Podcasts about Global South

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Neologism used by the World Bank to refer to developing countries

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Best podcasts about Global South

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Latest podcast episodes about Global South

People Places Planet Podcast
The Youth Review: Environmental Peacebuilding, Conservation, and Nonprofit Cooperation

People Places Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 32:38


In this episode of the People Places Planet Podcast, former Research Associate Shehla Chowdhury joins host Georgia Ray to reflect on her time as a research associate, which ended in June 2022. She discusses her work in the nascent field of environmental peacebuilding, while also delving into her contributions to the local government environmental assistance network, differences between domestic and international environmental work, and her takeaways from studying non-governmental organizations in the Global North and Global South. ★ Support this podcast ★

The BreakPoint Podcast
How the Church Has Been Good for Women... and Other Ways It Is “Essential"

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 5:44 Very Popular


Throughout Church history, church attendance and overall religiosity have been higher among women than among men. That seems to be changing, especially for younger generations. According to new data, the long-existent church gender gap, which shows up in both religious affiliation and church attendance, has now flipped.   However, the headline is not that more men are connecting with the Church. The story is that more women are disconnecting from the Church.  A number of factors have contributed to this demographic shift, not least of which are recent scandals of sexual impropriety and abusive leadership among prominent pastors and Christian leaders. Also, education and ethnicity seem to play a significant role in the religious identification of millennial women. “Among white respondents,” a recent Christianity Today article summarized, “women are 9 percentage points more likely to say that they have no religious affiliation compared to white men,” but “there's no real difference in the share of male and female nones among Black, Asian, and other racial groups.”  Another factor, Dr. Abigail Favale argues in a new book The Genesis of Gender: A Christian Theory, is the rising influence of feminist thought, what she calls “the gender paradigm” in evangelical circles. Or as a colleague recently put it, describing the deconstruction process of a few of her friends, “It's all about ‘resisting the patriarchy.” That kind of language points to the paradigm which Dr. Favale once herself subscribed. She now believes it to be incompatible with a Christian understanding of male and female, sex, and gender.   Even so, the feminist paradigm has quite successfully framed Christianity and the Church as misogynist, patriarchal, and harmful for women. The same paradigm idealistically reframes pagan religions and cultures as being pro-woman, at least until Christianity gained prominence. This narrative, however, doesn't match the historical realities.  First, in contrast to ancient paganism, monotheism provided women with more freedom than polytheistic religions with goddesses did. In cultures dominated by the latter, women were limited to roles performed by the goddesses, and not always all of them. In fact, the “role” designated for many women by pagan religion was temple prostitute, a tool of men's worship.   In ancient Rome, women were permitted to engage in business, but their primary role was in the household. Men had public roles, but women engaged in domestic work were subservient to their father or husband. As in other historical periods, elite women had more options. However, the vast majority of women were seen as not much better than slaves.  Twelve was the legal age for girls to marry in Rome. If not married by 20, women were generally marginalized. Though divorce was available to both men and women, husbands caused most divorces since women rarely had other financial means. Ex-wives and widows were often left destitute.   In contrast, Christianity saw women as the spiritual and moral equal of men. Women and men shared the same created dignity, the same problem (sin), and the same solution, Jesus. As result, women in the Christian community had a higher status and more freedom than women in the broader Roman world.  The Christian rejection of divorce and sexual double standards, and its insistence on strict monogamy reflected this. Further, women were given more choice about whom and whether to marry and tended to marry later than their Roman counterparts. While widows were encouraged to remarry, the Church provided aid for those who did not or could not.  The Church also rejected abortion and infanticide as murder, meaning that women were not subjected to dangerous surgical procedures, and girls were not “discarded.” Thus, there were proportionately more women in the Christian community than in Roman society as a whole.  Because of Christian attitudes and behavior toward women, more women converted to Christianity than men, and many men who converted did so under the influence of their wives. Eventually, Christianity transformed the status of women in the Roman world. Unfortunately, as Greek ideas were adopted within the Church, elements of pagan misogyny were as well. For example, some Church fathers placed blame for the Fall entirely on Eve and ignored the Apostle Paul's putting the blame on Adam.   Nonetheless, Christianity did more to improve the status of women than any other historical force. Even today, as the Gospel spreads around the Global South, the status and freedoms enjoyed by women are being raised. The treatment of women is just one example of how the Church has been an essential force for good in the world.   There are others, even in an age that often labels the Church “non-essential.” Don't buy it. This month, for a gift of any amount, the Colson Center's theologian-in-residence, Dr. Timothy Padgett is hosting a course entitled “The Essential Church.” Be equipped theologically, biblically, socially, and culturally in the critical role of the Church, both in the past and today. Go to colsoncenter.org/August to sign up. 

The Pastor's Heart with Dominic Steele
Repentance is what's needed - with former Gafcon General Secretary Peter Jensen

The Pastor's Heart with Dominic Steele

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 30:44


The Anglican Communion is broken and needs to repent. Provinces of the Anglican Communion are now free to develop their own teaching on sexuality, according to the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby. There will be no contending for the faith (cf Jude 1:3) or withdrawing fellowship from the sexually immoral. Archbishop Justin Welby arranged the Lambeth Conference so that delegates didn't get to vote on the most contentious issue of the day - sexuality. Rather he wrote to delegates announcing that Lambeth 1:10 still applied, but there would be no consequences for ignoring it. Former Archbishop of Sydney and former General Secretary of Gafcon Peter Jensen joins us to review the confusion in global Anglicanism in the wake of Lambeth22.Gafcon's letter to the churches: https://bit.ly/3BWUKadCommunique from the Global South: https://bit.ly/3p64FSVMedia Release from the Global South: https://bit.ly/3JUZoYhhttp://www.thepastorsheart.net/podcast/peter-jensen-on-lambeth22Support the show

The President's Inbox
America's Great Power Opportunity, With Ali Wyne

The President's Inbox

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 37:23


James M. Lindsay sits down with Ali Wyne, senior analyst of Global Macro-Geopolitics at Eurasia Group, to discuss great power competition and the growing rivalry between the United States and China, and Russia.   Mentioned on the Podcast   Ali Wyne, America's Great Power Opportunity, 2022   Gerald Segel, “Does China Matter?,” Foreign Affairs, September/October 1999   Nadège Rolland, “China's Southern Strategy: Beijing Is Using the Global South to Constrain America,” Foreign Affairs, June 9, 2022   Bonny Lin and Jude Blanchette, “China on the Offensive: How the Ukraine War Has Changed Beijing's Strategy,” Foreign Affairs, August 1, 2022   Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Liberman, Four Threats: The Recurring Crises of American Democracy, 2020   Suzanne Mettler, “Democracy Tested: Democratic Crises in U.S. History,” The President's Inbox, August 3, 2022

WorldAffairs
Are Women the Future of Sierra Leone?

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 31:32


War captures headlines… but what happens when the rubble clears? How does a country – and its people – rebuild after tragedy?   Chernor Bah was a child when Sierra Leone fell into a brutal, ten-year civil war. Now, 20 years later, he's working to ensure that Sierra Leoneans, especially women, are at the center of the country's postwar narrative and development.   Bah shares how his early experiences with war and humanitarian aid inspired to create Purposeful, an Africa-rooted organization that challenges the long held assumption that men – and white donors – should dictate redevelopment in the Global South.   Guest:   Chernor Bah, co-founder and CEO of Purposeful   Host:    Ray Suarez   If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

New Books in Literary Studies
Christopher Krentz, "Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature" (Temple UP, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:30


Dr. Christopher Krentz is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia, where he has a joint appointment with the departments of English and American Sign Language. He is also the author of Writing Deafness: The Hearing Line in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and editor of A Mighty Change: An Anthology of Deaf American Writing, 1816–1864, as well as numerous articles about disability in literature and culture. He is currently director of the University of Virginia's Disability Studies Initiative and helped found their American Sign Language Program. Characters with disabilities are often overlooked in fiction, but many occupy central places in literature by celebrated authors like Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, J. M. Coetzee, Anita Desai, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and others. These authors deploy disability to do important cultural work, writes Christopher Krentz in his innovative study, Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature (Temple UP, 2022). Such representations not only relate to the millions of disabled people in the Global South, but also make more vivid such issues as the effects of colonialism, global capitalism, racism and sexism, war, and environmental disaster. Krentz is the first to put the fields of postcolonial studies, studies of human rights and literature, and literary disability in conversation with each other in a book-length study. He enhances our appreciation of key texts of Anglophone postcolonial literature of the Global South, including Things Fall Apart and Midnight's Children. In addition, he uncovers the myriad ways fiction gains energy, vitality, and metaphoric force from characters with extraordinary bodies or minds. Depicting injustices faced by characters with disabilities is vital to raising awareness and achieving human rights. Elusive Kinship nudges us toward a fuller understanding of disability worldwide. Autumn Wilke works in higher education as an ADA coordinator and diversity officer and is also an author and doctoral candidate with research/topics related to disability and higher education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Christopher Krentz, "Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature" (Temple UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:30


Dr. Christopher Krentz is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia, where he has a joint appointment with the departments of English and American Sign Language. He is also the author of Writing Deafness: The Hearing Line in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and editor of A Mighty Change: An Anthology of Deaf American Writing, 1816–1864, as well as numerous articles about disability in literature and culture. He is currently director of the University of Virginia's Disability Studies Initiative and helped found their American Sign Language Program. Characters with disabilities are often overlooked in fiction, but many occupy central places in literature by celebrated authors like Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, J. M. Coetzee, Anita Desai, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and others. These authors deploy disability to do important cultural work, writes Christopher Krentz in his innovative study, Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature (Temple UP, 2022). Such representations not only relate to the millions of disabled people in the Global South, but also make more vivid such issues as the effects of colonialism, global capitalism, racism and sexism, war, and environmental disaster. Krentz is the first to put the fields of postcolonial studies, studies of human rights and literature, and literary disability in conversation with each other in a book-length study. He enhances our appreciation of key texts of Anglophone postcolonial literature of the Global South, including Things Fall Apart and Midnight's Children. In addition, he uncovers the myriad ways fiction gains energy, vitality, and metaphoric force from characters with extraordinary bodies or minds. Depicting injustices faced by characters with disabilities is vital to raising awareness and achieving human rights. Elusive Kinship nudges us toward a fuller understanding of disability worldwide. Autumn Wilke works in higher education as an ADA coordinator and diversity officer and is also an author and doctoral candidate with research/topics related to disability and higher education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The China in Africa Podcast
Week in Review: Taiwan, Tesla and Antony Blinken's Upcoming Africa Tour

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 61:28


China mounted an intercontinental media response throughout the Global South this week to rage against U.S. Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan. Managing Editor Cobus van Staden and Francophone Editor Geraud Neema break down why developing countries, including several in Africa, who have repeatedly said they want to stay out of the U.S.-China standoff, decided to weigh in on this controversy.Plus, a preview of U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken's upcoming Africa tour and what a Tesla battery deal with Chinese suppliers reveals the realities facing the U.S. and other governments that want to get China out of their strategic supply chains.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:Twitter: @ChinaGSProject| @stadenesque | @eric_olander | @christiangeraudFacebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectFOLLOW CAP IN FRENCH AND ARABIC:Français: www.projetafriquechine.com | @AfrikChineعربي: www.akhbaralsin-africia.com | @AkhbarAlSinAfrJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff, including our Week in Review report, an invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Own The Future
Nancy Pelosi sparks WWIII? Taiwan vs China Signals shift in World Order [E293]

Own The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 52:43


Time StampsNancy Pelosi Starts WWIII and Conservatives Abandon America First 00:00Green New Deal starts to promote air pollution 00:01:57Intro 00:03:49China going ballistic over Taiwan. 00:04:52Hypocritical Republican Pundits reverse their policy stances against China as they hate Pelosi more. 00:06:01China Taiwan History Overview 00:09:03World Order has an interest in protecting Taiwan 00:21:32Jake Sullivan 00:28:06Blinken 00:29:42China looking for opportunity to escalate 00:30:44Yeah That Makes Sense 00:33:40Drop in air pollution causing global warming 00:34:10Air pollution causes dementia 00:36:50Value for Value 00:41:00Weaver and Loom - Tests on the road to success. 00:41:59Closing 00:51:14For more detailed show notes visit: https://293.lucasskrobot.comVALUE FOR VALUE- If you get value out of this show— support the show in the value that you've received.You can do that by visiting the website and giving Fiat currency thereORYou can stream bitcoin by listening Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx – PodstationTo find one visit http://newpodcastapps.com and find a player with the “VALUE” tag. I personally listen on Breez.If you want to get MORE value out of the show, talk about it with a colleague or co worker, or friend. You will begin to build (hopefully) stronger relationship and culture through texting this to a friend and then talking about the concepts discussed here. Remember, as leaders our first job is to define reality and define culture and that is done brick by brick.Until next time… uncover your purpose, discern the Truth, and own the future.To take more steps to live a focus life to achieve your dreams and fulfill your destiny–get my book Anchored the Discipline to Stop Drifting.  https://amzn.to/2Vwb22nThank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220http://www.LucasSkrobot.comTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lucasskrobotLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucasskrobotInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lucasskrobot★ Support this podcast ★

The ThinkOrphan Podcast
The Care Leader Compilation

The ThinkOrphan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 49:08


This week we're jumping into our first summer compilation episode and we're learning from friends and colleagues throughout the world about leaving care. Nabs, Sinet, Grace and Tamrat give us first hand accounts of growing up in orphanages in the Global South. Beyond hearing their stories, they also provide insight for moving care forward. We'd encourage you to check out their respective organizations to learn more about care reform and pursuing family care in their respective countries. Mohamed Nabieu - Helping Children Worldwide - Sierra Leone Sinet Chan - Cambodia Children's Trust - Cambodia Grace Njeri - Weza Care Solutions - Kenya Tamrat Kebede - Selamta Family Project - Ethiopia Full show notes can be found at thinkorphan.com

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship
CEO of the IKEA Foundation, Per Heggenes: a wide-ranging conversation on climate, impact, collaboration, refugees, Ukraine and optimism

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 40:29


Per joins us back on the show after last having been with us on 6th September 2020. We continue where we left off and start by looking at the Global Energy Alliance for People and Planet (GEAPP), which the IKEA Foundation set up with the Rockefeller Foundation and the Bezos Earth Fund. GEAPP is working in partnership with countries across Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean to operationalise renewable energy transitions and expansions, which will reduce greenhouse gases, extend clean power to underserved people, and enable green jobs.  As Per notes, we need to embrace radical collaboration – it's the way to get to Net Zero. We also look at the IKEA Foundation's approach to measurement, learning and evaluation; the importance of using evidence to guide grant-making, and the importance of funding research to build such bodies of evidence when they don't exist.  Evidence is key for achieving systems change, and philanthropy needs to take risks, innovate and collaborate. The conversation also looks at the work the IKEA Foundation has traditionally been doing with refugees in the Global South and, more recently, how IKEA's commercial operations are supporting refugees from Ukraine in the Global North. Per details the close collaboration between IKEA's philanthropic and commercial sides. Thank you for downloading this episode of The Do One Better Podcast. Visit our website at Lidji.org for information on nearly 200 interviews with remarkable leaders in philanthropy, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. Please leave us a rating and a review to help others find this show.  

M.I.Cynic
“Winning the Unwinnable” with Dr. Jozef Hrabina [Episode 34]

M.I.Cynic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


In this week's episode, Jozef Hrabina (Ph.D., Moscow State Institute of International Relations) and I discuss Russian-Western relations following the onset of the Russo-Ukrainian War. We discuss misperception of mindsets, the origin of Russian Statehood, Russian mobilisation, Prof. Mearsheimer's Realist views, Russian foreign reserves and capacity to weather unprecedented sanctions, Russian stranglehold over European energy security, economic damage done to Europe as a result of these sanctions and its political consequences, the failure of deposing Vladimir Putin, Russian counter-measures such as intellectual property rights, China's silent opportunism, the role of the Global South, the future of the Post-Soviet Space, and lastly what "winning the unwinnable" war might look like. Join us for deep dive into Russia's unwinnable war.

Deep Dish on Global Affairs
Sri Lanka's Economic and Political Crises Continue

Deep Dish on Global Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 38:51


Two weeks ago, Sri Lankans stormed the residence of the President and Prime Minister, following months of protests against corruption and worsening economic conditions. Saddled with billions of dollars of foreign debt and facing the lingering economic effects of the pandemic and Russia's war on Ukraine, Sri Lankans face rampant inflation and dire shortages of fuel, foods, and medicines. Dialogue Advisory Group's Ram Manikkalingam joins Deep Dish to explore how this island nation, whose economy was once held up as a success story in South Asia, has come apart, and what this experience reveals about the pressures faced by other nations across the Global South.  Like the show? Leave us a rating and review!

New Books Network
Ali Mirsepassi, "The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 70:17


The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan (Stanford UP, 2021), opens with a fascinating passage about the 1934 decree whereby foreign delegates were instructed to refer to the country as Iran rather than Persian. In Ali Mirsepassi's view, the event closes a chapter on the long intellectual history of Iranian nationalism, which began in the often overlooked interwar era (1919-1935). Mirsepassi skillfully reconstructs the intellectual history of Iran during the interwar period by providing a holistic picture of the life and thought of Taghi Arani, a multifaceted public intellectual, a scientist, a cosmopolitan, and a Marxist. According to Mirsepassi, Arani's vision of Iran brings together cosmopolitanism with the idea of "civic nationalism" as a viable alternative to Soviet Marxism in the Global South. Arani's nuanced account of Iran as a nation has remained unacknowledged as an autocratic nationalism rises in Iran between 1934 and 1935. Yet, Arani's commitment to upholding the democratic ideals of the Constitutional Revolution (1905-1911), traceable to the Enlightenment, still has relevance today in the struggle against oppression, religious fanaticism, and cultural chauvinism. This study contributes a great deal to the understanding of intellectual history and social movements in the Global South, where demands for democracy and independence as well as oppression have been a part of the nation-building project. Kaveh Rafie is a PhD candidate specializing in modern and contemporary art at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His dissertation charts the course of modern art in the late Pahlavi Iran (1941-1979) and explores the extent to which the 1953 coup marks the recuperation of modern art as a viable blueprint for cultural globalization in Iran. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Nicole de Paula Is a Champion for Women's Advancement Through Environmental Conservation

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 36:12


Dr. Nicole de Paula has been globally connecting policymakers and researchers for more than a decade to create a public understanding on key issues related to sustainability and public health. As a Planetary Health advocate, she champions the socioeconomic advancement of women through environmental conservation. She is the founder of the Women Leaders for Planetary Health and in 2019, she became the first awardee of the prestigious Klaus Töpfer Sustainability Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Potsdam, Germany. Nicole is the author of the book “Breaking the Silos for Planetary Health: A Roadmap for a Resilient Post-Pandemic World.” Learn More about Nicole. Learn more about The Passionistas Project.   FULL TRANSCRIPT: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to the Passionistas project podcast, where we talk with women who are following their Passionistas to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington. And today we're talking with Dr. Nicole de Paula, who has been globally connecting policy makers and researchers for more than a decade to create a public understanding on key issues related to sustainability and public. As a planetary health advocate, she champions the socioeconomic advancement of women through environmental conservation. She's the founder of Women Leaders for Planetary Health and in 2019, she became the first awardee of the prestigious Klaus Töpfer Sustainability Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany. Nicole is also the author of the book “Breaking the Silos for Planetary Health - A Roadmap for a Resilient Post-Pandemic World.” So please welcome to the show Dr. Nicole de Paula. Nicole: Hi, Nancy and Amy. Thank you for having me. Passionistas: What's the one thing you're most passionate about? Nicole: I think recently it's definitely planetary health. Uh, we've been advocating so much and at the beginning, the term was what is planetary health sounded like a horror cop thing. Right? So it was the, it was a term that sounded, it was a bit weird in some language doesn't translate. Well, I think in German, for example, it's, it's, it's hard to translate in Portuguese as well. I'm from Brazil. So, uh, it was also a bit funny, but definitely is the topic that we should be talking about specifically. Now when we need to recover. Hopefully from this pandemic. Passionistas: So tell us of what planetary health means and how it relates to what you do for a living. Nicole: Yeah. So maybe what I do, I'm my background. I tend to say I'm a fake doctor, right? So I'm a, I have a PhD in international relations, so I'm not a magical doctor cause I've been talking a lot with public health experts. It's quite an interesting exercise. And so planetary health, uh, from my perspective is of very interesting narrative of things that decision makers should. Talking about or acting. So it's basically everything. So the planet is changing, right? We say that if the planet is sick with all the climate change impacts biodiversity loss, pollution, you know, we, we don't know anymore what we have in our foods. So much chemicals there processed food, you know, and crisis. We used to have a big problem of course, with hunger and. You know, half of the population is obese. So of course we're changing our lifestyles and the way the planet is changing and the way that we are impacting our planet. So that's why we say this anthropogenic impacts we need it's impacting public health. So the decision normally is what is health at the end of the day, right? Is everything that is inside our bodies and is just this small system. Or we should talk about health. Connected to the health of our planet. So the planetary health is a scientific discipline or, um, not discipline is there is discussion that I think is started as saying as a discipline, but let's say it's an approach, a new area of studies calling that way. I think many researchers were already discussing sustainability connecting to the, to human health. So again is very simple. It's just trying to connect sustainability to public health policies and on the, on the issue of. scientists are trying to understand how exactly climate change impacts, you know, human health. We have heat waves that impact, you know, the most vulnerable in cities. Uh, so we're trying to measure that's. So that's not exactly what I do, you know, when people will do modeling and, but in the end, we need to communicate and inform decision makers of this field and say, what do we do about it? And that's the, what I'm passionate about. How do we get the science and bring it to the people who can take these decision? And it's of course not an easy thing, especially this days, but we keep trying. So you mentioned COVID talk about how the relationship to COVID and planetary health. Like what, how is it affecting the world on the planet? Yes, COVID is as, um, sometimes mentioned and I notice in a book it's. Of course, it's a very bad thing, but if every crisis brings an opportunity, that's the sad reality. If we need change, we probably learn through love or pain. Right. So it's very hard to change behavior if you don't have a big crisis and COVID is now showing I think stimulating this conversation about, okay, what is exactly connections? It's, it's just, just a sanitary thing. It's, uh, the disease, but what you're learning now and, and. Trying to communicate. Actually, I think a lot of people have been trying to communicate this before, but the way, for example, deforestation, the way we are transforming our environment, we are, uh, increasing the chances of this contact with new viruses. So for example, illegal wildlife. Trading, you know, if you're bringing species to different and because the world is so connected in three days, the whole, if you have a new disease in three days, the whole world is contaminated. So the COVID is really showing that we need to connect more. The dots. Between these issues of biodiversity conservation. You know, this, there is a link with zoonotic diseases. When you have pathogens, frighten animals, jump to humans, we still, we don't have definitive answers about how exactly COVID was created, but six out of 10 new diseases come from animals. You know, so this, this zoonotic disease. So, so we know that we are creating some sort of this possibility of increasing diseases and, and climate change. For example, Our natural ecosystem. So new mosquitoes there wouldn't be in Europe, for example, because of the climate. Now, if we find, so we have a new ecology of, of these diseases that it's important to understand and study again, we have, uh, researchers doing that. So planetary health brings this conversation and links, uh, this points. Passionistas: So let's take a step back. You talked about the fact that you're from Brazil. Tell us a bit about growing up there. And when did you first become aware of these issues and what inspired you to pursue this field. Nicole: Of course, I mean, I think I always wanted to, I remember as a, let's say teenager, the time you need to decide about university, I was between. Two things. I think I, I love studying. So I think my thing, I love learning. So doesn't matter what it is. I people say, oh, what's your favorite? You know, subject? I liked everything. Uh, at the end I started being better at humanities and others, but I was still at some point. Good, very good in chemistry. Very good in math, some parts of physics. So I wish I had more talent. I wish I had kept my talents. I found that time would be great for calculating it or model. Days, which I don't feel they're very capable, but I enjoyed, uh, learning and, and, and I enjoyed traveling. So that was a big thing. So I think, you know, if you're uncomfortable in new places. So for example, from Brazil, I remember going to Portugal at early age and I didn't enjoy so much because it was so similar. To Brazil. And I think nowadays I would think, uh, differently because it's a fantastic city in LIBO, for example, it changed so much, but the traveling part was inspiring. And so I was trying to find things, you know, what is, what can I do that unite all this many disciplines that I enjoy and, and traveling. So I initially, um, I also was very good at debating, especially my family. If I wanted something I would debate until they were tired. So it was, uh, some people found that of course, very annoying, but they thought would be, I would be a good lawyer. Right. So I thought about it. And in the end I found this brochure, that's saying, oh, international relation. It was a new course at that point, you know, remember also globalization and all this. So that's something we have a very, of course at the university of Sao Paulo is let's say top university in Brazil, depending on the subject, but is very, uh, important center, but they didn't have international relations when I was applying for it. So there was another univers. The head leading that in Sao Paulo and from Sao Paulo. And so I joined that and started doing international relations, but at that point, nobody knew what do you do with international relations? Right? It just, and in the first year it was, it was actually the time when the United States. Was not ready to sign or, you know, was withdrawing from the Coda protocol, which is the whole, the initial agreement, uh, in the whole climate sphere. So as a student in political science, I was like, why, if it's such a good thing for the planet, why we have the biggest power saying that they don't wanna agree with this? You know, that's, it's good for the plant. So that's how I entered the, the climate diplomacy conversation. So again, I entered the sustainability sphere through the political. Perspective. Right. And then from that on, I was started doing a lot of understanding how countries negotiate about the trees. So it was climate then biodiversity and quickly I could actually move to France. So my university had an agreement. So I moved to France and then started studying a lot from the perspective of European union, which is another whole in region and negotiations of agreement to have a global position. So all that it's endless and it was fascinating. But I tended to focus on the sustainable stable development aspects. And, you know, we have in Rio, Brazil also, we are very, it's a very important country for sustainable development. The Amazon has always been on the agenda. We have infinite natural resources, you know, is the mega diverse, uh, countries top. So Brazil has been very important for this negotiations. And so that's why I started my academic life. And there was no specific moment, right. This, I had an aha moment for other things later, but for that, I just really enjoyed the disciplines. And, and that's how I think also. We say the planetary health is really about multidisciplinary, you know, whatever we do, we need to unite disciplines. And international relations was always a, let's say a collection of disciplines. You did economics, law, sociology, you know, theology, linguistics things. And you had to make sense of all this. So I think from the early age, I was maybe comfortable navigating multidisciplinary systems and which today is very useful because, you know, you're kind of comfortable. You're not there to protect a discipline and you're just free to kind of have this dialogue, which is so, so important. So tell us about some of the fellowships that you've done through the years, the international Institute for sustainable development. Passionistas: What was your work like there? Nicole: Yeah, so, well, the international for sustainable development is actually the it's more, um, it's a think tank and that's through this organization that I could. Actually be in the practice of sustainability tracking sustainable development in real time, because you are, uh, going to all this at the UN and, and, and trying to understand the country's positions and why. So it's a lot of work of Intel in the end, the product you would say you would do reports and informing in a very succinct, uh, way what countries are doing. However you need the whole background. So we were, most of the people there were doing their PhDs or at least a master in one of the specific negoti later negotiations. So it was more, uh, yeah, so we were part of a global team tracking this, but usually also connected to your academic. Research. So this was during my PhD times where I could, I think, you know, I don't know, almost 60 countries and, and it was gave a lot of perspective, you know, from what people think, because one solution, you know, in Europe is not a solution in Africa is on solution in Latin America. And that's, that's why it's so slow. And that's why it's so difficult because of course we do need global solutions. However, you still need to kind of get the. Contextualized moments of this. So very challenging, but that's what I did there. It was really getting, uh, and track and sustainability in practice at the UN level. Passionistas: And as we mentioned in our intro in 2019, you became the first awardee of the Klaus Töpfer Sustainability Fellow. So tell us about that period and what, and what that experience was like. Nicole: So that's a very recent experience and it's, it's one of my favorites because it gave so, um, gave me a lot of freedom to, I think, do follow my passion and do the things that, you know, I use usually say it's it's. When is a time that you have time and money together, you know, it never either you have time or no, uh, no money or money and no time. So this was, this fellowship is really dedicated for two kind of people do their projects and elevate them. And so I was so proud to, uh, cost software is the former Minnesota environment in Germany. He was also the head of the United Nations department program before. So it was someone who was, you know, doing politics in Germany. But also went moved to Kenya and was the head of a large organization. And he had to also understand, right. This compromises, how it works. Africa is not the same as Germany. So, um, and of course it's very influential. Public figure. So I, he, uh, and together a few of, I think Noble Prizes founded, uh, this Institute in, in Potsdam. And it's a very interesting, I think I had a lot of intellectual freedom there and I could develop the book, "Breaking the Silos for Planetary Health," which if you don't have time to sit down and write it's, you know, you never finish. So I could do that. I could support Brazil in a large planetary health global event together with the Harvard university. And this was a fantastic, uh, really expanding the field of planetary health in Latin America. Because one of the things I try to say is there's no point of having planetary health conversation. If it's only in Australia, Europe and you know, north America. So I need to bring that to the global south. And I could found the social enterprise, uh, called women leadership, monetary health, and, and this has opened so many. To a lot of my work today. So I really enjoyed that and, and very supportive colleagues and directors, and it was really, really a very fun time in my career. I must, I'm very thankful for that. I think it was, you know, when you got these things at the right time, you really could. I think I used the opportunity and then COVID came and that for me professionally, Was good because I was talking so much about health sustainability, and unfortunately, see, you need a crisis to push these things and it's a sad reality, but from that perspective was a good timing to talk about this. Passionistas: Talk us through what you do. You connect policy makers and researchers. So what is that process? What's your day like? Nicole: Well, that's funny. My day has been the most. I don't have a routine I have now. I think it's first two weeks that I'm having more of a routine in my life and I'm almost 40. So I enjoy that. I think I worked a lot to get a lot of flexibility in my work life. So I have absolutely no routine because every day, and now with the pandemic, it became then a different world. Why we could do so much virtually and things, but it was more about, so I did a lot of work in different countries when. You know, ISD the internet. When I said I was tracking sustainment about negotiations, every time was in a different country. So I would be in the desert and the next week I would be in the Arctic literally. So you'll have to Pack, you know, for north of Finland and Dubai. So it has been very hectic, but I enjoyed that, but definitely not a common. Existence, especially for women, as we know, you know, people expect that you have your traditional things and then you have your family life like a traditional way and all that. And I always refused in a way and said, no, that's really exciting to not have these routine. That's not what I want. And during this time, so you, why, if you travel so much, you're also connecting with people around the planet. So it facilitates so. Your work doing, you know, if you have to gathering intelligence, you have to see what that country's thinking and what the others. So how can I, if I'm writing a paper. Or, or, you know, even my PhD, I had to really, for, for five years you were doing research and, and, and I was about the strategic partnership between Brazil and EU on the specific agreements. So things are evolving, right? So I need to track that. And so this connection is. First through research because you have to inform and you have to publish and you have to get the knowledge, but then once, once you are working with these organizations, you're actually also transferring that knowledge or trying to, you know, it's not so much of an academic exercise, but if you do, if you're working with think tanks, then you do round tables and you do other events. And it's more of the networking part, exchanging the word that I like here. Cross pollinating knowledge around disciplines. Institutions. So that's a lot of what I do. And so it's not a clear cut thing, but when you see, you have to yeah. Do your research like political scientist and a lot of interviews. For example, the method, if you're this participant observant, you know, you are in the process. So not only reading cuz what is published in the end, it's not necessarily what was happening. There's so much in politics that cannot be published. That's why these personal connections are so important because you need trust from these individuals to get the information. That's how I think, think it's a very important talent. So this personal [00:18:00] diplomacy with trust building networking in many countries that really helps to kind of today. I have my colleagues that, oh, we will. And I moved to Bangkok after, right. So I lived in France, then I moved to Thailand and I lived in Canada. I lived in Washington, DC, and I lived in more in Brazil, of course. And now I'm in Italy. So it's kind of, some point gets Tre with the bureaucracy, you know, the visa things. That's, uh, what I'm, but apart from that is fascinating because you adapt and I think that's what the world needs today. Right? We all had to adapt so fast, but honestly, for me, it was. When the lockdown came, I just felt that was just my regular life that everybody could finally understand that we could do so much online, that we could do so much virtually. So a lot of distracting of the negotiations we did virtually and I worked. Like this with slack or all this chat functions with people around the world that I never met since 2012. So, you know, 10 years later, the world figured out that it is possible. We don't need to fly across the world to have, you know, a one-on-one meeting that that's absolutely insane Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and you are listening to The Passionistas Project Podcast in our interview with Dr. Nicole de Paula. To learn more about Women Leaders for Planetary Health's mission to empower women to lead planetary health solutions at frontlines of development in the Global South visit WLPH.org. We'd like to take a moment to invite you to the third annual Power of Passionistas summit this September 21st through September 23rd, 2020. The three-day virtual event is focused on authentic conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion, this unique gathering of intersectional storytellers and panelists harnesses, the power of our rich community of passionate thought leaders and activists to pose solutions to the problems plaguing women and non-binary people. Early bird tickets are on sale now through August 21st for just $99 at ThePassionistasProject.com. So be sure to register before the special discount rate ends. We'd like to thank our sponsors, Melanie Childers Master Coach, Graceful Revolution, The OSSA Collective, Tea Drops, Aaron's Coffee Corner, Flourishing Over 50, Espinola Real Estate Team, Sarah Finns Coaching, Tara McCann Wellness, Aspira Public Affairs and TrizCom Public Relations. Now here's more of our interview with Nicole. Did you miss traveling though for someone who likes to be on the go. Nicole: Exactly, that's a very, you know, interesting question and. The good thing is I did so much that I feel that. I feel a bit satisfied with, you know, the places that I've been and it's never enough there's no, if you like traveling, you know, you can always do again and, and learn more and spend more time. But I definitely felt at the beginning was fine because, you know, with the lockdown you could produce everything and write, I used my time, a lot to do the writing and. What I miss is just, um, the easing, you know, the facility that you could go. So now, if you're in Italy, Italy, you have to go back to Germany. It feels like you're going to another continent in the civil war, you know? So, and that's the thing, it's very, it's sad because, you know, if you have family also abroad and it's just, it's kind of a, a worry that if you need to travel fast and, and, and not every. We'll have, you know, the same advantages or being treated equally. So in the end, the most vulnerable will always suffer more. They will not have support. They cannot. So I miss, I miss the, the easy connections to exotic places. so in 2019 new co-founded the planetary health research group. So tell us about that and what the mission is of that organization. So this group is at the, is hosted by the universal Sao Paul in Brazil. And, and it's hosted by the, there is an Institute for advances studies there and was with together with professor Antonio Saraiva, who is an absolutely partnering crime and that in Brazil and an amazing group of. Interdisciplinary researches. So we were, we actually with professor sarava, we met in the first meeting of the planetary health Alliance in Boston. It was hosted by Harvard and we met in a museum, uh, with, you know, I think it was natural history and you have like ping wings around us. So it was a very fun dinner. And in the bit of the. And we just connected. And for many years we were, you know, discussing and going to these meetings. Every, every it's an annual meeting until Brazil got the right to host for, for the first time the planetary health Alliance would, you know, give the right for a developing country to host this, this conference. And then we, we were just natural partners and we had, we were working direct together. So we decided to have this an official center, uh, at the university of Sao Paulo in the most interdisciplinary center. And this is growing now I'm affiliated I'm founder co-founder and professor is really leading that. Now he's a very senior professor there, so it's, it's just fascinating because it's not something, you know, that belongs to the university. Of Sao, but it's something that belongs to Brazil because we have many partners. We have people from all regions, as you know, Brazil's a very, very big country. So it's kind of really well distributed now. And it's fascinating to, even for me, when you go to meetings, you have all different accents from Brazil. You know that sometimes you, if you'll sustain your bubble, you don't even listen to different voices. And, and if you're advocating for this diversity in decision making it. You know, it starts there. We have to have people from different regions, so that's, it's growing and we could host successfully the. In last year. Yeah, because January, so definitely like, uh, last year, I think April, we got 5,000 people who register for this and, you know, from 130 countries. And, and because also it was the first time it would be in Brazil, but the pandemic had to be online, but we really took the opportunity to make this. An inclusive, you know, not that a lot of people would, this conferences would be usually around 400 people and we could at least bring that to the houses of, you know, in people in hundred, 130 countries. So, and that's why the, what I like to talk about also volunteer health movement. It's a scientific thing, but also if you don't talk and people don't get excited and don't wanna do things, it's usually right. The planetary health movement, as you know, social movement is very important as well. And I think we've worked quite well and there are now new programs of young ambassadors from different universities and they're doing things. So it's about also inspiring others to, to get to know more about the few, to apply to their, how would they think, you know, in their topic of research discuss this. So, yeah, so very proud of that one. That's how I could help my own country. Explore the team. And in 2020 you founded the Women Leaders for Planetary Health. So what is the mission of that organization? Nicole: Yeah, it was so the United nations climate conference, the cop 25 December. I had it with the support of, I, I asked this organization that was in pots. I really wanted to do something that would, I was doing so much on voluntary health, but the gender dimension was really mentioned. I wasn't hearing about it. It was just. You know, unknown issue. So, so, uh, I, I definitely the mission is we want to empower women to lead planetary health solutions in the global south, simple as that, because how many women, you know, and sustainability is very full of women, but how many women really leading solutions or, you know, receive funding to do their own thing, or that's the challenge that we have. Right. And so I wanted to focus. On that discussion first to understand why if we empower women, what's the difference for planetary. And I mean, we're doing research on that, right. But of course there's many indications that you can accelerate the impact of sustainable development policies. If you have women empowered and able to, to take the lead and, and make a change, if you wanna like in food systems, for example, if you, you can be investing agriculture in bio things, however, if women don't have land. You know, legally they're discriminated and they cannot produce their own things or do practices. Um, it's kind of useless. So we need to pay attention to this, to many of inequalities of inequalities, not only income, but also opportunities. And that's why I wanted to again, bring the planetary health conversation to low and middle income countries. So I was really targeting that as part of the. That's why the first, um, round we created a digital academy, which was with the pandemic was great because everything could be digital. And it could, we, we had third more than 30 countries participating in our things. So, and, and, and very, let's say non reachable, difficult countries, you know, we had people in Palestine had people from Sudan. We had people named Zimbabwe from Brazil, you know, in Latin America. In all these women, they all share the same problems, but also the same passion and the same solutions. You see the they're doers, you know, and the, the [00:28:00] narrative is really not to make oh, women is, I didn't create organizations to say, oh, we are suffering. It's so difficult. They're discriminated. The point is how we empower them to, to do what they wanna do and, but have the right resources and the leadership. So we focus really on, on leadership training sessions and with, we had our wonderful Angela field who also supported us on that. And I was mostly focusing on, on this research part of planetary health. And so we write papers and do the research as well. How climate or. Biodiversity. How does things connect to gender? Yeah. So that's how we, and it's, it's growing the UN, so it was good to also have that conversation at the UN that's, how it started. And now we are a social enterprise, you know, legal institution in Germany. And, and that's, I'm very excited to see how this is growing. We have a team in Brazil. Now we have things growing Africa. We have things in Southeast Asia. Yeah. Very excited. That's I think how we get that's the, the passion, I think our jobs. And if you work with the policy makers, it's not always fun. Right? They're of course politics entered in the middle. Things can be delayed and take time to, to drive change. But this is really the fun part. I think of my work, cuz you see the results and you see also the results at the personal level. You know, you have sometimes I think we underestimate how much we could help people by simple things, just, you know, supporting them with the letter. So the mentoring part of our, we had this digital academy, but also we were pairing individuals with senior mentors. So we had a mentorship program. Targeting low middle income countries, women in low middle income countries. So, and I heard so many stories after, because at the beginning I thought, well, you know, this is not, I mean, it's not a big deal. It's just, okay, we're helping a little bit. But when you see the later, what they tell and the things, the decisions that they took in the end, or the courage that they had to do, their own things, they really, you get surprised and you say, wow, and this is, you know, we did this and that's very rewarding. Passionistas: Can you tell us about maybe a success story, something that you've seen come through the organization? Nicole: Yeah, I think it, I mean, what I saw a lot was this positive. They tell stories that, oh, when I joined the program, I was, you know, I was a bit lost. I didn't know what to do or maybe careers. And they normally, they felt empowered to take the decisions that they already knew that they would do, but they felt validated somehow that that's, oh, that's I can do this. So I heard many stories like this. If they wanna maybe start a new master's program or if they wanna change careers, if they wanna quit their toxic. You know, there were stories like this or people who they want to change industries and do more work on sustainability. I saw a lot of this and simply, and maybe at the end, I can tell another story, but don't keep it a secret. Passionistas: So what can women who aren't kind of full-time activists in this field? What can we do on a day to day basis to have an impact on the planet? Nicole: Yeah. So this is a very, it's a common question that we get, right? So how, of course, everybody wants to know how they can make a better place of role, but I like to call attention to, to another point, because yes, you can do your recycles. You can eat, you know, reduce, consumption meat, normally, what is in terms of impact. If you change your diets, that's the easiest and the biggest impact you're gonna. So not so simple to do it. And especially it depends where you leave and your culture or your habit, but that's what researchers show that that's the biggest impact you can have. If you change your diet, you have of course, more, more, less meat, less a more plants. And so there is something called plenary health diet that it doesn't say you can never eat meat, but you know, Definitely. We have to shift the quantity and the proportion of things that we are eating, as we know we're not so healthy these days. So I would invite our, our participants to, to, you know, Google planter, health diet. That's an interesting exercise. But what I like to think about, and that's why it's, it's important also to think in this, which is also hard, but the systemic part, right. Nobody will completely change. What I'm trying to do is really how do you address the root causes of this problems that are saving? I don't think it's our five minute, three minute or 60 seconds shower that will do that. So when we try to put the, the solutions on the shoulders of individuals only, you're not addressing the problem. You're just masking. The problem. And you're just, you know, you want to delay action because what you need to do is to change drastic. You know, you need to change trade rules, you need to change the way supply chains you need to, it's not only one company, right. That company has thousands of companies involved in their business. So how do we do that? So I'm more interested now in, in really in. Transformative systems for sustainability. And of course we have the UN sustainable development goals who, who addressed it. It's a very, it's a plan for development and address so many questions that they're important. But as you see there, it's very hard to disconnect one goal from the other, but many institutions they say, oh, I do, you know, SDG two or four or five. I do gender. And what I like to say, no, if you don't do everything. A little bit, if you don't understand the connections, you're not doing much. So, which is difficult to do because obviously capacity and is limited. Time is limited. Resources are limited. We need to prioritize, use your best skills and maybe focus on what you can do best, but you need partnerships. Nobody will do this alone. So that's why the individual quest, what can we do is yeah, you can start with your house and then maybe influencing your own family and your building and start expanding, but also try to educate yourself about these connections, because I see a lot of people. Oh, use this or consume that, but there's so many inconsistencies things, you know, they would, maybe they are young activists, but they're using Neo Polish full of chemicals for, because it's cheaper from, I don't know, another country try to understand the whole picture. And, and I think that's the way we can have a bigger impact and on women. Right. Let me just, uh, address that. And I think because. Women need to support women. That's simple, you know, for too long, we are also trying this narrative. Oh, women are difficult. You know, today I was hearing someone, if you, since a lot of positions of power are, you know, occupied by men. Also, if, if you're a woman you're just maybe used to kind of, let's say. Working for men or serving that, you know, the ideas of men have. And, and then if women wants to do things they're normally considered difficult or challenging, you know, this is so typical and, and it's happening every day and it's just getting tiring now. And I think women need to stop that and help each other. To, instead of making things worse for ourselves, because we already have a lot of challenge in life. So it's, it's just not acceptable that we are also struggling with other women. So I think it just is more cohesion and support solidarity would make life for all of us so much easier. Passionistas: Thanks for listening to The Passionistas Project Podcast in our interview with Dr. Nicole de Paula. To learn more about Women Leaders for Planetary Health's mission to empower women to lead planetary health solutions the frontlines of development in the Global South visit WLPH.org. Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women owned businesses and female artisans to inspire you to follow your passions. Double your first box when you sign up for a one-year subscription. And remember to get your tickets to the third annual virtual Power of Passionistas summit from September 21st through 23rd. Early bird tickets are on sale now through August 21st for just $99 at ThePassionistasProject.com. So be sure to register before this special discount rate ends. And subscribe to The Passionistas Project Podcast, so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time, stay well and stay passionate.

New Books in Biography
Ali Mirsepassi, "The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 70:17


The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan (Stanford UP, 2021), opens with a fascinating passage about the 1934 decree whereby foreign delegates were instructed to refer to the country as Iran rather than Persian. In Ali Mirsepassi's view, the event closes a chapter on the long intellectual history of Iranian nationalism, which began in the often overlooked interwar era (1919-1935). Mirsepassi skillfully reconstructs the intellectual history of Iran during the interwar period by providing a holistic picture of the life and thought of Taghi Arani, a multifaceted public intellectual, a scientist, a cosmopolitan, and a Marxist. According to Mirsepassi, Arani's vision of Iran brings together cosmopolitanism with the idea of "civic nationalism" as a viable alternative to Soviet Marxism in the Global South. Arani's nuanced account of Iran as a nation has remained unacknowledged as an autocratic nationalism rises in Iran between 1934 and 1935. Yet, Arani's commitment to upholding the democratic ideals of the Constitutional Revolution (1905-1911), traceable to the Enlightenment, still has relevance today in the struggle against oppression, religious fanaticism, and cultural chauvinism. This study contributes a great deal to the understanding of intellectual history and social movements in the Global South, where demands for democracy and independence as well as oppression have been a part of the nation-building project. Kaveh Rafie is a PhD candidate specializing in modern and contemporary art at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His dissertation charts the course of modern art in the late Pahlavi Iran (1941-1979) and explores the extent to which the 1953 coup marks the recuperation of modern art as a viable blueprint for cultural globalization in Iran. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Ali Mirsepassi, "The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 70:17


The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan (Stanford UP, 2021), opens with a fascinating passage about the 1934 decree whereby foreign delegates were instructed to refer to the country as Iran rather than Persian. In Ali Mirsepassi's view, the event closes a chapter on the long intellectual history of Iranian nationalism, which began in the often overlooked interwar era (1919-1935). Mirsepassi skillfully reconstructs the intellectual history of Iran during the interwar period by providing a holistic picture of the life and thought of Taghi Arani, a multifaceted public intellectual, a scientist, a cosmopolitan, and a Marxist. According to Mirsepassi, Arani's vision of Iran brings together cosmopolitanism with the idea of "civic nationalism" as a viable alternative to Soviet Marxism in the Global South. Arani's nuanced account of Iran as a nation has remained unacknowledged as an autocratic nationalism rises in Iran between 1934 and 1935. Yet, Arani's commitment to upholding the democratic ideals of the Constitutional Revolution (1905-1911), traceable to the Enlightenment, still has relevance today in the struggle against oppression, religious fanaticism, and cultural chauvinism. This study contributes a great deal to the understanding of intellectual history and social movements in the Global South, where demands for democracy and independence as well as oppression have been a part of the nation-building project. Kaveh Rafie is a PhD candidate specializing in modern and contemporary art at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His dissertation charts the course of modern art in the late Pahlavi Iran (1941-1979) and explores the extent to which the 1953 coup marks the recuperation of modern art as a viable blueprint for cultural globalization in Iran. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Ali Mirsepassi, "The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 70:17


The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan (Stanford UP, 2021), opens with a fascinating passage about the 1934 decree whereby foreign delegates were instructed to refer to the country as Iran rather than Persian. In Ali Mirsepassi's view, the event closes a chapter on the long intellectual history of Iranian nationalism, which began in the often overlooked interwar era (1919-1935). Mirsepassi skillfully reconstructs the intellectual history of Iran during the interwar period by providing a holistic picture of the life and thought of Taghi Arani, a multifaceted public intellectual, a scientist, a cosmopolitan, and a Marxist. According to Mirsepassi, Arani's vision of Iran brings together cosmopolitanism with the idea of "civic nationalism" as a viable alternative to Soviet Marxism in the Global South. Arani's nuanced account of Iran as a nation has remained unacknowledged as an autocratic nationalism rises in Iran between 1934 and 1935. Yet, Arani's commitment to upholding the democratic ideals of the Constitutional Revolution (1905-1911), traceable to the Enlightenment, still has relevance today in the struggle against oppression, religious fanaticism, and cultural chauvinism. This study contributes a great deal to the understanding of intellectual history and social movements in the Global South, where demands for democracy and independence as well as oppression have been a part of the nation-building project. Kaveh Rafie is a PhD candidate specializing in modern and contemporary art at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His dissertation charts the course of modern art in the late Pahlavi Iran (1941-1979) and explores the extent to which the 1953 coup marks the recuperation of modern art as a viable blueprint for cultural globalization in Iran. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Lowy Institute: Live Events
Rules Based Audio: The scramble for information control over Africa

Lowy Institute: Live Events

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 32:36


There has been increasing concern that Russia and China are using state-owned media companies, social media campaigns and proxy actors to manipulate public discourse in the global south. In this episode, Sasha Fegan discusses the influence of disinformation in the media landscape in Africa. Her guests will talk about how Russia and China calibrate their messaging to different nation states, and how Chinese state-owned media in Africa is replicating and reinforcing Russian narratives around Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Idayat Hassan, is a lawyer, development expert and director of the Center for Democracy and Development in Abuja, Nigeria. Dani Madrid-Morales, is a lecturer in the Department of Journalism Studies at The University of Sheffield. He is an expert on Africa-China mediated relations, particularly in Kenya and South Africa. His latest book is Disinformation in the Global South.

New Books in History
Ali Mirsepassi, "The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 70:17


The Discovery of Iran: Taghi Arani, a Radical Cosmopolitan (Stanford UP, 2021), opens with a fascinating passage about the 1934 decree whereby foreign delegates were instructed to refer to the country as Iran rather than Persian. In Ali Mirsepassi's view, the event closes a chapter on the long intellectual history of Iranian nationalism, which began in the often overlooked interwar era (1919-1935). Mirsepassi skillfully reconstructs the intellectual history of Iran during the interwar period by providing a holistic picture of the life and thought of Taghi Arani, a multifaceted public intellectual, a scientist, a cosmopolitan, and a Marxist. According to Mirsepassi, Arani's vision of Iran brings together cosmopolitanism with the idea of "civic nationalism" as a viable alternative to Soviet Marxism in the Global South. Arani's nuanced account of Iran as a nation has remained unacknowledged as an autocratic nationalism rises in Iran between 1934 and 1935. Yet, Arani's commitment to upholding the democratic ideals of the Constitutional Revolution (1905-1911), traceable to the Enlightenment, still has relevance today in the struggle against oppression, religious fanaticism, and cultural chauvinism. This study contributes a great deal to the understanding of intellectual history and social movements in the Global South, where demands for democracy and independence as well as oppression have been a part of the nation-building project. Kaveh Rafie is a PhD candidate specializing in modern and contemporary art at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His dissertation charts the course of modern art in the late Pahlavi Iran (1941-1979) and explores the extent to which the 1953 coup marks the recuperation of modern art as a viable blueprint for cultural globalization in Iran. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

TIME FOR A RESET
TFAR - Episode 37 - Gender Equality in the Workplace

TIME FOR A RESET

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 40:35


In this episode, Paul talks to Christine Fellows, Managing Director of NBC in the APAC region. She currently resides in Singapore and has spent most of her career in the Entertainment Industry, working at companies such as NBC, Comcast, and Turner. Christine has had many roles in tech businesses and currently sits on the board of an AI business. She is extremely passionate about gender equality and female empowerment and has started her own company, Nine by Nine, to address these issues across Asia. Paul and Christine discuss the topic of equal opportunity and female leadership in the workplace. The world is experiencing backward progression in societal equality as a result of major macro-economic impacts especially during the pandemic. Christine's curiosity in the topic led to her research project with Nine by Nine where they surveyed women in the work force to understand their expectations in gender pay. Listeners will be shocked by the percentage of women who felt that they have equality in regions where, statistically, there is a massive gender pay gap. In understanding these results, Christine also highlights cultural differences between the Global North and Global South. She also acknowledges that managerial positions are predominantly held by men while highlighting how they can be the drivers of change. Christine then offers her view on how we can ensure that men will tackle these issues and the importance of diversity in the workplace. While institutionalised patriarchal culture is evident globally, there is still hope. Christine shares her thoughts on the power of Gen Z. Perhaps the future of diversity lies in the hands of the younger generation. This discussion with Christine has left Paul challenged into thinking what he can do to do more. 

Doomsday Watch with Arthur Snell

With the war heading into a sixth month, where will the conflict go next? How are both sides doing when it comes to ammunition? Is NATO really united in its objectives? And how Russia's rhetoric playing out in the Global South? Dr Jack Watling, a senior research fellow at RUSI, joins Arthur Snell for the second of two war bulletins to look at the future direction of the conflict.  We're putting out irregular war bulletins covering different aspects of the Ukraine crisis. You can support our work on the crowdfunding app Patreon: doomsdaywatch.co.uk Resources to help the Ukrainian people can be found here: https://ukrainewar.carrd.co/  “The Russians have plenty of unguided ammunition and they can manufacture more of it.”  “Western sanctions will hamper Russia's ability to manufacture certain weaponry.”  “If I was watching this as China, thinking about Taiwan, I would be saying NATO lacks legs.”  “What we've seen in Ukraine is how dangerous it is when the credibility of your deterrence fails.”  “Just running the Ukrainian government is going to cost the EU and US a lot of money over the coming months.”  “We can't get too excited about Russian diplomacy.”  DOOMSDAY WATCH was written and presented by Arthur Snell, and produced by Robin Leeburn with Jacob Archbold. Theme tune and original music by Paul Hartnoll. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. DOOMSDAY WATCH is a Podmasters production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ChangeMakers
Ruchira Talukdar - ChangeMaker Chat - Global Climate Justice

ChangeMakers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 46:09


While the world is striving to stop catastrophic climate change, there is plenty of conflict over how climate campaign goals are chosen and the language that is used to express them. A key fault line is between the Global North and Global South and whether campaigns about energy transition are imposed onto communities, or connected to solutions that create broader economic, social and cultural justice. Ruchira Talukdar, a climate activist in India and Australia has lived and studied these tensions. In this chat we explore what is going wrong, and how listening and embedding climate work in community empowerment - like we see in Indian anti-extractivist campaigns - could signal a way forward. For more on ChangeMakers check us out: Via our Website - https://changemakerspodcast.org On Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ChangeMakersPodcast/  On Twitter - @changemakers99 or @amandatatts See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Crashing the War Party
Will "autocracies vs. democracies" extend to our economic world order? w/ Marcus Stanley

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 45:51


The U.S. seems determined to manage the world order, even if that means taking the current integrated global economic system and re-calibrating it based on shared national security concerns — like the West on the one side, China and Russia on the other, and the 'non-aligned' like India and the rest of the Global South pressured to pick a team. That seems to be afoot given recent statements by the U.S. Treasury Secretary and the State Department. Here to talk about it is the Quincy Institute's advocacy director and economic policy expert Marcus Stanley. In the first segment, Daniel and Kelley discuss the increased U.S. military presence in Somalia, which has gone all but unnoticed by official Washington and the media.More from Marcus Stanley:Stop using the China ‘threat’ to throw more money at the Pentagon (w/ Michael Swaine), Responsible Statecraft, 6/18/22The US Has No Endgame in Ukraine, an interview with Jacobin Magazine, 6/22Did Janet Yellen just signal a new world economic order? Responsible Statecraft, 4/28/22 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit crashingthewarparty.substack.com

Hot Take
Joe Manchin vs. The World

Hot Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 66:29


This week, Joe Manchin spiked Biden's climate bill, but the planet is no political football. This week's episode of Hot Take takes a closer look at the true stakes of the climate crisis with a focus on the Global South. Mary is joined by Dharna Noor to talk through extreme heat and rising authoritarianism in India, floating cities in the Maldives, drought in the Horn of Africa, and a rotting oil tanker in Yemen—and so much more.Follow us on twitter @RealHotTake and signup for our newsletter at hottakepod.com

Own The Future
Two principles for success from Ira Glass, a bus station, and an old slow reptile [E292 - remix of E024]

Own The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 34:13


I've been meditating on the two principles of uprightness and endurance and how they go hand in hand . . . one without the other and the ship is sunk.  It seemed fitting to pull a segment out (my favorite segment . . . okay favorite episode) out from the archives due to be laid out with the flu.  I've gone back to listen to this show, for my own encouragement, multiple times. I hope you find it as encouraging as I do.Arno Rafael Minkkinen, Ira Glass, and Lucas Skrobot shares their different view points on the Tortoise and the Hare.We hear an excerpt from Minkkinen, the famous photographer, share about a bus stop in Helsinki and how it relates to our work and our art.Ira Glass "stops by" to share about what is required of us to "close the gap" between our taste and our ability.And I share the REAL reason the tortoise beats the hare... and it isn't the reason you think.Here are some link from the show...Arno Rafael Minkkinen: and his speech --> https://petapixel.com/2013/03/13/the-helsinki-bus-station-theory-finding-your-own-vision-in-photography/Ira Glass on Story telling:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2wLP0izeJE&list=PLE108783228F1E008&index=3      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sp_8pwkg_R8&list=PLE108783228F1E008&index=4 warphotography   VALUE FOR VALUE- If you get value out of this show— support the show in the value that you've received.You can do that by visiting the website and giving Fiat currency thereORYou can stream bitcoin by listening Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx – PodstationTo find one visit http://newpodcastapps.com and find a player with the “VALUE” tag. I personally listen on Breez.If you want to get MORE value out of the show, talk about it with a colleague or co worker, or friend. You will begin to build (hopefully) stronger relationship and culture through texting this to a friend and then talking about the concepts discussed here. Remember, as leaders our first job is to define reality and define culture and that is done brick by brick.Until next time… uncover your purpose, discern the Truth, and own the future.To take more steps to live a focus life to achieve your dreams and fulfill your destiny–get my book Anchored the Discipline to Stop Drifting.  https://amzn.to/2Vwb22nThank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220http://www.LucasSkrobot.comTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lucasskrobotLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucasskrobotInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lucasskrobot★ Support this podcast ★

Collapse Talk
Ep 37: Lone Star Idiocy

Collapse Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 194:41


Damning new evidence has been leaked of the incompetent response from the police during the Uvalde massacre, images appear to show officers checking their phones and using hand sanitizer while children were being massacred. The Texas state Republican party platforms the idea of a referendum vote for secession in 2023, further signaling the radicalization of the GOP by far-right extremists. Texas, meanwhile, also experiences record heat and drought as the power grid system struggles to meet the demand of a rapidly growing population with outdated infrastructure. Political unrest grows in Europe and the Global South as working people are left to dry by the Neoliberal establishment, often getting radicalized by the right. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gabriel-marrero6/support

Security in Context
The Russian war in Ukraine: Perspectives from the global South w/ Eric Draitser, Samar Al-Bulushi, Noha Aboueldahab, and Arlene Tickner

Security in Context

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 76:11


In this episode we investigate the Russian war in Ukraine from a global South perspective by analyzing the effects of the crisis on the different countries and regions of the global South, and highlighting the issues that are currently missing from the mainstream discussion. Our guests include: Eric Draitser, independent political analyst and host of CounterPunch Radio; Samar Al-Bulushi, assistant professor of anthropology at University of California, Irvine; Noha Aboueldahab, assistant professor of international law and transitional justice at Georgetown University in Qatar; and Arlene Tickner, professor of international relations at the School of International, Political and Urban Studies, at the Universidad del Rosario Bogotá. At the end of the episode, Security in Context co-founders Omar Dahi and Firat Demir discuss the main highlights of the interviews and share their own takes.

SHINING MIND PODCAST
Episode #96. Francesca and Randall's Wish to Seek Justice for Patients and Relatives of Wolston Park. Dr Kerry Carrington, Professor of Justice.

SHINING MIND PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 37:46


Kerry and I have more in common than we realised. Our siblings, Francesca and Randall, were both made ward of the state at Wolston Park in 1970's and 1980's.  This interview is for them. Their wish is that others do not suffer the same fate.  Kerry Lyn Carrington FASSA (born 1962) is an Australian criminologist, and an adjunct professor at the School of Law and Society at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC). She formerly served as head of the QUT School of Justice for 11 years from 2009 to 2021. She was editor-in-chief of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy. She is known for her work on gender and violence, feminist criminology, southern criminology, youth justice and girls' violence, and global justice and human rights.[1]Carrington earned her PhD in sociology at Macquarie University[2] in 1985. She received the Distinguished Scholar Award of the American Society of Criminology in 2014. Her publication Resource Boom Underbelly: The criminological impact of mining won the 2012 Allen Austin Bartholomew Award. She co-edited the Palgrave Handbook in Criminology and the Global South (2018).Support the show

The Impact Room
Shifting the power: why development dynamics need to change

The Impact Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 35:04


In this final episode of the current series of The Impact Room, Asif Saleh, executive director of BRAC, the world's largest NGO, joins Maysa Jalbout to discuss community-led solution systems, microfinance, and climate accountability.BRAC began in 1972 as a relief organisation to support displaced people in the newly-independent Bangladesh, but in the five decades since, it has grown to become the largest – and arguably – most enterprising NGO in the world.Its programmes span poverty reduction, gender equality, community empowerment, health care, and pro-poor urban development. A pioneer in microfinance and the graduation approach, BRAC also runs 10 social enterprises and has its own insurance company. The first so-called Global South organisation to launch international operations, BRAC is a major provider of humanitarian support for the millions of Rohingya refugees who have fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar.Despite BRAC being the world's largest NGO, Asif is passionate about the need for more action on global commitments to listen to and build the capacity of smaller and local organisations. “There's a lot of talk around that we need to do this, but the how part of how we are going to do this is completely missing,” he tells host, Maysa Jalbout. “What you hear is when you talk to the donors is that it's too risky to support some of the local organisations because they didn't have enough capacity and systems in place. “But then how are these local organisations going to build their capacity if they are squeezed for every single penny? It's a bit of a chicken and egg situation,” he adds.As we recorded this episode of The Impact Room, Bangladesh was grappling with some of its worst flooding on record. Asif urges the world to “wake up” to the realities of climate change which he says is threatening to reverse decades of development gains.Asif began his career in the private sector, holding senior positions with global corporates such as Goldman Sachs, Glaxo Wellcome, and IBM. He joined BRAC in 2011, first as director of communication and social innovation, then rising through the ranks to become executive director in 2019.Listen to this wide-ranging interview with Asif to also hear his thoughts on the Rohingya refugee response, why BRAC's approach to microfinance is different, and why he left his corporate career behind to join the development sector.About the hostMaysa Jalbout is a leader in international development and philanthropy. Her previous roles include founding CEO of the Abdulla Al Ghurair Foundation for Education, a $1bn philanthropic initiative based in Dubai, and founding CEO of the Queen Rania Foundation. Maysa is a visiting scholar at MIT and ASU, and a non-resident Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Find her on Twitter @MaysaJalbout.The Impact Room is produced by Philanthropy Age. Follow us on social media @PhilanthropyAge. This episode was edited by Louise Redvers.This is the last in the current series of The Impact Room. We'll be back with more episodes very soon. 

Money on the Left
Superstructure: Bitcoin in El Salvador

Money on the Left

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 72:06


Ricardo Valencia joins co-hosts Andrés Bernal and Scott Ferguson to discuss recent protests against Bitcoin in El Salvador. Adopted as legal tender by the authoritarian President Nayib Bukele in September 2021, Bitcoin has become an emblem in El Salvador for U.S. corporate imperialism, public mismanagement, and anti-democratic rule. Whereas mainstream accounts of cryptocurrency tend to flatten stories in Latin America to matters of success and failure, Ricardo draws upon rich critical approaches in Cultural Studies developed by the likes of Stuart Hall and Paul Gilroy to situate current events in El Salvador within histories of global governance, political conflict, and cultural identity. During the conversation, Ricardo weighs the fraught legacy of left politics in and beyond El  Salvador. He analyses the conspicuous convergence of “tech-bro” boosterism coming from the U.S. with right-wing regimes in vulnerable countries across the Global South. He considers tensions between imperial domination and quotidian safety that attend El Salvador's dollarization in 2001, including the large role that remittances play in the everyday lives of the Salvadoran people. Finally, Ricardo contemplates the future promise of left politics in El Salvador. This promise, he explains, hinges upon feminist, queer and environmental movements, which are now demanding democratic and just uses of public money. Dr. Ricardo Valencia is an assistant professor of public relations in the Department of Communications at California State University, Fullerton. Between 2010 and 2014, Dr. Valencia was the head of the communication section at the Embassy of El Salvador to the United States. He has also worked as a reporter covering international and domestic politics for Salvadoran and global media outlets such as La Prensa Gráfica, German Press Agency (DPA), and El Faro. Follow Ricardo on Twitter @ricardovalp.Visit our Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/MoLsuperstructure

The Holy Post
What in the World? EPISODE 1: The Kingdom of God with Ruth Padilla DeBorst

The Holy Post

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 62:01 Very Popular


How big is the scope of the gospel? What does God's kingdom include? And what happens when we discover the American church isn't the center of it? Based on the book Inalienable by Eric Costanzo, Daniel Yang, and Matthew Soerens, in this episode Skye Jethani (co-host of The Holy Post) talks to theologian and missiologist Dr. Ruth Padilla DeBorst. With extensive experience in the Latin American church, Padilla DeBorst explains how popular American Christianity misunderstands the Kingdom of God, and how seeking the wisdom of the global church can guild the American church through its current crisis. "Inalienable: How Marginalized Kingdom Voices Can Help Save the American Church" by Eric Costanzo, Daniel Yang, and Matthew Soerens - https://amzn.to/3RyObjc 0:00 - Theme song and intro Interview with Ruth Padilla DeBorst 2:46 - Misunderstandings and assumptions about Christians in the Global South 7:41 - Power and privilege 13:39 - Theologies of liberation 18:10 - Immigrants in the American church 21:06 - Is partnership possible? 25:05 - Celebrity leader dynamics 31:32 - Learning from another contextSponsor: 35:21 - World Relief sponsorship Join the Path: https://worldrelief.org/holypost/ Debrief with Matthew Soerens and Daniel Yang 37:18 - Debrief intro 39:18 - U.S. short-term missions 41:25 - Daniel's family experience 44:13 - Communal culture 49:15 - Laying down preferences 55:35 - The good and the bad in American influence1:01:18 - CreditsResource referenced by Daniel Yang: GlocalNet - https://glocal.net/ The Holy Post is supported by our listeners. We may earn affiliate commissions through links listed here. As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

The China in Africa Podcast
China's Discourse Power in Africa and the Global South

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 60:00


China, like all major governments, uses a variety of tools and methods to influence international public opinion. Some, like CGTN, China Daily, and China Radio International, serve as conventional propaganda that is easy to identify; other tactics are far more subtle yet often very effective in shaping the global conversation about China and its role in the world.This so-called "discourse power" is now an important field of study. Kenton Thibaut, a China fellow at the Atlantic Council, and Tuvia Gering, also a fellow at the Atlantic Council, join us to talk about their latest research on the issue that explores not only how Chinese interests are communicating but also what they're saying.SHOW NOTES:The Atlantic Council: China's Discourse Power Operations in the Global South by Kenton Thibaut: https://bit.ly/3OdnhuqThe Discourse Power newsletter by Tuvia Gering: https://tuviagering.substack.comJOIN THE DISCUSSION:Twitter: @ChinaGSProject| @stadenesque | @eric_olander | @geringtuvia | Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectFOLLOW CAP IN FRENCH AND ARABIC:Français: www.projetafriquechine.com | @AfrikChineعربي: www.akhbaralsin-africia.com | @AkhbarAlSinAfrJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff, including our Week in Review report, an invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Own The Future
Your days are numbered [E291]

Own The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 19:09


VALUE FOR VALUE- If you get value out of this show— support the show in the value that you've received.You can do that by visiting the website and giving Fiat currency thereORYou can stream bitcoin by listening Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx – PodstationTo find one visit http://newpodcastapps.com and find a player with the “VALUE” tag. I personally listen on Breez.If you want to get MORE value out of the show, talk about it with a colleague or co worker, or friend. You will begin to build (hopefully) stronger relationship and culture through texting this to a friend and then talking about the concepts discussed here. Remember, as leaders our first job is to define reality and define culture and that is done brick by brick.Until next time… uncover your purpose, discern the Truth, and own the future.To take more steps to live a focus life to achieve your dreams and fulfill your destiny–get my book Anchored the Discipline to Stop Drifting.  https://amzn.to/2Vwb22nThank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220http://www.LucasSkrobot.comTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lucasskrobotLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucasskrobotInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/lucasskrobot★ Support this podcast ★

Fintech Beat
Blockchains as "Last Mile" Infrastructure in the Global South

Fintech Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 34:28


Robby Greenfield shares how Umoja Labs are leveraging blockchain-based tools to deliver financial inclusion in Africa and beyond. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CQ on Congress
Fintech Beat: Blockchains as "Last Mile" Infrastructure in the Global South

CQ on Congress

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 34:28


Robby Greenfield shares how Umoja Labs are leveraging blockchain-based tools to deliver financial inclusion in Africa and beyond. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship
CEO of Atlas Corps, Bidjan Nashat, on building a talent pool from the Global South and breaking down the barriers to diverse talent.

The Do One Better! Podcast – Philanthropy, Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 37:15


If you ever wondered how to create a truly diverse talent pool and intentionally attract the next generation of leaders from countries not usually represented in senior management teams, this episode will inform you and show you how some of the world's leading organisations are embracing this challenge. Atlas Corps was founded in 2006. They are a non-profit, a social enterprise and a registered 501(c)(3) in the United States. Their Fellowship program identifies strong talent and human capital potential from the Global South and they act as a matchmaker by placing Atlas Corps Fellows with leading organisations such as SAP, Save the Children and the Hilton Foundation. Thank you for downloading this episode of The Do One Better Podcast. Visit our website at Lidji.org for information on nearly 200 interviews with remarkable leaders in philanthropy, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. Please leave us a rating and a review to help others find this show.  

The Naked Pravda
Kadri Liik explains ‘Putin's archaic war' and the Russia we lost

The Naked Pravda

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 28:06


Save Meduza!https://support.meduza.io/enMeduza welcomes European Council on Foreign Relations Senior Policy Fellow Kadri Liik for a discussion about her recent article, “Putin's Archaic War: Russia's Newly Outlawed Professional Class – And How It Could One Day Return,” where she argues that the invasion of Ukraine is “effectively de-modernizing Russia” and derailing processes that could have put the country on a less aggressive, more professional path. A specialist in Russian domestic and foreign policy and in relations between Russia and the West, Liik joined The Naked Pravda to address the issues she raised in her essay. Timestamps for this episode: (2:07) How does the invasion of Ukraine trigger the “de-modernization” of Russian society and foreign policy? (4:36) How does Soviet foreign policy compare to the diplomacy Moscow practiced before and since launching a full-scale invasion of Ukraine? (5:58) What are the “modern” aspects of Russia's recent and current foreign policy in Syria and Africa? (9:14) How long will the war's de-modernization plague Russian society and policymaking? (11:23) To what degree is Russia now “de-modernized” and ostracized globally (not just in the West)? (15:00) What will it take for the West to come to a consensus with the Global South about Russia's invasion of Ukraine? (16:47) How does the “decolonization” debate in Western academia and activism fit into all this? Does this perspective have traction inside Russia? (21:46) What are the “needs” that fueled Russia's “homegrown” democratization potential before the February invasion?

New Books in World Affairs
Florian Wagner, "Colonial Internationalism and the Governmentality of Empire, 1893–1982" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 58:14


Today I talked to Florian Wagner about his new book Colonial Internationalism and the Governmentality of Empire, 1893–1982 (Cambridge UP, 2022). From its founding in 1893, to its decline in the 1970s, the International Colonial Institute (ICI) was one of the most powerful nongovernmental actors on the colonial scene. Styling itself a reformist institution, the ICI applied the tools of transnational scientific exchange to “rationalize” the practice of colonial rule. As part of this reformist project, members of the ICI mobilized progressive ideas in ways that built broad political consensus across Europe while also furthering inequality, exploitation, and segregation in the Global South, even beyond the end of formal empire. Tracing the long history of the ICI reveals fundamental continuities, argues Florian Wagner, that colonialist narratives of change obscure. Elisa Prosperetti is an Assistant Professor in International History at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. Her research focuses on the connected histories of education and development in postcolonial West Africa. Contact her at here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books Network
Florian Wagner, "Colonial Internationalism and the Governmentality of Empire, 1893–1982" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 58:14


Today I talked to Florian Wagner about his new book Colonial Internationalism and the Governmentality of Empire, 1893–1982 (Cambridge UP, 2022). From its founding in 1893, to its decline in the 1970s, the International Colonial Institute (ICI) was one of the most powerful nongovernmental actors on the colonial scene. Styling itself a reformist institution, the ICI applied the tools of transnational scientific exchange to “rationalize” the practice of colonial rule. As part of this reformist project, members of the ICI mobilized progressive ideas in ways that built broad political consensus across Europe while also furthering inequality, exploitation, and segregation in the Global South, even beyond the end of formal empire. Tracing the long history of the ICI reveals fundamental continuities, argues Florian Wagner, that colonialist narratives of change obscure. Elisa Prosperetti is an Assistant Professor in International History at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. Her research focuses on the connected histories of education and development in postcolonial West Africa. Contact her at here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Florian Wagner, "Colonial Internationalism and the Governmentality of Empire, 1893–1982" (Cambridge UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 58:14


Today I talked to Florian Wagner about his new book Colonial Internationalism and the Governmentality of Empire, 1893–1982 (Cambridge UP, 2022). From its founding in 1893, to its decline in the 1970s, the International Colonial Institute (ICI) was one of the most powerful nongovernmental actors on the colonial scene. Styling itself a reformist institution, the ICI applied the tools of transnational scientific exchange to “rationalize” the practice of colonial rule. As part of this reformist project, members of the ICI mobilized progressive ideas in ways that built broad political consensus across Europe while also furthering inequality, exploitation, and segregation in the Global South, even beyond the end of formal empire. Tracing the long history of the ICI reveals fundamental continuities, argues Florian Wagner, that colonialist narratives of change obscure. Elisa Prosperetti is an Assistant Professor in International History at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. Her research focuses on the connected histories of education and development in postcolonial West Africa. Contact her at here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Own The Future
Georgia Guidestones destroyed by Dutch Farmers? [E290]

Own The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 53:09


Time StampsGeorgia Guidestone destroyed 00:00Intro 04:46UN advocating for world hunger? 05:18George Kent & Satire 07:04Capitalism vs NWO post modern Marxism 08:35Alex Jones reports from Guidestones 09:48Alex goes off on globalist agenda 13:02Alex brings historical context to depopulation Darwinism destruction 14:27Stewardship of the earth has been highjacked 19:03Who destroyed the Guide Stones? 20:25mike1956? 24:29World silence on Dutch Farmer Protest 25:04Hypocritical Twitter suing India for censorship 30:09Jordan Peterson on getting banned from Twitter 32:25Yeah that makes sense 33:53VP Kamala compares abortion and slavery 34:20The real evil? Pregnancy crisis centers... 37:42What are abortion laws world wide? 40:31Safe havens for abortion on demand? 44:18Value 4 Value 45:53Weaver and Loom 47:06Ask a question 52:37For more detailed show notes visit: https://290.lucasskrobot.comVALUE FOR VALUE- If you get value out of this show— support the show in the value that you've received.You can do that by visiting the website and giving Fiat currency thereORYou can stream bitcoin by listening Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx – PodstationTo find one visit http://newpodcastapps.com and find a player with the “VALUE” tag. I personally listen on Breez.If you want to get MORE value out of the show, talk about it with a colleague or co worker, or friend. You will begin to build (hopefully) stronger relationship and culture through texting this to a friend and then talking about the concepts discussed here. Remember, as leaders our first job is to define reality and define culture and that is done brick by brick.Until next time… uncover your purpose, discern the Truth, and own the future.To take more steps to live a focus life to achieve your dreams and fulfill