Podcasts about sub saharan africa

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Area of the continent of Africa that is south of the Sahara Desert

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Best podcasts about sub saharan africa

Latest podcast episodes about sub saharan africa

Discovery
The venomous vendetta

Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 27:20


Whilst watching a documentary about some poisonous frogs, Curio Janni in Amsterdam, started to wonder what would happen if a frog licked itself or another frog of the same species. She asks Dr Adam Rutherford and Professor Hannah Fry to investigate whether an animal would react badly to a toxin it itself produces? In essence 'can a venomous snake kill itself by biting itself?' Of course the answer is complicated, but the sleuths know exactly who to ask. Steve Backshall, award-winning wildlife explorer, best known for his BBC series 'Deadly 60'. Author of 'Venom – Poisonous Creatures in the Natural World'. Steve has been bitten, stung and spat at by a plethora of venomous creatures during his career. He also studied the first known venomous newt - the sharp-ribbed newt - a creature that has sharpened ribs that when it's under attack, it will squeeze its body force those ribs out through its skin, coating them in venom, which is then delivered into the mouth of an attacker. Professor Nick Casewell, studies venomous snakes and their impact on humans. He works on treatments for snakebites at the Liverpool School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Snakebites have a huge impact on communities in South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. It's now been reinstated as one of the most serious neglected tropical diseases by the World Health Organisation. Traditional treatments - antivenins - can be expensive, difficult to access and don't always work - Nick is looking into alternative medicines to treat snakebite victims. Dr. Ronald Jenner is Principle Researcher in the Comparative Venomics group at the Natural History Museum's Life Sciences, Invertebrates Division and co-wrote the book ‘Venom -the secrets of nature's deadliest weapon.' He explains the evolutionary arms race between venomous predators and their prey and poisonous prey and their predators. He explains how resistance to venom has evolved and how venom has evolved to be more or less powerful over time, answering another Curio - Scott Probert's question on the evolution of venom. Christie Wilcox wrote 'Venomous – How Earth's Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry'. She studied the molecular basis of lionfish venom. Christie describes how venom and immunity to venom works at the molecular level.

First Paso
Episode 76: I Bless the Rains Down in Africa

First Paso

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 44:00


On this episode of First Paso, Karl Lindsay, host of the The Overflow Podcast, shares the pivotal moment when one statistic shattered his entire worldview. Has something seemingly small ever surprisingly shifted the trajectory of your entire life? Listen as Karl reveals his how a decide between instant recreation or dedicated service led him to planting his heart in the plains of Sub-Saharan Africa. Visit http://www.FirstPaso.com or @CandaceOlusola on social media with questions and comments about this topic. #FPBlessAfrica --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/firstpaso/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/firstpaso/support

IoT For All Podcast
Energy Harvesting and Future of Sustainable IoT | IoT For All Podcast E150 | SODAQ's Ollie Smeenk

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 28:07


This week on the IoT For All Podcast, SODAQ CEO Ollie Smeenk joins us to discuss the sustainable IoT space and some of the biggest technologies enabling it. Ollie shares the evolution he's seen IoT and the sustainable IoT front undergo so far, including some of the most impactful technologies, like energy harvesting, that are driving the adoption of more sustainable IoT solutions. He also speaks to more of the specifics - including low-power technologies and the use cases that fit it best, energy harvesting, and battery-less technology.Ollie also digs more deeply into energy harvesting - the use cases where it works best, some of the obstacles to adoption, and where the industry is going as a whole.Born in the Netherlands, raised in Tanzania, Ollie Smink installed a large base of weather monitoring stations across Sub Saharan Africa and is now CEO of IoT hardware company SODAQ. He has a passion for positive impact driven by physical products and technical innovation, especially using solar energy harvesting and low-power hardware in countries with limited infrastructure and focusing on environmental challenges.

Faith Angle
Highlights from Faith Angle Europe

Faith Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 44:43


For this first podcast of the New Year, we are recapping highlights from Faith Angle Europe, a two-day conference of 16 international journalists and 5 speakers in France, with a window into some especially compelling insights that emerged on national populism, anti-Semitism in Europe and particularly France, impact investing and the growth of religion in sub-Saharan Africa, and finally, a big-think conversation about the commonalities faced by creative minorities in a pluralistic world.    All three full Faith Angle Europe sessions as well as a short recap video from the forum are linked below.   Additional Resources Faith Angle Europe Recap  Session One: French Identity and Anti-Semitism Session Two: Rising National Populism - And Religion  Session Three: Impact Investing and Sub-Saharan Africa

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
166: Empowering Displaced Persons and Refugees to Become Online Language Teachers and Tell Their Stories Across the World with Aline Sara

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 59:38


Aline Sara takes us on her journey growing up in a Lebanese immigrant family in New York and reflects on how her family's experience in Beirut during the civil war shaped her passion for international human rights and conflict resolution.  She shares her extensive world travel experiences through Lebanon, Syria and Turkey, as well as Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. Matt and Aline talk about the international solidarity dynamics among oppressed people around the world, in countries ranging from South Africa to Chile to Ireland.  Aline then talks about her experience working as a journalist in the Middle East during the Arab Spring.  She explains how the Syrian refugee crisis was the main inspiration for founding NaTakallam as a language learning social enterprise.  She explains the mission is to empower displaced persons and refugees to work as online language teachers, regardless of their location and status, and to virtually pair them with students who are also interested in hearing their stories.  Aline talks about how she scaled NaTakallam, how she finds and hires the teachers, and shares some examples of their lives prior to being displaced.  She also talks about the customer experience, the expansion of NaTakallam's service offerings, and explains how it provides an opportunity for refugees and displaced people to tell their stories across the world, and to build bridges across cultures.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAILABLE AT www.TheMaverickShow.com  

Impact Leaders - Impact Investment and Performance with Purpose
59: The Economic Opportunity and Resilience Of Impact Investing

Impact Leaders - Impact Investment and Performance with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 45:33


Tameo Impact Fund Solutions Tameo is a spin-off from Symbiotics, including its market research, impact reporting, deal valuation and matchmaking solutions. Based on 15 years of experience built at Symbiotics, our aim is to promote the growth of the impact investing industry by increasing transparency and supporting evidence-based decision-making via independent solutions. Safeya Zeitoun, Head of Impact at Tameo During her 5 years at Symbiotics, Safeya has focused on assessing the social and environmental impact achieved by Symbiotics' investments. She has also contributed to industry initiatives on social performance management. Before that, she was a researcher at the Access to Knowledge for Development Center at the American University in Cairo. She holds a master's degree in International Economics from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and a bachelor's degree in Economics from the American University in Cairo. Ramkumar Narayanan, Head of Research & Investments at Tameo Over 8 years, Ramkumar contributed to Symbiotics' research work in the areas of microfinance funds, markets, and social performance by developing reporting tools and co-authoring white papers and industry reports on these topics. Prior to his time at Symbiotics, he worked for over 3 years at the World Microfinance Forum Geneva, leading a working group aimed at raising awareness of the opportunities and challenges of private sector MF investments in China. Ramkumar holds a master's degree in Public Management and a bachelor's degree in Business Administration from the University of Geneva. Key points: Impact is a subset of sustainable investments. Impact pushes it further by looking at the measurements. At Symbiotics, historically focused has been on Microfinance and research and reporting Tameo was created to provide more independence, to support impact investors and impact fund managers to make evidence based decision and data driven decisions for their investments, increase accountability and transparency in the market. Private Asset Impact Fund Report 2021 - for fund managers as benchmark 175 impact funds participated in the stud. 300 data points per fund. There was a flat growth in AUM for impact funds in 2020. Average fund size of USD 140-150 million with fixed income funds are much larger compared to private equity funds. Microfinance - No clear statistics that show with confident that micro finance alleviates poverty, but there are very clear consistent positive impact from micro finance with tangible benefits e.g micro enterprises provides a stable source of income. They are able to capture business opportunities that otherwise would not be possible for them. They won't be as strongly affected by shocks e.g if member of family dies or storm destroys your home.  Micro finance creates Increased possibilities and opportunities. From survey, 90% of end borrowers say they believe quality of life has improved with access to micro finance. Blended finance works, there are a lot more innovation happening and  there is huge interest in it. Tameo is providing this market intelligence to the market as more investors still need more information. Regmifa -  Regional MSME Investment Fund for Sub-Saharan Africa and Loans for growth fund Investors need to have a change in mindset and be open to new investable opportunities Time Stamp: [5.29] What is impact investing? [7:34] Symbiotics and Tameo, how Tameo got started [12:35] Private Asset Impact Fund Report 2021, top trends in 2020 [19:16] Breakdown of investments types in the funds [21:30] Safeya's research of Micro loans [28:10] How Tameo was funded as a startup [31:00] Latest update from the space of blended finance [33:59] Regmifa fund for sub saharan Africa and loans for growth fund [36:35] Investors need more information to understand and be educated [38:18] People are still reluctant to invest, changing the mindset of investors. [42:00] Educating investors and coming together under a common language. Useful links: Tameo Solutions https://tameo.solutions/ Symbiotics Group https://symbioticsgroup.com/ Impact Fund Report 2021 https://tameo.solutions/research/ Regmifa https://regmifa.com/ Event: Building Bridges https://www.buildingbridges.org/ -------- Call-to-actions: The podcast is one of the catalytic initiatives to help deliver on Our mission to “Raise awareness to help transition capital into Sustainable & Impact Investing faster and at scale” 1- Become an IMPACT LEADER - Book your FREE STRATEGY CALL today! We are looking for 10 people interested to join our new IMPACT LEADERS programme. Book your FREE strategy call today. 2-Become a sponsor We're looking for 3 founding sponsors to support the mission! Reach out today to work with us!  3-Become a Patreon if you would like to support it, you can become a patreon and also make one-off contributions.  4 - Get in touch Contact us to help you transition into Sustainable & Impact Investing - ILA & Partners 5 - GIFT: My FREE Guide to Profit & Impact If you are a professional, a high-achiever, trying to get ahead in your career to double your Income & Impact …  then download my free guide: The 6 Reasons Why You Don't DOUBLE Your INCOME And IMPACT And How To Fix It.. Connect with JP Dallmann on Linkedin, Twitter, Instagram, and Clubhouse Impact Leaders is produced by Podcast Publishing ------- Important: The content shared on this podcast does not constitute a request, offer a recommendation, or solicitation of any kind to buy, subscribe, sell or redeem any investment instruments or to perform other such transactions of any kind. Update Description

IHS Markit | Economics & Country Risk
Sub-Saharan Africa challenges for 2022. Could it be more challenging than 2021?

IHS Markit | Economics & Country Risk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 40:19


Like the rest of the world, Sub-Saharan Africa suffered greatly from COVID-19 outbreaks and the resulting lock downs. Our Africa team explores how Africa and constituent countries fared through 2021 and then take us to 2022 and what they see in terms of economic growth, external pressures, rising political challenges, and the threat of civil conflict. Langelihle Malimela, Senior analyst, Country Risk – Africa, IHS Markit https://experts.ihsmarkit.com/experts/malimela-langelihle Thea Fourie, Associate Director, Sub-Saharan Africa Economics, IHS Markit https://experts.ihsmarkit.com/experts/fourie-thea Theo Acheampong, Senior Analyst Country Risk – Sub-Saharan Africa, IHS Markit https://experts.ihsmarkit.com/experts/acheampong-theo

FinTech Silicon Valley
Mark Straub, CoFounder/CEO Smile Identity

FinTech Silicon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 13:39


Mark Straub is the Co-founder and CEO of Smile Identity, the leading digital KYC and identity verification provider in Africa. He has spent much of his career trying to help people in underserved markets get access to better opportunities through technology and entrepreneurship. Mark was a venture investor for a decade, and worked with over 20 companies doing business in adtech, fintech, healthcare, and energy in markets ranging from the US and China to India and Sub-Saharan Africa. Working with Vinod Khosla at Khosla Impact, he led investments in Kopo Kopo, NeoGrowth, Milaap, Branch, and Flutterwave; and he was an investor in all three of Elon Musk's companies during his time at DFJ.

Scaling UP! H2O
230 The One With A Water Strategist

Scaling UP! H2O

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 54:28


I got to know this week's guest over LinkedIn and it was a blast to have him on the show. Walid Khoury is a water strategist, investor, and influencer and has such a wealth of knowledge to share with the water treatment industry.  Walid has 20 years of industry experience having worked for GE, Nalco, and Danaher. Over the years, Walid built and led diverse and inclusive water teams, selling technical solutions, developing strategies for direct and indirect sales channels, re-allocating resources, and driving sustainable and profitable growth.  In 2020, Walid founded Desalytics, a company that offers a diverse portfolio of water testing and water treatment consumables in Sub-Saharan Africa. Desalytics helps municipal and industrial customers produce reliable water, optimize processes, maximize returns at a competitive cost through expertise, technologies, and local footprint. For this, Walid is partnering with, coaching, and mentoring young African entrepreneurs to grow Desalytics' presence across the African continent and be close to customers.   Desalytics was established in 2020 to help municipal and industrial customers produce reliable water, optimize processes, maximize returns at a competitive cost through expertise, technologies, and local footprint. Desalytics' innovative business model relies on an impact investing approach where the company partners with young African entrepreneurs, and helps them start or scale their businesses, through working capital injection, mentoring programs, and global supplier relationships. Walid is an active LinkedIn thought leader, inspiring engaging and insightful discussions with his 26,000 industry followers. He holds a bachelor's degree in water and environment, a master's degree in water sciences, and lastly a master's degree in management from Harvard University.     Bottom line: Walid Khoury is going to inspire you to think about water treatment on a bigger and more global level. Your roadside friend, as you travel from client to client.  -Trace    Timestamps:  2021: the year that water treaters around the world came together to learn and grow [0:30] James' Challenge: “Make time for your family, friends, and you.” [7:17] Introducing water strategist, investor, and influencer Walid Khoury [9:10] Desalytics in Africa [15:57] Attending WEFTEC 2021 [18:15] Walid's water treatment career journey  [20:47] The value of coaching [27:30] The importance of diversity in the workplace [32:00] Continuous improvement [39:00] Lightning round questions [42:45]   Quotes: “Optimize your water footprint.” - Walid Khoury “It's not a straightforward job; it is interesting and exciting because you are trying to solve tough challenges. If it wasn't a tough challenge they wouldn't need us.” - Walid Khoury “Find women engineers and help them grow in their careers and retain them.” - Walid Khoury “Don't get stuck, there is always a constant challenge. Keep developing yourself.” - Walid Khoury  “One of the best ways to learn is to teach.” - Walid Khoury “If you are bored at your job, you are not learning. It's time to move on to the next one.” - Walid Khoury “Africa is a similar market to other places.” - Walid Khoury “I'm passionate about water.” - Walid Khoury   Connect with Walid Khoury: Phone: +971 56 5362147  Email: walid.khoury@gmail.com Vlog: walidkhoury.com   LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/walidkhoury   Links Mentioned: The Rising Tide Mastermind Submit a Show Idea AWT (Association of Water Technologies)   Books Mentioned: What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful by Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter  Hot Seat: What I Learned Leading a Great American Company by Jeff Immelt  Africa's Business Revolution: How to Succeed in the World's Next Big Growth Market by Acha Leke The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Nicholas Taleb   

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
S4 E65: The Progress of the Human Race, Part 1

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 65:21


All we ever hear about on the mainstream news is that the world is in dire straights, that we are going in an irreversible direction, and that it is all our fault. Throughout many conversations in Season 4 of this podcast, we have explored these narratives in depth. We would like to promote an alternative narrative... Did you know that in 1981, 42% of the world's population was living in what is called “absolute poverty” and by 2018, that number had fallen to 8.1%? By 2030, we are on pace to have less than 5% of the world's population living in poverty.  Are you aware that alongside nearly eradicating poverty, we have also nearly ended world hunger? Over the last 50 years, we have added nearly 1,000 calories per day to the world food supply average. The world's poorest region, Sub-Saharan Africa, has roughly the same access to food as Portugal did in the 1960s. As of the last survey in 2017, only 2 out of 173 nations in the world have food access averages under 2,000 calories per day.  We have also drastically increased the supply of tree coverage across the globe, resources are being used more efficiently than ever before, and the global economy has grown by over 100x over the last 200 hundred years. There are legitimate reasons to be concerned about certain specific issues that we still need to improve; but overall, the data is undeniable. We are living in an age of seemingly-impossible progress in nearly every sector imaginable. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Morning Africa
Sub- Saharan Africa needs upto 73bn dollars of investment in the Agricultural sector. How do development finance institutions fine tune themselves for this investment?

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 8:41


Sub- Saharan Africa needs upto 73bn dollars of investment in the Agricultural sector.How do development finance institutions fine tune themselves for this investment?

ChangeMakers
Jared Barnett, CEO of Slingshot Memphis, Inc. - Promoting a Results-Driven Poverty-Fighting Ecosystem

ChangeMakers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 59:49


Visit www.slingshotmemphis.org to learn more. About Jared Barnett:Jared joined Slingshot Memphis in October 2019. Prior to Slingshot, Jared worked at McKinsey & Company for six years. Several years of his career were based in Sub-Saharan Africa, including in South Africa with McKinsey, in Ghana as CEO of a manufacturing company and VP of a financial advisory firm, and in Kenya working in private equity. He brings experience with disruptive innovation, strategic planning, organization building, and operational efficiency to Slingshot. Jared holds a Masters in Business Administration with Honors from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a Bachelor of Science in Accounting with a minor in Statistics from Brigham Young University.

Events at USIP
Security Dilemmas in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Role of Community-Based Armed Groups

Events at USIP

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 87:05


Since 2018, the RESOLVE Network has been researching the complex interactions between armed groups, civilians, state actors and international security — with particular attention to discerning women's roles, agency and choices in conflict. On December 1, USIP and the RESOLVE Network held a virtual conversation that examined how community-based armed groups impact the wider conflict ecosystems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Speakers Dr. Alastair Reed, welcoming remarks Senior Expert and Executive Director, RESOLVE Network Nicoletta Barbera, introductory remarks Senior Program Officer, Africa, U.S. Institute of Peace Dr. Lauren Van Metre, moderator  Senior Advisor, Peace and Security, National Democratic Institute Dr. Jakana Thomas Associate Professor, School of Global Policy and Strategy, University of California San Diego Rida Lyammouri Associate Fellow, Clingendael Institute; Senior Fellow, Policy Center for the New South  Bogi Bozsogi, concluding remarks Executive Coordination and Network Manager, RESOLVE Network   For more information about this event, please visit: https://www.usip.org/events/security-dilemmas-sub-saharan-africa-role-community-based-armed-groups  

The CGAI Podcast Network
Energy Security Cubed: Forging a New Path - Africa's Energy Transition

The CGAI Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 34:53


On this episode of the Energy Security Cubed Podcast, Kelly Ogle is joined by Sara Vakhshouri to talk energy security and energy transition in Sub-Saharan Africa, and what this could mean internationally. Guest Bios: - Sara Vakhshouri is Founder and President of SVB Energy International Host Bio: - Kelly Ogle (host): President and CEO of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (www.cgai.ca/staff#Ogle) What is Sara reading? Michio Kaku, "The God Equation: The Quest for a Theory of Everything" https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/54614037-the-god-equation Recording Date: November 24, 2021 Energy Security3 is part of the CGAI Podcast Network. Follow the Canadian Global Affairs Institute on Facebook, Twitter (@CAGlobalAffairs), or on LinkedIn. Head over to our website at www.cgai.ca for more commentary. Produced by Joseph Calnan. Music credits to Drew Phillips.

Africa Legal Podcast
Africa Legal Podcast - 'Unlocking African Expansion' with Hortense Mudenge

Africa Legal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 21:05


In this podcast, Hortense Mudenge of Rwanda Finance Limited, the agency which operates the Kigali International Financial Centre, and Africa Legal's Tom Pearson discuss the findings of their latest collaborative research report. This third report focuses on expanding markets in Africa. A survey into unlocking expansion opportunities across Africa has revealed that around 85% of respondents, being both corporates and service providers, expect their operations to expand into new markets within the next five years – notwithstanding the coronavirus pandemic. The drivers behind this confidence growth are the most recent economic reports from the International Monetary Fund which highlighted that the GDP growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is expected to rebound to 4-5%. Hortense Mudenge, Chief Operating Officer at Rwanda Finance Limited, told Tom that the reports show that Africa continues to have the fastest growing population and urbanization rates which means great opportunities for existing and new businesses. She lists e-commerce, e-logistics, and financial technology as platforms that are enabling businesses to easily expand to new markets from their domestic base of operation. While just over 20% of respondents to the survey indicated the use of holding companies, Hortense believes there is room to grow and develop this aspect. She says holding companies are seen to be the most efficient model for asset consolidation and management. “If you're a company and you have multiple businesses across different jurisdictions, you are going to be exposed to different risks.There will be a need for you to find a structure that can allow you to easily manage or distribute your assets effectively.” That is where Kigali International Financial Centre (KIFC) speaks to the heart of what can be offered to African-based companies, or companies looking to set up shop on the continent. Hortense goes into detail on discussing whether holding companies are viable for young, high growth businesses and talks about the innovation explosion witnessed in many African markets. She is particularly excited about the advancement in technology – both financial and regulatory – and its capabilities for monitoring and compliance. “Some of the key innovative products that we're really keen on developing are centred around financial and regulatory technology and that is because we're seeing an increase in financial inclusion and compliance. There's also the opportunity for fintech investors and actors to pilot their projects in our market.” The conversation ends with Hortense bringing out the technophile in Tom, who is fascinated by how fintech and regtech can support each other. Click here to read the report: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/rwanda-finance-ltd_unlocking-expansion-opportunities-across-activity-6871376610591813632-Uygy

The Days for Girls Podcast
Episode 036: Building Equity Through Sanitation Innovation with Jasmine Burton

The Days for Girls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:59


Jasmine Burton is a social inclusion and design specialist who is passionate about building a more inclusive world through sanitation innovation. She is the founder and CEO of Wish for WASH, a social impact organization that addresses equity gaps in the WASH sector through human-centered design thinking and research.In this episode, Jasmine shares her journey as a toilet design specialist striving to improve outcomes for the 4.2 billion people who lack access to safely managed sanitation. Join us as we dive into the challenges of global toilet inequity; exciting innovations in the WASH sector today; and the relationship between sanitation innovation, menstrual health and the empowerment of women and girls. HighlightsWhat it means to be a social inclusion and design specialistHow Jasmine utilizes the concept of empathy in an iterative framework to drive innovation, sustainability and impactWhat inspired her to go into toilet innovation at a young ageThe founding story of Wish for Wash, which she started as an undergrad at Georgia Tech to improve global sanitation infrastructure through human-centered design “Flying toilets,” and other hazards prompted by widespread lack of access to safely managed sanitation Notable innovations in the sanitation space today, including:Development of toilet systems that can easily be tailored to different sets of needs The “circular sanitation economy” turning human waste into a renewable resourceThe “smart sanitation economy” using wastewater technology as a preventative public health toolHow the COVID-19 has impacted Wish for Wash, and what the future holdsJasmine's future endeavors in impact investing and sustainable financing ConnectWebsite: jasminekburton.com | wishforwash.org  | periodfutures.org | toiletboard.orgIG/FB/Twitter: @jasminekburton | @wishforwash | @periodfutures LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasminekburton/BioJasmine (Jaz) is a social inclusion and design specialist with a focus on gender equity, meaningful youth engagement, and innovation in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and global health sectors. She is trained in product design and public health, and is passionate about social justice and human rights. She has led iterative toilet innovation pilots and research across Sub-Saharan Africa with a design thinking lens and in resettled refugee communities as the founder of Wish for WASH, a social impact organization that seeks to bring innovation to sanitation. Jasmine has served as the Toilet Accelerator Manager and Innovation Lab Lead at the Toilet Board Coalition, Technical Advisor for the gender equity startup Equilo, on the Board of Directors for Planet Indonesia in order to help lead their WASH and gender strategies, a Design/Communications Associate for Women in Global Health, and a former consultant for gender and women's health research organizations Atethemis and International Planned Parenthood Federation. As a 2018-2019 Women Deliver Young Leader, she spoke at the 2019 WD conference about her work and vision for gender equity in the WASH sector. Jasmine identifies as a social impact designer who seeks to utilize design thinking, evidence-based research, and business acumen to build a more inclusive world. Support the show (http://bit.ly/donatetodfg)

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
Can Cryptocurrency Accelerate Global Development?

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 40:50


The most innovative cryptocurrency projects today are being built in the developing world (Sub-Saharan Africa in particular) to address real-world obstacles to economic development and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.  Cryptocurrency and the blockchain technologies they power carry big implications for global development, but are generally off the radar of the global development and foreign policy community. That may soon change as these technologies become more widely adopted.  Guest Garry Golden demystifies the world of crypto and explains the implications of this emerging technology for emerging economies and the business of global development.  This is a free episode of the new Cryptocurrency and Global Development podcast series and newsletter from Global Dispatches, which profiles crypto projects built to address common global development challenges.  Future episodes in this series will be exclusively available to paying subscribers to the Cryptocurrency and Global Development podcast series and newsletter.  Subscribe --> https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches

Anticipating The Unintended
#149 Turning And Turning In The Widening Gyre

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 22:56


India Policy Watch: Crypto And Samvidhaan Insights on burning policy issues in India— RSJWhen you write a weekly newsletter you view every news item as possible content for the next edition. You shoehorn some framework or stretch things to draw a historical parallel with that event. Trust me, it can be tiring - speaking for me, not for Pranay who has frameworks for his breakfast with poha. But as I sometimes like to say, there are weeks when content presents itself on a platter with a side of masala papad. This is one of those weeks.First, there was news that the government plans to table the Cryptocurrency and Regulation of Official Digital Currency Bill, 2021, in the winter session of the Parliament. It is likely the government will impose strict regulations that might fall short of an outright ban on them. Separately, there are indications that the bill will have a framework for creating a digital Rupee to be issued by RBI, the equivalent of a central bank digital currency (CBDC). We have written about crypto and CBDC in previous editions (here and here) through the lens of public policy and economics. As Satoshi wrote in his essay:“The root problem with conventional currency is all the trust that’s required to make it work. The central bank must be trusted not to debase the currency, but the history of fiat currencies is full of breaches of that trust. Banks must be trusted to hold our money and transfer it electronically, but they lend it out in waves of credit bubbles with barely a fraction in reserve. We have to trust them with our privacy, trust them not to let identity thieves drain our accounts.” That digital currencies will reduce transaction costs, be more efficient as a payment method, and can have all kinds of interesting decentralisation use cases, is all good. But as the past year in India has shown, nobody thinks of cryptocurrency as a medium of exchange. It has turned into a speculative asset with customers being promised outrageous returns in ads that are everywhere. This has meant hordes of unsuspecting investors flocking to crypto exchanges with estimates of crypto owners in India ranging from 10 to 100 million. The number of cryptocurrencies globally has shot up too and it’s a bit difficult to make out what’s a meme and what’s real anymore in this world. Consumer protection is a real issue now. The decentralised and anonymous nature of transactions is a further worry for the RBI and government. There are concerns around the use of crypto to fund criminal activities or for money laundering. But most importantly, for central banks and governments, letting private cryptocurrencies go unchecked and unregulated will gradually take away their power to influence monetary policy. This is a difficult thing to let go because a fundamental principle on which the modern economy rests is that the governments (or central banks) know what to do about the supply of money in general interest. Of course, the votaries of crypto and decentralisation believe this isn’t true. They would go back to the argument Hayek had made in his book Denationalization of Money:“A single monopolistic governmental agency can neither possess the information that should govern the supply of money nor would it, if it knew what it ought to do in the general interest, usually be in a position to act in that manner. Indeed, if, as I am convinced, the main advantage of the market order is that prices will convey to the acting individuals the relevant information, only the constant observation of the course of current prices of particular commodities can provide information on the direction in which more or less money ought to be spent. Money is not a tool of policy that can achieve particular foreseeable results by control of its quantity. But it should be part of the self-steering mechanism by which individuals are constantly induced to adjust their activities to circumstances on which they have information only through the abstract signals of prices. It should be a serviceable link in the process that communicates the effects of events never wholly known to anybody and that is required to maintain an order in which the plans of participating persons match.”This battle between the centralisation instincts on which the edifice of the state rests and the promise of decentralisation and individual control that Web3 or Metaverse, or whatever else they are calling it now, offers, is going to define this century.Second, I noticed there were some enthusiastic celebrations for Constitution Day on Nov 26 across India. Except at the Central Hall of the parliament. About 15 parties boycotted the function organized by the Lok Sabha Speaker because they felt the government was disrespecting the Constitution and undermining democracy. Not sure how staying away from an event that celebrates the Constitution helps. Anyway, the PM responded to the boycott by claiming dynastic parties are the biggest threat to the health of Indian democracy. Indeed! The LS Speaker compared the Constitution to the Bhagwad Geeta to mix things up further. The usual Twitter wars broke out on who had subverted democracy more over the years while others pulled out the original text of Constituent Assembly debates to show how far we have fallen in our discourse. All in a day in the life of India.The Centre Cannot Hold But…As I was reading through these, cryptocurrency and Constitution, and wondering if there was a way to bring them together for this edition of the newsletter, providence struck. The next news item was - ConstitutionDAO’s bold crypto bid for US Constitution falls short. Yes, Constitution and crypto in a single line. Someone up there must be looking out for me. Here’s more:“There are 13 surviving copies of the original print of the U.S. Constitution. Today, a decentralized autonomous organization (DAO) announced it lost its bid to buy one from art dealer Sotheby’s after a high-stakes bidding war that captured the internet’s attention. Still, the bold ascendance of the DAO, a group of people who met on the internet, is a unique case study into the art of on-ramping swaths of people into crypto, one meme and auction at a time.Austin Cain and Graham Novak, two 25-year-old Atlanta residents working in finance, first started a Discord chat to launch the effort, which now has more than 8,000 members. Within a week of launching, the DAO raised over $40 million worth of ETH on Juicebox, an early stage DAO platform.The effort, largely spun up through Twitter and a ballooning Discord server, is a window into what a community effort could look and feel like in a Web3 universe, where shared ownership and transparency are guiding principles. The opportunities presented by the DAO structure are sparking widespread interest — the value governed by DAO treasuries is now at over $6 billion, per some estimates.”So, a few people created a DAO to buy an original print of the US Constitution that was up for auction. ConstitutionDAO, as they called it. About 17,500 people raised about $50 million worth of ether (ETH), the native cryptocurrency of Ethereum using Juicebox, a platform that gets you started on setting up a DAO. But the process was a bit more complicated. Sotheby’s doesn’t accept cryptocurrency, nor does it recognise a DAO; it needs bids to be made by an individual or an organization in fiat currency (in this case Dollars). So, ConstitutionDAO set up a non-profit entity that could bid on its behalf. The next challenge was how to make sure all 17,500 members could claim to own a piece of the original print. This kind of fractionalised ownership is difficult to administer. So, the DAO arrived at a workaround. They would issue a ‘governance token’ called PEOPLE for donations made by contributors at the rate of 1 million PEOPLE per 1ETH donated. These PEOPLE tokens represented the voting rights of the members in the DAO for any decision to be taken. In this case, the voting right was restricted to what the DAO would do with the original imprint of the Constitution once they won the auction - where to display it and what to do with the proceeds etc. The whole thing sounded like the future had arrived. A decentralised group of “we, the people” on Discord decide to bid for the original copy of the US Constitution and beat the usual gaggle of billionaires who show up at auctions. People’s document would then be at the hands of people.This is how it worked. A donor would buy ETH on a crypto exchange by paying dollars. The ETH would then be parked in a crypto wallet which would then pay Juicebox for redeeming PEOPLE token. Throughout this process, at every step, you would have to pay transaction fees for using the platforms. These are called ‘gas’ fees in the crypto world and they are fixed in nature regardless of the size of the transaction. As many articles have pointed out, the ‘gas’ fees for small value transactions could be as high as 30-40 per cent. Anyway, the ConstitutionDAO raised about $50 million in little under a week. Such was the buzz around PEOPLE token that a secondary market for trading of the token opened up. All was going well till the DAO lost at the auction. It was outbid by billionaire Ken Griffin, founder of hedge fund Citadel, who is a known crypto sceptic. I mean if you publicly announce the total corpus you have raised for an auction and then let everyone know you’re going to underbid, your odds of winning will be quite low. I guess strategy isn’t a strength of DAOs. Of course, Griffin wasn’t impressed with this DAO business. As Bloomberg reported:“I wish all this passion and energy that went to crypto was directed toward making the United States stronger,” Griffin told Bloomberg’s Erik Schatzker at the Economic Club of Chicago on Oct. 4. “Let’s face it — it’s a Jihadist call that we don’t believe in the dollar. I mean, what a crazy concept that is.”Doubts Over DAOAnyway, the lost bid raises all kinds of questions.  What do you do with a DAO that has no objective any longer? Disband it or choose another objective? Who decides? Or how if, like in this case, there are no governance tokens issued yet? Or, if they had, is it fine then to have those with more tokens having more votes than others? Should you return the money and let donors incur the ‘gas’ fees one more time? Is this a prototype for next generation ‘wire frauds’? If as simple a use case for DAO like this fails and raises so many questions, what about other ambitious plans? How difficult they might turn out to be?The charitable view might be this shows it is possible to do something like this. That a group of people driven by a single purpose could come together in a short time and raise a large amount of capital. I’m sure that’s some achievement but I guess people raised more than $100 million back in 1985 for LiveAid to help out famine afflicted Sub Saharan Africa. Radically Networked Societies (RNS) because of their non-hierarchical structure can mobilise really quickly. But is speed so important a feature that it trumps everything else? Over the past few months, I have sat through multiple podcasts and read long-form articles that feature decentralisation evangelists like Balaji Srinivasan, Vitalik Buterin, or Naval Ravikant talking at length about the future of human civilisation. It is all about networked states, starting a country from scratch using your laptop, and using blockchain to make your lassi. My reactions to these discussions have ranged from ‘what!’ to ‘Lolwut’. There’s some kind of ‘This is John Galt speaking’ vibe when I listen to them. That book, Atlas Shrugged, had pages and pages of soliloquies by characters declaiming about some kind of an ideal future. As an impressionable young man, I read them with great passion. Over the years I realised there’s no ideal future that can be built by upending the current. Human progress is incremental and gradual. We have an imagination of ourselves, our community and of our nation. It is tied to real and tangible artefacts, like our constitution, our books, our languages, our affiliations and an understanding of our civilisational story. Technology was always seen as an enabler for a comfortable life for us. It has delivered value to us beyond our wildest imagination in the past two centuries. Maybe for the first time in history, it is positioned to take control of our lives. And those leading it are keen to establish its benefits to hold the reins of humanity. I don’t know if it is a good idea. Regulating technology is the key policy challenge for the foreseeable future. It needs a more enlightened view of our civilisation than what the tech bros have to offer.   If you find the content here useful, consider taking a deep dive into the world of public policy. Takshashila’s PGP — a 48-week certificate course will allow you to learn public policy analysis from the best practitioners, academics, and teachers. And that too, while you continue to work. In other words, the opportunity costs are low and the benefits are life-changing. Do check out.Matsyanyaaya: Pegging China’s Tech PowerBig fish eating small fish = Foreign Policy in action— Pranay KotasthaneIf one were to judge the technological prowess of a nation-state on the basis of daily news, China comes across as heads and shoulders above the rest. Hardly any day passes by without reports reminding us that China is well on its path to creating a self-reliant technology industry. While China’s technological progress is quite real, I want to list three caveats to make you recalibrate exponential growth projections and over-optimistic predictions about China’s tech ecosystem.1. CCP’s self-preservation imperative Across many critical sectors such as defence and technology, the CCP exaggerates its capabilities. This strategy is not meant to be just an information operation aimed at other nation-states. It is also a domestic imperative for the CCP, to create a perception that it has things under control at all times.Projecting control requires demonstrating success. For this reason, CCP propaganda projects promising initiatives by individual companies as world-beating solutions. What we forget is that such reportage is prone to survivorship bias — it overlooks the many companies and initiatives that have failed. Take the example of Tsinghua Unigroup — which made a lot of news in 2015 for its bid to buy the American memory chipmaker Micron. Once touted as China’s leading chip design house, it has since then failed to make any major breakthroughs. As of now, it is reeling under debt and the government is coordinating its buyout to another player. Similarly, companies such as the Wuhan Hongxin Semiconductor Project (HSMC), once projected to unleash China’s first seven-nanometer foundry went bust last year. But you’ll hardly see reports about the costs and consequences of such failures.2. US’ Need to Align Domestic VectorsThe second reason why we should be wary of tall claims is that it is in the interest of the US military-industrial complex to overplay China’s technology capabilities. There are few things that can fire national imagination like a well-equipped, seemingly more advanced adversary. Just as the Sputnik moment aligned the domestic constituencies in the US and resulted in path-breaking institutions such as the DARPA, overplaying China’s technological advances creates room for prioritising expenditure on key technologies and their governance structures. It’s not surprising then that the first National Strategy for Critical & Emerging Technologies (C&ET) put out by the Trump administration explicitly cautions against China’s pursuit to become a global leader in Science & Technology. As an example, consider the debate over semiconductor policy in the US. China’s shadow over East Asia has allowed the US semiconductor industry to make a persuasive case for higher incentives and government support. 3. Opportunity Cost NeglectA lot of China’s technological success is being financed by governments at the city, provincial, and central levels. While the benefits and successes of these initiatives make news, the costs do not. And as a student of public policy, the first question that comes to my mind is: what is the opportunity cost of China’s governments pouring money, attention, and time into this quest for all-around self-reliance? Predicting a linear growth path based on current trends misses asking the opportunity cost question completely. In my view, the odds of getting anywhere near the US’ technological capabilities are stacked against China for three reasons. One, China’s per capita GDP is one-eighth of the US GDP per capita. Simply put, every dollar used in pursuit of one technology goal in China is eight times as costly as a dollar used for the same purpose in the US. With limited resources available, China might well be able to take a lead in a few areas but the opportunity costs are likely to catch up much before it reaches anywhere near self-reliance.Two, until now, the opportunity costs were partially being borne by other countries, particularly the US. FDI from the US and uninhibited access for its citizens to the technology ecosystems of other countries allowed China to make rapid progress in key technology domains. That party is now over. The US is now acutely aware of the asymmetric advantage that China enjoyed in the old-world globalisation period. The US has already started putting in place restrictions on the movement of knowledge and capital to China. Under this changed geopolitical scenario, China’s technological superiority is far from inevitable. Take the example of the recent Alibaba announcement of Yitian 710 - a cutting-edge server chip. The Taiwanese foundry TSMC is the only company that can mass-produce this chip. And there are already murmurs in the US to restrict TSMC from accepting orders from Alibaba on the grounds that this chip can potentially have military applications. And three, the US still remains a vibrant destination attracting the best tech talent from across the world. Chinese governments can throw money but is unlikely to attract top global talent in the same manner. And in the high-tech domain, skilled labour holds the key. And so, the next time you come across another technological breakthrough in China, take a deep breath and consider if any of the three factors outlined in this note modulates the hype. India Policy Watch #2: Health Data Aayo ReInsights on burning policy issues in India— Pranay KotasthaneThe National Family Health Survey-5 results have been published. And you know what’s the best part? It’s that the National Family Health Survey-5 results have been published. No, really. The foundation of evidence-based public policy is reliable, high-frequency, population-scale information. In its absence, we have to settle for policy-based evidence making. The NFHS-1 conducted in 1992-93 was funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The latest avatar was spread in two phases over two years due to the pandemic. Most importantly, it began three years after the NFHS-4 of 2015-16. Given that earlier versions had gaps of six, seven, and ten years between them, it is encouraging that this critical information is being collected at a higher frequency. I hope an NFHS every three years becomes a norm. The timely release of this data will prepare the ground for voters to judge their representatives, amongst other things, on public health outcomes. Such a feedback loop is completely missing in our current electoral cycle.Now, to the results. In edition #133, I presented a list of phrases that should fall into disuse from our policy discourse. One of them was ‘population explosion/bomb’. The NFHS-5 results confirm, yet again, that India’s population is reducing across regions, religions, and income groups. In fact, the fertility rate is already below the replacement rate; India’s population has stabilised. This means we should stop letting our governments escape responsibility in the name of overpopulation. Also, government schemes to deny people services and rights on the basis of the number of children should be summarily rejected.Next, the sex ratio at birth has improved from 919 to 929 since 2015-16. This number is still lower than what nature would dictate. Though the preference for sons in Indian society still remains strong, this data suggests a gradual shift away from this mindset.The attention should now shift from overpopulation to real issues such as the increase in the prevalence of anaemia and obesity. The NFHS-5 results help in framing India’s health challenge accurately. Thanks for reading Anticipating The Unintended. Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support our work.HomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters[Article] Balaji Srinivasan: “A network state is a social network with a clear leader, an integrated cryptocurrency, a definite purpose, a sense of national consciousness, and a plan to crowdfund territory.” Go Figure.[Article] Ashwini Deshpande has an excellent take on the NFHS-5 results.[Book] Montek Singh Ahluwalia’s Backstage is a book filled with interesting nuggets about the pre-1991 economy. Enjoyable read. Subscribe at publicpolicy.substack.com

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
DMRE abandons fight over Mining Charter

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 6:43


Guest: Patrick Leydon joins John to explain and assess the reasons for the abandonment of The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy Mining Charter Judgment.  The Pretoria High Court Judgment declared that the Mining Charter is a policy instrument and not binding legislation and that the Minister is thereby empowered to make law. The Department of Mineral Resources decided not to appeal and intends to drive transformation in the sector by enforcing the terms of existing mining rights while it works to amend the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (MPRDA). Patrick Leydon is a corporate lawyer practicing across a number of industry sectors but specializing in the mining and energy sectors within Sub-Saharan Africa. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

(don't) Waste Water!
[Extract] Rapid Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 1:36


Walid Khoury shares his vision of Sub-Saharan Africa, quite far from the usual preconceptions, and explains how much of an incredible business opportunity it represents, if you take the water market right.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 23, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 24:40


Please join first author Yuan Lu and Guest Editor Jan Staessen as they discuss the article "National Trends and Disparities in Hospitalization for Acute Hypertension Among Medicare Beneficiaries (1999-2019)." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run: your weekly podcast, summary and backstage pass to the journal and it's editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, and director of Pauley Heart Center at VCU health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Greg, today's feature discussion is about the national trends and disparities and hospitalizations for hypertensive emergencies among Medicare beneficiaries. Isn't that interesting? We're going to just dig deep into this issue, but not before we discuss the other papers in today's issue. I'm going to let you go first today while I get a coffee and listen. Dr. Greg Hundley: Oh, thanks so much, Carolyn. My first paper comes to us from the world of preclinical science and it's from professor Christoff Maack from University Clinic Wursburg. Carolyn, I don't have a quiz for you, so I'm going to give a little break this week, but this particular paper is about Barth syndrome. Barth syndrome is caused by mutations of the gene encoding taffazin, which catalyzes maturation of mitochondrial cardiolipin and often manifests with systolic dysfunction during early infancy. Now beyond the first months of life, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy typically transitions to a phenotype of diastolic dysfunction with preserved ejection fraction, one of your favorites, blunted contractile reserve during exercise and arrhythmic vulnerability. Previous studies traced Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy to mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species. Since mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species formation are regulated by excitation contraction coupling, these authors wanted to use integrated analysis of mechano-energetic coupling to delineate the pathomechanisms of Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, I love the way you explained that so clearly, Greg. Thanks. So what did they find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. Well, first defective mitochondrial calcium uptake prevented Krebs cycle activation during beta adrenergic stimulation, abolishing NADH regeneration for ATP production and lowering antioxidative NADPH. Second, Carolyn, mitochondrial calcium deficiency provided the substrate for ventricular arrhythmias and contributed to blunted inotropic reserve during beta adrenergic stimulation. And finally, these changes occurred without any increase of reactive oxygen species formation in or omission from mitochondria. So Carolyn what's the take home here? Well, first beyond the first months of life, when systolic dysfunction dominates, Barth syndrome cardiomyopathy is reminiscent of heart failure with preserved rather than reduced ejection fraction presenting with progressive diastolic and moderate systolic dysfunction without relevant left ventricular dilation. Next, defective mitochondrial calcium uptake contributes to inability of Barth syndrome patients to increase stroke volume during exertion and their vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Lastly, treatment with cardiac glycosides, which could favor mechano-energetic uncoupling should be discouraged in patients with Barth syndrome and left ventricular ejection fractions greater than 40%. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, how interesting. I need to chew over that one a bit more. Wow, thanks. But you know, I've got a paper too. It's also talking about energetic basis in the presence of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, but this time looking at transient pulmonary congestion during exercise, which is recognized as an emerging and important determinant of reduced exercise capacity in HFpEF. These authors, led by Dr. Lewis from University of Oxford center for clinical magnetic resonance research sought to determine if an abnormal cardiac energetic state underpins this process of transient problem congestion in HFpEF. Dr. Carolyn Lam: To investigate this, they designed and conducted a basket trial covering the physiological spectrum of HFpEF severity. They non-invasively assess cardiac energetics in this cohort using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy and combined real time free breathing volumetric assessment of whole heart mechanics, as well as a novel pulmonary proton density, magnetic resonance imaging sequence to detect lung congestion, both at rest and during submaximal exercise. Now, Greg, I know you had a look at this paper and magnetic resonance imaging, and spectroscopy is your expertise. So no quiz here, but could you maybe just share a little bit about how novel this approach is that they took? Dr. Greg Hundley: You bet. Carolyn, thanks so much for the intro on that and so beautifully described. What's novel here is they were able to combine imaging in real time, so the heart contracting and relaxing, and then simultaneously obtain the metabolic information by bringing in the spectroscopy component. So really just splashing, as they might say in Oxford, just wonderful presentation, and I cannot wait to hear what they found. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, they recruited patients across the spectrum of diastolic dysfunction and HFpEF, meaning they had controls. They had nine patients with type two diabetes, 14 patients with HFpEF and nine patients with severe diastolic dysfunction due to cardiac amyloidosis. What they found was that a gradient of myocardial energetic deficit existed across the spectrum of HFpEF. Even at low workload, the energetic deficit was related to a markedly abnormal exercise response in all four cardiac chambers, which was associated with detectable pulmonary congestion. The findings really support an energetic basis for transient pulmonary congestion in HFpEF with the implication that manipulating myocardial energy metabolism may be a promising strategy to improve cardiac function and reduce pulmonary congestion in HFpEF. This is discussed in a beautiful editorial by Drs. Jennifer Hole, Christopher Nguyen and Greg Lewis. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great presentation, Carolyn, and obviously love that MRI/MRS combo. Carolyn, these investigators in this next paper led by Dr. Sara Ranjbarvaziri from Stanford University School of Medicine performed a comprehensive multi-omics profile of the molecular. So transcripts metabolites, complex lipids and ultra structural and functional components of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy energetics using myocardial samples from 27 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and 13 controls really is the donor heart. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, it's really all about energetics today, isn't it? So what did they see, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts showed evidence of global energetic decompensation manifested by a decrease in high energy phosphate metabolites (ATP, ADP, phosphocreatine) and a reduction in mitochondrial genes involved in the creatine kinase and ATP synthesis. Accompanying these metabolic arrangements, quantitative electron microscopy showed an increased fraction of severely damaged mitochondria with reduced crystal density coinciding with reduced citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial oxidative respiration. These mitochondrial abnormalities were associated with elevated reactive oxygen species and reduced antioxidant defenses. However, despite significant mitochondrial injury, the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts failed to up-regulate mitophagic clearance. Dr. Greg Hundley: So Carolyn, in summary, the findings of this study suggest that perturbed metabolic signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction are common pathogenic mechanisms in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and these results highlight potential new drug targets for attenuation of the clinical disease through improving metabolic function and reducing myocardial injury. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, what an interesting issue of our journal. There's even more. There's an exchange of letters between Drs. Naeije and Claessen about determinants of exercise capacity in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. There's a "Pathways to Discovery" paper: a beautiful interview with Dr. Heinrich Taegtmeyer entitled,"A foot soldier in cardiac metabolism." Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn, and I've got a research letter from Professor Marston entitled "The cardiovascular benefit of lowering LDL cholesterol to below 40 milligrams per deciliter." Well, what a great issue, very metabolic, and how about we get onto that feature discussion? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to our feature discussion today. We have a paper that is going to address some issues pertaining to high blood pressure, or hypertension. With us, we have Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. We also have a guest editor to help us review this paper, Dr. Jan Staessen from University Louvain in Belgium. Welcome to you both and Yuan, will start with you. Could you describe for us some of the background that went into formulating your hypothesis and then state for us the hypothesis that you wanted to address with this research? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Thank you, Greg. We conducted this study because we see that recent data show hypertension control in the US population has not improved in the last decades, and there are widening disparities. Also last year, the surgeon general issued a call to action to make hypertension control a national priority. So, we wanted to better understand whether the country has made any progress in preventing hospitalization for acute hypertension. That is including hypertension emergency, hypertension urgency, and hypertension crisis, which also refers to acute blood pressure elevation that is often associated with target organ damage and requires urgent intervention. We have the data from the Center for Medicare/Medicaid, which allow us to look at the trends of hospitalization for acute hypertension over the last 20 years and we hypothesize we may also see some reverse progress in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension, and there may differences by population subgroups like age, sex, race, and dual eligible status. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. So you've described for us a little bit about perhaps the study population, but maybe clarify a little further: What was the study population and then what was your study design? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yeah, sure. The study population includes all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries 65 years and older enrolled in the fee-for-service plan for at least one month from January 1999 to December 2019 using the Medicare denominator files. We also study population subgroups by age, sex, race and ethnicity and dual eligible status. Specifically the racial and ethnic subgroups include Asian, blacks, Hispanics, North American native, white, and others. Dual eligible refers to beneficiary eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. This study design is a serial cross sectional analysis of these Medicare beneficiaries between 1999 and 2019 over the last 20 years. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Yuan, what did you find? Dr. Yuan Lu: We actually have three major findings. First, we found that in Medicare beneficiaries 65 years and older, hospitalization rate for acute hypertension increased more than double in the last 20 years. Second, we found that there are widening disparities. When we look at all the population subgroups, we found black adults having the highest hospitalization rate in 2019 across age, sex, race, and dual eligible subgroup. And finally, when we look at the outcome among people hospitalized, we found that during the same period, the rate of 30 day and 90 day mortality and readmission among hospitalized beneficiaries improved and decreased significantly. So this is the main findings, and we can also talk about implications of that later. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And did you find any differences between men and women? Dr. Yuan Lu: Yes. We also looked at the difference between men and women, and we found that actually the hospitalization rate is higher among females compared to men. So more hospitalizations for acute hypertension among women than men. Dr. Greg Hundley: Given this relatively large Medicare/Medicaid database and cross-sectional design, were you able to investigate any relationships between these hospitalizations and perhaps social determinants of health? Dr. Yuan Lu: For this one, we haven't looked into that detail. This is just showing the overall picture, like how the hospitalization rate changed over time in the overall population and by different population subgroups. What you mentioned is an important issue and should definitely be a future study to look at whether social determine have moderated the relationship between the hospitalization. Speaker 3: Excellent. Well, listeners, now we're going to turn to our guest editor and you'll hear us talk a little bit sometimes about associate editors. We have a team that will review many papers, but when we receive a paper that might contain an associate editor or an associate editors institution, we actually at Circulation turn to someone completely outside of the realm of the associate editors and the editor in chief. These are called guest editors. With us today, we have Dr. Jan Staessen from Belgium who served as the guest editor. He's been working in this task for several years. Jan, often you are referred papers from the American Heart Association. What attracted you to this particular paper and how do you put Yuan's results in the context with other studies that have focused on high blood pressure research? Dr. Jan Staessen: Well, I've almost 40 years of research in clinical medicine and in population science, and some of my work has been done in Sub-Saharan Africa. So when I read the summary of the paper, I was immediately struck by the bad results, so to speak, for black people. This triggered my attention and I really thought this message must be made public on a much larger scale because there is a lot of possibility for prevention. Hypertension is a chronic disease, and if you wait until you have an emergency or until you have target organ damage, you have gone in too late. So really this paper cries for better prevention in the US. And I was really also amazed when I compared this US data with what happens in our country. We don't see any, almost no hospitalizations for acute hypertension or for hypertensive emergencies. So there is quite a difference. Dr. Jan Staessen: Going further on that, I was wondering whether there should not be more research on access to primary care in the US because people go to the emergency room, but that's not a place where you treat or manage hypertension. It should be managed in primary care with making people aware of the problem. It's still the silent killer, the main cause of cardiovascular disease, 8 million deaths each year. So this really triggered my attention and I really wanted this paper to be published. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Jan, I heard you mention the word awareness. How have you observed perhaps differences in healthcare delivery in Belgium that might heighten awareness? You mentioned primary care, but are there any other mechanisms in place that heighten awareness or the importance? Dr. Jan Staessen: I think people in Belgium, the general public, knows that hypertension is a dangerous condition. That it should be well treated. We have a very well built primary care network, so every person can go to a primary care physician. Part of the normal examination in the office of a primary care physician is a blood pressure measurement. That's almost routine in Belgium. And then of course not all patients are treated to go. Certainly keeping in mind the new US guidelines that aim for lower targets, now recently confirmed in the Chinese study, you have to sprint three cells. And then the recent Chinese study that have been published to the New England. So these are issues to be considered. I also have colleagues working in Texas close to the Mexican border at the university place there, and she's telling me how primary care is default in that area. Dr. Jan Staessen: I think this is perhaps part of the social divide in the US. This might have to be addressed. It's not only a problem in the US, it's also a problem in other countries. There is always a social divide and those who have less money, less income. These are the people who fell out in the beginning and then they don't see primary care physicians. Dr. Jan Staessen: Belgium, for instance, all medicines are almost free. Because hypertension is a chronic condition prevention should not only start at age 65. Hypertension prevention should really start at a young age, middle age, whenever this diagnosis of high blood pressure diagnosis is confirmed. Use blood pressure monitoring, which is not so popular in the US, but you can also use home blood pressure monitoring. Then you have to start first telling your patients how to improve their lifestyle. When that is not sufficient, you have to start anti hypertensive drug treatment. We have a wide array of anti hypertensive drugs that can be easily combined. If you find the right combination, then you go to combination tablets because fewer tablets means better patient adherence. Dr. Greg Hundley: Yuan we will turn back to you. In the last minutes here, could you describe some of your thoughts regarding what you think is the next research study that needs to be performed in this sphere of hypertension investigation? Dr. Yuan Lu: Sure. Greg, in order to answer your question, let me step back a little bit, just to talk about the implication of the main message from this paper, and then we can tie it to the next following study. We found that the marked increase in hospitalization rate for acute hypertension actually represented many more people suffering a potential catastrophic event that should be preventable. I truly agree with what Dr. Staessen said, hypertension should be mostly treated in outpatient setting rather than in the hospital. We also find the lack of progress in reducing racial disparity in hospitalization. These findings highlight needs for new approaches to address both the medical and non-medical factors, including the social determinants in health, system racism that can contribute to this disparity. When we look at the outcome, we found the outcome for mortality and remission improved over time. Dr. Yuan Lu: This means progress has been made in improving outcomes once people are hospitalized for an acute illness. The issue is more about prevention of hospitalization. Based on this implication, I think in a future study we need better evidence to understand how we can do a better job in the prevention of acute hypertension admissions. For example, we need the study to understand who is at risk for acute hypertensive admissions, and how can this event be preempted. If we could better understand who these people are, phenotype this patient better and predict their risk of hospitalization for acute hypertension, we may do a better job in preventing this event from happening. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And Jan, do you have anything to add? Dr. Jan Staessen: Yes. I think every effort should go to prevention in most countries. I looked at the statistics, and more than 90% of the healthcare budget is spent in treating established disease, often irreversible disease like MI or chronic kidney dysfunction. I think then you come in too late. So of the healthcare budget in my mind, much more should go to the preventive issues and probably rolling out an effective primary care because that's the place where hypertension has to be diagnosed and hypertension treatment has to be started. Dr. Greg Hundley: Excellent. Well, listeners, we've heard a wonderful discussion today regarding some of the issues pertaining to hypertension and abrupt admission to emergency rooms for conditions pertaining to hypertension, really getting almost out of control. We want to thank Dr. Yuan Lu from Yale New Haven and also our guest editor, Dr. Jan Staessen from Louvain in Belgium. On behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on the run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions express by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association for more visit aha journals.org.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Countries should not drop all restrictions once vaccination targets reached - Helen Clark

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 6:30


Helen Clark is urging countries not to give up on pandemic management once they reach vaccination targets. Clark told Morning Report even if a country reaches 90 percent vaccinated that doesn't mean the pandemic has gone away. "Don't throw away the rest of the toolkit because you need it to control transmission among those who aren't vaccinated, which may be the 8 to 10 percent here, but it's also, at the moment anyone under 12 years of age." Clark also pointed out there are some countries where vaccination coverage was nowhere near New Zealand's. "The rollout of vaccinations in Sub Saharan Africa would still scarcely exceed 6 percent of total population, which is, of course, really almost no coverage at all." Clark was speaking about a new report commissioned by the World Health Organisation, which warned the world is moving too slowly in ending the coronavirus pandemic. It says resources have been concentrated towards the developed world while people are continuing to die in poorer countries where there is little or no access to vaccines. The report says the failure to work together is also leaving the world unprepared for the next pandemic.

Kenyan Wallstreet
The AfCFTA Intra African Business Opportunity

Kenyan Wallstreet

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:31


In this episode, we talk to Pramod Bagalwadi, CEO DHL Global Forwarding for Sub Saharan Africa on how the African Free Continental Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) will boost intra African trade. We break down how receptive national borders under the AfCFTA could benefit African MSMEs through freer movement of people, goods, and resources, allowing them to target the entirety of the 1.2 billion population. We also talk about the impediments to the agreement such as varying divestment in infrastructure among member countries and conflicting national interests and how they could shape the success of the agreement. Tune in to learn: How Covid-19 pushed innovation in the logistics space. How optimizing member country regulations such as tax policies could help more SMEs reach customers regionally. How improvements of infrastructure will boost trade between Africa and the world by bringing multinationals closer to their consumers. Tune in to all our podcasts directly through the Hisa App on Android or iOS, or subscribe to the Kenyan Wallstreet podcast wherever you listen from. This episode features: Pramod Bagalwadi - CEO, - DHL Global Forwarding, Sub Saharan Africa Mwakaneno Gakweli - Podcast Producer/Host, Hisa and The Kenyan Wallstreet Produced by Mwakaneno Gakweli

The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild
Maas Goote - Conserving and Restoring Forest and Wetland Ecosystems

The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 32:44


DOB Ecology CEO Maas Goote joins Scott and Lookfar COO Marlies Quirino on The Lookfar Podcast: Voices from the Wild. This is the first of three forthcoming episodes recorded last month in Ecuador -- this one in the Canandé Reserve while DOB Ecology and Lookfar visited with our partner Fundación Jocotoco. So enjoy the evening sounds of the rainforest accompanying our discussion! (We'll return in the coming weeks with more from Jocotoco.) Maas talks about his background in international environmental law, where among other things he served as the Dutch government's lead climate negotiator, and his transition to heading a charitable foundation supporting forest and wetland conservation and restoration projects in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa. He shares his views on DOB Ecology's donor strategy and how protecting biodiversity, particularly by maintaining large, interconnected habitats, can play a critical role in combating climate impacts and mitigating emissions. A fascinating, wide-ranging, interdisciplinary discussion with Maas.

The Meb Faber Show
#369 – Africa Startup Series – Maya Horgan Famodu, Ingressive Capital - Africa Holds The Fastest Growing Consumer Class, Fastest Growing Population & Fastest Growing Middle Class in The World

The Meb Faber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:57


In episode 369, we welcome our guest, Maya Horgan Famodu, founder of Ingressive Capital, a VC fund focused on early stage African tech, and believed to be the youngest person to launch a tech fund in Sub-Saharan Africa.   In today's episode, we start with Maya's journey to the African tech scene.   She lays out the factors behind the recent explosion in funding that the continent has recently seen - strong demographics, high growth, and rapid tech adoption.  Then we get into some companies she's invested in, specifically a lot of “X for Africa,” the African equivalent of companies like Stripe, Robinhood, Flexport, and Plaid. And we even touch on 54gene, which we highlighted in episode 345.     As we wind down, we hear what lies ahead for Maya now that she just finished raising her second fund of $50 million.      -----   Follow Meb on Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube For detailed show notes, click here To learn more about our funds and follow us, subscribe to our mailing list or visit us at cambriainvestments.com   -----   Today's episode is sponsored by The Idea Farm. The Idea Farm gives you access to over $100,000 worth of investing research, the kind usually read by only the world's largest institutions, funds, and money managers. Join today and get access to quarterly CAPE ratios, an excel quant backtester and the entire research library.

Listen to The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology
In conversation with... Wendy Spearman

Listen to The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 22:34


Wendy Spearman (University of Cape Town) discusses a Series on the emergence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in Sub-Saharan Africa and the challenges it presents.

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry
The Venomous Vendetta

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 42:44


Whilst watching a documentary about some poisonous frogs, Curio Janni in Amsterdam, started to wonder what would happen if a frog licked itself or another frog of the same species. She asks Dr Adam Rutherford and Professor Hannah Fry to investigate whether an animal would react badly to a toxin it itself produces? In essence, 'can a venomous snake kill itself by biting itself?' Of course the answer is complicated, but the sleuths know exactly who to ask. Steve Backshall, award-winning wildlife explorer, best known for his BBC series 'Deadly 60'. Author of 'Venom – Poisonous Creatures in the Natural World'. Steve has been bitten, stung and spat at by a plethora of venomous creatures during his career. He also studied the first-known venomous newt - the sharp-ribbed newt - a creature that has sharpened ribs that when it's under attack, it will squeeze its body force those ribs out through its skin, coating them in venom, which is then delivered into the mouth of an attacker. Professor Nick Casewell, studies venomous snakes and their impact on humans. He works on treatments for snakebites at the Liverpool School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Snakebites have a huge impact on communities in South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. It's now been reinstated as one of the most serious neglected tropical diseases by the World Health Organisation. Traditional treatments - antivenins - can be expensive, difficult to access and don't always work - Nick is looking into alternative medicines to treat snakebite victims. Dr. Ronald Jenner is Principle Researcher in the Comparative Venomics group at the Natural History Museum's Life Sciences, Invertebrates Division and co-wrote the book ‘Venom -the secrets of nature's deadliest weapon.' He explains the evolutionary arms race between venomous predators and their prey and poisonous prey and their predators. He explains how resistance to venom has evolved and how venom has evolved to be more or less powerful over time, answering another Curio - Scott Probert's question on the evolution of venom. Christie Wilcox wrote 'Venomous – How Earth's Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry'. She studied the molecular basis of lionfish venom. Christie describes how venom and immunity to venom works at the molecular level. Presenters - Adam Rutherford and Hannah Fry Produced by Fiona Roberts

The Clement Manyathela Show
The Front Seat to Tomorrow with the BMW iX Episode 1

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 24:05


With the COP26 UN climate conference currently taking place in Glasgow, the environment and sustainability is on everyone's minds currently. Clement speaks to BMW Group South Africa & Sub-Saharan Africa, Group Communications & Political Affairs, Deena Govender. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Charter Cities Podcast
Urbanization and Urban Governance with Ed Glaeser

Charter Cities Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 54:35


Today's guest is Ed Glaeser, a Professor of Economics at Harvard University, and he joins us to talk about urbanization and urban planning. Ed has written, or co-authored several books, including The Triumph of The City, and more recently, Survival of the City: Living and Thriving in an Age of Isolation, published this year with David Cutler. Our conversation begins on the subject of the rapid urbanization of parts of the developing world such as India and Sub-Saharan Africa. We explore what lessons can be learned in this regard from the urbanization of Latin America in the 1960s. Our exchange moves to touch on ways of urbanizing without industrialization or via services rather than manufacturing. Shifting onto the topic of urban governance, we hear Ed's thoughts on the 15-minute city concept, how to overcome political constraints to construction such as vetocracy, and how to push back against cars when they stand as status symbols to the newly rich. We also get into why the schools in big US cities are failing and how to deal with the rising carbon emissions that come as developing countries urbanize. We then talk about COVID-related challenges to productivity and the supply chain, before wrapping up on the subject of whether charter cities are a way of experimenting with pro-entrepreneurship institutions. Key Points From This Episode: •   The lessons to be learned from Latin America's urbanization regarding transport and more. •   Countries that have become urbanized without being industrialized. •   The connection between urbanization and moving out of poverty. •   Perspectives on manufacturing versus service-led paths toward transformation. •   Whether there is a distinction between urban migrants who arrive due to ‘pull' versus ‘push' factors. •   Ed's thoughts on whether secondary cities can be as productive as primary ones. •   The contrast between entrepreneurship and poor living conditions in Mumbai's Dharavi slum. •   Under which conditions private provision (PPP) works best and worst. •   What we can learn from large urban infrastructure projects built in the 1970s. •   Whether there are examples of cities that are good at combatting vetocracy. •   The leaders behind cities that have experienced massive urbanization. •   Why Ed thinks the 15-minute city is a dead-end concept but agrees with some aspects of it. •   How to push back against environmentally damaging status symbols for the newly rich as a planner. •   The factors that contribute to suburbanization and whether China is headed that way. •   How to deal with the rising carbon emissions that come as developing countries urbanize. •   Why large cities in the US are failing on the schooling front and Ed's thoughts on a solution. •   Ed's thoughts on a land-grant university model in developing countries. •   How to grapple with current COVID-related supply chain challenges. •   Productivity after social distancing in light of the connection between density and productivity. •   Why London and New York are still the only truly global cities. •   Whether charter cities are a way of experimenting with pro-entrepreneurship institutions.   Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: https://scholar.harvard.edu/glaeser/home (Ed Glaeser) https://www.nber.org/ (National Bureau of Economic Research) https://www.amazon.com/Triumph-City-Greatest-Invention-Healthier/dp/0143120549 (Triumph of The City) https://www.amazon.com/Survival-City-Living-Thriving-Isolation-ebook/dp/B08V896ZD6 (Survival of the City: Living and Thriving in an Age of Isolation) https://scholar.harvard.edu/cutler/home (David Cutler)... Support this podcast

Beltway Golfer
Andrew Szunyog - Driving the Green

Beltway Golfer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 66:46


.elementor-2659 .elementor-element.elementor-element-76e2a7a{text-align:center;} Sustainability in the game of golf is an increasingly relevant multi-faceted topic within the industry.  Andrew Szunyog is the DC-based co-founder of Driving The Green, a golf sustainability consultantcy.  At next week’s Symposium on Municipal Golf,  Andrew will be leading a panel on the subject, covering a wide-range of how golf courses can help themselves and the communities around them be more sustainable. (Listen to the episode for a 25% discount code on tickets to the Symposium presented by National Links Trust)Driving the Green has also partnered with Hunter Industries Golf Division to plant 1,000 trees through the use of the health and wellness app Active Giving. Active Giving converts your activities and sweat equity into planted trees that provides income and economic opportunity for farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa while helping to sequester carbon. Link below..https://www.drivingthegreen.golf/projects/agroforestry-trees

Crosstalk America
News Roundup & Comment

Crosstalk America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 53:00


The following stories were part of a much wider look by Jim at the news this week-----At the conclusion of an emergency hearing, the Federal District Court of Illinois has issued a temporary restraining order against NorthShore University HealthSystem on behalf of 14 healthcare workers who've been unlawfully discriminated against and denied religious exemption from the COVID shot mandate.----President Biden said he has secured a new 1.75 trillion dollar framework for economic and climate change spending that could pass the Senate and express confidence that it would win the backing of all wings of the Democratic party.----House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband hit -paydirt- Monday as Tesla's valuation rose to 1 trillion dollars. ----The Biden administration is reportedly considering paying out hundreds of thousands of dollars to migrant families separated at the southern border during the Trump administration.----Judicial Watch reported while Americans struggled through pandemic induced financial hardships and the supply chain crisis, the U.S. government is dedicating millions of dollars to provide bicycles for residents of Sub-Saharan Africa.----U.S. home prices rose 19.9- in the 12 months leading to August.----Taiwan's president confirmed that American soldiers are stationed in the nation.----The U.S. intelligence agency community assesses that the Afghanistan-based terrorist groups -ISIS-K and Al Qaeda- intend to attack the U.S. in as little as 6 months.

Crosstalk America from VCY America
News Roundup & Comment

Crosstalk America from VCY America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:00


The following stories were part of a much wider look by Jim at the news this week-----At the conclusion of an emergency hearing, the Federal District Court of Illinois has issued a temporary restraining order against NorthShore University HealthSystem on behalf of 14 healthcare workers who've been unlawfully discriminated against and denied religious exemption from the COVID shot mandate.----President Biden said he has secured a new 1.75 trillion dollar framework for economic and climate change spending that could pass the Senate and express confidence that it would win the backing of all wings of the Democratic party.----House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband hit -paydirt- Monday as Tesla's valuation rose to 1 trillion dollars. ----The Biden administration is reportedly considering paying out hundreds of thousands of dollars to migrant families separated at the southern border during the Trump administration.----Judicial Watch reported while Americans struggled through pandemic induced financial hardships and the supply chain crisis, the U.S. government is dedicating millions of dollars to provide bicycles for residents of Sub-Saharan Africa.----U.S. home prices rose 19.9- in the 12 months leading to August.----Taiwan's president confirmed that American soldiers are stationed in the nation.----The U.S. intelligence agency community assesses that the Afghanistan-based terrorist groups -ISIS-K and Al Qaeda- intend to attack the U.S. in as little as 6 months.

IMF Podcasts
Sub-Saharan Africa Outlook: 1 Planet, 2 Worlds, 3 Stories

IMF Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 12:00


The world remains in the grip of the pandemic and a seemingly accelerating pace of climate change. Solutions to these global problems must involve all countries and regions, especially sub-Saharan Africa, with the world's least vaccinated population and critical ecosystems. Sub-Saharan Africa's economy is set to expand by 3.7 percent in 2021 and 3.8 percent in 2022. This follows the sharp contraction in 2020, but still represents the slowest recovery relative to other regions. Papa N'Diaye leads the team that produces the Regional Economic Outlook for sub-Saharan Africa. In this podcast, he says access to vaccines is still the priority for the region. Transcript: https://bit.ly/3ppx8EP

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
Humanity Gets A Malaria Vaccine!

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:05


On October 6, the World Health Organization endorsed a malaria vaccine for the first time ever. After years of testing, the vaccine was shown to be safe and effective at preventing the deaths of thousands of children in Sub-Saharan Africa. The WHO's backing of this Malaria vaccine is both a breakthrough in scientific research and an important moment in human history. Margaret McDonnell, executive director of Nothing But Nets at the UN Foundation, explains why this new malaria vaccine is so promising    

Hot Mess Hotline
Ep. 40: 5 Steps To Take After Being Fired with Emil Ekiyor

Hot Mess Hotline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 58:11


Emil Ekiyor, CEO of Innopower, learned some tough lessons before finding his purpose. He came to America from Nigeria in high school, never having played football. He learned the game and earned his way into the NFL. He put his head down and got to work. Every. Single. Day. Working on his mind and body to always be competing against himself and the league's best with his speed, strength, and endurance. One day it was just over. After injury and an unexpected termination, his name was at the bottom of ESPN's screen and he was packing his bags to head home. If you've ever been fired, you know how Emil felt. If you've never been fired, it feels like that time you belly flopped off the diving board, smacking your whole front side and knocking the wind out of your lungs. Then trying to get back up to air as soon as possible. Our conversation reminded me that we over-romanticize hard work. We forget that an amazing career has hard work, luck, serendipity, tears, setbacks, and maybe, sometimes, success. Hard work might gain us visibility to the right powers that be, but it's not the only thing that takes us to the top. About Emil Ekiyor Born in Lagos, Nigeria, Emil Ekiyor left his family (7 sisters and two brothers) in Lagos to pursue educational opportunities in Daytona Beach, Florida, at the age of 15. Emil participated in basketball, soccer, and football in high school and received a full athletic scholarship to attend the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida. At the University of Central Florida, Emil was named a captain of the football team. After an outstanding college career, Emil went on to play six years in the NFL with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Atlanta Falcons, and Las Vegas Raiders (formerly Oakland Raiders). Upon retiring from the NFL, Emil started several businesses in the United States.  He launched several projects in Nigeria as CEO of EnabekSolutions, which works with companies in Sub-Saharan Africa and the United States to expand and take advantage of the rapid growth in Sub-Saharan imports and exports.  He also served as the National Executive Director for the GEO Foundation, a nonprofit organization that partners with local community leaders to start, support, and manage high-quality K-12 charter schools in the country; President of the Indianapolis Chapter of Indiana Black Expo, President of Indy Youth Sports, Indianapolis Prayer Breakfast Leadership Team, and Board of Directors for the Friends of Education, a nonprofit corporation dedicated to improving K-12 education in the state of Minnesota since 1999 and Board of Directors of the NFLPA Former Players Indy Chapter. Growing up in Nigeria and then coming to the US without family, Emil's journey offers a unique perspective on the gaps in Black communities in Sub-Saharan Africa and the US. These experiences and the desire to close the wealth and opportunity gaps for African Americans and Africans are the driving force behind the creation of INNOPOWER. About INNOPOWER INNOPOWER Indy is a nonprofit community development organization that works with communities and stakeholders to create capacity-building opportunities for underrepresented ecosystems, businesses, and professionals in education, workforce development, and entrepreneurship. Learn more at innopowerindy.com. Take the Hot Mess Hotline Quiz: As a leader, you've felt paralyzed by where to start first with your team's and organization's problems. Do you need team building or a frank conversation? Like a Rubik's cube, one shift changes everything else but may create more problems than it solves. Take this 3-minute quiz to find your next best step.

IHS Markit | Economics & Country Risk
Beyond banking - The possibilities provided by block chain technology in Sub-Saharan Africa

IHS Markit | Economics & Country Risk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 36:56


Fintech is a major force shaping the structure of the financial industry in Sub Saharan Africa and it is rapidly changing the competitive landscape. Block chain technologies specifically have shown great promise to solve issues around access to banking, money, and mortgages. Across the continent it's also transforming access to energy, education and even healthcare. Is it too good to be true? Should Central Banks race to use digital currency? What should we be thinking about around social economic change, data protection, accountability, regulations and policy? Our analysts talk through this complex issue. Anton Casteleijn, Senior Economist, Sub-Saharan Africa, IHS Markit https://experts.ihsmarkit.com/experts/casteleijn-anton Theo Acheampong, Senior Analyst Country Risk – Sub-Saharan Africa, IHS Markit https://experts.ihsmarkit.com/experts/acheampong-theo Alisa Strobel, Senior Economist, Sub-Saharan Africa, IHS Markit https://ihsmarkit.com/experts/strobel-alisa.html Brian Lawson, Senior Economic and Financial Consultant, Country Risk, IHS Markit https://experts.ihsmarkit.com/experts/lawson-brian

The Take
Could this new malaria vaccine save millions of lives?

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:57


With close to half a million deaths from Malaria in 2019 --most in Sub-Saharan Africa-- scientists have spent decades working toward a vaccine, and last week, the World Health Organization approved the first. But, with only 30 to 40 percent efficacy some are also asking, is it worth it? And, there are other questions about how quickly it can be deployed.  We talk to one Kenyan scientist who grew up in one of the world's most malaria ridden regions and hear about how he's helping to stop this dogged and deadly disease.

@ Sea With Justin McRoberts
The Problem of Care

@ Sea With Justin McRoberts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 5:53


A few weeks ago, I was in a contraption with a few folks my age and older who were voicing concerns about all the “information” kids get online. During that conversation, statistics were thrown around about how much data we're subject to. Apparently, every person creates something like 1.7 MB of data every second, which amounted to 2.5 quintillion data bytes per day. ThatIsA Lot At some point, someone said something about kids knowing too much. I don't remember the exact phrase but it was something along the lines of “it's just too much information. They're overwhelmed.” That.. gave me pause. Something about it rang true, but not entirely. You see, I wonder if the hang-up here isn't that there's too much to know; I wonder if it's that I feel responsible for caring about all of it... or even too much of it. And saying I don't care about everything can be a slightly troublesome thing to say. Because “everything” is a very long list and it includes things you might think are REALLY vital; maybe even essential. So, as I confess my limitation of care, I just might be telling you that I don't care about the things you care about the way you care about them or to the same depth… and now… now we might have a problem. And that… that's overwhelming; to feel like I have to overextend my care or even pretend to overextend my care in order to remain true to my tribe. What if I care about the hungry teens in Pleasant Hill / Martinez, CA who are sleeping in cars around the corner from their local HS instead of at home so they know they can get to school on time … but my heart isn't drawn to the clean water crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa?What if I spend the lion's share of my charitable, care time and energy in the area of child exploitation and human trafficking and, because I do, I don't know enough about trans persons or biology or the science in the mix? What if I don't care about what you care about? And what if it scares me to tell you that? What if it's not the amount of information available to us. What if it's the degree of responsibility we feel we have to have for that information; I don't have the time or energy or the resources to effectively and consistently care for more than a few things. That's just true… and I know it's true. I also know it's true that there are absences on (or from) my care list that have been disappointing to more than a few people. And that's been a point of stress at times; Moving the question from “what do I care about?”To “what should I care about?”Author and Missiologist Michael Frost gets a lot of questions that basically boil down to the question of care. Because he's in the field of teaching religious-minded about responsible “mission,” he regularly converses with folks who are searching the world around them for urgent needs to fill so that they can participate in the Grand Work of Redemption and Restoration. Rather than prescribe to folks attention to “that which matters most,” Michael turns the question towards people To whom are you called? Who will go with you? Michael redirects issue-focused conversations to the people whose actual, human, soft, and precious lives are affected, altered, damaged, or saved; the people whose fundamental value is the foundation of value for any and every “issue” or idea in all of human history. This is why I have been so richly blessed by David Dark's commitment to Reality. It is her complex and sacred humanity that is David's doorway into care for issues and ideas like criminal justice, responsible citizenship, and a more comprehensive expression of what it means to be “Pro-Life.”  “To love a person” David has written, “is to love a process.” Yes. Also, to love a person is to enter into a world full of ideas and dilemmas and issues, but to find them in their proper context; encased in the soft, impermanent flesh of humanity.So…What if we're not so much overwhelmed by the amount of information available to us; what if we're simply distracted by it. And in our distraction, we lose touch with what enlivens us; what grounds us what makes any and all of the 2.5 quintillion daily data bytes worth a thing.That our hearts are not build to simply KNOW the world and those who live in it; we are built to care for the world and those who live in it…. So far as we are capable. 

My Climate Journey
Startup Series: Nithio

My Climate Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:54


Today's guest is Kate Steel, Co-Founder and CEO of Nithio.Nithio is an energy financing platform powered by a proprietary AI-enabled risk analytics engine. Nithio developed its innovative approach to standardize credit risk assessments to unlock and scale energy access in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nithio advances energy financing at scale through its Financial Intermediary, Nithio FI B.V., which offers receivables-backed funding to off-grid energy providers in Nigeria, Uganda, and Kenya. Driven by the Risk Analytics Engine, Nithio FI's innovative approach expands access to off-grid clean energy for households, micro-businesses, and smallholder farmers. Kate co-founded Nithio in 2018. Before Nithio, she had a long career in the off-grid power sector, most recently as Energy Director for Power Africa. In addition, Kate was on the Energy Access and Investments team at Google and the World Bank-IFC Lighting Africa initiative manager.In this episode, Kate takes me through Nithio's approach and what led her to co-found the company. She explains why energy access is a climate problem and policy's role in the equity and clean energy transition. We also discuss the existing funding tools available to startups across Africa, the importance of integrating impact into the startup's mission, and what holds lenders back from investing in energy access startups. Kate is a great guest, and it was exciting to learn more about the important work Nithio is doing.Enjoy the show!You can find me on twitter @jjacobs22 or @mcjpod and email at info@myclimatejourney.co, where I encourage you to share your feedback on episodes and suggestions for future topics or guests.Episode recorded September 27th, 2021To learn more about Nithio, visit: https://www.nithio.com/To learn more about this episode, visit: https://myclimatejourney.co/ctss-episodes/nithio

Finance Regulation Technology
FRT Episode 108: Mobile Money in Sub-Saharan Africa

Finance Regulation Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 58:38


The dramatic growth of Mobile Money in Sub-Saharan African markets presents some interesting learnings for bank strategies and partnerships with FinTech firms, and with some fascinating scenarios ahead as app-based payment platforms enter the market.

CFR On the Record
A Conversation With Minister Naledi Pandor of South Africa

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


Minister Naledi Pandor discusses the state of democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa, the South African response to COVID-19 along with lessons learned for the future, and the country's role as a leader in the region.

Changing the Rules
Episode 86: What's Your Transition to Retirement Plan? Guest, Lori Woodward

Changing the Rules

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 29:59


Guest Co-host:  Cecily Laidmain:  CLaidman@springpointsl.orgCecily's website:  https://springpointsl.org/springpoint-choice/Podcast Guest:  Lori Woodward:  LWOODWARD@actslife.orgLori's website:  https://www.actsretirement.org/ Transcription:Kris Parsons00:01Welcome to changing the rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best life and how you can figure out how to do it too. Join us with your lively host Ray Loewe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world.Ray Loewe00:16Good. Good morning, everybody. And Taylor, thank you for going a little long on that intro. Okay. It's always nice to have music when you start out. And I am one of the luckiest people in the world. And we've got two more of the luckiest people in the world with us today, we're going to talk to them and find out why they're lucky. And remember, our definition of the luckiest people in the world is they're people who design their own lives and then live them under their own terms. So they tend to be happy people, they tend to be excited. They're not without problems, they deal with many of them, they have to pivot a lot. And therefore they are quite good at dealing with rules. You know, one of the things in life that we have is we're saddled with too many rules. We're given rules by our parents, then the schools come in, the church comes in their business comes in. And the next thing we know we got all these rules, saddling us down. And rules usually tell us things that we must do, or we shouldn't do. And we find that the luckiest people in the world get around those rules pretty well, they find a way to make them work for us. And I'm going to start today with introducing Cecily Laidman. I met Cecily, probably 10-12 years ago, Cecily has been taking care of my long-term health, up to today, even. And she's done a great job, I haven't needed her. Okay, and it's been wonderful. So, so Cecily is at a place called springpoint choice. And she runs a care program for seniors, where she will take people and put them in your house to take care of you if you get sick. And if you need help. And she does a wonderful job. And she is going to be our co-host this month, and we are going to spend some time with other people who do similar things. They're all different. There's different strokes for different folks. And Cecily Say hi.Cecily Laidman02:25Well, hi, Ray, thanks for introducing me, I I'm definitely feeling like one of the luckiest people in the world. And, and one of those reasons is that about 21 years ago or so, I was in this great early morning workout program that would you know, we'd get up at six o'clock in the morning rain, snow, shine, and be outdoors and doing boot camp things and all that sort of stuff. And at that time, I was kind of doing some freelance marketing and sales, and public relations. And one of the people that I met at the workout was that made me a lucky person is who we're going to be talking to today, which is Lori Woodward. And Lori Woodward at that time was in the senior living industry. And I had no idea what that was all about. And she asked if I had, you know, help out doing, you know, go to some of the communities and see how the sales were doing and this and that, and then it kind of evolved. And I went to one of the communities and worked as a marketing director. And that was because of Lori Woodward, who is now the vice president of marketing and sales at all of the Acts communities, which is one of the premier organizations on the East Coast that has a number of different continuing care retirement communities. But Laurie can do a little more about that. So welcome, Laurie.Lori Woodward03:57Well, good morning. Thank you for the great introduction. Great to be here. So, you know, do you want me to get started? Or?Ray Loewe04:09Well, well, let's, let's direct you a little bit more. Okay. So first of all, you are one of the luckiest people in the world. I know that because you got a smile on your face. You're here you're doing exciting things. You're making a difference to people in life, and you've had a path to get here. Yeah. Okay. So, tell us a little bit about your journey. I know you went to Millersville.Lori Woodward04:33Okay. My journey starts long before that Okay, it does. Okay. I thought a lot about this because you because of the title of your podcast. And I thought about why am I lucky? You know, I thought about well, I've had some real serious health scares. I feel lucky. Now that's really medicine, that's science that that helped me with that. Why do I personally feel lucky? To start out with I feel very lucky to have I've been born in this country because I think it's the greatest country in the world. And regardless of any issues we have, I could have been born in Sub Saharan Africa where millions of people die from starvation I didn't, I was lucky enough to be born in the US. And I think that is luck. But growing up, I do really feel that your formative years form who you are. And I've been so lucky to have great mentors in my life that I really attribute almost everything in my life to that, you know. So to keep it short and simple. My mom was a great mentor, she taught me how to prioritize happiness. My aunt Carol was a huge mentor in my life, she taught me how to value independence. And my brothers were great mentors to me because they taught me how to punch like a boy. So growing up, I really feel that's what formed, gave me courage and gave me focus and made me feel like I didn't worry too much about whatever I was doing in my life, I just kind of, you know, took the bull by the horns and did it. So. And then throughout my career, I had great mentors in the positions I was in. So you know, that comes later. But really, that's why I feel I'm the luckiest person in the in the world is those main factors. Ray Loewe06:31So I love this punch, like a boy thing. Okay. And I love the prioritize happiness. And I love the independence piece because that's what we are all about. Okay. So you started doing a lot of work in a lot of senior marketing organizations, give us a sense of where you came from because I think that certainly tells us where you're going.Lori Woodward06:54Sure, sure. So I did go to Millersville. local state school, Pennsylvania, I'm born and raised in Pennsylvania and love, you know, always just love where I am. So I never had a reason to leave. But from there, I got into really corporate communications, and I met my first career mentor, who I really just got connected with through a friendship. And, and she said to me, you know, what I need, I need someone who knows how to write and edit. And, and she hired me like, just knowing my, my qualities, you know, my enthusiasm, my intelligence, and I had no background at all in senior living, marketing, sales, or communications. But she handed me this job, or she said, you're going to have three continuing care retirement communities or life plan communities, I want you to do all the marketing strategy. And I want you to deploy all the strategy as well. So you have to learn advertising, you have to learn graphic design. So I did soup to nuts for three ccrcs That was my first job. I wrote all the newsletters, I took the pictures, I interviewed the residents, I got them printed, I got the mail, I learned a lot from that position, and loved it. And then from there, I just stayed. I just found this you know, a mission of helping seniors find happiness in that, you know, whatever you want to call it, the that that later stage of life, which I don't like to call retirement, I don't like it to call planning, call it planning. I like it to call it it's just another way you're finding happiness in that particular part of your life. Because that's what it's all about, right? That's what we're selling. We're selling stay happy. So IRay Loewe08:54So is that what you guys do you sell independence, happiness, and you teach us how to punch like a boy. Lori Woodward09:00Yes, that's exactly it. I love that. That's my new motto. Anyway, I just I stayed and I've worked with a lot of different companies. In the not-for-profit arena, I worked for a for-profit assisted living company, I worked for a couple of consultants where I really got to know Senior Living options all over the country. And, and then I landed at Acts, where I've been for almost 10 years and, and will probably be here until I go on to my next transition not to be called retirement. So So that's, that's my story. And today, I'm working here at this company and I'm at a very strategic level, but I still get to, you know, impact the lives of, of the people who live here, and so it's a Yeah,Ray Loewe10:02yeah, that's really cool. And we want to spend some time on the Acts community itself. But before we get there and Cecily get in on this conversation over here, because you're involved with this in a different way, when do people how do people make these decisions to get where you guys are? I mean, there has to be some time and like, where all of a sudden a light bulb goes off, and it says, gee I, I've got to make plans for where I'm going, when, when does that occur? And, and then kind of give us some idea of what some of the tracks are on how people get there. So uh Cecily lead us and LoriCecily Laidman10:46Yeah, I was gonna say that, you know, the when is is a big is a good question. Because some people can just, you know, sit on their duff and not do anything until something major happens in their life. And that's not the right way to do it. When I first got into this industry, I had no idea what this industry was. I mean, I, you know, I didn't have anybody that had gone into a retirement community or anything. So I think that a lot of it has to do with education about what your options are. And you know, when you make that if you, if you're knowledgeable of what the options are, then you'll be able to make a decision rather than just, you know, sitting at home and waiting for something to happen. And I think that, you know, even when I was working in a community, after people had moved in, I would say to the person, and to the couple, they all said, I wish I had done this sooner. So I mean, it's it's definitely your question is excellent Ray because of the timing, you know, when do you make that decision? I think people keep saying, you know, a lot of people say, Well, you know, I'm not at all I don't have to go there, I'm you know, I'm still young, I'm still Well, yeah, you can be young and go into a community. So there, you know, I would you agree with that, Lori?Lori Woodward12:06I do in part, I feel that for our for, for a person who is moving, physically moving somewhere. They look, you know, everyone feels like they're a younger age than they actually are. Like, I still think I'm 32. And then I'd say, Well, my son is 32. How can that be, but um, everyone, I feel like, looks at you know, their later years as something to dread, something that's going to be scary, something that's going to be painful. And what Cecily and I do in our business is try to convince them No, it doesn't have to be like, if you choose one of these options, you can actually take the course the other way doesn't have to be this downward shift, it can be like a, you know, an inverted bell curve, you can rise up again. So, you know, when you move, physically move to a, what we all call senior living community, I feel that people think it's going to be like your grandmother's nursing home, you know, and that is why most people say, why didn't I do this years ago? And it's why a lot of people say I'm not ready yet. And we and we say, Ready for what? So, you know, the, the fact that our, you know, care, some form of care is usually included in the decision, whether it be 55 plus that has visiting nurses that they tell you what you can have when you get older, or Cecily's product that's kind of an insurance model that involves protection for future care, or our model that's move into a campus and the care is right there on campus. There's the care aspect. So that immediately makes people think that's why I'm moving there. So that I have a plan for future care. And when they finally move in, they go oh, that's, that's not what this is all about at all, you know, so it's really that psychological barrier of care is included.Ray Loewe14:31Let me throw out a couple of scenarios here. I come out of the financial planning business, I've seen what my clients did. Okay, so one of the first things that I find is a client say gee I'm going to retire I'm going to do something and they decide to move with their grandkids are until their grandkids move after they bought their house and they've spent all this money on things. So I have one in particular that that bought a house in Florida to be near their kids and their grandchildren, of course, the kids change jobs are in Rhode Island now, okay. And as not that it's a bad kind of thing, but it's not an ultimate solution. I've known other people who moved to Arizona, and they go into like an over 55 community, it's not care, right? It's, it's about lifestyle. So when do you put all this together, because there's one major thing that I think I want you both to comment on. And that is, when Can't you get into Axes communities anymore, or Cecily when Can't you get into springpoint anymore, because there's that to think about.Lori Woodward15:43So, so I'll start like, you know, moving into an Acts campus, a lot of our prospects say, it's the gift I'm giving to fill in the blank, to my children, to my grandchildren, to my neighbors, because I am making decisions for myself today. So no one has to make the decisions for me later. And financially, I move in, my children never have to worry, again. And I think Cecily's product offers the same thing. So I describe our campus setting, as you have to think of it as that feeling you got when you went to college or university, you're with like-minded individuals, you're hanging out with them, you're learning, you're growing, you're staying active, you're feeling better and better every day, because you're socially connected. And if you and you know, and you're, you're improving your yourself, you're learning and growing. So not that you're moving in to prepare for the future. It's really, I mean, there is that aspect of it, but that's how I like to describe, to describe it. But it's, it's hard to convey that to the people who are looking in terms of the when, that's why we say it's better to move in when you're, you know, ready to have fun and ready to, to grow and learn in a convenient way. But also know that you have a plan in place, so no one will ever have to worry about you again, and you've been the decision-maker. So when is that it's not really an age, it's really when you feel you, you want to have that kind of lifestyle. But you also want to guarantee that, you know, you have a plan, when it's too late for Acts is when you already, it's I mean, I guess you could argue at a lot of our campuses is it's never too late because we do take outside, private, to our assisted living and skilled care. But generally, to move into the independent living, it's too late if you already need a high level of care, in turn to experience all the advantages of what we have. And it's also too late if you don't financially qualify. So if you've, you know, disposed of all your assets already, and you don't have funds to, you know, to pay for the to live there.Cecily Laidman18:36Our, you know, our program is a little different in that, you know, when you say the when, and when is the time, because we have a pretty strict medical underwriting to get into our program. So you have to be healthy and well. So that is a decision that has to be made sooner than later. Now, given that, I mean, we have people in their 50s that join our program. But in addition, we've had people in their 80s join the program that are still independent, healthy, active, etc. So you have to, you know, with our program, there are a little more caveats in order to be able to qualify,Ray Loewe19:12you know, you guys brought up a couple of really interesting things I like this idea of it's the gift it's the gift you give your kids. And I think that people don't think about that as much as they should. But it's really, really true. I have met people who have spent a good part of their life taking care of parents. And although it's a labor of love, although, you know, in a sense, they feel like they're doing something good. They get to the point where they actually start to resent their parents after a while because they're so burdened by taking care of people and they're not qualified to do that. You guys bring in that qualification you, you bring in this stuff and it's the gift of things and i think uh, people need to remember, you can't just pick this place when it's too late. Right? So let's talk about this medical underwriting a little bit. And I don't want to get too in detail but one of the big things, I think today is this whole concept of dementia  Alzheimer's, you know when you're at that point where you don't have your memory anymore, and this affects two people often. So you know, you got a couple and one's healthy, and the other one is not and, and now you're restricted from doing what you want to do, which is the gift to your children, etc, etc.Cecily Laidman20:42Well, they're just a little tag on that gift to your children. quick story. In my program, I was there was a couple that signed up down in Delaware, and the woman after she signed the contracts and gave us a check started crying, and I'm like, oh my god, was this buyer's remorse, you know, and I was all worried about it. And she said, No, she said, I wish this had been around when my mother was around because I ended up taking care of her. And it changed our relationship. We were no longer a mother and daughter, and I wish if somebody else and I could have kept that relationship, so, it's, you know, very significant. And the same thing happens in a community. I was in one of the communities I used to work in the About a month ago, and I saw this woman who is now in a wheelchair, she was talking to a younger woman who was obviously her daughter, and she goes, she goes Tesla, Oh, it's so good to see that. And she looks at her daughter, this is the one that saved me. And you because I came here. I remember, you know, we she came in on a Thanksgiving day to do a tour and I didn't want to do it. You guys wanted me to do what she said Cecily was the best decision I ever made. So, you know, that was the gift that she gave her kids and she was you know, exemplifying that. And Ray Loewe21:57You know, as usual, time flies when you're having fun. We have some time left. But let's take a little time and give Lori a chance to talk a little bit about her specific community. And the things that you do for people. What's different about them? What's the same about them? It's your commercial plug, go for it.Lori Woodward22:17Okay. All right. So Axe, the official company name is Acts retirement life communities been around for almost 50 years. Next year is our 50 year anniversary. And we have what are called continuing care retirement communities, sometimes called life plan communities. 26 of them from Pennsylvania down to Florida, all on the eastern seaboard. And we're founded in Pennsylvania right outside Philadelphia. So we have eight of them. Eight of them are right around here where our corporate office is here in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania. Anyway, our continuing care retirement communities. I explain them a couple different ways. One is you the best way to benefit from the this type of living is to move in when you're still independent, and most people move in we are 55 Plus, with one caveat that I'll get to in a minute. So most people move in when they're in their 70s late 70s. Move into independent living, mostly apartments, but on some campuses, we do have freestanding houses, villas, townhomes, etc. But there's a central clubhouse with a whole wide variety of life-enrichingactivities, everything from fitness centers, aquatic centers, pickleball courts, libraries, performing arts centers, that's all centrally located, kind of similar to what a lot of 55 plus communities offer that central clubhouse. But then if, if as a resident you ever need care of any type, whether it be rehabilitative care, a nurse practitioner oversight, or long-term assisted living or skilled nursing care, it's right on the same campus. So it's one-stop shopping, it's one decision move in. And it's one resident contract that gives the resident protections and explains what Axe provides to the resident. So people move on when they're independent, and typically live there, the rest of their lives and get all the care they need. But in the meantime, they have this university-like experience where they're, they're enjoying like-minded neighbors and participating in all kinds of programs that are available right on the campus. So it's very social enriching, and I like to say, life improvement experience that you get. Because if the fitness center is right there down the hall, you're going to go use it every day. If you're that way, if you're, you want to, you know, and you're going to get encouragement from your peers, which is different than staying in your house and, and having more alone time as you get older, honestly, the other thing that's a benefit is, when you move into a campus-like that your time with your family when they visit is time with your family. Yeah, you don't, you're not asking your son to mow your lawn and then having five minutes before he leaves to catch up with him. So that's another advantage in terms of financially. Axe offers primarily what we call life care contract type A Life Care. That's what it's called in the industry. And what that means is, when a resident moves in, they pay an entrance fee that's based on whatever apartment or house they move into. And they begin paying a monthly fee. And the monthly fee covers everything from restaurants, fitness center use, housekeeping, indoor and outdoor maintenance, and rent. So it's a very comprehensive monthly fee. And what life care means is, as a person may need permanent health care, later, their monthly fee stays the same wherever they live. So you're basically prepaying for potential future health care, in order to get a very stable healthcare rate at a future time. That's in today's dollars, not tomorrow's dollars. So that's a real financial advantage. And it offers a real good financial plan. It also, it also includes tax advantages, because the entrance fee and the monthly fee, because it includes a partial prepayment for future healthcare can be a tax deduction if the prospect is able to itemize in health care, or medical. So that's kind of my five-minute commercial about the two primary aspects of what we offer, it actsRay Loewe27:26It's a great five-minute commercial. And thank you for that. And we're going, to sum up, a little bit and we're going to give everybody a chance to get their last-minute cover comments in. But I think what I got out of this is there comes a time in your life when you start to think about this. And there's a lot to think about, you know, are you going to? Are you going to go follow your kids and your grandchildren? And what's going to happen when they move? You know, but at some point in time, you have to choose where you're going to be because that's the gift to your kids. Right? Yeah, all right. Whether it's staying in your home, whether it's going to an Acts community, whether it's going somewhere else, it's part of the process? And when do people need to start thinking about this? Because we have the medical underwriting and the financial underwriting piece to think about? So if you're gonna advise somebody, you know, here I am, I'm 60 years old, let's say, and I'm thinking about retiring. You know, when do I need to start thinking about when do I need to start making provisions. So let's start with Lori on this.Lori Woodward28:35People should decide whether they removed want to move into a continuing care retirement community when they want social connection, and a vibrant environment that helps them age better, or at a point in time when they're starting to feel they want to know, there's a plan, you know, a lot of people start having little health issues, or they're at home alone, a spouse has died, that sort of thing. Move-in, move in, then, or think about moving in then is my advice.Ray Loewe29:13Well, thanks so much, Lori Woodward, and thanks to Cecily, and thanks for giving our listeners some clues as to what they need to think about. And we're going to be back next week with Cecily as our co-host and another guest. Okay, and Lori, you definitely are one of the luckiest people in the world and continue to be that way. And thank you. Taylor, we're at our end, thank you for Sign us off.Kris Parsons29:39Thank you for listening to changing the rules, a weekly podcast about people who are living their best life and how you can figure out how to do that too. Join us with your lively host of Ray Loewe, better known as the luckiest guy in the world.

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship
John Rendel of the Peter Cundill Foundation joins Alberto Lidji to talk about trust-based philanthropy and the value of long-term, unrestricted funding provided by grant-makers

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 29:43


  A strong case is made by John Rendel in support of unrestricted funding, encouraging grant-makers to embrace this approach to giving and calling on recipient organisations to fight for the cause of unrestricted funding as well. John's advice is that if you, as a grant-maker, don't trust the organisation you're supporting, then don't trust a restricted grant to that organisation. And, if you do trust them, then give them unrestricted funding. We need to build the understanding of how restricted grants undermine impact and reduce the efficacy of the organisations grant-makers are trying to empower.  While the philanthropy sector has seen a move towards more unrestricted funding during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Peter Cundill Foundation has been arguing for this approach since before the pandemic was a fact of life. The Peter Cundill Foundation grants out around USD $9 million annually. They are based in Bermuda and operate internationally, including in the UK, Canada and Sub-Saharan Africa. They do much of their funding in support of charities that are improving the lives of children around the world.  Please subscribe, share and leave us a review if you enjoy the show. For more information on more than 100 interviews with remarkable thought leaders, visit The Do One Better Podcast website at Lidji.org  

Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg
277. Dr. Roland Bunch on the Promise of Regenerative Land Management in Sub-Saharan Africa

Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 41:20


On this episode of Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg, Dani speaks with Dr. Roland Bunch, a leader in regenerative land management systems and the Founder and CEO of Better Soils, Better Lives. The initiative aims to increase food security for 70 percent of Sub-Saharan farmers by helping them double their agricultural productivity in the next 20 years. They discuss the promise of green manure/cover crops and how regenerative practices can restore soil quality, boost food security, and support local economies.  While you're listening, subscribe, rate, and review the show; it would mean the world to us to have your feedback. You can listen to “Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg” wherever you consume your podcasts.

Navigating Neuropsychology
78| Neuropsychology and Sub-Saharan Africa – With Drs. Jean Ikanga and Tony Stringer

Navigating Neuropsychology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 94:23


Culturally informed neuropsychological evaluations require that clinicians develop knowledge of the macrosocietal structures of unfamiliar countries and the cultural backgrounds of their patients. Sub-Saharan Africa is a large region, with over one billion people, some of whom develop neurological conditions and could benefit from neuropsychological services. In this episode, we discuss shared aspects of sub-Saharan culture, particularly in contrast to Western norms, and we introduce and describe the African Neuropsychological Battery. Show notes are available at www.NavNeuro.com/78 _________________ If you'd like to support the show, here are a few easy ways: 1) Get APA-approved CE credit for listening to select episodes: www.NavNeuro.com/INS  2) Tell your friends and colleagues about it 3) Subscribe (free) and leave an Apple Podcasts rating/review: www.NavNeuro.com/itunes 4) Contribute to the discussion in the comments section of the website (click the episode link listed above) or on Twitter (@NavNeuro)   Thanks for listening, and join us next time as we continue to navigate the brain and behavior! [Note: This podcast and all linked content is intended for general educational purposes only and does not constitute the practice of psychology or any other professional healthcare advice and services. No professional relationship is formed between hosts and listeners. All content is to be used at listeners' own risk. Users should always seek appropriate medical and psychological care from their licensed healthcare provider.]

Expat Happy Hour with Sundae Bean
243: Intentionally Lucky with Dr. Rachel Pope

Expat Happy Hour with Sundae Bean

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 34:53


Continuing her month-long focus on living with intention, Sundae welcomes Dr. Rachel Pope. An expat most of her adult life, Rachel is an OBGYN specializing in obstetric fistula and other childbirth injuries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Rachel shares how she meshed the profession she loves with her passion for social justice and recounts her challenges, triumphs, and transformation abroad. The ladies also discuss the underrated impact of transition. The post 243: Intentionally Lucky with Dr. Rachel Pope appeared first on Sundae Schneider-Bean, LLC..

Data Skeptic
Predicting Urban Land Use

Data Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 27:06


Today on the show we have Daniel Omeiza, a doctoral student in the computer science department of the University of Oxford, who joins us to talk about his work Efficient Machine Learning for Large-Scale Urban Land-Use Forecasting in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The Lawfare Podcast
Africa and U.S. Foreign Policy Opportunities with Judd Devermont

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 46:24


National security attention rarely focuses for long on Sub-Saharan Africa, and when it does, it's largely on the most populous countries like Nigeria, Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Former intelligence community and National Security Council official Judd Devermont, now director of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, wants to change that. Along with Nicole Wilett, who used to cover Africa for the State Department, the National Security Council and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Judd has created and co-hosts the new podcast called "49," now available everywhere. This podcast jumps head-first into the past, present and future of U.S. policy toward each of Sub-Saharan Africa's 49 countries. David Priess sat down with Judd to discuss a few of these countries, the new podcast and the opportunities for the incoming Biden administration to make real inroads in relations with countries across the continent.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History Unplugged Podcast
Travelers and Explorers, Part 7: Sir Henry Stanley (1841-1904) – “Dr. Livingstone, I Presume?”

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 41:21


Henry Stanley was a soldier-turned-journalist-turned explorer who charged wide swaths of the Congo. He famously searched for the source of the Nile, commanded the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition (a major expedition into the interior of Africa), and, most famously, searched and found missionary and fellow explorer David Livingstone.” He was knighted in 1899He led major expeditions there and wrote much of the early scientific literature of Sub-Saharan Africa and contributed to nearly every field of inquiry in the subject area. His accounts remained the standard work in botany, biology, zoology, geography, and anthropology of the regions treated for decades. One English writer related of his discoveries, “The fact is now generally recognized that Stanley, after Livingstone, gave greater impulse than any other man to the movement which resulted in the rapid exploration of most parts of unknown Africa.” But Stanley's legacy has its black marks, though. He was a product of nineteenth-century colonialism and the European Scramble for Africa, and as such was used by monarchs to extend their landholdings on the continent.