’s — having spent a majority of my life working on polio eradication, you must expect the unexpected. You never know when these exportations are going to occur. Wars break out. So it’s really being on guard to provide the global response that will prevent this from spreading to neighboring countries. And to that end, the International Health Regulation Emergency Committee was convened by Dr. Margaret Chan, the WHO director, where specific recommendations are provided to stop and mitigate the risk of exportations to other countries. JEFFREY BROWN: All right, so before I ask you about those, though, I want to talk about some of those specific countries. Pakistan is one we mentioned in our setup piece, a lot of complications there, political, terrorism, anti-Western sentiment. How do you — how do you cope with that? DR. JON ANDRUS: It requires a multipronged approach, but I think what we learned in India is persistence. Today may not be an ideal time, because vaccination — vaccinators are being murdered. But when sufficient commitment and sufficient capacity to approach the problem develops, and that window of time when we take advantage, like India, Pakistan can accomplish the goal. JEFFREY BROWN: India has been — India is considered a success story in this. DR. JON ANDRUS: As of a couple of months ago, India was certified as polio-free. So, all of Southeast Asia was certified as polio-free due to India’s success. Fifteen years ago, the government of India didn’t even think polio could be eradicated. So my point is, it’s persistence. And I think we have a partnership with World Health Organization, UNICEF, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation stepping forward, and others like CDC, that will provide that persistence in helping the government stop transmission. JEFFREY BROWN: Another key country here is Syria. And we have reported on this on the program. Here — there, the case is a real breakdown in just the health infrastructure. Kids just are not getting vaccinations. DR. JON ANDRUS: Well, during the civil war, vaccinators can’t reach certain areas. So coverage is going to go down. Susceptible children, susceptible to the infection, those numbers will increase. So, when the virus — as Dr. Aylward mentioned, the virus is going to find those children. And the outbreaks that we have seen have occurred. Now Syria is exporting the virus, most recently to Iraq, which is another country that’s fragile and will be difficult to control. JEFFREY BROWN: So, tell us a little about the measure that can take place. WHO doesn’t have enforcement provisions, right? But you’re recommending — well, some of it has to do with travel restrictions. DR. JON ANDRUS: Well, the international health regulations, which were modified in 2005, adopted by the World Health Assembly — so that is a governing body that all member countries participate in — they approved these regulations that injects a level of accountability to the countries that have the problem. So, in the old days, when the international health regulations were only limited to a small number of diseases, mainly smallpox, cholera, plague, and yellow fever, with a one-size-fits-all strategy, we now have regulations that can be adjusted and — and tailored to the situation. It’s not just about an infectious disease. It could be about an earthquake, as happened in Haiti. It could be about a tsunami that happened in Indonesia. So those regulations, we believe, add accountability and really, through the global community, encourage local action at the source of the infection, whereas, in the old days, it was at the border crossings. JEFFREY BROWN: I see. DR. JON ANDRUS: So now it’s… JEFFREY BROWN: So, now it’s a mix. DR. JON ANDRUS: It’s a mix. And I think does add accountability. So, specifically, the director of WHO is asking those three countries that are exporting the virus — namely, Pakistan, Cameroon and Syria — any traveler that plans to leave the country be required to be vaccinated four weeks before they leave, up to a year. But that then would be documented with the WHO forms, and would be a mechanism to mitigate the risk of it being exported. JEFFREY BROWN: OK. Dr. Jon Andrus of the World Health Organization, thanks so much. DR. JON ANDRUS: Thank you, Jeff. The post Persistence is key to wiping out polio outbreaks in fragile nations appeared first on PBS NewsHour.

Meet the Journalist
Fred de Sam Lazaro and Simone Ahuja Report on KISS

Meet the Journalist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2013 2:31


Journalists Fred de Sam Lazaro and Simone Ahuja discuss their project KISS: Fighting Poverty with School and Sport to Keep Maoists at Bay. With a grant from the Pulitzer Center, de Sam Lazaro and Ahuja went to a remote part of India to look at the work of an alternative education program devised with the intention of luring tribal children away from the Maoist separatist conflict. The Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences (KISS) — which children can attend at no cost — teaches close to 18,000 pupils and focuses on language, culture and religion. This project takes a look into the school's business model: how it works, how it stays afloat and how it is supporting often neglected children in India

Meet the Journalist
Fred de Sam Lazaro on Brazil's Declining Birth Rate

Meet the Journalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2013 2:11


Journalist Fred de Sam Lazaro explains the source of declining birth rate in Brazil and how it could enhance women’s role in the society—a topic of his project “Brazil: Girl Power.”