Podcasts about Change

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 26,432PODCASTS
  • 69,938EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Change

Show all podcasts related to change

Latest podcast episodes about Change

How'd It Happen Podcast
Donna Loughlin, Five Dollars and Half a Tank of Gas (#239)

How'd It Happen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 67:55


Not everyone can set and achieve one goal to another tirelessly all their life since childhood. That goes to show that today's guest is indeed one of a kind. With me today is Founder and President of Loughlin/Michaels Group PR, Donna Loughlin, to talk about her journey from being shy to being the class president and taking on school paper leadership roles, and winning the title of “Most Likely to Succeed.” We also talk about her long career as a journalist, typing 150 words per minute her way up the ranks until finally starting her firm PR with five dollars and half a tank of gas. Donna Loughlin is the Founder of LMGPR and known for her work with futurists and innovators. Donna excels in the realm of storytelling and uses those skills to propel new companies into the mainstream. Inspired every day by the forward-thinkers, she works with, Donna has a deep fascination with advancements in AI, automotive, consumer electronics, and more. She is also the host of BeforeItHappened, a leading narrative podcast featuring visionaries and the moments, events, and realizations that inspired them to change our lives for the better.Reach out to Donna at:Website: https://lmgpr.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/donnal2/Twitter: https://twitter.com/dlmichaelsListen to her podcast, Before It Happened: https://www.beforeithappened.com/Show notes:[3:17] How'd it happen for Donna?[9:14] The Valley as a fertile soil of ideas[11:58] The land of heart's delight[13:33] Her penny books[17:27] How she describes using smells when writing[23:09] On personal experience[28:03] When she decided what she wanted to do[36:36] PR and Marketing[41:38] Her magic weapon[44:21] Her thoughts on journalism and reporting now compared to before[49:28] What made her start her firm?[57:43] On doing racing and getting out of her comfort zone[1:06:59] OutroCheck the accompanying blog post of this episode at: https://mikemalatesta.com/podcast/donna-loughlin-five-dollars-and-half-a-tank-of-gas-239/If you like this episode and want to be the first to know when new ones are released? Make sure you subscribe! Also, a review will be much appreciated, so make sure you give us a 5-star (or whatever one makes the most sense to you).Connect with Mike:Website: https://mikemalatesta.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemalatesta/

Background Briefing with Ian Masters
January 18, 2022 - Christopher Chivvis | Paul Glastris | Valeria Sinclair-Chapman

Background Briefing with Ian Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:08


A War Between Russia and Ukraine Will Likely Break Out Within Weeks | Biden's First Year in Office at a Time His Domestic Agenda is Stalled and Poll Numbers Are Sinking | The Apparently Futile Senate Debate to Change the Filibuster Rules backgroundbriefing.org/donate twitter.com/ianmastersmedia facebook.com/ianmastersmedia

Sea Change Radio
Celia Ouellette: The Business of Punishment in America (re-broadcast)

Sea Change Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:00


People sometimes like to quote that Bible passage about “an eye for an eye” when justifying a punitive criminal justice system focused on retribution and vengeance. Others like to repeat a saying often attributed to Ghandi, that “an eye for an eye will leave the whole world blind.” This week on Sea Change Radio, we … Continue reading Celia Ouellette: The Business of Punishment in America (re-broadcast) → This article and podcast Celia Ouellette: The Business of Punishment in America (re-broadcast) appeared first on Sea Change Radio.

Eric Chase
Helping Toledo Youth

Eric Chase

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:43


Thanks to Shawn Mahone, whom I came across here, for joining us to talk about BOOTCAMP and his Young Men and Women for Change program. Then... It's not actually 0% Don't watch this sci-fi show. Or maybe you will. 

RAD Radio
01.18.22 RAD 02 Win Rob's Change & Vaccine Policies- Having Fun in Hawaii

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:24


Win Rob's Change & Vaccine Policies- Having Fun in HawaiiSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

RAD Radio
01.18.22 RAD 10 Win Rob's Change & Jokes From the Maggots

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 8:21


Win Rob's Change & Jokes From the MaggotsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Hyper Conscious Podcast
#855 - Recognizing Your Blind Spots - Live Podcast

Hyper Conscious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:31


A blind spot is a subject or area in which someone's ability to understand is weak or lacking. We all have blind spots, but some proactively try and discover theirs, while others would rather not know in fear of getting hurt. In this episode, hosts Kevin Palmieri and Alan Lazaros talk about blind spots and the importance of identifying and understanding yours. Knowing what your blind spot is doesn't only help you have a deeper understanding of yourself; it also facilitates personal growth.Group coaching details: https://nextleveluniverse.com/group-coaching/We love connecting with you guys! Reach out on LinkedIn, Instagram, or via emailWebsite

LeaderTHRIVE with Dr. Jason Brooks
Rick Maurer joins LeaderTHRIVE podcast with Dr. Jason Brooks: Episode 91

LeaderTHRIVE with Dr. Jason Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 55:00


Today's guest, Rick Maurer, is a speaker, author, consultant, and expert on helping leaders avoid resistance to change. Since the publication of his book Beyond the Wall of Resistance in the 1990s, Rick's opinion has been sought by The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, NBC Nightly News, Fortune, and many other media outlets. Some of the largest companies in the world ask for his advice on ways to avoid resistance to change and ways to build strong support for changes and other big projects. Connect with Rick at www.RickMaurer.com

Leaders in Living Rooms
LILR 049 | Tommy Politz on How to Lead Different Seasons of Ministry

Leaders in Living Rooms

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 44:56


“Change is painful, but it's better than death.” Meet Tommy Politz, Senior Pastor of Hillside Christian Church, who has served as pastor, church planter, and transitional leader in his 30+ years of ministry. In this episode, Tommy shares with us his own personal journey of transitional leadership and the wisdom he's gained along the way. Transitional leaders will face high resistance in their quest for high impact. Paying attention to the rate, pace, and acceleration of decision making will be a critical element to a successful transition. Welcome to Episode 049 of the Leaders in Living Rooms Podcast with Sean Morgan.

Straight Outta Prison
The #1 Key: Commitment (The 12 Keys to Life After Prison)

Straight Outta Prison

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 71:36


James & Haley discuss Commitment, which is the first Key, and the foundation to seeing success in any area of your life. James is giving you the tools to get you from where you are to where you want to be. His story started out as hopeless, but over time he learned a set of keys that helped him unlock every door that was stopping his life from going forward. Those same keys will work for you no matter what you're facing. The keys are not magic, they're just simple truths that are easy to understand and apply. Join James for a journey into the unknown… out of what is and into what could be…More from James & Haley:Cooking with Chef James K Jones (YouTube Channel)Cooking Guides & Team Jones StoreCookbook by James K JonesChef James K Jones InstagramThe Straight Outta Prison Podcast The 4Real Reel Podcast Narrowing The Gap Podcast Team Jones InstagramStraight Outta Prison InstagramFor exclusive, ad-free content, download the Patreon App, and look up Team Jones Media. Or, head over to Team Jones.co/podcast and click the “Become a Patron” Button.Please Support our Sponsors. They help us provide this content for free. Alec Priola -NMLS# 1301247apriola@assurancemortgage.com205-215-2888www.assurancemortgage.com/apriolaAssurance Financial- Equal Housing Lender NMLS# 70876Dana Sorensen Real Estate TeamRE/MAX Northern Properties205-563-7432Hand's Pest Control- Mike & Debra Hand205- 229-0514 email-mrbugs00@bellsouth.netFacebook PageHurst Towing and Recovery -Lynn & Debbie Hurst205-631-8697 (205-631-TOWS)https://hursttowing.com/Deidre Tolbert Designshttps://www.instagram.com/deidretolbertdesigns/ 205-746-5328Crossfit Mephobia - Hayden SetserCrossFitmephobiainfo@gmail.com256-303-1873https://www.instagram.com/crossfitmephobia/  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/straighouttaprisonpodcast)

THE ED MYLETT SHOW
Breakthrough For A Compelling Future w/ Tony Robbins

THE ED MYLETT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 61:56


Tony Robbins is an icon  He's an icon for a very good reason , which is that he has helped millions of people improve or change their lives I AM ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE. Tony and I have been FRIENDS for many years.  He was one of my earliest SUPPORTERS when I decided to get into performance coaching. We've spent a lot of time exchanging thoughts and ideas about how to IMPROVE the human condition, and without a doubt, those are some of the most IMPORTANT CONVERSATIONS of my life. I'm grateful for that friendship and I'm grateful to share one of those conversations with you in this interview   We know how hard all the disruptions have been for many people, from losing loved ones to COVID, job upheavals, economic ups and downs, political turmoil, and trying to face what the future holds for us. Because our time was at a premium, we wanted to use it where it would do the most GOOD.  That's why we focused on the fear, anger, and uncertainty so many people are dealing with right now, and how we could START A DIALOG that might provide you with some badly needed ANSWERS.  TONY wastes no time offering simple and practical advice…turn off the TV, FOCUS ON YOURSELF, and what you want out of life for 2022.  He also explains why fear is more than just psychological, it's physical too, and how that fear negatively impacts your health. As Tony explains, the most difficult thing to do right now is CREATE MOMENTUM to overcome all the obstacles we're facing.  But that's exactly what you need to do as part of TAKING CONTROL of your life. Tony reveals the best way to do this is to develop the SKILLS you're going to need to be successful in the future.  Listen closely for what those skills are. You're also going to hear some master-class wisdom about the difference between success and FULFILLMENT, and the importance of PATTERNS and SEASONS and their impact on your life. We can't solve all the world's problems in one hour, but what we wanted to do is talk about them, how those of us who are hurting can start to CHANGE some of the ways we think and to help you rediscover HOPE that's maybe been in short supply in your lives.

Soul Solutions
Beginnings Happen Every Day, Use Them To Empower You To Move Forward

Soul Solutions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:26


Episode 77: Beginnings Happen Every Day, Use Them To Empower You To Move Forward Show Description:  New beginnings occur daily. Are you seeing them? Begin empowering yourself to use each fresh start to move you a step closer to your dreams.Top Takeaways: ·         [2:05] New Beginnings Vs. A New You·         [3:41] Moving Past Self-Doubt·         [5:07] Perseverance Means Beginning Again·         [6:42] Fresh Approaches To Beginnings·         [8:20] Moving Forward With New Beginnings Episode Links: Ø  https://terrikozlowski.mastermind.com/masterminds/25609Ø  Hope to rise Ø  Completing the items Ø  Clearing your mind Ø  Masks and armor Ø  Who you authentically are Ø  Universal faithØ  Forgive yourself and others Ø  Other side of your comfort zoneØ  The opportunity in front of youØ  Believe in yourselfØ  Go within Ø  Change Ø  Being persistent Ø  Be a success Ø  WillpowerØ  It alters perspectiveØ  Big picture you want to envisionØ  That you may need to prune Ø  Letting it goØ  Accept what isØ  Allows peace Ø  Following your heartØ  Be focused Ø  Move you forward Ø  Overcome the ego's limiting beliefsØ  Live a successful lifeØ  Create the life you desireØ  Raven Transcending Fear   Support the show (https://paypal.me/TerriKozlowski)

The Long and The Short Of It
173. Who Not How

The Long and The Short Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 20:41


Pete found himself being called out this week, and he and Jen share their thoughts and reactions to the ideas in the book Who Not How, which inspired this week's episode.Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about:Why is it important to add people to your team and to work with people that have different strengths?Why might someone want to keep all the tasks of a project to themselves?What are ways in which we can reach out to people and invite them to collaborate?To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It website: https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/.You can subscribe to our Box o' Goodies here (https://thelongandtheshortpodcast.com/) and receive a weekly email full of book and podcast recommendations, quotes, videos and other interesting things Jen and Pete are noodling on. To get in touch, send an email to: hello@thelongandtheshortpodcast.comLearn more about Pete's work here (https://humanperiscope.com/) and Jen's work here (https://jenwaldman.com/).

From Willingness to Wellness
2022 - The Year to Be Still | Ep 112

From Willingness to Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 6:02


The next few episodes, I will be sharing what 2022 is for me. Maybe you can relate? To begin, 2022 is the year to Be Still and Know. To get more information on the new Ready & WILLING! Video Course for health gain by weight loss that will be launched later this month and to sign up to be notified, go HERE.Receive a FREE gift from me for signing up for my newsletter at 4theWilling.com.Find my book, No More Weighting - Thought for the Week at Amazon or BarnesandNoble.Support the show (https://paypal.me/DebbiRobertson)

Tough Girl Podcast
Hazel Oakes - Illustrator and mural artist, passionate about empowering women to reach their goals and to become more adventurous.

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:26


Nocciola The Drawer (Hazel Oakes) is an artist and designer from the UK. She has lived in 8 different countries, visited almost 40 countries between 5 continents. She's hiked the peaks of the Balkans, completed half marathons and the Athen's marathon.    Hazel is military trained and has a joy for life, for sharing and inspiring other women to become more adventurous.    Hazel has a nomadic spirit and feels her sense of community with women anywhere in the world.   She specialises in bright, colourful, bold artwork that combines female characters with lively patterns. All with the aim to uplift, inspire, empower and celebrate women.   She is inspired by the seasons, women, childlike imagination, travel, making the most of the moment, street art and graffiti. She spends her time illustrating, creating large murals and drawing on anything (paper, canvas, plates, walls).    Nocciola The Drawer is spreading her joy of life one splash of colour at a time!      New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Who is Hazel Being based in Italy at the moment Her aims and goals  Spreading her joy for life - one splash of colour at a time! Wanting to move her body and to follow her passions Being a creative explorer Where her passion for art and adventure came from Getting her creative side from her mum Getting her adventurous side from her dad Doing all the dance classes from a young age Her teenage years - and the pressure to get a normal job Loving art at school Wanting to learn about fashion design Joining the Officer Training Core OTC Following both of her passions The next step in her career Deciding to do a Masters course at Kingston University  Working with brides and helping them to feel comfortable in their bodies Wanting more adventure and booking a one way ticket to Australia  The different pathways and journeys that can be taken Spending time in Australia! Loving to travel and spending time in Canada and Italy What does Adventure mean to Hazel The why and the how of challenge The power of taking small steps Don't compare yourself to how other people have done it Living a nomadic lifestyle  Taking advantage of the travel opportunities that become available Getting to know a new place  Her love for walking and exploring Peaks of the Balkans Working as a trip manger in Italy  Taking on new challenges every few years Dealing with the heat Why Nocciola? What it means Being a full time artist… Tips for being more creative Curiosity and amazement  The Tough Girl Mural and how it came about  Follow Hazel on line  Future plans for 2022 Top tips and advice to motivate and inspire you   Social Media   Website: www.nocciolathedrawer.com   Instagram:   @nocciolathedrawer @nocciolatheexplorer    Facebook: @nocciolathedrawer    Youtube: Nocciola The Drawer   

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra
Episode 114: Ingredients for Healthy Succession Planning with Robby Angle and Bruce McNicol

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:27


Change is hard. Handing off the baton of an organization is even harder. Are you in a season of transition? When do you know it's time to release something and pursue another calling? Maybe you are a senior leader who is considering whether or not it's the right time to begin succession planning. Maybe you are the next president or CEO of an organization and you are carefully striving to honor the past while innovating for the future. Regardless, this episode with co-founder of Trueface Ministries, Dr. Bruce McNicol, and current President/CEO, Robby Angle, is one you don't want to miss. They talk about principles for healthy transitions and how to manage change well. Bruce shares how he planned for his succession and he highlights the role of providential help along the way. Robby describes Bruce's role and his humility throughout the succession and the importance of communication and patience in this process.   Robby is the President and CEO of Trueface. He lives in Dawsonville Georgia with his wife Emily and their 8 children. Prior to serving at Trueface, Robby served for over 7 years as Director of Adult Ministry Environments and Director of Men's Groups at North Point Community Church in Atlanta, Georgia founded by Andy Stanley. Prior to joining North Point, Robby and his wife, Emily, both worked in professional counseling and aid work, where they served with Samaritan's Purse in Pakistan and Myanmar overseeing international disaster response teams. Robby and Emily received a Masters in Community Counseling from Appalachian State University. Angle also holds a business degree from the University of Florida, and a Certificate in Bible/Biblical studies from Dallas Theological Seminary.   Bruce McNicol is the Co-Founder (with Bill Thrall) and President Emeritus of Trueface. God has used Bruce's teaching wisdom, global vision, and business skills to help Trueface offer break-through experiences of grace for many thousands around the world. With degrees in finance law, theology, leadership and organizational development, Bruce's gifting to write to diverse readers and leaders has proved true in the best-sellers he has co-authored: The Cure, The Ascent of a Leader, Bo's Café, Behind The Mask, The Kingdom Life, and High Trust Cultures. Having lived in Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco Bay Area, Chicago, and Phoenix, Bruce has gained a variety of interests through the years, including international cultural trends and needs, music, hiking, reading, comedy, and sports. His constant interest is his wife Janet, who is a home-maker, nurse, and mentor, as well as their three adult children and their growing families.   Learn more about trueface.org and all their incredible resources.   Jeff and Terra and their professional team of executive coaches and organizational development experts are here to help you in any season of transition in your leadership. Learn more at www.livingwholearted.com

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Anti Racist Author and Speaker Tim Wise and Finance Expert Barry Ritholtz Episode 522

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 141:48


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books 35 mins Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. 1:28 The GREAT Barry Ritholtz who has spent his career helping people spot their own investment errors and to learn how to better manage their own financial behaviors. He is the creator of The Big Picture, often ranked as the number one financial blog to follow by The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and others. Barry Ritholtz is the creator and host of Bloomberg's “Masters in Business” radio podcast, and a featured columnist at the Washington Post. He is the author of the Bailout Nation: How Greed and Easy Money Corrupted Wall Street and Shook the World Economy (Wiley, 2009). In addition to serving as Chairman and Chief Investment Officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management, he is also on the advisory boards of Riskalyze, and Peer Street, two leading financial technology startups bringing transparency and analytics to the investment business.   Barry has named one of the “15 Most Important Economic Journalists” in the United States, and has been called one of The 25 Most Dangerous People in Financial Media. When not working, he can be found with his wife and their two dogs on the north shore of Long Island. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

This Grit and Grace Life
Ready to Overcome Disappointment? Here’s How with Baylor Wilson – 176

This Grit and Grace Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 32:14


Disappointment hurts! Especially when what disappointed you was something you'd been working towards or anticipating for a long time. So how can we come to terms with being let down? Country artist Baylor Wilson joins Darlene Brock and Julie Bender on This Grit and Grace Life podcast to share her own run-in with disappointment. After a door closed in her life, Baylor sat in the pain of rejection and grief before realizing her worth and the possibilities that awaited her after being redirected. A chance encounter following her disappointment led Baylor to a career she loves and opportunities she previously never would have expected.  When life hands us disappointments, it's easy to feel overcome with sorrow over what could have been. Instead, we hope Baylor's story encourages you to recognize your identity in Christ and embrace change as part of life—it could lead to you to prosper in ways you may never have thought possible before your disappointment. Baylor Wilson is a Christian artist whose first single, “Jesus Happened,” just debuted in 2021. She's been a country songwriter as well as a contestant on season 29 of the hit CBS show, Survivor. Baylor is newly married to her husband, James, and is a proud puppy mom to her Great Pyrenees, Willow. You can follow Baylor on Instagram @baylorwilson, or at her website: baylorwilson.com   Quote of the episode: "When you're walking through disappointment, it's not for nothing." —Baylor Wilson Resources For more on overcoming disappointment, check out: – "How to Find Strength In the Midst of Disappointment" – "How Brain Science Restored My Hope for Change" – "5 Steps for Remaining Hopeful in Seasons of Change" Be sure to follow us on social media! Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest #gritandgracelife

Feed Your Family Tonight Podcast
168 4 Tips to Riff on a Recipe

Feed Your Family Tonight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 15:03


If you follow recipes to a "T" this episode can help you make simple changes to recipes that will help you get more creative in the kitchen and save money on ingredients. If you use recipes as suggestions this episode can help you understand how you do this naturally and may give you some new ideas of ways to make recipes your own. 4 Tips to Riff on a Recipe Tip 1: Think About Why You Want to Change a Recipe. Tip 2: What do You Want to Change in the Recipe? Tip 3: Does the Change Make Sense? Tip 4: Just Do It! For Full Show Notes and Transcript Click Here. 

Manlihood ManCast
Upgrade Your Masculinity | Men's Self Improvement Tips

Manlihood ManCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 14:19


Start building healthy habits It's so easy to fall into the trap of entropy - to let things get away from you. And it's not something we can fix overnight! We can't instantly change the unhealthy habits we've built. But we CAN start now with one habit, or two or three habits that we start building, and as we get it in place, we add more. Or if we're killing habits, we kill one or two at a time. Do the heart work Nick Matiash talks about doing the heart work, so that you can do the hard work. The truth is, most men have never really learned how to properly deal with their emotional health. We're conditioned to believe that emotions are bad, and we learn to stuff them, rather than to properly deal with them. Then, when our emotions seruface, they're unruly and ugly. If you need a place to start on this, I recommend Jason Wilson's book, Battle Cry. Change your m ind Men, Changing our behavior starts be changing our feelings. Changing our feelings starts by changing our thoughts. We have to learn to change the way we think. Repeating truth into our brain, rooting out the lies we believe, and replacing it with truth is a life changer. The biggest battle for any man is the battle to control and guide his thoughts. Learn this, and you can do anything you want to do. Take ownership Men who take ownership of their lives are men whose lives improve. If you want to upgrade your masculinity, you'll embrace your responsibilities. You'll acknowledge your mistakes, and you'll acknowledge that your success is up to you and your decisions as well. Get Around Other Men It's tempting to want to go it alone. It's easier sometimes, to avoid the drama and the confrontation and the discomfort of having people in your seem to poke their noses in your business. But the truth is - if you want to be a better man, you'll be around other men who want to encourage you and who call you higher. ------------------ Get REIGNITE: A MAN'S FIELD GUIDE TO TAKING BACK HIS LIFE http://www.manlihood.com/reignite/ Join the ManCave Today: http://facebook.com/groups/manlihoodmancave ---------------- Do you have a question you'd like to have answered on The Manlihood ManCast? Send it to us here: http://manlihood.com/ask-a-man --------------- VISIT THE MANLIHOOD STORE FOR RESOURCES, APPAREL, AND MORE! http://manlihood.com/store More from Manlihood: http://manlihood.com More from Josh Hatcher: http://joshhatcher.com -------------- Don't forget to check out our sponsors / partners / affiliates: GET A FREE STOCK FOR JOINING ROBINHOOD - https://join.robinhood.com/joshh826 Death to Tyrants Apparel - http://deathtotyrantsapparel.com Hatcher Media - http://hatchermedia.net Honky EDC - http://honkyedc.com Out of Your Shell Poetry - http://outofyourshellpoetry.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/manlihood/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/manlihood/support

Scrum meistern
#122 Auftragsklärung als Scrum Master / Agile Coach

Scrum meistern

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 22:38


Als Scrum Master oder Agile Coach unterstützen und führen wir ohne Macht und Weisungsbefugnis. Umso wichtiger ist es, dass wir aus einem klaren Auftrag ALLER beteiligten Personen heraus agieren. In dieser Folge arbeite ich auf, was sich für mich bewährt hat, um ein Mandat für mein Wirken von den beteiligten Personen zu bekommen.   LINK: https://cutt.ly/scrummeistern122

The Spring Legion Podcast
Ep 42: Wild Turkey Report 2022 with David Hawley

The Spring Legion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 62:35


Hosted by Hunter Farrior and Austin Sills, welcome to a year-round discussion on the wild turkey and those who hunt them.  This week, we're excited to hop on the line with someone who "gets it," Mr. David Hawley, aka @WildTurkeyReport across most platforms in the outdoors. When it comes to the spring turkey woods, there aren't many folks who love them more than today's guest.  In this episode:  The history of @wildturkeyreport.  Nest Predators explained and how to trap effectively this season.  Habitat How-To:  what do "turkey woods" really look like?  Social Media in the outdoor space - a conversation worth having.  Our Open Season Countdown, brought to you by Open Season Properties: 55 Days     In the market for buying or selling land in Mississippi?  Give either of today's hosts a call, text, or email, and we'll be glad to help!   Hunter Farrior, Licensed Agent, Open Season Properties:  (769) 798-2355  hunterfarrior@springlegion.com  @hunter.farrior  hunterfarriorfb   Austin Sills, Licensed Agent, Open Season Properties:  (601) 672-9113  austinsills@springlegion.com  @sills_springlegion   New Box Call Tees at Spring Legion!  2022's Edition of our "Not Subject to Change" Series is now live for Spring '22!  Click Here to check them out!  Make sure to subscribe to our podcast, YouTube, and social platforms to catch all kinds of live content throughout the NWTF Convention, and the remainder of Spring Turkey Season 2022!  NWTF CONVENTION 2022 - Booth #304   Follow us on Social Media:  Instagram: @springlegion   TikTok: @springlegion  YouTube: springlegion  Facebook: @springlegion  More may be found at springlegion.com  Thank you all for listening and Rolling Thunder Game Calls for making this podcast possible!  

Art Beauty
Tough-love Tips to Actually Achieve Your Fitness Goals

Art Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 33:50


“If you want to make a change, you have to be willing to change.” Frank advice is hard to hear, but that's why we love Casey Cohen. And that's why her "Be The Change" program is so successful. We talk to the NASM Certified Personal Trainer & G.E.A.R Certified Indoor Cycling instructor, about how we can actually stay accountable to our fitness goals in 2022.How she went from not knowing how to clip-in to six spin classes a day!Key aspects of her “Be the Change” mindset and fitness plan.How to avoid expiration dating in our goals. The dangers of working out with an instructor who isn't certified and how to find one who is.

The Oh Hell No Podcast
Episode 229: Meet Rudy Poe & Discover How to Embrace Change

The Oh Hell No Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 31:57


Rudy Poe describes his purpose in life in three simple words; ‘Change For Better.'Rudy is no stranger to change, he is an entrepreneur and Emmy Award winning documentary filmmaker. He has co-founded two highly successful companies (in completely different industries) and produced over two-hundred hours of documentary productions covering a wide array of topics.  As an adept innovator, storyteller and change maker, Rudy has become an expert at pulling disparate resources together and crafting them into thought-provoking messages and media that are practical, educational and entertaining. His most recent work, Embracing Change: Your Go-To Guide to Your Desired Future is a useful, comprehensive and easy-to-understand book and online course chock full of transformative thoughts, stories and tools that help individuals develop a future-forward mindset – one that empowers them to become expert problem-solvers, decision-makers and change-for-better-makers themselves.To learn more about Rudy visit www.rudypoe.com. Check out The Oh Hell No Podcast & get the information you need to live your best life!www.ohhellnopodcast.comFollow on Instagram  @theohhellnopodcast Tell us what you want to hear...fill out our questionnaire! https://forms.gle/pLHjHLtv1SkgHRpF9Shop Bent Beauty 25% off Coupon Code: OHHELLNO

Hyper Conscious Podcast
#854 - Don't Mistake Movement for Achievement

Hyper Conscious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 10:18


“Knowledge is not power. Applied knowledge is power.” - Alan LazarosWalk the talk. It means putting your words into action—showing that you mean what you say by actively doing it yourself. But everyone has failed to do that at least once in their life. In another call to action episode, hosts Kevin Palmieri and Alan Lazaros remind you once again to get your butt off where you're sitting and start doing what you said you would a couple of months ago! Because you'll never have achievement unless there's embodiment.Group coaching details: https://nextleveluniverse.com/group-coaching/We love connecting with you guys! Reach out on LinkedIn, Instagram, or via emailWebsite

The Takeaway
MLK: Activism & The Arts

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 44:29


In some ways it is impossible to fully celebrate MLK Day in a virtual environment, after all, the movement for racial justice and Civil Rights  has always been about coming together. However, the decision to go digital does honor another aspect of the movement- its creativity and collective action. Hosted by various WNYC radio hosts, this commemorative and uplifting special brings together scholars, cultural and community leaders, and activists to engage in conversations and performance, exploring the many ways the arts influenced the creative nonviolent resistance of Dr. King's activism and how his work is continued today. You'll be hearing excerpts from the Uptown Hall: MLK- Activism And The Arts, our live celebration of the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. recorded on Apollo Digital Stage. Brian Lehrer sat down with award winning children's book author Jacqueline Woodson; Kai Wright spoke with Rashaad Robinson from Color of Change; and WNYC's Jami Floyd, spoke with Garrett McQueen, executive producer and co-host of the Trilluqoy podcast and president of trill werks media. WNYC's host of “all of it”, Alison Stewart was joined by stage and film actress, writer and director, Trezana Beverly and Jonathan McCrory, the artistic director of the National Black Theater. Graphic courtesy of WNYC (WNYC Studios )             

New Collective Church
When The World Doesn't Want To Change

New Collective Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 43:05


Luke 3:1-14 1 In the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar—when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, Herod tetrarch of Galilee, his brother Philip tetrarch of Iturea and Traconitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilene— 2 during the high-priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John son of Zechariah in the wilderness.    The word comes in the wilderness.   Solitude in the wilderness gives recovery from and preparation for.   3 He went into all the country around the Jordan, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. 4 As it is written in the book of the words of Isaiah the prophet: “A voice of one calling in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way for the Lord, make straight paths for him. 5 Every valley shall be filled in, every mountain and hill made low. The crooked roads shall become straight, the rough ways smooth. 6 And all people will see God's salvation.'”   The way of the Lord is for all to see.   7 John said to the crowds coming out to be baptized by him, “You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the coming wrath?  8 Produce fruit in keeping with repentance. And do not begin to say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our father.' For I tell you that out of these stones God can raise up children for Abraham.  9 The ax is already at the root of the trees, and every tree that does not produce good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire.” 10 “What should we do then?” the crowd asked. 11 John answered, “Anyone who has two shirts should share with the one who has none, and anyone who has food should do the same.” 12 Even tax collectors came to be baptized. “Teacher,” they asked, “what should we do?” 13 “Don't collect any more than you are required to,” he told them. 14 Then some soldiers asked him, “And what should we do?”   He replied, “Don't extort money and don't accuse people falsely—be content with your pay.”   The way of the Lord challenges all to change.   Change the father - change the fruit.

HR Leaders
From Work to Workology: The Evolution of the Function

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:51


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest Jessica Miller-Merrell, founder of Workology.Thanks to WorkForce Software for Supporting the show!Download your guide to improving employee experience for the modern workforce: https://bit.ly/3pTdrVOEpisode Highlights00:00 - Intro00:50 - Jessica's journey04:10 - On the shift towards vulnerability05:45 - About Workology08:32 - On the evolution of the CHRO role11:21 - How HR challenges have changed over the past 2 years13:13 - Advice for leaders who want to influence at stakeholder levels15:29 - Common wellbeing focuses in the function23:55 - Is it too late for companies sufferring from the great resignation?If you enjoyed the podcast be sure to subscribe for more content like this and visit our website to access resources mentioned: www.hrleaders.co/podcastSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Product Boss Podcast
332. Be Honest: Are You Afraid of Success?

The Product Boss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 43:16


The second Friday of every year is National Quitters' Day. Why? Because it's the day that, statistically, most people give up on their new year's resolutions. Why is it so difficult to make the changes we really want in life? We know the obvious answers, but have you ever considered that maybe you're scared of change – of success? Let's really dive into what that means and what you can do about it. Let's compare your business resolutions to a resolution that a lot of people make at the beginning of the year: trying to lose weight. Losing weight couldn't possibly be scary, right? Well, for many people, it can! There's the fear of committing to a new way of life, the fear that your lifestyle changes will make you feel less comfortable, and the fear of failure, all of which can contribute to you being afraid to make that change. Business resolutions are no different! Change is scary – especially when you are wanting to take that next step in your business to become successful. You may experience thoughts such as "I don't want to be successful because I won't have the time" or "I can't scale my handmade business because my customers expect me to be the one making the product." Ultimately, it comes down to your mindset and the limiting beliefs you have that can lead to you being the biggest obstacle on your path to success. So how can you overcome this? It's simple, really. It starts with daring to dream – and by trusting in your abilities. Listen for more. Brought to you by the https://shop1in5.com/take-the-pledge/?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shop_1_in_5_pledge&utm_content=podcast (Shop 1 in 5™ Pledge)! Commit to making 1 in 5 of your purchases from a small business, whether online or offline. The https://shop1in5.com/take-the-pledge/?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shop_1_in_5_pledge&utm_content=podcast (Shop 1 in 5™ Pledge) is a way to make an impact together when (and where) it matters most. Join us and take the pledge today! The Product Boss's Guide to Your Best Year Yet is a FREE series of workshops where we share the biggest tips and tricks to creating financial momentum for the year ahead. The first workshop kicks off on January 20th so be sure to join https://www.theproductbossworkshops.com/workshop-opt-ingriao2ac?utm_source=Podcast&utm_medium=pre-launch&utm_campaign=optin&utm_content=podcast (here). Resources: https://fb.watch/awN9vffhFm/ (Listen to the full Bosses & Breakfast episode here). Product Biz Owners at $250k+ yearly revenue: Are you a product business owner that has built your business to a multi-6 figure to multi-million dollar business? If so, https://theproductbossmastermind.com/new (The Product Boss Mastermind) has limited spots available open for consideration to applicants $250k and above, https://theproductbossmastermind.com?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=tpb_mastermind&utm_content=podcast (apply here). https://shop1in5.com/get-listed?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=shop_1_in_5&utm_content=podcast (Join the Shop 1 in 5 Small Business Shopping Directory. Get listed now!) Consistent content is key to getting more people to see and buy your products. If you want to create great content but you don't know what to say, or you feel too busy, or you just don't want to be the face of your brand, no worries – because we've got you covered with a year's worth of consistent content that's sure to resonate with your audience! If you want to see how easy this can be, visit https://ayearofcontent.com/join-now1?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=a_year_of_content&utm_content=podcast (A Year of Content). Check out and shop from hundreds of small businesses from the https://shop1in5.com/shop-the-directory/?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=small_biz_shopping_directory&utm_content=nov_2021_podcast (Small...

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
573: Dr. Sheree Bekker: A Contemporary Vision for Sports Injury Prevention

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:43


In this episode, Social Justice and Sports Medicine Research Specialist, Sheree Bekker, talks about social justice in sports, medicine, and research. Today, Sheree talks about the conversations around physiology and injuries, and the different environments that affect the ACL injury cycle. How do clinicians implement the findings in the research? Hear about Sheree's qualitative research methods, the importance of recognising the social determinants of injuries, tackling systemic experiences, and get Sheree's advice to her younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “We have to recognise the human at the centre of those experiences.” “Gendered language that seems like everyday language in sport can be really harmful to both men and women.” “[Be] cognisant of, and [be] able to have those conversations with athletes, patients, people that you work with all the time about their social conditions of their lives.” “The social conditions of our lives play into our injuries and our rehabilitation.” “It is about not simply seeing rehab as a biomedical issue alone to solve, but thinking about it as socially, politically, and materially oriented is a practice that you might incorporate in your way of thinking.” “Injury prevention, and a contemporary vision for injury prevention, needs to be athlete-centred and human-focused.” “We need to have those uncomfortable conversations about our complex, messy realities.” “Context is everything.” “Sport isn't neutral. It isn't apolitical.” “We can start to ask these questions, start to have these conversations. The answers aren't going to come tomorrow.” “These ripples will take some time.” “Connection is greater than competition.” “Hold on to the power of connecting with people who are at the same career stage and doing work with people who are at the same career stage as you.”   More about Sheree Bekker Dr Sheree Bekker (she/her) was born in South Africa, grew up in Botswana, completed her PhD in Australia, and now calls Bath (UK) home. She is an expert in ‘complexity' and research that links social justice and (sports) injury prevention. She has a special interest in sex/gender and uses qualitative methods. This underpins her work as an Assistant Professor in Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion in the Department for Health at the University of Bath. At Bath, she is Co-Director of the Centre for Qualitative Research, and a member of the Centre for Health and Injury and Illness Prevention in Sport (CHI2PS), and the Gender and Sexuality Research Group. Internationally, Sheree is an Early Career Representative for the International Society for Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise, and a founding member of the Qualitative Research in Sports Medicine (QRSMed) special interest group. In 2020 she was appointed as an Associate Editor of the British Journal of Sports Medicine, and in 2021 she was appointed Qualitative Research Editor of BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine. She completed a Prize Research Fellowship in Injury Prevention at the University of Bath from 2018-2020, and received the 2019 British Journal of Sports Medicine Editor's Choice Academy Award for her PhD research.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Physiotherapy, Social Justice, Injury, Prevention, Gender, Sexuality, Physiology, Sociology, Environment, Research, Change,   Resources: Anterior cruciate ligament injury: towards a gendered environmental approach   To learn more, follow Sheree at: Website:          https://sites.google.com/view/shereebekker/home Twitter:            @shereebekker Instagram:       @sheree_bekker   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:02 Hi, Sheree, welcome to the podcast. I'm so excited to have you on. I've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you so much for joining.   00:12 Thank you for having me. Karen. I am delighted to be talking to you today.   00:16 And today we're going to talk about some of now you had a couple of different presentations at the International Olympic Committee meeting in Monaco a few weeks ago, and we're going to talk about a couple of them. But first, I would love for you to tell the audience a little bit more about you, and about the direction of your research and kind of the why behind it. Because I think that's important.   00:43 Mm hmm. Yeah, I've actually I have been thinking about this a lot recently, over the course of the pandemic, and thinking about where my research and my work is going and why I'm so interested in in kind of social justice issues in sports injury research in Sport and Exercise medicine. And I guess for me, there are two reasons for that both of them related to my background. First of all, I was born in South Africa. And I grew up in Botswana. And I think, you know, growing up into countries that have interesting pasts, you know, South Africa having post of apartheid and Botswana having been a colonized country, I think I grew up in places where we were used to having difficult conversations about social justice issues on a national level. And I think, you know, that is something that has influenced me definitely in the way that I see the world. The second part for me is I studied human movement science at university. And my program was in a Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. And I didn't realize at the time that most people get their sport and exercise medicine, sports science, human movement, science training, in medical faculties, or in health faculties, whereas mine was very much social sciences and humanities. And I only realized this later that my training in this regard was quite different in terms of the way that I see the work that we do. And so now, I've landed here at the University of Bath, and I'm in a department for health. But once again, I'm back in a Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. So it's been a really, really nice connection for me to come back to these bigger social justice questions, I guess, that I'm interested, you know, in our field. So for me, that's really the why I think of why I do this work.   02:42 And, and kind of carrying along those themes of social justice and really taking a quat. Know, a quantitative, qualitative, sorry, qualitative eye, on athletes and on injury, let's talk about your first talk that you gave it at IOC, which is about the athletes voice. So take us through it. And then we'll ask some questions. So I'll, I'll shoot it over to you.   03:17 Yeah, so um, my first talk, the first symposium that I was involved in at IOC this year, we had titled The athlete's voice, and those of us who were involved with it, we're really proud to be able to get this topic, this kind of conversation onto the agenda in Monaco. I had so many people comment to me afterwards, that this was the first time that we've been able to have this kind of discussion at this specific conference. And, you know, previous editions, I think, have been very much focused on that biomedical that I was just talking about, given that it's Sport and Exercise medicine. And it was the first time that we've been able to bring athlete voice into this space. And so this symposium in my talk in particular, was really focused on qualitative research. Even though when we pitched the symposium, we kind of decided that we couldn't call it qualitative research, because it wouldn't have been accepted at the time. And, and now, it's amazing to me how far we've come that we can actually talk about qualitative research in these spaces. So what I spoke about, and what I was interested in is, you know, what are the kinds of different knowledges and who are the people that we might listen to in Sport and Exercise medicine and sports injury more broadly, that traditionally we maybe haven't scented and haven't listened to? And I was interested in those kinds of social meanings of injury and of injury prevention and how we might do things differently. So you know, for me, it was that Recognizing the value of alternative perspectives, and working across disciplines and advancing our research and practice in this way. And so that's really what I spoke about was, you know how we might do these things differently by actually listening to the people at the center of our work and listening to athletes themselves. And that was really the focus of that symposium.   05:26 And in looking through some of the slides from the symposium, some of the quotes that I'm assuming we're taking from the qualitative work are, gosh, they're kind of heartbreaking. So what do you do with that information once you have it, right? So you're conditioned not to quit, you turn off your emotions, you become a robot as soon as you step onto the field or the pitch or the court. So how do you take that qualitative research? And what do you do with that once you have it?   06:01 Yeah, so you know, my talk, the way I kind of structured my talk was to talk about how we generally do injury prevention. And what we generally do is we, you know, figure out what the issue is what the injury problem is, we develop an intervention, and then we implement that in intervention and hope that it works. And, and some, you know, that's the kind of general cycle that we use. And what I decided to do in my talk, which was only a 10 minute talk was to dedicate two of those minutes to a video that I showed, that was just set to music that flashed up all of these quotes from athletes. And there were quotes that I'd collected from a number of different sports, a number of different athletes and spaces over the years, that really speak about their experience in sports and these toxic environments, which is something that I think we tend to kind of put to the side, maybe sometimes and ignore, sometimes in sport, when we put sport up on a pedestal and only think about the good things that happen in sports. And those quotes are also, I guess, a throwback or connection to one of the other talks that I had at IOC, which is not something that I think we'll speak about today, but about safeguarding and recognizing safeguarding as an injury prevention issue. And so we had these, like two minutes of these quotes from athletes. And I think that video really signaled a palpable shift in the room in recognizing what athletes are actually saying, and what their experiences are in sport about needing to, I guess, you know, put their their kind of robot hat on and be this strong person within sport where they can't break down where they can't have injuries or anything like that. Otherwise, they're going to be the team. And just for us to come back and to recognize that humanity in that experience, within sport, I think is really, really important, especially when we're at a conference where we're talking about injury prevention and interventions, we have to recognize the human at the center of those experiences. And so for me, coming back to your question about what do we do with that information? I think that's really powerful information, in terms of how we think about what injury prevention is, and does. And I guess we always focus on bodies, and you know, body parts, the ankle, the knee, the hip, the growing. You know, that's, that's kind of been a big focus of injury prevention. And I think we often forget that injury prevention is and can be so much more than that. And that there are these social factors, or social determinants, that to play into injury and its prevention. So the social aspects of our lives in terms of, you know, abuse that might happen in these spaces, or just being exposed to toxic spaces, you know, how that does actually render us more susceptible to injury, and how that can thwart our injury prevention efforts in these spaces. So for me, it's about integrating both of those two things I think together, and that's what I'm kind of getting at with qualitative research.   09:19 And, and that leads me into something else I wanted to talk about, and that is a review from the British Journal of Sports Medicine that you co authored with Joanne Parsons and Stephanie Cohen, anterior cruciate ligament injury towards a gendered environmental approach. And what you just said, triggered in me something in in reading through that article was that there's intrinsic factors and extrinsic factors that can lead to injury and injury prevention programs, if done well, should incorporate both of those. Right but they often concentrate on the biomedical part of the The, whether it be strength training, or landing, or, you know, whatever it may be when we look at a lot of these injury prevention programs, but there are so many contextual issues and extrinsic issues that can impact any of those programs. So I'll kind of let you sort of talk through that a little bit and talk through some of the main points that you found in that paper. But gosh, it really gets you thinking like, Well, wait a second, it could be, like you said, if you are, depending on the environment in which you live, can have a huge impact. And it's, it's more than just, especially when it comes to girls and women, it's more than just oh, it's because you have your period. And that's why this happened. Or if your hips are wider, that's why you got injured, right? So go ahead, I'll throw it over to you. And you can kind of talk through that paper a little bit, and then we'll see what comes up.   11:04 Mm hmm. You know, I'm so happy to hear you say that, because I'm so I'm not a clinician, but it has been amazing to me to hear how this paper has resonated with clinicians and people working in this space in terms of your own experiences and what you see and what you hear from the people that you're working with. So yeah, you're absolutely right. I mean, this paper was born out of conversations that Steph and Joanne and I had in terms of how we were frustrated by I guess, the discourse around sports injury, particularly for girls and women, often being blamed on our physiology on our bodies, right. And to us, that seems like a bit of a cop out. And just to say, oh, you know, girls are more susceptible to ACL injury, because they have wider hips, so there's nothing that we can do about it, you know, so that's really pitched us that intrinsic risk factor that girls and women are just inherently weaker, or supposedly more fragile than boys and men, and there's nothing that we can do about it. So we're just going to have to kind of live with those injury breeds. Right. And, and we found that this kind of thinking had really underpins so much of the injury prevention work that we'd seen over the last 10 or 20 years. And we wanted to problematize this a little bit and to think through what those kind of other social and I would say structural determinants of sports injuries are. So I'm starting to talk about this idea of the social determinants of injury. So not just what are those intrinsic things, but actually, what are the what are the other other social modes, I guess, that we might carry that might lead to injury. So in this paper, we speak about how we, as human beings, literally incorporate I think, biologically, the world in which we live. So our societal or ecological circumstances, we incorporate that into our bodies. And so we can start to see how injury might be a biological manifestation of exposure to that kind of social load. So for girls and women, how our gendered experience of the world might render us more susceptible to injury, rather than just positioning ourselves as being more weak, or more fragile. So we were interested in how society makes us and skills in women more weaker, and more fragile. And so in this way, we speak about how you know, from the time that we're babies, girls are not expected to do as much physically we are brought up differently to young boy babies might be when we go through school and play sport in school, we play different kinds of sports, and again, you know, on average, or in general, and girls, goes out, you know, not encouraged to be as active and to do as much with our bodies as boys. And we then go in right to have this kind of that cumulative effect of less exposure to activities and doing things with our bodies. Actually, that is what leads to us being more susceptible to things like ACL injury over time. And this is carried on in the kind of elite sports space as well. So we see how girls and women's sports are devalued in so many ways and how we're not expected to do as much or to perform as well. Or to train as hard I guess, as boys and men So an example of this that actually happened a couple of weeks after we published the paper was the NCAA March Madness. I don't know if you remember, there were those pictures that were tweeted all over social media, about the women's division, only being supplied with one set of teeny, tiny Dunda. Whereas the men's division was given, you know, massive weight room with everything that they needed to be able to train to be able to warm up and do everything that they needed to do in that state. And the first that was just an excellent example of what we're talking about in terms of girls and women being expected to and actually being made, I guess, weaker than boys and men are in exactly the same sports spaces. And so that's kind of a rundown, I guess, of what we wrote about in the paper.   15:53 Yeah, and I look back on my career as I was a high school athlete, college athlete, and not once was it, hey, we should go into the gym and train with specific training programs, because it will help to make you stronger, maybe faster, better, less prone to injury, but the boys were always had a training program. You know, they always had a workout program. So I can concur. That is like a lived experience for me as to what training was like, comparing the boys versus girls college straight through or high school straight through to college. And yes, that March Madness thing was maddening. Pun intended. I couldn't you could not believe couldn't believe what we were seeing there. That was that was completely out of bounds. But what I'd like to dive in a little bit deeper to the article, not not having you go through everything line by line. But let's talk about the different environments that you bring up within the article, because I think they're important. And a little more explanation would be great. So throughout this kind of ACL injury paradigm, you come up with four different environments, the pre sport environment, the training environment, the competition environment, and the treatment environment. So would you like to touch on each of those a little bit? Just to explain to the listeners, how that fits into your, into this paper and into the structure of injury prevention?   17:31 Yeah, sure. So um, yeah, what we did with this paper was we take we take the the traditional ACL injury cycle, and that a lot of us working in sports injury prevention are aware of, and we overlay what we called gendered environmental factors on top of that, so we wanted to take this this site, call and think through how our gendered experiences and girls and women, again render us more susceptible, and over the course of a lifetime, or a Korean. And so starting with the pre sport environment, you know, that goes back to what I was just saying about girls and boys being girls being socialized differently to boys, when we're growing up. So that kind of life course effect, gender affects over the life course, in terms of what we're expected to do with our bodies. That really starts in that pre sport environment when we're babies and young boys and young girls. And then we track how that works throughout the ACL injury cycle. So moving into the next step, coming back to this NCAA example, you know, what the training environment looks like, and how it might be gendered in ways that we might not even pick up on. So another example here, and this is a practical example that we've given to some sports organizations, since then, is, you know, the kind of gendered language that seems like everyday language and sport that can actually be really harmful to both men and women. So for example, you know, talking about girl push ups, you know, that really does set a precedent for what we think about girls and women in sports spaces. When you say, Oh, you go over there and do some girl push ups, it really does render girls and women as being more weak, you know, weaker and more fragile than boys and men. So those kinds of gendered experience in sports spaces, and you're an example there is really key. But then we also talk about kind of during injury and post injury as well. And this comes more into the kind of rehabilitation space and so on how, again, expectations of girls and women's bodies might play into what we expect when we go through rehabilitation as well and, and how that plays into that ACL injury cycle of recovery, as well. So that's really for So it was overlaying gender, across all of those spaces. And I think that gives us a really powerful way of looking at ACL injury differently and to, to conceptualize what we might do both in injury prevention, but also once injury has happened to help girls and women differently.   20:20 And in reading through this paper, and and also going through the slides that you graciously provided on Twitter, of of all of your talks at IOC, as a clinician, it for me, gives me so much more to think about, and really sparked some thoughts in my head as to conversations to have with the patient. So what advice would you give to clinicians, when it comes to synthesizing a lot of this work? And taking it into the clinic, talking with their patient in front of them and then implementing it? Because some people may say, oh, my gosh, I have so much to do. Now, I have to read all of this. Now I have to incorporate this, do you know what I mean? So it can some be somewhat overwhelming. So what advice do you have for clinicians? Yes,   21:13 so I really do think and as I said earlier, I think a lot of what we're seeing here is what clinicians are doing all the time anyway, I think, especially people who are already connected to this kind of idea of this social determinants of health. And so I guess, for me, it is really just being cognizant of, and being able to have those conversations with athletes, with patients with people that you work with all the time, about their social conditions of their lives. So not again, not just reducing people down to bodies, but recognizing that people have you know, that the social conditions of our lives play into our injuries and our rehabilitation, and holding space for that, you know, when I'm teaching, that's what I say to my students all the time, but I know that that you know, this, and clinicians know this better than I do. You, you know, it's not just about saying to someone, go away and do these exercises, and come back to me when you know, that person might have a full time job with three kids to look after. And, you know, a lot of other things on their plate as well that that one exercise or exercise program isn't necessarily going to be the silver bullet or the answer to, you know, the way that they need to be dealing with that injury. So I think for me, it's again, that re humanizing and being able to have those those conversations and recognizing those social determinants of injury or recovery, and so on. And so I think for clinicians, it is about not simply seeing rehab as a biomedical issue alone to solve, but thinking about it as socially and politically and materially oriented as a practice that you might incorporate in your way of thinking. That's really it. It doesn't need to be any more than that. We don't need to complicate it. Any more than that.   23:10 Yeah. Perfect. Thank you for that. And as we start to wrap things up, is there a, are there any kind of key points that you want to leave the listeners with? Or is there anything that we didn't touch on that you were like, oh, I need I need people to know this. This is really important. Hmm.   23:36 Yeah, I think, you know, if we kind of connect the conversations that we've kind of had today with the different points that we've connected to, I think, you know, what I saw in IRC at the IOC conference in Monaco is I really felt especially on day one at that athlete centered symposium that we had, I really felt like a palpable shift in that room. And in the conversations that I've had afterwards, with people I've had so many people come up to me to say that, you know, that it was really inspiring, and it's helped them to be able to go away and have different kinds of conversations, incredibly have different kinds of conversations about the work that we're doing in injury prevention and in Sport and Exercise medicine more broadly. And so I really think that we need to focus on that idea that injury prevention and a contemporary vision for injury prevention needs to be athlete centered and human focused. And I think if we truly committed to this, I think the ways in which we develop our interventions, and the ways in which we might go about our work, more generally in Sport and Exercise medicine, in physiotherapy and so on, it needs to reflect the socio cultural, so meaning those social determinants of injury in cluding the ways in which things like sexism, and misogyny, and racism, and classism, and ableism, and homophobia and transphobia, how that all can and does actually lead to injury. I think those are larger conversations that we need to be having enough field that we've started to have very slowly, but they are difficult conversations to have. And we often cut them out when we only think about injury as a biomedical thing, again, only thinking about bodies. And so for me, I think those are the those are the thing that we now need to get uncomfortable, you know, about, we need to have those uncomfortable conversations about our complex, messy realities, and that we're dealing with that athletes are human beings, that these are our experiences of the world, that sport and exercise medicine needs to reflect that as well. In terms of our composition, we need to reflect the communities that we serve as well. And Tracy Blake talks about that often. And you know, those are the conversations that I'd like to see our field having going forward. And I do think there was a shift in being able to say those things at Monaco this year.   26:16 Yeah. And so what I'm hearing is, was the big takeaway for me from Monaco is context is everything. And we can't, we can no longer take that out. And focus, like you said, just on the biomedical aspect of this person in front of us as if they don't have past experiences and emotions and thoughts and fears and concerns. And context is everything. And for clinicians, it sounds like a challenge to start having these conversations at more conferences. I know it's this little kind of bubble of clinicians, but if it can start there, perhaps it can make a ripple out into the wider public and into having these conversations with your athletes and patients and not be afraid to have these difficult conversations, or to ask the probing questions to the person in front of you. Because they're more than just their ACL injury, they're more than just their back pain. So I think challenging clinicians to have these conversations, whether it be one on one like this, or within large groups at conferences, and then take that back to your, to your practice and really start living it and understanding that this can is as important, maybe, in some cases more important than the biomedical injury in front of you.   27:41 Oh, I could not agree more with that statement. I mean, something that I've spoken about a lot before is that, you know, sport isn't neutral. It's not a political. And it's the same for the work that we do. It's, you know, for far too long, it's been positioned as a neutral science thing that we do. And I think we're now starting to recognize the context around that, that our values and our principles and people's lives and experiences, you know, as you say, play as much as if not more of a role in their experience of sport, and injury, and rehab, and all of that. So I would agree with you completely, we need to be having more of these conversations, we need to recognize this within our research, we need to recognize this within our practice. And we can't keep going on as if you know, none of so if we can remove all of that from the practice of working with human beings and being human beings as well. You know, all of this is connected for me. And as you know, as we're seeing now, it's for all of us who work in this space, once we start to have these conversations, we can start to ask different questions, we can start to think about things differently. And I think that that's really powerful for the future of our work in this space.   28:55 Yeah. And I think it's also important to remember that we can start to ask these questions start to have these conversations that the answers aren't going to come tomorrow. So that instant gratification that has become the world that we are now living in that if it doesn't happen within the next couple of days, that means it's not going to happen, but that these ripples will take some time. Yeah, absolutely.   29:19 And, you know, so a lot of my work is in complexity theory. And what I say about that is, you know, there probably are not going to be hard and fast answers here. But it will bring up new considerations and it will bring up I think, I'd like us to move away from this idea that we can solve things, but actually move closer towards the idea that this is an ongoing practice. And that that's always going to be I think, more powerful for me when we see things like injury prevention as a process or a practice. That's not necessarily going to solve things. But that is you know, really To the context in which we live in our lives is an ongoing thing. And I think that's what we brought into the ACL injury cycle. Papers. Well,   30:09 yeah, I think it takes away from the clinician as being the MS or Mr. Fix it to, okay, we are layering ourselves into people's lives. And we need to be able to do that in a way that fits the person in front of us as best we can.   30:26 Yeah, exactly. Beautifully said exactly. We can't necessarily solve those things for them. But these provide considerations, things that we can do. And yeah, we can move with that.   30:39 Yeah, absolutely. Well, Cherie, thank you so much. I mean, we can go on and talk for days on end about this stuff. And perhaps when one of these days we will we'll have a bigger, wider, broader conversation and and make it go on for a couple of hours, because I'm sure it will bring up a lot of questions, maybe some answers, and perhaps some changing of minds when it comes to injury prevention and what our role is as clinicians. So thank you so much, where can people find you?   31:13 Thank you, Karen. And I love that I think broader conversations are so helpful in this space. So people can find me on Twitter at Shree Becker, that's probably the best place to find me. I'm always over there and happy to have broader conversations with everybody. So please come and find me on Twitter.   31:32 Perfect. And we'll have links to everything, including the paper that we're talking about. From BDSM. We'll have links to everything at the show notes at podcast dot healthy, wealthy, smart, calm. So one question left that I asked everyone and that is knowing where you are now in your life and in your career? What advice would you give to your younger self?   31:51 Oh, so that's a really good question. And it's I think it's my Elan series, again, connected to what we saw in Monaco. And something that I've said for many years now is connection is greater than competition. And something that I live in that I feel like I wish I had done earlier is to hold on to the power of connecting with people who are at the same career stage and doing work with people who are at the same career stages as you especially someone who has and is an emerging researcher, or researcher clinician in this space, because I think the exciting new conversations that we're seeing in this space are coming from people who are you know, recently merging, I guess, in these researchers faces and so it's okay to collaborate rather than being in competition with people who are doing great work in your area. So that would be my advice.   32:54 I love it. I love it and couldn't agree more. So Sheree, thank you so much for coming on. Thank you again. I appreciate it.   33:02 Thank you so much, Karen. And everyone. Thanks   33:04 so much for tuning in and listening and have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.

How'd It Happen Podcast
Michael Chernow, Discipline = Freedom: Why Habits are Everything (#238)

How'd It Happen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 60:22


If you haven't heard about the importance of habits and being consistent and persistent about it, then you probably haven't listened to or read enough personal growth content yet. In this episode, I am joined by this amazing and inspiring entrepreneur who even created a company called Kreatures of Habit. Make sure to stay tuned until the end because he has generously given my listeners a 10% discount on their first purchase.Michael Chernow is a restaurateur and chef, entrepreneur, TV host, fitness personality, and family man dedicated to inspiring the world through positivity, hospitality, and service. He first began working in restaurants as a teenager and thereafter built a successful career in the industry. He worked as a bartender and bar manager at Frank Restaurant for eight years and met his wife Donna while there. In 2007, he enrolled in the French Culinary Institute and graduated with honors, and was awarded an Associate's Degree in both Culinary Arts and Restaurant Management in 2008.Michael's impressive resume includes managing thirteen properties and four companies, hosting two seasons (26 episodes) of Food Porn on the FYI network, being featured in the CNBC docu-series Consumed: The Real Restaurant Business, and appearing in many cooking shows, including the Food Network's Beat Bobby Flay, Kitchen Casino, and Chopped. Michael is a volunteer, board member and community leader for City Harvest. In 2018, he led the City Harvest team of 35 members in the NYC Marathon, helping to raise over $100,000 to feed more than 600,000 New Yorkers.Get a 10% discount on your first purchase of The Proatagonist Oatmeal with the code: Howdithappen go to this link: https://kreaturesofhabit.com/products/the-proatagonist-oatmealKreatures of Habit website: https://kreaturesofhabit.com/Michael's web: https://michaelchernow.com/Social Media:https://www.instagram.com/michaelchernow/https://www.instagram.com/kreaturesofhabit/Show notes:[4:59] How'd it happen for Michael?[16:58] What is Kreatures of Habit and the products that it offers[19:03] Let's talk about Michael's EQ [23:44] Michael's relationship with his mother and father[31:04] Business plan vs. actual business trajectory[33:16] Why is partnership difficult for Michael[40:06] On failure—does Michael see it as something negative?[44:55] Diving a little bit deeper into Michael's tattoos[48:30] On the concept of habits[57:02] Where to find more of Michael and Kreatures of Habit[59:38] OutroCheck the accompanying blog post of this episode at: https://mikemalatesta.com/podcast/michael-chernow-discipline-freedom-why-habits-are-everything-238/If you like this episode and want to be the first to know when new ones are released? Make sure you subscribe! Also, a review will be much appreciated, so make sure you give us a 5-star (or whatever one makes the most sense to you).Connect with Mike:Website: https://mikemalatesta.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemalatesta/

Consciousness Anywhere
E82: Pragmatic Psychology | Consciousness Anywhere Podcast: Shannon O'Hara & Susanna Mittermaier

Consciousness Anywhere

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:46


What if there is nothing wrong with you? Feeling angry or being depressed might actually be your awareness of something else.  What if you had abilities rather than disabilities? Pragmatic psychology invites you to look for what works and what will create the greatest outcome. It allows to you to access everything you know, and brings ease like never before. You can use it to thrive, create your life and inspire other people. Spoken by Susanna MittermaierKey takeaways:In your day to day life, where do you see things in a different way?What if we questioned every label and diagnosis?What if you were a giant radio receiver and you picked up what's going on around you?Resources: Susanna Mittermaier's websitePragmatic Psychology Book by Susanna Mittermaier

It's All Related
Episode 43: You Can't Be In-tuned with a Noisy Mind

It's All Related

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 46:00


Sonia T. took a break from everything to really disconnect from the world and get in touch with her intuitive self. She is glad she is home in New Orleans and is currently getting re-integrated back into her normal routine. She's excited for the year to come! Sonia C. approves! Sometimes you just need to take a step back from the sensory overload. Sonia C. is excited to be doing the same in the next upcoming weeks.    This week's theme is about: Take a Break.   Highlights: Intuition is so subtle, which means you have to really listen. You can't do that if your head is all noisy! [2:50] Sonia T. is so proud of Sonia C for keeping a consistent yoga practice! [4:15] Sometimes what you're missing in your day-to-day life is a bit of fun [6:45] Who can you have fun with? [13:15] When you brag about your intelligence, you're bragging about the size of your prison cell. [19:10]  If you're committed to your own joy, the bad vibes give themselves up. [23:20] You're not happy with your vibrations? Change the channel! [29:00] Took of the week [32:25] Give yourself permission to have fun! [38:10] Question of the week [38:45]   Sonia T. has almost been nagging Sonia C. to make self-care more of a priority. And, she finally listened! Sonia C. is proud to say she's kept up a consistent yoga practice, and wow, what a difference does it make when you're trying to stay more grounded with your intuition. Sonia C. looks forward to this time now because it gives her a chance to have the entire world go away for a full hour.    You have to create some space to fully tune in to your intuitive self. You really can't tap into your intuition when you're going 90 miles an hour. If everyone's trying to grab your attention and trying to talk to you you're just going to miss the subtleties of life and the quiet messages your spiritual guides are leaving you. Sonia T. had been experiencing spiritual burnout where even her self-care practices hadn't been feeling good to her. This was a major sign that she needed to disconnect and slow down.    Question of the Week: Whenever I ask for a sign, I get even more confused about my path. How do I know what's the right sign for me?    Tool of the Week: Make fun a primary value in your daily life.    Continue on Your Journey: More Sonia Choquette at www.soniachoquette.com More Sonia Tully at www.soniatully.com Connect with Sabrina at www.sabrinatully.com Join Sonia Choquette's Vibe Tribe Follow Sonia Choquette on Instagram Follow Sonia Tully on Instagram Buy Sonia and Sabrina's Book You Are Amazing Ask your intuitive questions at: itsallrelatedpodcastquestions@gmail.com

The Bledsoe Show
How We Are Building Eduction for the Future

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 83:21


00:00.00 mikebledsoe All right welcome to Monday morning with Mike and max Today we're gonna be talking about education and you know what this is a bit of a taboo subject because when I get in the conversations with the average. Person and I make certain comments about the education system a lot of people get very protective of it and they they get a little little scared around it and they want to reject things and and 1 of the things that I have to remember in those conversations is that. I am standing from a perspective that's very different than the perspective that they're holding and when that's the case we really need to stare step people into the conversation versus just saying well that's stupid so max and I are going to take a ah. 00:47.90 Max Shank KA. 00:54.75 mikebledsoe Stab at the conversation of Education. Hopefully we can help ah expand people's ideas about this and maybe change perspectives and maybe you're listening and you share the same perspective and we're able to help you put it into words more clearly so that you can share with others. As well and this was this conversation was inspired by the show we did last week where max was talking about how he would do things different with Education. So We decided to go deeper with it. Good to have you max. 01:32.76 Max Shank It's great to be here Mike I think what I'd like to start off by saying is that there is a monumental difference between school and education education is the process of learning. Which is essentially like cheating. That's how humans have been able to become so dominant because we've been able to ah compound our acquired knowledge intergenerationally over long term I think schooling. Especially public schooling and even university has been a colossal failure in almost every way does more harm than good and I think the reason that people get so triggered and defensive when you make a comment like that is because they don't want to feel. Silly for having wasted their time having gone through that system themselves and especially if they have kids that they have put through that system. They don't want to feel like they have abused their children which they probably have so those are the 2 main reasons that people get charged up. When you make a comment like school is probably 5% efficient use of time. There are a few things that are useful about school but most of it is done in such a destructive manner for both the body and mind of a child. So those are the reasons that people get triggered schooling itself is a colossal failure education is the most powerful tool you have to increase your leverage which is going to allow you to have a greater impact in life with lower effort or less work There's a great. Mark Twain quote that says I never let schooling interfere with my education and I think that describes perfectly what we're talking about so there's a big big distinction big difference between school and education. So. Ultimately, it is your responsibility to educate yourself. It is your responsibility to educate your kids and then it is their responsibility to educate themselves beyond that and I think tying into our concept of freedom and personal responsibility. That's. 1 of the biggest errors is when you outsource your education you are priming yourself for propaganda and brainwashing and just essentially you end up in obedience school is what it becomes rather than an actual education that allows you to be more. 04:19.91 Max Shank Self-reliant and contribute in a constructive way. 04:24.29 mikebledsoe Yeah, when I think about I mean there's a few other distinctions to make here. So the distinction between education schooling you've made well another one that um stands out to me is Dr Andy Galpin he he always says that. Know the difference between education and training and the what he witnesses is the average student walking through the door at cal state is expecting training from a college university whose job is to educate. 05:00.43 Max Shank A. 05:01.88 mikebledsoe And and the point of education especially like a liberal Arts education is to is this is this is the way it was set up is that the wealthy would send their kids here so they could broaden their horizons. They could broaden their their scope of knowledge into many different areas. And then after they attended University They then entered the workplace and they were able able to enter the workplace being more cultured having more total information but not necessarily going to school unless you're going to become a doctor or lawyer or or something like that. Ah. 05:37.18 Max Shank No. 05:39.13 mikebledsoe A lot of so a lot of people have basically ah in in regard to college. They've confused education with training and it's not training and so some of these expectations around. Oh I'm going to go to college and then I'm going to get a job that's paying me close to 6 figures. 05:46.42 Max Shank H. 05:58.46 mikebledsoe You have 0 training All you have is education and so it's ah the the learning is going to happen when you start training or when you start actually doing so I like to have that as a distinction. As well. The just because so many people think they should should have that job and yeah, you're gonna have to get your training after college and which also brings me to ah a. A phrase. That's really stuck with me for a long time which is learning is behavior change and there is ah there are so many the education system the way that people have been educated have been really rewarded for memorizing and regurgitating. And they've mislabeled that as learning. So What I notice is a lot of people. They'll you'll start talking to them. They go I know I know I know we know this because max and I are both Educators. We tell somebody and they go I know I was like why aren't you doing it if you know it. And it's because they read it and they know it and so they almost get they the problem with education system is it rewards you with good grades a pat on the back like you did something good by memorizing it and then you go Oh I should get a reward for memorization. 07:27.81 Max Shank Right. 07:29.45 mikebledsoe And so people are very confused about why they're not getting a reward in the real world for just knowing shit and you be if you really live your life which I've really taken this on for myself that learning is behavior change if your behavior didn't Change. You don't get to say that you learned it. 07:47.70 Max Shank Um, yeah I Really like that a lot I think the collapse distinction between training ah and education was that what you said between education and training. 08:01.19 mikebledsoe Education and training. Yeah. 08:05.32 Max Shank That's huge. That's huge um because you can go to welding school and you will learn a craft and you are now trained as a welder but the concept of broadening your horizons or as Charlie Munger calls it. The mental lattice work which I really like so you can borrow. Different ideas from a variety of topics and subjects and sources is really beneficial to your overall knowledge. But I also like the concept there of if the behavior doesn't change. You didn't really learn and it. Kind of makes me think of bf skinner classical conditioning right? If you if the behavior changes then learning has taken place. But if the behavior doesn't change then it has not ah that's. 08:55.64 mikebledsoe Right? And and going to your point in the beginning is the school has become Ah, it's ah it's obedient school because what's the primary thing that people are learning. And they're learning to follow directions. They're learning to be at a specific. Yeah, be here at this Time. Don't do all these things do all these other things. Ah yeah, there are like you. So. Also said there's 5% of it is useful information. 09:14.86 Max Shank Repeat What I say when I say it to you. 09:33.78 mikebledsoe And I think that people tend to focus on the 5% because they want to protect I mean their identity right? because if you come out and say hey you you got screwed over by this education system which you believe so strongly in. 09:41.13 Max Shank Exactly. 09:52.00 mikebledsoe Because it's the only thing you know? Ah yeah, it could be. It's It's a blow to the identity Ego does not like to have that conversation and I'm curious max. What was what was your education. What was ah what was your education experience like. 10:02.62 Max Shank Yeah, and. 10:11.12 mikebledsoe Growing up. 10:11.25 Max Shank Oh hellacious of of or pertaining to hell. Ah it. It was awful. Um, you know when you're a child the last thing in the world you want to do is sit in a desk and listen to someone who you don't like. Try to teach you something you don't care about for long long periods of time so it was horrible I almost got held back for bad bad handwriting ah made me think I was stupid and I mean once again I don't remember. 95% of the stuff I learned because that's not how that's not how memory works you know, even if you read a book and enjoy the book. You're not going to remember most of it unless you start using it and applying it in your everyday life and it is a tough pill to swallow. To recognize that you may be wasted 12 years of your life having your creativity and critical thinking skills essentially beaten out of you on some level but conversely. If. You don't accept that then you won't change your behavior so you have to sort of accept that before you can move on in a new and more constructive way. That's like that sunk cost fallacy. Oh well I did this for so long. Let me just do it a little bit more. So. Elementary school. Ah really traumatizing high school all the way up I did go to college before dropping out and it was it was really smart I didn't even have much left. To finish my spanish and economics degree. But I'm really glad I dropped out because it just proved ah how true that sunk cost fallacy is and it was almost better in terms of my actual learning and belief in that reality like. Am I going to spend another semester and a half to finish this degree when I have no intention of using it and I realized no so I went full hog into the career that I did enjoy that I was enthusiastic about and the gym that I had opened up. 12:28.50 mikebledsoe Beautiful. Oh we boat dropped out of college to run a gym and. 12:30.89 Max Shank Yeah, yeah, yeah, well and I I you know I I bought my house Thanks to book sales but I also failed English in high school. 12:46.90 mikebledsoe You know? yeah I think that um. 12:48.60 Max Shank So clearly I don't know how to write. 12:52.71 Max Shank And the incentives the incentives are backwards right? So we've established that it's obedient school but there's no incentive for the teacher to do anything other than get you to behave yourself while in class and repeat back through rote Memory. Wrote memorization what she taught you. There's no advantage.. There's no incentive there for her to teach you. How to think critically because of the way that we measure is kind of like ah yeah, whatever, whatever way that you measure is. Going to affect the tactics that you employ. So if you're measuring Memorization. You're not really going to be incentivized to build critical thinking skills or expansive questioning. Um same as the incentive for college. You know there's no incentive for them to ensure that you get a good paying job and actually the only incentive there is to continue to increase the price of college because student loans for college are one of the only things you can. Get a person that young with that bad of credit to engage into a contract in I mean they're essentially like raping kids of their future by getting them to take out huge student loans that they can never default on due to bankruptcy So The incentive structures are. Um, completely backwards through the entire schooling process. 14:31.67 mikebledsoe Yeah, by the way if if it sounds like we're just doing a lot of bashing we we do have solutions for each one of these things that we're gonna discuss we want to. We want to get all the problems out there first and one of the things that struck me is you know. The the rope memorization regurgitation is a really strong focus on what to think and as you were saying you know critical thinking skills. That's more about how to think and how to work your way through problems and we have an entire society that. Is easy to control because they're just told what to think if you if you log into Google Apple Facebook watch television listen to radio. They're repeating to you what to think about, but they're. Not telling you how to think about it. It's usually ah telling you what to think and then why you should worry about it and why you should be afraid of it and so this is it's a very fear drivenve experience in our culture right now and recognize this with. 15:34.92 Max Shank 11 15:47.32 mikebledsoe My girlfriend especially she. She's got a master's in psychology and she's a certified you know, Psychotherapist and she did all the education racked up the student loan debt and she's very good at what she does like there. There's there's a lot of benefit out of it. But she's also since since her and I met and she's been swimming around the world of coaches who may not necessarily have finished their degrees which I know some coaches that were psychology majors but then just decide not to you know, go all the way or whatever it is and so. 16:14.74 Max Shank And. 16:25.44 mikebledsoe Um, now we get into this realm where people don't have you know certifications that fall under a board of ethics run by a bunch of academics and there was so much she I've heard this from her and many other people who have ah. Ah, ah, not certifications. But they have these credentials that could be taken away by a board. You know like a medical board or this or that and so what she shared with me is being in college. There was so much emphasis on. 16:52.30 Max Shank Right? well. 17:02.73 mikebledsoe You could lose your license for this. It's license not certification. You could lose your license for this lose your license for that like all the she said there was just so much fear and there was like if you don't follow these very specific rules then you're gonna lose your license and then you won't be able to work ever again and then she starts meeting everybody who. 17:04.23 Max Shank Small cut. 17:20.96 mikebledsoe Nobody has a license and they make good money and they get great results for their clients and she experienced ah ah quite a bit of frustration around that and ah, you know and there's so many things that she has because she went through. Like it was the perfect way for her to go she needed to go through that for many reasons part of it is you know, no one in her family had gone to college and her finishing at College made a big impact on the family you know and and there's there's all these. There's all these. 17:42.67 Max Shank No. 18:00.30 mikebledsoe Cultural narratives that really drive that but what I'd like for her to get to and I think she's getting there which is being really appreciative for the education she received but also recognizing it that its limitations and and going beyond. Ah. 18:09.42 Max Shank And. 18:17.97 mikebledsoe Where those limitations were at which which I've witnessed her due and I I hope that most people can do that? Um, yeah. 18:24.12 Max Shank That's a tricky thing is changing resentment into gratitude when you know, full well with the benefit of hindsight that there was a much better way. But if you're not feeling that way your whole life. You're probably not paying attention. Like if you can never think back and go like there was a better way I could have done that than I want whatever you're having this can you imagine. 18:46.70 mikebledsoe Yeah. Yeah, yeah, and one of the things that I also see missing in school that that really occurred to me after I got out of college was I remember taking a counting class in my first semester back to school after I was in the Navy and. I got a quarter away of the way through and the and the drop date was approaching and and I dropped the accounting clause because I was gonna get like a d in it or something and I had never gotten such a poor grade on anything and then um I go and i. 19:16.44 Max Shank Ah. 19:25.56 mikebledsoe Go on to physics you know a couple semesters later and do just fine which if you talk to most people accounting is way easier than physics for for most people. What I recognize when I look back? Ah what I really enjoyed about physics was the there was so much Context. This is why we're doing this. This is the practical application of this This is why we're learning this and when I sat down in the accounting class I was like all right. These are credits and these were debits. There was no and this this this teacher was so this accounting teacher was so. 19:55.71 Max Shank Context. 20:02.48 mikebledsoe Ah, popular for having it being a difficult class or you he was like pride prided himself on weeding people out of business school and I look back I was like it's just a bad teacher like come on you So proud of you Idiot like. 20:11.72 Max Shank What an asshole. 20:20.93 mikebledsoe A good teacher would be educating their students really well and giving them the tools to succeed but this is I think this is one of the dangers of you know I met a lot of ah I'm not saying that they're all like this but I met a lot of people who were. In the education department so they went to school specifically to become a teacher so we have to remember that the education system. It's not one of those things where we could just introduce new curriculum into the system and it would solve it because part of the problem is the teachers grew up in a. Memorize and regurgitate environment. They don't have the critical thinking skills in order to pass them down and I think that's at the core is really the problem. Um, you know there's a lot of problems but like. You can't expect the teacher that doesn't have critical thinking to be able to teach critical thinking. 21:20.83 Max Shank Right? And unfortunately because the system is so entrenched and there's 10 year and there's um teachers who do really well actually become ostracized by the rest of the teachers. And I think the core problem with schooling the absolute core problem is the lack of incentive because if we talk about what the purpose of education is which is what the purpose of schooling should be It should be that you are. Self-reliant able to contribute understand value and values and because there's no connection. There. There's no incentive for the teacher to be able to do that. There's no incentive for the college to. Do a good job. Once they've gotten your tuition money. That's the biggest problem is there's ah, no incentive or sometimes there's actually a backwards incentive so you need to allow competition to happen with education. And there was actually a really good um thing that John Stossel did about education with regard to letting the free market help elevate the best teachers to the chop and I guess there's this. I want to say he's like a south korean guy. Um, who is a multi multi-millionaire I think like tens of millions of dollars because his lectures are so well attended both in person and online and actual learning is happening and. So that's part of it. But also if there was some correlation to how well the students do afterward. Um, just like if you offer coaching I'm sure you've offered coaching with a guarantee before hey I guarantee and yeah I mean that like like ah right. 23:20.33 mikebledsoe Oh yeah, yeah, it's a conditional guarantee so you have to show us the work you did that we prescribed. Otherwise you're not getting your money back. 23:28.54 Max Shank Yeah, right? But imagine though like that is that's an insanely good deal like if you pay me five k for coaching I guarantee that if you do what we say that you will get 10 k back like whoa. Are you kidding me. You have all the incentive to do a great job. They're bought in so they have all the incentive to do a great job I mean talk about a win-win and so that's my core point is the incentives are backwards and people respond to incentives more than anything else and that's why I like the. The ancient ah Roman ah bridge builder having to stand underneath the bridge when the first guys drive over it and they're like ah carriages I think that's that's essentially. 24:16.42 mikebledsoe Seeing him. 24:22.94 Max Shank How everything should be done. Is there needs to be an incentive for the people who are doing the work and the reward needs to also go to those who are incentivized to do so that's the core problem across the board. 24:34.20 mikebledsoe Yeah, on your point 1 more out which is cost and the cost is soared and the quality has diminished over time I think it's at least in the the college university experience. The the government came in and basically subsidized through grants and they ah they stood behind loans. They guaranteed loans so that these banks would start lending money to people that have poor credit scores or have no credit. 25:10.34 Max Shank Their children their children. 25:10.60 mikebledsoe Or just too young to even know what they're getting themselves into yeah and so the education loans are predatory in nature for one they predatory loans I everyone I know that's got over $ $100000 in debt when I talk to them about. Experience of going into the financial aid office. It's always the same They're just always trying to max them out and the people in the financial aid office. They don't know any fucking better either. They're just doing what they're told they're not thinking they didn't they weren't taught to critically think they don't understand what's going on. They think they're doing a good thing. 25:41.83 Max Shank It was just following orders. 25:46.66 mikebledsoe Um, and and the the ah the cost as skyrocketed because these are guaranteed by the government. You can't be Bankrupt. You can't bankrupt your way out of these. So It has incentivized the schools to raise their rates because more people can get loans so simultaneously. Yeah, so the schools have raised their rates without actually making improvements to the education at all I Imagine it's just made the administrative. 26:12.73 Max Shank Guaranteed. 26:22.73 mikebledsoe Portion of the school much fluffier. Um, there's tenured professors that are in ah in a fluffy environment and in some way due to these things. So The football teams are probably getting you know, really great stadiums built who the fuck knows but um. Yeah, the the cost is to me is really disgusting in how much people are spending on education with what they get out of it and that is just long term debt. So it's. Pretty sickening. 27:00.87 Max Shank Predatory is the correct word I think use the word predatory I think that's exactly what it is I think the guy Mike Roe who hosted dirty jobs and now has a foundation called micro works. Really has done a good job in illuminating the destructive cultural expectation that says oh going to university means you're good and if you're a welder and electrician that makes you bad and I'm falling back to the same examples. But. You know plumber there's nothing wrong with being a tradesman shoot I knew a guy who became a truck driver when he was 18 by the time he was 27 he owned like 3 or 5 semi trucks and he was basically retired you know so this whole idea that you need to be part of the intelligentsia is. Such a fallacy and it's very destructive because of course children they just want to be loved they want they want to get positive attention. So um, kids will do whatever gets them positive attention I mean the more interviews you listen to the the great people. In their fields. It's usually that they got positive attention for whatever it is they were doing. 28:19.63 mikebledsoe Yeah, and another part of um, you know the the grants and the guaranting of the loans has basically made it possible for people who would not normally go to college to go to college and. With that has been the lowering of standards for accepting people to schools and so college education hasn't become special and it used to be special and now because everybody's going and the standards are lower. It's just kind of. It lowers the overall experience of what colleges it no longer stands out like the batch but the Bachelorsard's degree is what the high school diploma used to be.. It's It's not. It's not anything that's gonna make you stand apart and so we end up with just people that are in school into their mid 20 s or. Early 30 s just putting off actually getting their life started. 29:19.15 Max Shank And with the exception of a few careers. It's totally worthless. It's for most careers, you'd be better off working and earning money when you're like 1412 1416 you know you can you can become an apprentice. For something when you're in your teens and by the time you're 18 have lots of money saved up and have a valuable skill and if you have a good mentor a valuable skill that you know how to sell and there's no better security than that. Ah, valuable skill that you know how to sell. 29:59.30 mikebledsoe Yeah,, let's let's get into that So What are the now. What I want to do is I Want to talk about the important things that are that we should be learning So What should exist and. Education and then after we talk about the different things that are important. We can roll into how we would design an education system that included these things and excluded all the bullshit. So. What do you got Max. What are the important things for us to learn. 30:30.96 Max Shank First off I just want to reiterate why? what? What were you trying to learn. Why is it important we have self reliance and contribution. We have value and values and we have physical and mental health. I think that pretty much covers what you would hope to learn right? Is there anything else. You can think of I think that's basically it. 30:56.42 mikebledsoe Um I like that as ah as a context I started thinking about the things that like specifically when I think about what's commonly thought of being created in school is reading writing arithmetic. Ah. 31:10.90 Max Shank O. 31:14.38 mikebledsoe If you can if you can read and write you can you're going to be able to and if you can comprehend what you read at a high level you become more literate so that the more you can comprehend the better. You can comprehend the more literate you become which allows you to grasp information at much faster speed. But also be able to produce it and share it. So um, the reading and writing are super important there if you can I Really think I mean this this trumps math if you can read, you can learn anything. You can go anywhere if you can read really? well. Um, that's. 31:46.49 Max Shank Agreed agreed. 31:52.67 mikebledsoe To me is the primary thing I'm a little biased I'm sure because like I I have ah a super high reading comprehension but I look at my life and I see how beneficial that has been It's probably because I was homeschooled. And basically around seventh or eighth grade I was learning everything on my own so it was was kind of like forced into reading comprehension. Um. 32:15.72 Max Shank Whole words usually make or break your life your ability to communicate with other people and cooperate with other people is totally dependent on your ability to express and interpret both. Ah. 32:20.81 mikebledsoe You know. 32:35.49 Max Shank Actual language and body language. So it it is the ultimate skill and we are the ultimate social emotional creature. So there's no question that word is important I have it split up into word number and movement basically and. 32:49.63 mikebledsoe E. 32:54.10 Max Shank That will give you the mental and physical health that will also allow you to understand the concept of value and if you understand the concept of value. You know that value is relative to the individual like you know, bottled water at Coachella. Is very valuable but bottled water on you know, an iceberg is is next to a ah pure stream is not that valuable at all. In fact, it might even be detrimental. You'd pay nothing for it. So that's really the the crux of it. So. With number I have it split up into economics engineering and music is how I would teach numbers econ so you can learn about risk reward cost and benefit. There's some accounting in there of course and then engineering. Would be where like physics and geometry and structures would come into play. So I think that covers most of the practical uses for numbers and I'm sure that our listeners would have other ideas of how that work I think music is. Ah, really good thing to ah teach people because it's actually pretty easy and the amount of effort required versus the benefit you get both ah psychologically and physically is very high so that would be number and then for words. You would want logic and rhetoric history to know what worked and what should be done differently Ww and Dd and then ah learning about programming. Learning about how humans are programmed learning how to program yourself using language learning about the power of stories and storytelling and maybe most importantly, learning how to craft an offer and sell that offer. And I think that really covers a lot of the word skills that a person might need. And lastly we have under movement I have meditation under movement because it's sort of the um I think stillness is actually a pretty useful. Exercise and then we have wrestling striking gymnastics and Ballgames and I think that would cover like 95% 35:41.39 Max Shank Of what you need in order to be able to deliver value which allows you to be self-reliant and contribute and it would also enhance your mental and physical health and still leave lots of time left over for. Recreation and leisure and rest and play which I think are also non-negotiables. 36:06.61 mikebledsoe Yeah, one thing I would add to that be law I think there's yeah, no manmade laws. The um, those. 36:13.36 Max Shank Law like physical laws or so so crime crime and punishment. 36:25.30 mikebledsoe Yeah, really I mean people people be don't understand how law works They don't understand I mean going back to because that falls under the the word category for you because law is just an opinion. 36:38.94 Max Shank Yeah. 36:44.32 mikebledsoe By a certain group of people that they then Hire Policy. You know they create a policy Hire Policy enforcers to make sure that everybody complies. Um. And most people are very confused about the law so it leaves it leaves law in the hands of very few people people people get involved politically in ways that they don't understand. 37:11.36 Max Shank O. 37:18.77 mikebledsoe Don't understand the implications of what's going On. Ah and they don't know how to make a change. They don't know how to how to change the law or take advantage of the law or to interpret the law and I think this is something I started learning some of that when I was in high school. I was I was blessed enough to have been exposed to constitutional law and take that high school and I was homeschooled so I got to study a bunch of shit that other people never I talked to anyone who went to public school. No one talked about constitutional law. Even though that's the entire basis of our culture So culture is made up of language in the most concrete version of culture is the laws that are written down and people are going around enforcing those laws I mean it doesn't get more concrete than that outside of. 38:12.54 Max Shank Or else That's a strong incentive. 38:15.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, or else. So I think that I think that law is is really powerful to to learn and another thing is most of the things that people avoid in this world that keeps them from being wealthy I had this conversation with one of my friends this weekend. Is people are scared to learn anything administrative in nature people due to avoiding administrative load ah remain poor They they don't engage with what's happening financially with and with their taxes. They don't know how to. 38:49.31 Max Shank So. 38:52.36 mikebledsoe They're afraid of it and they just you know whatever the accountant says I don't really know how to how to engage in that administratively and a lot of people confuse law with Administrative. There's a lot of administrative stuff going on if you just do these things that you're not going to be subject to certain laws because you went through these. Certain administrative Processes. So this happens with real estate this happens with what what we're seeing in the the crypto markets right now there's a lot of there's a lot of really complex and sophisticated administrative things that are built in a society right now that. 39:11.40 Max Shank Ah. 39:28.85 mikebledsoe The only people who really get the benefit of it are the people who are willing to engage in that administrative load and are willing to learn the complexity of it and so I see the administration falls under government and governance and law. Whether it's coming from a government or the governance is coming from a smaller institution. These things are all important to know about if you want to participate in society and make a difference in it. 39:50.27 Max Shank The. 39:58.98 Max Shank It's like how you want to? It's like how to manage your life. Basically right? because you know don't hate the player hate the game better yet. Just ah, don't hate anything just ah play the cards you're dealt. But you're right I mean law is so deliberately complex to obscure the truth accounting rules are so deliberately complex to obscure the truth tax rules, etc. But you can complain about how it's unfair. Which it is or you can learn the language of those pursuits and I think the fact that we don't teach kids about accounting and taxes and law in high school is a frigging crime. 40:50.69 mikebledsoe Yeah, well be too many people learn it. They might get they they might start thinking for themselves. That's a problem so we won't go. 40:59.71 Max Shank Well, they might realize how bad everyone's being screwed I mean that's why we also that's why we also don't get ah a transparent pie chart with a list of how tax dollars are being spent because we would all go like are you fricking kidding me. Like you couldn't you couldn't imagine a more egregious misappropriation of funds. But once again that is taboo because people are under the fantasy. That it's being spent well if their tax dollars are going to a good cause and so in order to come to the realization that they're being catastrophically mismanaged wasted or maybe even ah used for ah sinister acts. 41:51.57 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 41:53.53 Max Shank Right is horrifying. 42:00.63 mikebledsoe So horrifying. Alright, so we know we know what we want to learn so I don't have children yet. But I'm planning on it. Um I was homeschooled I feel very blessed for that I think. 1 of the things that people are mostly concerned about and it comes homeschooling is you know the social interaction piece and I said this last week is you know the 3 big things we want to learn that the reason we want to learn things is so we can benefit our health our wealth and our relationships. And ah, you know a lot of times people think about you know, homeschoolers being isolated and and I had plenty of opportunity I my parents hired tutors along with some other parents. So I would go to a latin teacher with 3 other guys once a week we would study latin. Um I had an algebra tutor I had a spanish tutor and I was getting little social engagement in these small groups throughout the week so I wasn't without a social structure. It was just different and I think I actually developed very well because of that because I actually spent more time. Amongst adults that I did with kids who are my own age who probably weren't as mature and had I been in that environment I would have behaved less maturely as well. So I had ah I was able to mature pretty quickly due to that. Um. And I know one thing that's really emerged. That's really exciting is this past couple of years. The kids weren't allowed to go to school and they all had to sit at home and and ah, they're basically being homeschooled. 43:46.12 Max Shank Right. 43:54.49 mikebledsoe By parents who may not even be interested in it or they're having to work a job and can't give them the attention and it just created this this whiplash in a way and you know they they started letting kids go back to school here in Texas and Florida you know the kids. Everything's pretty much back to normal when it comes to going to school sometimes I have mass sometimes they don't depends on the school here in in Texas and ah, but my friends in California who have children what they've done because California laws are so insane. Ah. Is ah a lot of these teachers have left these these really great teachers have left these amazing schools because they're tired of all the mandates as well and these parents have gotten together and they go oh there's 6 families. Getting together. We're all going to contribute $20000 to this teacher for the year the teacher gets paid more the kids get more attention that the ratio of parent a teacher is just right? The parents are in a constant conversation with the teachers. And there's not just one teacher to 1 group of kids. There's multiple teachers that have specialties and different things and so these kids are are and it's and it's very it's become very communal and what we're gonna what we're gonna be witnessing over the years is there's a ah decentralization of. Everything everything's being decentralized and so a lot of people are not going to like that because it's so different than the way it's been but education is becoming decentralized and it's gonna be very community oriented and when things decentralized things tend to become tribal and what I mean by that is. There are small cultures. There's these subcultures that start forming these bubbles I'm part of a subculture where I live we all have you know we we all share the same beliefs and all that kind of stuff and when you know we have kids and bring them up through that culture that's going to be that way. And we need to be good with other people having their own bubbles and their own beliefs and their own cultures. That's perfectly fine. That's what makes this world such a beautiful place. Um, but what I I see in the future is the reason this teacher can get paid much more. You know it could be making 6 figures and. Not working for the school. So the teacher makes more money it costs the parents less money to send their kids to school because're not paying for all this administrative bullshit and the administrative bullshit basically gets in the way of having a direct relationship with the teacher and it gets in the way of community because it's sets a centralized humane and control. 46:35.28 Max Shank Right. 46:42.61 Max Shank And no direct incentive either yet, you need to have um, correlated incentives. Otherwise you're always going to get a worse result. You're always going to get corruption. You're always going to get. Ah. 46:47.34 mikebledsoe And the incentives are yeah are broken. 47:02.44 Max Shank Like lobbying. For example, we're we're going to. We're going to convince the rule breakers to give us better rules I mean that's just that's just crazy. 47:05.19 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 47:13.45 mikebledsoe so so I started throwing out a solution. that's that's 1 big broad solution. We didn't talk about how kids should be school choice. 47:19.84 Max Shank School choice. Yeah school choice is the ultimate solution because if you want to send your kid to public school and you have what you consider a good public school and you're well-informed then hey you know more power to you but you have to have that choice. Which allows for competition so that the let's just say like the destructive schools don't have a monopoly on the hearts and minds of kids. It's ridiculous. 47:49.98 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, how would you handle the 8 hours of sitting in 1 spot as a child. 47:57.10 Max Shank You you don't I mean what could possibly be worse than sitting in a chair that is horizontal with a desk that is horizontal. It's catastrophically bad. You're looking straight down all the time. Or you're looking at the teacher talk. Ah I think for the body. It's awful. You know you could you could do you could do 100% of schooling outside if the weather was good. You could do most schooling outside depending on the weather just with like a. A notebook or a tablet of some kind I mean it doesn't have to be a fancy ipad or anything like that. You know we forget that you pay a premium for a luxury brand like that. But you could go to Walmart today and for like eighty bucks get a tablet that can connect to the internet. And write notes and has a little pen on there. So. 48:55.83 mikebledsoe For all my friends kids were the school gave them Macbooks once covid hit like all the kids got macbooks I know well you're welcome kid. 49:05.43 Max Shank Wow you and I paid for those. Ah, yeah, and obviously someone won big on securing that contract too. So that that's that sort of ah backwards incentive is par for the course and a lot of it has to do with transparency. 49:18.51 mikebledsoe Oh yeah, for sure. 49:29.19 Max Shank I think that's the main attraction of cryptocurrency. For example, especially like blockchain technology is that it's so transparent. Ah there isn't anyway, we don't want to get on that topic too much but when it's transparent and you know where everything's going. It's really difficult for there to be those. Dirty dealings behind the scenes and those backwards incentive structures. So I think that sitting in a desk, especially ah a single desk most of the day is. 1 of the worst things you could do to a kit to their posture to their eyesight to their skin to their body I mean it's horrible. You know if you don't see it as child if you don't see it as child abuse then you like don't understand physiology. 50:12.84 mikebledsoe Well, the other thing is is. 50:21.37 mikebledsoe Yeah, and the other thing that I've done a lot of work in the emotional realm and one of the things that I recognize is the emotional body and the physical body are so intertwined These are not different these are and. 50:21.90 Max Shank At all. 50:41.36 mikebledsoe And if you put kids in an environment where they cannot move and they're experiencing anything emotional that they're not allowed to express because you're not allowed to express yourself emotionally in class you gotta be quiet. You can't you know if you're crying. We're gonna. 50:53.91 Max Shank And right? yeah. 50:59.33 mikebledsoe You You know, get rid of you somehow or get you to settle down if you're if you want to be happy and Laughing. You can't do that either. So Not only is there this retardation of physical movement but ah of being in touch with the emotional body. So What I see. Problem with the desk is it's yeah, it's the the emotional body also gets stunted in this so you get the the physical body and the emotional body are suffering by being in this and while the physical body and the emotional body are being minimized. 51:17.99 Max Shank Eq goes down. 51:35.57 mikebledsoe We are then putting most of our attention on the memorization and regurgitation and so we end up in honoring and really I guess holding on a pedestal. The. The intellectual part of being human as being the most valuable so we've got 20 years of education telling us that what's in our mind is what's truly important and that our body and our emotional body are not as important you won't be valued in Society. If you have that So what we have is a bunch of people who have very poor development physically poor development Emotionally who have an overdeveloped psyche in a lot of ways that is that they identify as who they are and that that. Creates a very controllable population. It's a very,. It's very easy to create sheep in that in that case. 52:41.60 Max Shank All being taught by an obedience teacher who has no skin in the game for how well they do in life. 52:51.11 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 52:52.80 Max Shank Even even with the best of intentions I've I've met teachers who are amazing I've also met teachers who couldn't be worse and even if you have really good intentions. It doesn't mean that the action is good I Think that's. 52:57.84 mikebledsoe I. 53:11.00 Max Shank Something that I've really come to think about a lot as I study history as I Observe what's going on in our culture Good intentions doesn't doesn't make the action good if your intentions are good. It doesn't mean what you're doing is good. So Even with the best of intentions you can like horribly abuse a lot of people. 53:29.65 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 53:35.33 mikebledsoe The the truth is in the results I talk to people about this which is somebody wants to start getting defensive of you know I speak frequently about the the medical system being fucked up and you know what people refer to as the health care system. Being fucked up and they're like well you know and they want to defend it I'm like all we have to do is look at the results I don't want to hear about why you think this is a good idea or not or people want to defend very specific actions when I go look I don't I'm not look. That action. You know was a good theory and it was put in place and all that but it didn't work out the way we wanted to work out. You know the american healthcare system is failing. How do we know? record breaking diabetes cancer mental health the heart disease people. That ah number one killer in the United States right now. Fentanyl overdose. So ah, prescription drugs. 54:37.86 Max Shank Number 1 even above and beyond like heart disease that would surprise me. 54:44.30 mikebledsoe I I Saw a new thing I think it became number one definitely beats Covid but um. 54:50.44 Max Shank Maybe number one? No well, there's ah, there's a lot of iffy numbers around testing and things like that and the amount of deaths and cases there but we don't want to get ourselves censored. 55:01.35 mikebledsoe Everything? Ah yeah, all arms. Ah yeah, if you're getting censored. 55:09.50 Max Shank That's always a good sign by the way if ah if someone's trying to censor certain topics. They're probably doing it with good intentions. 55:16.98 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah, so so we really got to look at the results and so anyone who still is hesitant to agree with us. Ah just look at the results you know or the results of the education system. What kind of what kind of people are going out into the world. Seems pretty chaotic to me at this point. Um, what I mean I too many too many kids to one teacher these classrooms with 30 kids 1 teacher. What? What's the number you'd like to see. 55:46.28 Max Shank I well here's the thing I think if the structure were different that would be fine that'd be fine if if kids worked with each other in groups and they were learning things that were useful. Things that were important and interesting to them. Um, then you wouldn't need to have that teacher giving one thirtieth of her attention to everyone all the time it could be done in more of like a ah circuit style. 56:20.70 mikebledsoe Um. 56:22.54 Max Shank So I think the number of students to the teacher is relevant but it can work a lot of different ways. Ah no question, no question if you have ah a 1 on 1 relationship you're you're gonna get more. 56:29.36 mikebledsoe You. 56:41.19 Max Shank Information transmitted there you're going to get more direct and immediate feedback which can be very beneficial. Um, ah so I think 1 to 30 is not necessarily a problem but it is a problem especially with the structure that we have it in. You know everybody in an individual desk. We got 95% fluff. The rest of it is not really um, taught in a way that is principles based It's more rote memorization based so um, yeah, part of the reason that's no good is. Because of the structure we have in place ah school school choice though is the solution and unfortunately the worse we like dumb down the. 57:20.81 mikebledsoe Got it? yeah. 57:38.17 Max Shank School system the more ah like pork belt barreling the more like fluff we throw in there due to lobbying and teachers unions and stuff like that and the less incentive at play you just create are ah wider wider and wider chasm between the haves and the have-nots because if then. You know going to public school is actually worse and worse and worse for a child that makes the gap between that and a private school or a free choice school bigger and bigger. 58:09.43 mikebledsoe yeah yeah I think about how I teach and we break you know Um I'm teaching adults so they learn the information on their own. They they try to apply it. Um, but then they also meet with a pod I put people in groups of a pod of 6 and that pod of 6 is led by 1 of my coaches and you know they're usually got more than no more than 25 or 30 people they're managing at a time but only 6 at a time. 58:32.57 Max Shank This. 58:48.20 mikebledsoe Is what they're managing and so I really like that that group of 6 I I grew up learning in in groups of 6 or or less I see a lot of value in that I do like what you were saying you know one teacher could be handling 30 kids if there was a certain rotation going on. But I think most teachers are managing like 150 kids and 30 at a time. So I think that and and the other thing we have to also think about is you know the age if you're if you're 3 4 5 6 7 eight years old you probably need that constant supervision. There needs to be a teacher all the time present or most of the time present you know I think it's really silly for thirteen fourteen Fifteen year olds to be under constant supervision of a teacher for 8 hours a day. It's I'm a big believer in. 59:31.71 Max Shank A. 59:45.69 Max Shank But. 59:46.61 mikebledsoe Like let's sit down for 60 to 90 minutes to focus on a topic as a group and then go go fuck off for an hour. You know, go go ah go to recess. Go move your body go play. Do something you enjoy. If you want to study more if you want to learn more about it and continue to have the conversation. Great. But I'd like to see an environment where like as kids get older that they get more autonomy over their time and how they spend it and. Giving them the space to research and learn about things that they're curious about instead of having this need to cram all this useless information in your head so that you know the teacher can meet their quota the way to pause it real quick. 01:00:31.50 Max Shank Um, yeah, sure. Yeah, so what we need is interest and incentive. Basically. 01:00:40.12 mikebledsoe Hear the door knocking go. 01:00:49.19 Max Shank Like if if you're interested in something and you're incentivized. You'll do it. That's that's what I've noticed with coaching adults as well is if you're interested and incentivized. There's no limit to the energy and enthusiasm that you'll have and if you. Reinforce that sense of ah contribution that good feeling you get when you share with others. It allows you to have this abundance of psychic energy which I think you and I agree you and I would agree is 1 of the main roadblocks. For adults in success in their business. It's not because they don't know how to do arithmetic. It's because there are personal blocks. Ah psychologically and emotionally right. 01:01:42.64 mikebledsoe Yeah, absolutely absolutely. Um, how how do you approach teaching children to we. We talked a lot about memorizing and regurgitating as as not learning, but just as it is what it is. 01:01:54.65 Max Shank Right. 01:02:00.54 Max Shank Right. 01:02:02.19 mikebledsoe How do we teach like what would be your idea of how to teach kids. How to think for themselves. 01:02:07.31 Max Shank So I have ah I have a very controversial method. What I do is I have a pocket full of marshmallows and then I carry a long stick and if they do something I like then they get a marshmallow and if they do something I don't like then I hit them with the stick and I'll. I'll trick them. Ah, into just blindly believing what I say and if they do blindly believe what I say then I hit him with the stick and if they ask for context then they get a marshmallow I'm a little bit old school. Ah no I mean I. 01:02:45.13 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 01:02:49.75 Max Shank I Think ah, encouraging curiosity and question asking is very valuable. Um I think relating everything back to how you're going to be able to liberate yourself and contribute. Is very important there needs to be context with the content. You can't have just content. You want to reinforce how learning to read will allow you to learn anything Else. You have to reinforce how ah economics and accounting are. Going to help you become wealthy so you don't have to worry about living paycheck to Paycheck. So I think having context with content and encouraging curiosity are probably the most important things when it comes to teaching kids. Um. The other thing is trying to have something physical in the world rather than just ah, verbal or visual something that they can hold in their hands I think is really valuable and making it a little bit more kinesthetic. 01:03:58.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, there's ah ah well the the interesting there is um I read I read this book last year called Metaphors that we live by and it Yeah, do you. 01:04:11.60 Max Shank I have that book. Yeah. 01:04:15.61 mikebledsoe And it does a really good job of mapping out how the the mind works in Metaphor. So ah, the when we when we talk about if we talk about inflation the way that it's structured in a sentence. Makes it out to where we're creating inflation as a person you know inflation is bad and it's gonna come get you and all these types of things just as an example and so we tend to take Concepts and we we say the mind is a. Is an engine or a machine.. It's like that's not actually True. You know we we could think about it as a process but most people don't That's too conceptual So Most Concepts are made that we make sense of those concepts by ah, assigning Them. Ah. 01:04:58.40 Max Shank Right. 01:05:13.25 mikebledsoe It's a metaphor to something we can physically see and touch and and feel and all that kind of stuff and so to your point if there is a lack of of 3 D experience if there's a lack of what's going on then. I Think these when you when you're learning Concepts and you don't have the metaphors locked in well enough you you are going to you. You run the risk of just living in the conceptual world which I call the fifth dimension and. 01:05:49.10 Max Shank Yes. 01:05:51.19 mikebledsoe World of concepts the fourth dimension being our 3 dimensions that we exist in in this particular moment and then add time and for the fourth dimension fit dimension being concepts and so what we end up with is a bunch of people who are lost in their heads. 01:06:10.34 Max Shank And. 01:06:10.71 mikebledsoe And just doing you know mental masturbation that never know how to to practically apply these things and I have suffered from that a bit myself. So I I get it. But that's something that I think you're spot on I think the solution to that is a lot of hands On. Learning like I learned geometry and trigonometry in my high school years but the real application which was way simpler than what I was learning in the books by the way was going on the job site with my dad and renovating houses and having to cut pieces of wood that were going to fit. 01:06:45.50 Max Shank Okay. 01:06:49.79 mikebledsoe This angle over here and this angle over there and we were doing the math it Trigg made so much sense to me being on the job site. You get me in a book and all of a sudden. It's stop it. It doesn't it doesn't mean as much but again because I have the I have the carpentry background. 01:07:05.69 Max Shank It's not rich. 01:07:09.11 mikebledsoe I do understand trick really well I was able to get into physics really well because I I so I can take the conception when I and I've had practice making it practical. 01:07:19.84 Max Shank Well and you know you bring up a really good point like pract I'm one of the most practical people I've ever met because I tend to think that if something is superfluous. You can do it for fun but otherwise it should be. Cut out like there's no reason for any of that unless you're specifically like trying to just have fun. So when I have the 3 categories of you know, word move and number there's a lot. You actually still have a lot of time left over so you could have part of schooling be woodworking and plumbing and learning a little bit about electric circuits and having these very practical schools like how about cooking and once again, we don't want to. Rely 100% on the state to teach your kid because they will ah do the worst job possible because there's no incentive for them to do a good job so having practical skills acquired that are not only. Ah. Applied in that moment but also applied for the rest of your life is hugely valuable. So I think um, that idea of no content without context would be. Like 1 of the most important things because you need someone to emotionally and intellectually buy in and apply that knowledge once they've realized that it's valuable. 01:08:59.99 mikebledsoe Yeah, that also solves the problem of the fluff. The the useless information that is made important when you have context I think about history and how much history is taught and it's like. 01:09:10.34 Max Shank A. So much fluff. 01:09:17.62 mikebledsoe This battle happened at this point and whatever and you know on the test you got to make sure that you got the right battle in the right year and all that kind of shit and it just makes no sense and um. 01:09:24.18 Max Shank Right? It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous. It's rote memorization with no idea for like why are we learning this. It's so we don't repeat the mistakes of history and history is all about how human beings clump together and cooperate or. 01:09:35.26 mikebledsoe Right. 01:09:43.56 Max Shank Or don't cooperate how they resolve their differences How you know that that kind of thing I agree. 01:09:47.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, and so we could study the the purpose of studying history. The the grand context there which isn't taught school is yeah, don't repeat the mistakes and what's made us better. How do we do more of that and how does this. Why are we learning what we're learning today. How does that apply to today's environment and where we're going and what what are the pitfalls and and I I would you know when I have kids that conversation is gonna it's gonna be a conversation. You know what do you think about how that applies to what's going on in our world right now. 01:10:10.44 Max Shank Right. 01:10:23.52 Max Shank Hello text. 01:10:24.85 mikebledsoe This and that and and talk it through. 01:10:29.89 mikebledsoe Um, how would you incentivize creativity. What do you? What are you laughing about. 01:10:42.50 Max Shank I'm just thinking about ah the the teachers who hear this who are going to hate my fucking guts and yours too probably, but but they'll hate me more after I say this next thing is it doesn't seem hard. It actually doesn't seem difficult at all. Once you add context to every piece of content and once you cut away all the fluff. There's not that much. You need to know to understand value and values and when I say value and values I Basically just mean understanding that value is relative understanding that you have to deliver value. To be able to exist within this societal framework and values to me essentially means like volunteerism like non-coercion Morality like we talked about before like if you if you don't like someone that's fine but don't punch them in the face. 01:11:28.89 mikebledsoe Oh. 01:11:39.20 Max Shank Ah, however, if they attack you then ah go ahead and make sure you win that battle in some way, don't steal. Don't lie like it's very simple stuff. But. 01:11:46.10 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:11:53.29 Max Shank It's not a lot of stuff. It's more important to reinforce those things with practical application and context. That's what I was laughing about. 01:11:58.12 mikebledsoe Yeah I on that I want to make sure that we have ah some type of solution for each thing we we named as a problem we we're talking about ah the the school system is stifling creativity. So. 01:12:06.54 Max Shank Yeah, can you repeat it I I was off in my own little world. There. Those are the. 01:12:17.28 mikebledsoe What? Ah how would you enhance? what would you do to help enhance creativity in children you were teaching. 01:12:22.66 Max Shank I Suppose asking leading questions to how you could apply something. You know that seems unrelated to something that we're learning right now would be a good way to do it. 01:12:38.70 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:12:42.10 Max Shank Um, asking what other ways could you try to solve this problem. Um I think music and art would be Useful. Creativity is a tricky thing because. If we try to nail down a definition. What does creativity really mean um, like an unexpected solution like if you say in sport someone came up with a really creative play. It would be something that you haven't really seen before it would be. Something that maybe you've seen elsewhere applied in a new way right? So I I think encouraging knowing what that means and then encouraging that behavior and recognizing that's what innovation is would be useful. 01:13:24.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, one one of the ways I like her. 01:13:35.59 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, I like the idea of well you know I train entrepreneurs I train people to be entrepreneurs basically and an entrepreneur is just a problem solver at the end of the day is. 01:13:44.50 Max Shank Right. Yeah. 01:13:53.49 mikebledsoe A problem in the world and you're gonna create a solution. So I really like the idea like creating an environment where creativity is enhanced by putting problems in front of them without the without saying solve it inside of this context but obviously. 01:14:10.74 Max Shank 2 01:14:13.24 mikebledsoe This problem solving this problem it. The problem itself creates its own boundaries and so if I'm solving a very specific problem then I have to take all this creative energy that might be going in random directions and then focus it down into this one solution and I think that. 01:14:25.85 Max Shank The. 01:14:32.62 mikebledsoe Being able to approach different types of problems and then apply all this other knowledge that that exists in other Contexts and then see the the principles overlap and the relationship of those principles into this New. Ah. New context if you can do that then you're you're gonna be really well Off. So It's I think putting a I think putting problems in front of kids and letting them work it out in their own way and just see what happens also allowing them to be. 01:14:57.69 Max Shank Ah. 01:15:08.12 Max Shank That's that's a great point. 01:15:10.69 mikebledsoe Kids just allowing kids to be curious and study what they want I mean ah the way I've thought about approaching is like you know what? I'm gonna make sure that my kids do math for like twenty thirty minutes a day I'm gonna make sure they read and write for twenty thirty minutes a day. It's like reading writing arithmetic. 01:15:12.84

Inspired Intentions Podcast
106. Change is a Process, Not an Event: Episode #3

Inspired Intentions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:28


In the last of a series on the Triangle of Change, learn how to build confidence around the changes you want to make in your life.

Doctor Me First
Episode 347: Stories & Sass Solocast

Doctor Me First

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:36


2022 is here! Can you believe it? In some ways I'm excited to see a new year and in others I'm wary. The past few years have given us more and more adversity, and I don't know about you, but I don't necessarily feel ready.  But we're here regardless and no matter how much we may or may not like change, it happens. All the time! For instance, my Burnout to Badass Course? Remember that? The course platform that we have it hosted on is closing. We received notice JUST before the new year and honestly, I grieved.  The team and I have finally hit this stride and things feel really good and we were just settling in and then we find out about CourseCraft closing. But that's just the way of it. Change is happening constantly and we have to keep working and pivoting.  That's just life.  Listen in to hear some more fun goodies, get some good information, and get ready to be inspired. Just keep going. Just keep putting one foot in front of the other because you'll be surprised to look back days, weeks, months from now and see how far small steps have taken you.  “Have the courage and confidence to fail, because it may be leading you to a place where you have 2nd-year medical student love too.” Errin Weisman   In this episode: [01:47] Let's start with a story about my course host closing. [02:50] “Change happens.” [04:38] Now a story about Craig and I hot-tubbing. [04:57] My husband told me “Errin, I admire that you have kept trying.”  [07:11] My last story is about my favorite Instagram post. [08:36] Come talk to me in my Slack group.   Links and Resources 3 WAYS TO GET INCREDIBLE HELP AT A LOW COST!!! Buy my Kindle Book,Doctor Me First, on Amazon Join us for our Monthly Burnout Masterclass Series. Sit with me in my Slack Channel.

Leading the Rounds
Leading National Change as a Medical Trainee with Joel Bervell

Leading the Rounds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:15


Joel Bervell is a third year Ghanaian-American medical student at Washington State University. Joel graduated from Yale University, where he served as an elected member of Yale student government, and director of a longitudinal mentorship program based in low-income neighborhoods. He completed a Masters in Medical Science at Boston University and spent a year working as a clinical research assistant at Providence Hospital. At Washington State University, Joel served as Medical Student Council President and the co-founder and president of a chapter of the Student National Medical Association. He is also the founder and director of the Coug Health Academic Mentoring Program, a mentoring program dedicated to increasing the number of underrepresented students interested in medicine. He has been invited to speak to national organizations such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Clinton Foundation, Network of the National Library of Medicine. He has also spoken on well-known media outlets including Good Morning America, NPR, YahooNews and WebMd. He currently is working with the World Health Organization's Digital Communications Team with a collection of health professionals combating the spread of misinformation on social media about COVID-19, and on a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion project with the VA Hospital systems.Joel is committed to fighting health disparities in medicine through education and regularly shares topics about racial disparities/ biases in healthcare and other industries on his TikTok and Instagram (@joelbervell). Joel has been named by TikTok as the top 2021 “Voice for Change,” was featured by TikTok as one of 10 “Changemakers” on their inaugural Discover List, named as one of ten recipients of the 50K MACRO x TikTok Black Creatives Grant, and was a nominee for the AdColor Awards. He is the recipient of the National Medical Association's Emerging Scholar Award. Joel has served in an advisory role on the boards of multiple organizations including the National Student Response Network, Hope in A Box, and the Ron Brown Leaders Network Council.Welcome to Leading the Rounds!Questions We Asked: How did you get started using media platforms to promote change? How have you been able to manage social media with being a 3rd year medical student? Have you always been comfortable speaking in public? How have you been able to use your voice as a medical student to affect change?How have you felt being a young professional speaking to experts?  Have you struggled with imposter syndrome when speaking out for change? What are biases that we see in medicine? How do we discuss genetics vs race in medicine? What is your outlook with our generation in terms of eliminating health disparities? What advice would you have for trainees who want to create change? Quotes & Ideas: Use social media as an extension of yourself. Be true to who you are. Medical students can make an impact on changing what we are taught in medical school Medical students have been instrumental to rethinking pulse oximetry, eGFR, and diversity in medical imaging Levels of bias in medicine: Medical education- Risk factors Systematic biases- Race based medicine, disease equations, etc. Educational materials- Dermatology textbooks Book Suggestions: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi CoatesAtul Gawande books The Color of Law Richard RothsteinShoe Dog by Phil Knight How to be an Anti-Racist Ibram X. Kendi

Life Kit: Health
Need to make a change in your life? Behavioral science can help

Life Kit: Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 18:23


When's the best time to start a new habit? And what makes some stick while others fall by the wayside? Behavioral scientist Katy Milkman's new book, How to Change, breaks down the research about how to leverage human nature instead of working against it to achieve your goals. (This episode originally aired in May 2021.)

Life Kit: All Guides
Need to make a change in your life? Behavioral science can help

Life Kit: All Guides

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 18:23


When's the best time to start a new habit? And what makes some stick while others fall by the wayside? Behavioral scientist Katy Milkman's new book, How to Change, breaks down the research about how to leverage human nature instead of working against it to achieve your goals. (This episode originally aired in May 2021.)

TwoBrainRadio
How Does Your Business Survive Change?

TwoBrainRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 6:11


If you don't post pictures of torn, bloody hands like you did in the old days, is it really your gym? If there isn't a shirtless athlete vomiting in the corner, is it really your gym? If you aren't the one unlocking the doors at 5 a.m. and locking them again at 9 p.m., is it really your gym? Things change, and so will your business if it's to survive the test of time. Here's Coop on which changes matter—and which don't.P.S. Coop's new book is out! For everything you need to start and scale a fitness business, get your copy of "Start a Gym" here.Links:Gym Owners UnitedTimeline:1:14 – The story of Theseus' boat.3:06 – Grandfather's axe.4:38 – The story that matters.

Girls with Goals
18. Can You Out-Train Your Genetics??

Girls with Goals

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 54:30


Can you out-train your genetics? How much can fitness and nutrition actually impact your body?? We are getting EDUCATIONALLL for you today, all in an easy to understand, relatable way... let's get into it!!!Code "goals" for 10% off of your Hydrojug: HydrojugCode "caroline20" for 20% your first order and free shipping from HekateUse AnnCatherine's digital journal: Daily Journal Prompt PlannerJoin Caroline's fitness program: Change with Carolinewww.changewithcaroline.comFollow Girls with Goals on Instagram: @girlswithgoalspodFollow AC on Instagram: @anncatherinconneenFollow Caroline on Instagram: @carolineconneenSubscribe to Caroline on Youtube: Caroline ConneenSubscribe to AnnCatherine on Youtube: AnnCatherine ConneenFollow AC on Tik Tok: @anncatherineconneenFollow Caroline on Tik Tok: @carolineconneenFor business inquiries please contact us at anniecarolineconneen@gmail.com :)

Everyone Counts by Dr. Jürgen Weimann - Der Podcast über Transformation mit Begeisterung
Gelingender Kulturwandel bei der Otto Group - Gespräch mit Tobias Krüger

Everyone Counts by Dr. Jürgen Weimann - Der Podcast über Transformation mit Begeisterung

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:47


Wie gelingt ein Kulturwandel in einem Konzern? Knapp 50.000 Mitarbeiter*innen in verschiedenen Ländern der Otto Group machten sich auf den Weg, das Unternehmen zu transformieren. Ein Wandel fern ab von Top-Down-Initiativen. Inspirierende Einblicke gibt uns der damals verantwortliche Manager für den Kulturwandel Tobias Krüger.

Hyper Conscious Podcast
#853 - Jason Goldberg - The Importance of Learning Yourself

Hyper Conscious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 30:51


Do you know who you really are? Are you confident enough not to be easily influenced by what people say you are? In this episode, hosts Kevin Palmieri and Alan Lazaros talk about learning who you truly are and its importance with Podcaster, Mindset Mentor, Best-Selling Author, and Self-Leadership Coach, Jason Goldberg. Self-leadership is understanding who you are, identifying your desired experiences, and intentionally guiding yourself toward them.Jason “JG” Goldberg is a Mindset Mentor and Self-Leadership Coach for Celebrities, Change Makers, and CEOs. He is also the host of The Jason Goldberg is Ruining Podcasting Podcast, author of the #1 International Best-Seller on Self-Leadership entitled “Prison Break,” and creator of the Playful Prosperity AND Competition-Proof Business Immersion programs.   JG has been a featured expert on media outlets including ABC, CBS, and FOX as well as teaching on the MindValley and SoulPancake platforms and has founded multiple start-ups, including one in partnership with NASA and the space shuttle program.He now focuses on blending his signature mix of transformational and straightforward wisdom, captivating storytelling, practical business mentorship, and belly-busting humor to make personal growth less “personal growth-y” and to leave everyone he meets with at least 5% more joy than when he found them!Reach out to Jason at:Website: https://thejasongoldberg.com/IG: https://www.instagram.com/thejasongoldbergFB: http://facebook.com/THEJASONGOLDBERGListen to his podcast: https://thejasongoldberg.com/thepodcast/Join the next monthly event (Feb. 2022): Creating Financial Abundance https://calendly.com/alanlazaros/monthly-event-creating-financial-abundanceWhat are you waiting for? Grab this FREE COURSE now! https://next-level-university-courses.teachable.com/p/what-it-takes-to-get-to-the-next-levelGroup coaching details: https://nextleveluniverse.com/group-coaching/We love connecting with you guys! Reach out on LinkedIn, Instagram, or via emailWebsite

Fusion Church NY Podcast
Live on purpose 3: Fasting for change?

Fusion Church NY Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 35:57


This new year join us and learn how to live a life of intentionality, of no regrets, a life of power. This message series will help you to live and learn how to keep the changes you want and shed the negative behaviors we despise. Learn practical steps, behaviors and beliefs that will help you to usher in the new year and habits that stick to create a firm foundation for long lasting change. Today, you will learn how to live a live free of guilt and regrets. NO MORE SELF BLAME!Remember to hit that subscribe button and SHARE the podcast!Make sure you don't miss it!Main scripture: Daniel 10; Mark 9:17-25To learn more or connect, visit our website at fusionchurchny.com/, download the FusionChurch App, or follow us on Facebook.You can submit a prayer request or connect by sending us a message.Join a Small Group.Also, don't forget to SUBSCRIBE and Leave A Review.Topics: New Year's Resolution | No more regrets guilt or shame | Change | new beginning | learn new habits | break old patterns | Just do it | Keep the change | learn self-discipline | schedule | Change beliefs | faith | JesusSupport the show (http://www.fusionchurchny.com/give )

Tomorrow's Leader
#234 - Decisions—Do Your Homework First

Tomorrow's Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 11:59


As a leader, part of your role is to make decisions, and more often than not, these decisions are enormous. So how do you make sure you're making the right ones? In today's episode, host John Laurito talks about how leaders can make sure their decisions are sound.Show notes:[2:15] Quick story for today's episode[7:14] As a leader, be careful with making the decisions solely based on feedback or people's opinion[9:36] On making big decisions—ask this question first[11:32] OutroGet a copy of Tomorrow's Leader on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/huseae9hText LEADER to 617-393-5383 to receive The Top 10 Things That The Best Leaders Are Doing Right NowFor questions, suggestions, or speaker inquiries, contact me at john@lauritogroup.com

Transformative Principal
Creating A School Kids Are Dying To Attend With Andrew Marotta Transformative Principal 464

Transformative Principal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 26:43


layout: podcast title: Creating a school kids are dying to attend with Andrew Marotta Transformative Principal 464 comments: true date: 2022-01-16 categories: middle, student driven learning, mindset, permalink: https://jethrojones.com/podcast/episode464 Social Media: Do your teachers want the information or do they want the inspiration? via @andrewmarotta21 Andrew Marotta is an energetic and enthusiastic leader who has put his positive imprint on his beloved Port Jervis HS, in Port Jervis, NY. With the release of his first book, “The Principal: Surviving and Thriving”, Andrew is expanding his impact on the education leadership community.  The 2nd edition, The School Leader, Surviving & Thriving was released in November 2020. Surviving & thriving a keep rolling mindset, & the power of storytelling ADHD is not a disability, it's a superpower. Moving from High School to Middle School. Change is good. Right move for me to have a different challenge while staying in the same district. The kids are amazing. Extremely impressionable. Kids rally around excitement. The importance of direction. How the power of impressionable kids matters If we're not pushing out fun things on social media, the kids will pay attention to the other stuff. Amazing after school experience. Amazing school culture happens 30 seconds at a time. School's gotta be fun. That kid's going to learn to love it when they have real audiences. Still trying to get kids back into the school. Mid-lesson checkins to help know where kids are at. Do your teachers want the information or do they want the inspiration? Always working on just one move in wrestling. Only looking at it as a weakness. Mikey the wrestler story. When your weakness becomes a strength. How to be a transformative principal? Spend time investing in your staff. Now, more than ever, teachers need our support. ## Sponsors ### [Transformative Principal Mastermind](https://transformativeprincipal.com) Lead a school everyone can be proud of. Being a principal is tough work. You're pulled in all kinds of directions. You never have the time to do the work that really matters. Join me as I help school leaders find the time to do the work they became principals to do. I help you stop putting out fires and start leading. Learn more at [https://transformativeprincipal.com](https://transformativeprincipal.com) ### [John Catt](https://us.johncattbookshop.com) Today's Transformative Principal sponsor, John Catt Educational, amplifies world-class voices on timeless topics, with a list of authors recognized globally for their fresh perspectives and proven strategies to drive success in modern schools and classrooms. John Catt's mission is to support high-quality teaching and learning by ensuring every educator has access to professional development materials that are research-based, practical, and focused on the key topics proven essential in today's and tomorrow's schools. Learn more about professional development publications that are easy to implement for your entire faculty, and are both quickly digestible and rigorous, by visiting https://us.johncattbookshop.com/. Learn more about some of the newest titles: - _[The Coach's Guide to Teaching](https://us.johncattbookshop.com/products/the-coach-s-guide-to-teaching?_pos=2&_sid=0405c747f&_ss=r)_ by Doug Lemov - [_The Feedback Pendulum: A manifesto for enhancing feedback in education_](https://us.johncattbookshop.com/collections/frontpage/products/the-feedback-pendulum-a-manifesto-for-enhancing-feedback-in-education) by Michael Chiles - _[Putting Staff First: A blueprint for revitalising our schools](https://us.johncattbookshop.com/products/putting-staff-first-a-blueprint-for-revitalising-our-schools?_pos=1&_sid=7dc3400e3&_ss=r)_ by John Tomsett and Jonny Uttley - _[10 Things Schools Get Wrong (And How We Can Get Them Right)](https://us.johncattbookshop.com/collections/frontpage/products/10-things-schools-get-wrong-and-how-we-can-get-them-right)_ by Jared Cooney Horvath and David Bott - _[Let's Talk About Flex: Flipping the flexible working narrative for education](https://us.johncattbookshop.com/collections/frontpage/products/let-s-talk-about-flex-flipping-the-flexible-working-narrative-for-education)_ by Emma Turner - _[A Parent's Guide to Powerful Teaching](https://us.johncattbookshop.com/products/powerful-teaching-a-guide-for-parents?_pos=1&_sid=7bf6ec56e&_ss=r)_ by Patrice Bain John Catt is also proud publisher of the new book from Transformative Principal host Jethro Jones: [SchoolX: How principals can design a transformative school experience for students, teachers, parents – and themselves](https://us.johncattbookshop.com/collections/frontpage/products/schoolx-how-principals-can-design-a-transformative-school-experience-for-students-teachers-parents-and-themselves) Visit this page to learn more about bulk orders and how to bring John Catt's research-based materials to your school: https://us.johncattbookshop.com/pages/agents-and-distributors

Hyper Conscious Podcast
#852 - Think Like An Investor - Strategy Saturday

Hyper Conscious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 15:46


Have you ever wondered how exactly do investors think? Why do they invest or not invest in some things? In today's episode, hosts Kevin Palmieri and Alan Lazaros share what they know about investing and how you can apply their strategy in your life. So before picking up, subscribing, or spending on anything, ask yourself: Is it worth it in the long run?Join the next monthly event (Feb. 2022): Creating Financial Abundance https://calendly.com/alanlazaros/monthly-event-creating-financial-abundanceWhat are you waiting for? Grab this FREE COURSE now! https://next-level-university-courses.teachable.com/p/what-it-takes-to-get-to-the-next-levelGroup coaching details: https://nextleveluniverse.com/group-coaching/We love connecting with you guys! Reach out on LinkedIn, Instagram, or via emailWebsite

Life in the Leadership Lane
88. Get Uncomfortable with Rachel Ferina on Life in the Leadership Lane!

Life in the Leadership Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 40:32


Welcome to Life in the Leadership Lane where I am talking to leaders making a difference in the workplace and in our communities. How did they get to where they are and what are they doing to stay there! Buckle up and get ready to accelerate in the Leadership Lane! This week, I am talking with Rachel Ferina, SPHR, SHRM-SCP, Regional HR Manager, Kimley-Horn and former Director of The HRSouthwest Conference. How did Rachel get started in her career? What led her to the world of HR and leadership? When did Rachel “find her lane” in her career? How important have mentors been for Rachel on her journey? What does Rachel share about her personal board of directors at work? What does Rachel share about the value of volunteer leadership? What does Rachel share about leadership? What does Rachel share about strategic planning? What does Rachel share about the war on talent? What does Rachel share about not rushing to the top? What is a leadership practice Rachel shares that helps in her every day? What advice does Rachel share about that has helped her and now shares with others? …and more as we spend “Time to Accelerate” with a few more questions. Interview resources: Favorite quote from Rachel: “I get my satisfaction on motivation out of seeing my team succeed.” Connect with Rachel on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachel-ferina-sphr-27b7421/ Visit Kimley-Horn https://www.kimley-horn.com/ Check out Bruce's leadership books... NEW "Life in the Leadership Lane" Moving Leaders to Inspire and Change the Workplace “Find Your Lane Change your GPS, Change your Career (“Book Authority” Best Books) “Milemarkers” A 5 Year Journey …helping you record daily highlights to keep you on track. Subscribe to Bruce's Blog “Move to Inspire” https://brucewaller.com/blog-2/ Connect with Bruce on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/brucewaller/ Connect with Bruce on Twitter https://twitter.com/BruceWaller Connect with Bruce on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bruceww300/ Connect with Bruce on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/brucewwaller Get relocation support for your next household goods or commercial office move across the US by reaching out to Bruce bwaller@goarmstrong.com or visit Armstrong Relocation https://www.armstrongrelocation.com/ Visit www.brucewaller.com for more information on Life in the Leadership Lane podcast and more!

The Allender Center Podcast
Navigating Transitions One Step at a Time

The Allender Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 45:50


Change is inevitable, and transitioning through change often holds together two realities: grief for things that have been lost and hope for what lies ahead. How do we navigate these transitions when it feels as if we're wandering through the wilderness? Listen as Dan and Rachael talk with Jon DeWaal of Liminal Space about how we might approach walking through seasons of transition in our lives, one step at a time.

Fix Yourself First with Dr. Kristie
137. Listener Questions Answered: Couples Intimacy + Communication Issues

Fix Yourself First with Dr. Kristie

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 11:25


Your questions are answered this week on intimacy and communication in relationships. Listener's questions answered:- We've turned into friends versus a couple who focuses on the day-to-day of parenting and no physical intimacy… is sex important?- We're dealing with a lot of stress and pressure as a couple so I've been yelling and screaming at my partner… what do I do?I've got the answers for these two listeners in today's episode. I've got the answers for these two listeners in today's episode. Be sure to join me for my free 3-part live Boundaries Workshop Series https://drkristie.kartra.com/page/FYF-series , where I'll walk you through the steps to identify, create, and uphold boundaries in all of your relationships. Click here to reserve your spot https://drkristie.kartra.com/page/FYF-series .