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Best podcasts about Polish

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Latest podcast episodes about Polish

Stuff You Missed in History Class
A Brief History of Dentistry and Oral Health, Part 1

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:05


This first episode covers the earliest ways humans cared for their teeth, including the belief that demons might have something to do with tooth decay. We move all the way up to the 18th century, as dentistry became a profession in the U.S., including a surprising early practitioner. Research: Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Shamash". Encyclopedia Britannica, 4 Mar. 2020, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Shamash Hand, Greg. “IDA GRAY WAS A PIONEERING CINCINNATI DENTIST WHO EARNED NATIONAL FAME.” Cincinnati Magazine. Feb. 15, 2022. https://www.cincinnatimagazine.com/article/ida-gray-was-a-pioneering-cincinnati-dentist-who-earned-national-fame/ Hallmann-Mikołajczak A. Papirus Ebersa. Ksiega wiedzy medycznej egipcjan z XVI w P.N.E [Ebers Papyrus. The book of medical knowledge of the 16th century B.C. Egyptians]. Arch Hist Filoz Med. 2004;67(1):5-14. Polish. PMID: 15586450. Lorenzi, Rosella. “Bad teeth tormented ancient Egyptians.” NBC News. Dec. 3, 2009. https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna34258529 Faulkner, Raymond Oliver and Dorman, Peter F.. "Ramses II". Encyclopedia Britannica, 18 Mar. 2021, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ramses-II-king-of-Egypt Jones, Colin. “Pulling Teeth in Eighteenth-Century Paris.” Past & Present, no. 166, 2000, pp. 100–45, http://www.jstor.org/stable/651296. Accessed 26 Apr. 2022. Forshaw, Roger. (2013). Hesyre: The First Recorded Physician and Dental Surgeon in History. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library. 89. 181-202. 10.7227/BJRL.89.S.10. PROSKAUER, CURT. “The Two Earliest Dentistry Woodcuts.” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1, 1946, pp. 71–86, http://www.jstor.org/stable/24619536 Riddell, William Renwick. “Teeth in Olden Times.” The Public Health Journal, vol. 16, no. 2, 1925, pp. 51–65, http://www.jstor.org/stable/41973265 “The Story of Flouridation.” National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. https://www.nidcr.nih.gov/health-info/fluoride/the-story-of-fluoridation Jain, Shruti, and Hemant Jain. “Legendary Hero: Dr. G.V. Black (1836-1915).” Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR vol. 11,5 (2017): ZB01-ZB04. doi:10.7860/JCDR/2017/17462.9813 Peck, Sheldon. “A Biographical Portrait of Edward Hartley Angle, the First Specialist in Orthodontics, Part 1.” Angle Orthodontist, Vol 79, No 6, 2009. https://watermark.silverchair.com/021009-93_1.pdf Einhorn, Alfred. “ALKAMIN ESTERS OF PARA-AMNOEBENZOC ACID.” U.S. Patent Office. https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/3b/3d/29/66b6b947ec1e06/US812554.pdf Dummett, Clifton O. “A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE OF THIRTEEN UNHERALDED CONTRIBUTORS TO MEDICODENTAL PROGRESS.” JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, VOL. 81, NO. 3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2571621/pdf/jnma00264-0103.pdf Montalbano, M.J., Sharma, A., Oskouian, R.J. et al. The ancient Syrian physician Archigenes and his contributions to neurology and neuroanatomy. Childs Nerv Syst 33, 1419–1420 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00381-016-3191-2 Etter, William M. Ph.D. “False Teeth.” George Washington's Mount Vernon. https://www.mountvernon.org/library/digitalhistory/digital-encyclopedia/article/false-teeth/#:~:text=Contrary%20to%20later%20legend%2C%20none,to%20Washington's%20remaining%20real%20teeth. Hyson JM Jr. “History of the toothbrush.” Journal of the History of Dentistry. 2003 Jul;51(2):73-80. Wynbrandt, James. “The Excruciating History of Dentistry.”  St. Martin's Griffin. 2000. Reinberg, Steven. “Even Before Pandemic, One-Third of U.S. Adults Went Without Dental Care.” U.S. News and World Report. July 9, 2021. https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-07-09/even-before-pandemic-one-third-of-us-adults-went-without-dental-care Sheridan, P G. “NIDR--40 years of research advances in dental health.” Public health reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974) vol. 103,5 (1988): 493-9. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3140276/#:~:text=The%20National%20Institute%20of%20Dental,training%20to%20improve%20oral%20health. “Law Regulating the Practice of Dentistry in Alabama.” https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/81bf/51ebbc6c544da12b436c1154eb62ebeaa488.pdf “Josiah Flagg, Surgeon Dentist.” Massachusetts Historical Society. https://www.masshist.org/database/177 “Jan Steen – The Tooth-puller.” Mauritshuis. https://www.mauritshuis.nl/en/our-collection/artworks/165-the-tooth-puller/ “Alfred Einhorn.” National Inventors Hall of Fame. https://www.invent.org/inductees/alfred-einhorn Strack, Joseph Gordon. “Rx for Living: Dr. H.T. Dean – Public Health Officer.” TIC. January 1950. http://www.nobilium.com/skin/frontend/ultimo/default/pdf/tic1950jan_small.pdf Gallagher, Jennifer E. and Lynn Hutchinson. “Analysis of human resources for oral health globally: inequitable distribution.” International Dental Journal. Volume 68, Issue 3. 2018. Pages 183-189. https://doi.org/10.1111/idj.12349. “Oral health.” World Health Organization. March 15, 2022. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/oral-health ADA Library/Archives staff. “HISTORY OF DENTISTRY TIMELINE.” ARCHIVES OF THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION. https://www.mouthhealthy.org/~/media/ADA/Education%20and%20Careers/Files/dental_history.pdf See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Burn Bag Podcast
Standing with Ukraine: Polish Embassy DCM Adam Krzywosądzki on the Russo-Ukrainian War, European Security, and the Path Forward

The Burn Bag Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:05


In this episode, Ryan talks with Adam Krzywosądzki, the Deputy Chief of Mission of the  Embassy of Poland to the United States. They discuss the Polish perspective on Russia's war against Ukraine and why Poland has been such a steadfast supporter of Ukrainian sovereignty. Adam delves into the ways in which Poland and other NATO and EU countries are pushing back against Russian aggression, but also notes what else can be done. The conversation then turns to Ukraine's humanitarian crisis and how Poland has taken in and provided support to millions of refugees. While there does not seem to be an end in sight now, Adam points out what the international community can do to assist Ukraine, as well as how institutions such as NATO and the EU can play a decisive role. To learn more about how to help Ukrainian refugees in Poland, please click here. 

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast
Fabrizio Romano: Lewandowski wants Barcelona, Mbappe to speak this week, more! | Transfer news (Soccer 5/16)

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 32:06


Robert Lewandowski wants out of Bayern Munich, but the feeling isn't mutual for the Bundesliga giants. Fabrizio Romano discusses the Polish striker's future, Kylian Mbappe's much-anticipated announcement, and answers a slew of user-submitted questions! 04:20 -- Will Bayern let Lewandowski leave? 9:00 -- Mbappe's decision is imminent 12:14 -- Frenkie De Jong wants UCL 14:25 -- Arsenal's striker search 16:27 -- Eriksen and the prospect of a Tottenham return 20:45 -- Chiellini, Suarez & Cavani 23:20 -- What next for Lisandro Martinez? 26:01 -- Dembele & Barça's finances 28:02 -- Juve looking at Di Maria Qué Golazo' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts. Follow the Qué Golazo team on  Twitter: @quegolazopod, @lmechegaray, @MikeLahoud, @JimmyConrad, @FabrizioRomano, @Jon_LeGossip, @jamesbenge, @heathpearce, @LRoman32, @PartidoPooper Watch Qué Golazo on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/QueGolazo For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Classics For Kids
Frederic Chopin 2: The Polonaise

Classics For Kids

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 6:00


The polonaise is a dance that was fashionable in the Polish court. Since Polish nobility used to like to speak French, the name "polonaise" is French. Eventually, the polonaise caught on all over Europe, and even migrated to America. Lots of operas contain polonaises, and after a while, composers began to use the polonaise as a form for non-dancing, instrumental pieces.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 49:51


Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our third episode discussing Kate Chopin's controversial novella, The Awakening.  Week 1 we introduced Chopin, her life and the book itself.  We talked about what a stir it made during her lifetime ultimately resulting in it being forgotten and then rediscovered midway through the 20th century.  Last week, we spent all of our time on the vacation resort island of Grand Isle.  We met Mr. ad Mrs. Pontellier, as well as the two women who represent got Edna, our protagonist, two alternating lifestyles.  Edna Pontellier, we were quick to learn, is not a happily married woman.  Her husband is outwardly kind to her, but readers are told outright that love and mutual respect was never part of the arrangement between these two.  Edna is indulged by Mr. Pontellier, for sure.  He gives her anything she wants in terms of money or material, but in exchange, she is his ornament, an expensive hobby, a pet even- something to be prized- or as Ibsen would describe it- a beautiful doll for his doll house.      The story starts in the summer at the vacation resort town of Grand Isle, Louisiana.  While vacationing on the island, Edna Pontellier experiences what Chopin terms “the awakening”.  She awakens to the understanding that she is not a pet or a doll in the doll house, and just like Nora in the The Doll's House, she decides she really doesn't want to be one anymore.     No, I guess if that were the only thing to this story, we'd have to say, Sorry Kate, Ibsen beat you by about 20 years.  In Ibsen's story, Nora awakens when her husband, Torvald, turns on her over money.      That's a good point, what awakens Edna in this book is not a marital crisis over money.  It is a crisis that awakens her, and it totally informs how she views her marriage, but it is a crisis concerning her husband at all that is the catalyst.   She is awakened to her own humanity by discovering her own sensuality.  I want to highlight that this awakening isn't overtly sexually provoked.  No man comes in and seduces Edna; she does not go off with a wild vacation crew.  She is left vulnerable, if you want to think about it that way, because of loveless marriage, but she is sensually and emotionally provoked through three  very different relationships- all of which affect her physically as well as emotionally.  The first is with a Creole woman, Adele Ratigntole, one with a younger Creole man, Robert LeBrun, and the third with the provocative music of Madame Reisz.  Experiences with these three awaken something in Edna that encourages maybe even forces her to rebel- rebel against her husband, against the culture, against the person she has always been, against the roles she has played, against everything that she has ever known.      The problem is- rebellion only takes you so far.  You may know what you DON'T want, but does that help you understand what you DO?  And this is Edna's problem.  Where do we go from here?     And so, in chapter 17, we return with the Pontellier's to their home in New Orleans.  And, as we have suggested before, New Orleans is not like any other city in America, and it is in these cultural distinctives of Creole life at the turn of the century that Chopin situates our protagonist.  But before we can understand some of the universal and psychological struggles Chopin so carefully sketches for us, we need to understand a little of the culture of this time period and this unusual place.  Garry, tell us a little about this world.  What is so special about Esplanade Street?    Well, one need only Google tourism New Orleans and a description of Esplanade street will be in the first lists of articles you run into.  Let me read the opening sentence from the travel website Neworleans.com    One of the quietest, most scenic and historic streets in New Orleans, Esplanade Avenue is a hidden treasure running through the heart of the city. From its beginning at the foot of the Mississippi River levee to its terminus at the entrance of City Park, Esplanade is a slow pace thoroughfare with quiet ambiance and local charm.  According to this same website, Esplanade Street, during the days of Chopin, functioned as “millionaire row”- which, of course is why the Pontelliers live there.    It actually forms the border between the French Quarter and the less exclusive Faubourg Marigny.  At the turn of the last century it was grand and it was populated by wealthy creoles who were building enormous mansions meant to compete with the mansions of the “Americans” on St. Charles Avenue.    “The Americans”?    Yes, that was the term for the non-Creole white people.  The ones that descended from the British or came into New Orleans from other parts of the US.     Esplanade Street was life at its most grand- there is no suffering like you might find in other parts of New Orleans.  The Pontelliers were wealthy; they were glamorous; these two were living competitively.      The first paragraph of chapter 17 calls the Pontellier mansion dazzling white. And the inside is just as dazzling as the outside. Mrs. Pontellier's silver and crystal were the envy of many women of less generous husbands.  Mr. Pontellier was very proud of this and according to our sassy narrator loved to walk around his house to examine everything.  He “greatly valued his possessions.  They were his and I quote “household gods.”    The Pontelliers had been married for six years, and Edna over this time had adjusted to the culture and obligations of being a woman of the competitive high society of Creole New Orleans.  One such obligation apparently centered around the very serious etiquette of calling cards and house calls.  This is something we're familiar with, btw, since we watch Bridgerton.  It was something we saw in Emma, too.  Garry, talk to us about the very serious social business of calling cards.     Well, this is first and foremost a European custom during this time period. It started with simple cards designed to announce a person's arrival, but as in all things human, it grew and grew into something much larger and subtextual- and of course, with rules.  During the Victorian era, the designs on the cards as well as the etiquette surrounding were elaborate.  A person would leave one's calling card at a friend's house, and by friend meaning a person in your community- you may or may not actually be friends. Dropping off a card was a way to express appreciation, offer condolences or just say hello.  If someone moved into the neighborhood, you were expected to reach out with a card, and a new arrival was expected to do the same to everyone else.      The process would involve putting the card on an elaborate silver tray in the entrance hall.  A tray full of calling cards was like social media for Victorians- you were demonstrating your popularity.    For example, if we were doing this today, we would have a place in the entrance of our home, and we'd make sure the cards of the richest or most popular people we knew were on to.  We would want people who dropped off cards to be impressed by how many other callers we had AND how impressive our friends were. The entire process was dictated by complicated social rules, and as Leonce explains to Edna, to go against these rules could mean social suicide.     It could also mean financial suicide because business always has a human component.  The function of an upper class woman would be to fulfil a very specific social obligation and this involved delivering and accepting these calling cards.  Every woman would have a specific day where she would make it known she was receiving cards, and the other ladies would go around town to pay house calls.  In some cases, a woman might remain in her carriage while her groom would take the card to the door.  During the Regency era like in Jane Austen's day, there was a system of bending down the corner of the card if you were there in person, and not if you were sending it, but by Chopin's day, I'm not sure if that was still a thing.     The main thing was that the card would be dropped off on this special silver tray. If it were a first call, the caller might only leave a card.  But, if you were calling on the prescribed day, the groom would further inquire if the lady of the house were home.  A visit would consist of about twenty minutes of polite conversation.  It was important that if someone called on you, you must reciprocate and call on then on their visiting day.      Well, the Tuesday they get back, Edna leaves the house on her reception day and does not receive any callers- a social no-no.  In fact, as we go through the rest of the book, she never receives callers again. This is an affront to the entire society, and an embarrassment to her husband; it's also just bad for business, as Mr. Pontellier tries to explain to his wayward wife, let's read this exchange.    “Why, my dear, I should think you'd understand by this time that people don't do such things; we've got to observe “les convenances” if we ever expect to get on and keep up with the procession.  If you felt that you had to leave this afternoon, you should have left some suitable explanation for your absences.      One thing I find interesting.  Mr. Pontellier assumes that Mrs. Pontellier is on the same page on wanting the same things as he wants, and what he wants is to keep up with the procession.  They'd been doing this for the last six years, and doing it well.    Another thing I notice is that he doesn't rail at her for skipping out. Mr. Pontellier, unlike her father, even as we progress through the rest of the book, is not hard on her at all.  In fact, he's indulgent.  The problem in the entire book is not that he's been overtly abusive or cruel.  Read the part where he tries to kind of help her fix what he considers to be a serious social blunder.    Page 60    Well, if taken in isolation, this exchange doesn't seem offensive, and I might even have taken sides with Mr. Pontellier if it weren't back to back with this horrid scene of him complaining about his dinner then walking out to spend the rest of the evening at the club where he clearly spends the majority of his time.  You have to wonder what is going on at that club, but beyond that.  Edna is again left in sadness.  “She went and stood at an open window and looked out upon the deep tangle of tea garden below”.  (On an aside, if you've read Chopin's story, the story of an hour, you should recognize the language here and the image of this open window).  Anyway,, Here again we have another image of a caged bird, or a person who is looking out in the world but not feeling a part of it.  “She was seeing herself and finding herself in just sweet half-darkness which met her moods. But the voices were not soothing that came to her from the darkness and the sky above and the stars.  They jeered and sounded mournful notes without promise, devoid even of home.  She turned back into the room and began to walk to and from down its whole length, without stopping, without resting.  She carried in her hands a thin handkerchief, which she tore into ribbons, rolled into a ball, and flung from her.  Once she stopped, and taking off her wedding ring, flung it upon the carpet.  When she saw it there, she stamped her heel upon it, striving to crush it.  But her small boot heel did not make an indenture, not a mark upon the little glittering circlet.  In a sweeping passion she seized a glass vase from the table and flung it upon the tiles of the hearth.  She wanted to destroy something.  The crash and the clatter were what she wanted to hear.”    She's clearly angry…and not just because Mr. Pontellier complained about the food and walked out of the house.  She's angry about everything.     Never mind the fact that we are never told what goes on at this club, but there are several indications in different parts of the book that Mr. Pontellier may be doing other things besides smoking cigars in crowded rooms.  Adele even tells Edna that she disapproves of Mr. Pontellier's club.  She goes on to say, “It's a pity Mr. Pontellier doesn't stay home more in the evenings.  I think you would be more- well, if you don't me my saying it- more united.”      Although I will add, Edna quickly replies, “'Oh dear no!' What should I do if he stayed home? We wouldn't have anything to say to each other.”  - the fact remains that MR. Pontelier does not see any need to nurture any sort of human or intimate relationship with Edna- theirs comes across as a cordial business arrangement, at best, with Edna in the position of employee.      True, and although I don't know if this is the right place to point this out, but in terms of the sexual indiscretions that may or may not be going on when Mr. Pontellier is at the club, there is likely a lot in the culture at large going on under the surface that a person from the outside wouldn't immediately be aware of.   Edna is naïve at first to all that goes on in her Victorian-Creole world.  There just is no such thing as “lofty chastity”  amongst the Creole people, or any people I might add, although Edna initially seems to believe that in spite of all the sexual innuendo in the language, nothing sexual was ever going on.  There are just too many indications otherwise in the story that that is not the case.  The reader can see it, even though Edna cannot.     True, and if you didn't catch it on Grand Isle, in the city, it is more obvious, and the farther along we go in the story, it gets more obvious as well.  Mrs. James Highcamp is one example.  She has married an “American” but uses her daughter as a pretext for cultivating relationships with younger men.  This is so well-known that Mr. Pontellier tells Edna, after seeing her calling card, that the less you have to do with Mrs. Highcamp the better.  But she's not the only example.  Victor basically details an encounter with Edna of being with a prostitute he calls “a beauty” when she comes to visit his mother..ending with the phrase that she wouldn't comprehend such things.  And of course, most obviously there is the character Arobin with whom Edna eventually does get sexually involved, but his reputation has clearly preceded him.       Well, Edna's awakening to all of this would explain part of her anger, but  there is more to Edna's awakening then just Leonce, or the new culture she's a part of, or really any outside factor.     Yes, and it is in the universality of whatever is going on inside of Edna that we find ourselves.  That's what's so great about great literature- the setting can be 120 years ago, but our humanity is still our humanity.       I agree and love that, but let's get back to her setting for a moment. I think it's worth mentioning that the 19th century culture of the Creole people in New Orleans is messy and complicated in its own unique way.  It's fascinating, but for those who are not of the privileged class, life was often a harsh reality.  The world, especially in the South, was problematic for people of mixed race heritage.  So, and this is more true the closer we get to the Civil War and the Jim Crow era, but those who called themselves “white creoles” had a problem because of the large existence of the free people of mixed race ancestry in New Orleans.  There was a strong outside pressure to maintain this illusion of racial purity, but the evidence suggests this simply wasn't reality.  Let me throw out a few numbers to tell you what I'm talking about.  From 1782-1791, the St. Louis Catholic Church in New Orleans recorded 2688 births of mixed race children.  Now that doesn't seem like a large number, but let me throw this number out- that same congregation at that time same only records 40 marriages of black or mixed race people.  Now, I know Catholics are known for having large families, but I'm not sure 20 women can account for 2688 births.      No, something feels a little wrong.  That number suggests another explanation may be in order.      Exactly, and by 1840 that number grows from 2688 to over 20,000 with mixed raced Creoles representing 18% of the total population of residents of New Orleans.  And if that doesn't convince you, here's another indicator, during this same period many many free women of color were acquiring prime real estate in New Orleans under their own names.  These women had houses built and passed estates on to their children, but notice this detail, the children of these mixed-raced women had different last names then their mothers.  We're not talking about small amounts of property here.  By 1860 $15 million dollars worth of property was in the name of children with last names that were not the same as that of their mothers, oh and by the way, a lot of that property was in the neighborhood where Edna rents her pidgeon house just around the corner from Esplanade street- in other words around the corner and walking distance from millionaire row.      Well, that's really interesting, and I guess, does add a new dimension to the subtext in the language for sure.    Well, it does, and it is likely something readers of the day would have certainly understood, more than we do 100 years later when the stakes of identifying as being of mixed raced heritage are not the difference between freedom and slavery.  But beyond just that, it's an example of cultures clashing.  Edna represents an outwardly prudish Puritan culture coming into a society that is French, Spanish and Caribbean- very different thinking.  This is a de-facto multi-cultural world; it's Catholic; it's French-speaking; it's international.  She doesn't understand what she's seeing.  And in that regard, her own situational reality is something she's realizing she is only beginning to understand, and she comes into it all very gradually. She is not, in Adele's words, “One of them.”  In fact, there may have been irony in the narrator in Grand Isle suggesting that Robert LeBrun's relationships every summer were platonic.  His relationship with the girl in Mexico we will see most certainly is not, but nor was his relationship with Mariequeita on Grand Isle, the girl they meet on the day they spent together.      Indeed.  You may be right- perhaps there is a real sense that Edna has been blind, and perhaps not just to her husband but by an entire society that presents itself one way but in reality is something entirely different altogether.  When she visits Adele and her husband at their home, everything seems perfect- of course.  Adele is the perfect woman with this perfect life.  Adele is beautiful.  Her husband adores her.  The Ratignolle's marriage is blissful, in fact to use the narrator's words, “The Ratignolles' understood each other perfectly.  If ever the fusion of two human beings into one has been accomplished on this sphere it was surely in their union.”      Do you think it's sarcasm again?  Was it truly perfect, or just presenting itself to be perfect?     It's really hard to tell.  Maybe they have worked out a great life together.  I think there is a lot in this passage to suggest they are truly happy together.  Edna even expresses that their home is much happier than hers.  She quotes that famous Chinese proverb “Better a dinner of herbs”.  The entire quote is “Better a dinner of herbs than a stalled ox where hate is.”- meaning her house has better food but she thinks of it as a hateful place- whereas this place is the opposite.   Poor thing- she sees her reality for what it is.  I still see a little sarcasm in the narrator's language, but even if Adele is every bit as perfect as she seems, and even if her home is every bit as perfect as it seems, and even if her husband is every bit as perfect as he seems, in the most real of ways, that could all be true and it wouldn't matter.  E    Precisely, The Ratignole's life can be every bit as perfect as it appears. and it wouldn't make Edna want it any more.  Edna leaves Adele's happy home, realizing that even if she could have it it's not the life she wants.  She wouldn't want that world even if Leonce loved her.  It's just not for her.  The problem is, that's as far as she's gotten with her problem solving.  All she knows is what she DOESN'T want.  Her new world is a world of negation.  She wants to quit, and so she does.  She absolutely disregards all her duties to the point that it finally angers Leonce enough to confront her.    “It seems to me the utmost folly for a woman at the head of a household, and the mother of children, to spend in an atelier days which would be better employed contriving for the comfort of her family.”    An atelier is an artist studio.  It' seems Edna has left all the responsibilities she had as a housewife as well as a mother.  And let me add, Edna was never dusting, cooking, or bathing her children.  She has several house keepers and nannies.  But now, she's not even overseeing what others are doing.  Instead, she's devoting herself entirely to painting.  And surprisingly, Leonce doesn't even have a problem with that in and of itself.  Edna tells her husband, “I feel like painting.”  To which he responds, “Then in God's name paint!  But don't let the family go to the devil.  There's Madame Ratignolle, because she keeps up her music, she doesn't let everything else go to chaos.   And she's more of a musician than you are a painter.”  Yikes, that may be honest, but it does come across as a little harsh.  I know.  I think it's kind of a funny line.  To which, Edna has an interesting comeback- it's like she knows it's not about the painting. She says, “It isn't on account of the painting that I let things go.”  He asks her then why she's let everything go, but she has no answer.  She says she just doesn't know.  Garry, do you want to take a stab at what's going on with Edna?   Well, I do want to tread carefully.  What is fascinating about this book is not so much that Chopin is arguing for any specific course of action, or warning against any specific set of behaviors.  She doesn't condemn Edna for anything, not even the affair she will have with Arobin.  Instead of judging, Chopin, to me, seems to be raising questions.  And it is the questions that she raises that are so interesting.  Edna is desperately trying to rewrite the narrative of her life.  There is no question about that.  But that is an artistic endeavor, in some ways like painting or singing.   I guess we can say Chopin is blending her metaphors here.  Edna doesn't want to be a parrot and copy, but she's living her life exactly the way she is painting- it's uncontrolled; it's undisciplined; it's impulsive.  I'd also say, it's rather unoriginal.  There is no doubt that the social roles offered to her are restrictive.  There's no doubt her marriage is a problem, but as we get farther into the story, it's hard to believe that even if all of these problems could be rectified that Edna would be able define a life for herself.  We, as humans, are always more than a reaction to the social and cultural forces in our world- I hate to get back to the word we used last week, but I can't get away from it.  Even under strict social norms, which I might add, Edna is NOT under for her time period- she is after all one of the most privileged humans on planet Earth at that particular time in human history, but even if she were under severe restrictions, she, as a human, still has agency- we all do.  Yes- and to use Chopin's words from chapter 6, Mrs Pontellier was beginning to realize her position as an individual as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world WITHIN and about her.  I think that Edna is like the rest of us in that it's easier to understand and manage the world about us as opposed to the world within.  At least I can SEE the world about me- how can I see within?  How can I understand myself?  And so Edna goes to the world of Madame Reisz having discarded the world of Adele Ratignolle- the world of art, the world of the artist- which is where Edna goes in chapter 21.  I would argue that she sees it as the polar opposite of Adele's reality.  There is the Adele version of being a woman- a totally objectified, sexualized but mothering type of woman= versus this version of womanhood who is basically asexually.  Perhaps Madame Reisz isn't a woman at all- she's an artist.    Except that world, the world of the artist, comes with its own share of difficulties nevermind that it is simply more uncomfortable.  Reisz' house is described as “dingy”.  There's a good deal of smoke and soot.  It's a small apartment.  There's a magnificent piano, but no elegant food or servants or silver trays for calling cards.  She cooks her meals on a gasoline stove herself.  Let me quote here, “it was there also that she ate, keeping her belongings in a rare old buffet, dingy and battered from a hundred years use.”  True, but there is also  the music and when the music filled the room it floated out upon the night, over the housetops, the crescent of the river, losing itself in the silence of the air and made Edna sob. The art is otherworldly, and there is something to that.  Something attractive maybe even metaphysical.  I want to talk about Kate Chopin's choice of music.  I don't think we noted this in episode one, but Chopin was an accomplished pianist.  She played by ear and read music.  She held parties, almost identical to the ones she described Madame Ratignole throwing in the book with dancing and card playing.  Music was a very big deal to Kate Chopin, so when she includes specific music in her writing, she's not just dropping in commonly used songs, she uses artists she likes for specific reasons, and in this novel, the pianist Frederic Chopin is selected intentionally- and not because he has the same last name, although I did check that out- they are not related.  Garry, as a musician yourself, what can you tell us about Frederic Chopin, the Polish composer and pianist?  Well, let me make this comparison, Frederic Chopin's music in his day was the pelvis gyrating Elvis' Rock in Roll of his day.  It was provocative.  19th century attitudes towards this type of harmony driven romantic music would seem hysterical to us.  They were seen as sensual and a destructive force, especially for women.  This may even be Chopin's sassy narrator playing with us again- Frederic Chopin's music is definitely driving sensuality in Edna. To say Kate Chopin is using it ironically is likely taking it too far, but I don't know, maybe not.  This narrator has been ironic before. The main undeniable connection is that Madame Reisz plays Impromptus.  Impromptus are improvisational music.  Frederic Chopin wrote only four of them in his career.  The one Kate selects here is called Fantasie-Impromptu in C minor- it's the only one in a minor key that he ever wrote.  You can pull it up on Spotify and hear it for yourself.   It is full of rhythmical difficulties.  It's very difficult to play. It's quick and full of emotion.  There is banging on low notes at times, thrills and rolling notes going faster and slower at others points.  Frederic Chopin, by the way, was a very temperamental person and in some ways shares a lot of the personality quirks of Madame Reisz. But he did have an interesting philosophy about music that I really like and does connect to our book.  He is recorded to have said this, “words were born of sounds; sounds existed before words…Sounds are used to make music just as words are used to form language.  Thought is expressed through sounds.  And undefined human utterance is mere sound; the art of manipulating sounds is music.”  Interesting, music is thoughts as sounds.  I like the expression “undefined human utterance” especially in regard to Edna because she absolutely cannot get her thoughts out nor is she willing to share then with anyone.  She expresses more than once that her inner world was hers and hers alone. She can't get her thoughts out when she talks to Adele; she can't get them out when she talks to her husband, and she can't get them out even with Madame Reisz which would have been a very safe space for her to express herself.  At the end of chapter 21, she's sobbing at the music and holding in her hands a letter from Robert LeBrun crumpled and damp with tears.   It would have helped her to have found someone to talk to, maybe the Dr. Mandelet that Leonce goes to in chapter 22 for advice about how to help his wife.    What we find out from Leonce's conversation is that Edna has withdrawn from every single person in her world.  She won't even go to her sister's wedding.  What the doctor sees when he goes to dinner at their house is a very outwardly engaging woman but an inwardly withdrawn one.  The Doctor wonders if she's having an affair, but she isn't.    She is, to use the title of the book, One Solitary Soul.  As a human being, there are only so many types of relationships we find meaning in: we have our parents and birth family, we have our intimate relationship, we have our children (if we have any), we have our professional relationships, and we have our social friends- at least one of these has to be working for us.  Edna finds no satisfaction in any of them.  She doesn't have a trusting relationship anywhere.    Yes, every single relationship in her life is basically a burden.  Edna is trying to relieve herself of every single responsibility in the world hoping that getting out of relationships will help her expand her identity.  The problem is getting RID of responsibilities is not really the answer.  To find meaning in this world you must DO something worth doing.  Something that takes strength and energy.  Something you can be proud of.  Of course as a classroom teacher, that is what we do everyday.  It's not helpful to give students high grades or marks for nothing.  It weakens them.  When you give them a difficult task and then they are able to do that task, they grow, they get strong, they learn they are capable of even great responsibilities.  If you want to get strong, you have to take ON responsibilities- you have to practice strength training, Edna goes the opposite way here.      Edna does look for models, and if she wanted a career path, or a professional life like we think of in  our era, Chopin threw in a character that could have served that function.  It's what I see going on in  the chapters about the races.  Edna is actually really good at horse gambling.  She knows horses.  She knows the horse-racing business and knows it well.  The text actually says that she knows more about horse-racing than anyone in New Orleans.  In fact, it's her knowledge about horses that puts her on the radar of the man she eventually has the sexual relationship with, Alcee Arobin.    Let's read the section where we see this relationship, if we want to call it that, take shape.  Arobin had first seen her perform well at the tracks and to use the narrator's words, he admired Edna extravagantly after meeting her at the races with her father.  Mrs. Highcamp is also a completely different version of a feminine ideal, although neither Edna nor the narrator seem to think enough of to give her a first name.  This confused me some when I read this because in my mind, Mrs. James Highcamp would have been this type of a liberated woman that Chopin might want to have Edna admire.  She's clearly sexualy liberated, but beyond that she's worldly, intelligent, slim, tall.  Her daughter is educated, participates in political societies, book clubs, that sort of thing.  But nothing about Mrs. James Highcamp is alluring to Edna at all.  She suffers Mrs. James Highcamp because of her interest in Arobin.   Let's read about these encounters between Arobin and Edna.   Here's the first one  Page 86     So, Arobin becomes fascinated with Edna, in part because she is so smart and different from other women.  At the end of that evening, they dined with the Highcamps. And afterwards Arobin takes Edna home.  The text says this “She wanted something to happen- something, anything, she did not know what.  She regretted that she had not made Arobin stay a half hour to talk over the horses.  She counted the money she had won.  There was nothing else to do, so she went to bed, and tossed there for hours in a sort of monotonous agitation.  And so the relationship with Arobin is born out of boredom.    Yes, the dominant movement in Edna's life is always drifting towards boredom.  Edna wants to rewrite her social script, but she can't seem to define what she wants.  She has trouble speaking, so she has no words to write her own story.  She doesn't want to be a mother; she doesn't want to work except in sunny weather; she has an opportunity with Mrs. Highcamp to get involved with political or literary women; but that doesn't spark her interest.  She could make a name for herself at the races, but the money doesn't motivate her- she's always had it and in some ways doesn't seem to know a world without money.  So, she's going to default into this relationship with Arobin.  I'm going to suggest that she is again playing the part of the parrot.  Messing around with Arobin is just the kind of thing she sees men doing.  It's what Victor does; it may be what her husband does; it is likely what Robert is doing down in Mexico, so she's going to try to mimic male behavior since she hasn't really found a female model she's interested in emulating, and Arobin is an opportunitiy for this.    And yet, she's self-aware enough to not be seduced by Arobin.  The first time he really tries to make a move on her by kissing her hand, this is what she says which I find insightful,  “When she was alone she looked mechanically at the back of her hand which he had kissed so warmly.  Then she leaned her head down on the mantlepiece.  She felt something like a woman who in a moment of passion is betrayed into an act of infidelity, and realizes the significance of the act without being wholly awakened from its glamour.  The thought was passing vaguely through her mind, “what would he think?”  She did not mean her husband; she was thinking of Robert LeBrun.  Her husband seemed to her now like a person whom she had married without love as an excuse.  She lit a candle and went up to her room.  Alcee Arobin was absolutely nothing to her.  Yet his presence, his manners, the warmth of his glances, and above all the touch of his lips upon her hand had acted like a narcotic upon her.  She slept a languorous sleep, interwoven with vanishing dreams.”  Garry, is there a connection between Edna's boredom with her new life and her desire to pursue this relationship with Arobin.   Well, again, Dr. Kate Chopin is playing the psychologist.  Science has absolutely confirmed there is a relationship with boredom and risk-taking behaviors.  In other words, the more bored you find yourself, the more likely you are to do something risky.  It's one reason teenagers are so prone to dangerous behaviors like drugs.  They don't know yet how to cope with personal down time.  They can't manage their own boredom.  Bored people don't know what they want to do.  They also score low on scares that measure self-awareness.  Bored people can't monitor their own moods or understand what they truly want.  And here's another characteristic that should sound familiar in the life of Mrs. Edna Pontellier, notice that last line “vanishing dreams”, Edna is not dreaming.  She's not working at writing a script for her life..structuring a story for herself.  Her dreams and not building anything, they are vanishing.  That's not good.  And it's not that doesn't have illusions, she does, but a dream is not an illusion.  Dreams are what inspire us to do something different. Both a dream and an illusion are unreal, but an illusion will always be an illusion- it has no chance of becoming real; out of dreams new realities are born.  We are not seeing Edna dream.  Her dreams are vanishing.    Which brings us to the place where I want to end with this episode- chapter 26 and Edna's decision to move out of her husband's house.  I mentioned that this book is constructed with the archetypal 3 in mind at every point.  Edna has been living on Esplanade street- the wealthy gilded cage life, and she doesn't want that.  She has visited Madame Reisz's apartment, but she doesn't seem to want that- it's, and I quote, “cheerless and dingy to Edna”.  So what does she do? She moves two steps away from Esplanade Street, to a house Ellen calls, “the pigeon house.”  Pigeons are the oldest domesticated bird in the world.  They never fly far from home- homing pigeons is actually a term. She's building an illusion. Edna is going out of her husband's house to a place around the corner, but is she really building a new life of any kind?  What is this about?   Edna describes it to Madame Reisz, this way,  “I know I shall like it, like the feeling of freedom and independence.”    But is the feeling of freedom and independence the same as actually having freedom and independence?  Well, obviously not.  They are worlds apart.  But Edna lives in feelings.  She works when she feels like it.  She plays with her children when she feels like it, and now she admits to Madame Reisz that she's in love with Robert LeBrun, who by the way is coming back.  And when she finds that out she feels, and I quote “glad and happy to be alive.”  And what does she do after that, she stops at a candy store, buys a box to send to her children who are with their grandparents in the country and she writes a charming letter to her husband.  Her letter was brilliant and brimming with cheerfulness.  I'm sorry, but Edna frustrates the feminist in me.    Well, Edna is struggling for sure.  She can't connect with people.  She can't identify a dream worth pursuing.  She can't write her own story.  There is no doubt that a lot of this has to so with cultural and social forces at work in her world.   These are powerful forces.  However,  it is not the outside forces of her world that will do her in.  Edna is smart.  She's beautiful.  She's charming.  She actually has a lot going for her, especially for a woman during this time period.  If Chopin had wanted to write a story where a woman breaks free and soars, she has a protagonist who is positioned to do that very thing.    But she's in a mess.  And maybe that's why she's so relatable.  Many of us have made messes of our lives.  We have an incredible ability to screw up, but  humans are also incredibly resilient.  Look at Chopin's own life as an example.  In some ways, she's both Adele Ragntingole and Madame Reiz, at different points in her life she'd been both.  She may even have been Mrs. James Highcamp to a lesser degree. Why is Edna struggling here?  Well, humans are incredibly resilient, but you know what else we are- we are social beings.  Let's revisit that original book title, “One Solitary Soul”- it's my experience that no one gets out alone- not even the rich, the beautiful or the smart.  No one gets out alone.    Ah, Edna is strong enough to confront the forces without, but who will help her confront the forces within?  And so next episode, we will see her confront those internal forces.  There are no more female characters to meet; no more male characters either for that matter.  We will see Edna confront Edna alone, and we will see what happens.  Thank you for listening.  If you enjoy our podcast, please share it with a friend, a relative, your classmates, your students.  We only grow when you share.  Also, come visit with us via our social media how to love lit podcast- on Instagram, facebook and our website.  Feel free to ask questions, give us your thoughts, recommend books.  These are all things we love.  Thanks for being with us today.  Peace out.         

Fortune's Wheel: A Podcast History of the Late Middle Ages

Today, we uncover the context for a legend, a legend we discover on Episode 67, so stay tuned! Members-Only Series on Patreon: Don't forget to head over to Patreon, as well, to hear an entirely new series on the rise of Poland during the 10th and 11th centuries! For only a few bucks per month, you can hear this fascinating tale of how a small group of Slavs transformed into the formidable Polish people who will one day direct European politics for over a century! Every dime donated will be put directly back into the show, so I hope you consider becoming a Patreon member! Just follow this link to our Patreon page to peruse the right “donation plan” for you: https://www.patreon.com/FortunesWheelPodcast. Social Media: Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/fortunes.wheel.3 Twitter Page: https://twitter.com/WheelPodcast Music: Music for this episode is called “Al Andalus” by the incredibly talented (as you'll hear) Shane Ivers. Check him out at https://www.silvermansound.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/fortuneswheelpodcast/support

WTAW - Infomaniacs
The Infomaniacs: May 13, 2022 (8:00am)

WTAW - Infomaniacs

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 39:06


The superstition of apricots and military tanks. Native Polish police officer visits with former Polish president. Lottery presenter reads wrong number. The Indiana/Michigan border war. A visit with Jay Socol and Emily Fisher with the City of College Station. Cheez-It is coming out with a new flavor. A visit with the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley. Scientists have grown plants in moon dirt.

The Roofer Show
275: 5 Actions You Need To Take In Your Roofing Business Now

The Roofer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 40:50


The good, the bad, and the ugly: On today's episode, I'll be sharing my experiences with being a successful roofing contractor from that least favorite (but very effective) educator of ours: the school of hard knocks. I also cover some of the most common problems that my coaching clients encounter. Learn how to avoid these pitfalls so that you can build a sustainably profitable roofing business! What you'll hear in this episode: Why you must FIRST take a look at your financials. Polish up your sales skills. The importance of having systems and processes in place (from start to finish) when you're doing a job. Know ALL of your costs associated with each job. Run your business by the numbers. Can your business run without you? This is what a profitable business in the roofing industry looks like: A 10% salary for the owner and a 10% net profit. Are you paying yourself a salary? Commercial vs. residential: Where are you making your money? What about overhead? Devise a strategic plan for how you want to niche your work. Do you need one-on-one coaching? I'm here to help! Contact me here and let's get to know each other over a FREE one-hour call.   Resources: Check Out My NEW Website: The Roofer Coach Download My FREE 1-Page Business Plan Text Me @ (510) 612-1450 – Say Hi! I would love to hear your feedback, pros & cons! **Please leave me a review on iTunes!** ~Please Share My Podcast With Other Contractors~ THE ROOFER SHOW SPONSOR INFO: Need Help Answering the Phone Or Online Chat? Find Out How Ruby Receptionists Can Help Bring In Leads!! Or Call Ruby at (844) 326-7829 Check out their app!  

Fanbyte FM
New Intern Day

Fanbyte FM

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:53


New intern Charles educates the Fanbyte Thinktank on a number of pressing issues, including the whole deal with Cincinnati Chili, whether or not Master Chief nutted, "raw dogging the 'cumbers," bat infestations, Stern's new Jurassic Park pinball machine, Polish delicacies, and crucially, even more. More from Fanbyte: Fanbyte Podcast Network (We do other podcasts too!) Follow us on Twitter (Yell at us on Twitter in good ways.) Talk to us on Discord (Talk to us and our loving community. Also we have a pets channel that is very good.) Twitch Live Streams (Hang out with us live.) Rate and review our show (If you have any idea how to describe this show please help us.) And hey, get in touch if you want to advertise with us: advertising@fanbyte.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

West Michigan Live with Justin Barclay
Polish Off Your Tin Foil Hat After Show 5-12-22

West Michigan Live with Justin Barclay

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 53:08


Polish Off Your Tin Foil Hat After Show 5-12-22Get the links to each day's show here:http://JustinBarclay.comPatriots are making the Switch!What if we could start voting with our dollars too?Now, you can spend your hard-earned money with family-owned businesses and "made in the USA" products that won't send it on to woke political causes that don't support our values.Discover how you can join the revolution when you select Justin Barclay from the drop-down menu at PatriotSwitch.comThe stories you won't hear anywhere else..Grab gear in Justin's store and help support the cause to bring you the stories you won't hear anywhere else.http://JustinBarclay.com/storeNo matter what's coming, you can be ready for your family and others.http://PrepareWithJustin.comJustin's book "Good News: Hope and Encouragement for Trying Times" is out now!Grab your signed copy today.http://JustinBarclay.com/storeDown 96 pounds!What's my secret?http://JustinBarclay.com/mysecret

Simple Farmhouse Life
132. What to Look for When Buying an Old Farmhouse | Cathy & Garrett Poshusta of The Grit and Polish

Simple Farmhouse Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 44:05


Looking for an older home can be scary and exciting all at the same time. What are the most important characteristics to look for? How do you know which flaws are deal breakers? Cathy and Garrett have been renovating and restoring homes for over a decade, so they have seen the good, bad, and ugly of old houses. In our conversation, they answer some of the most common questions I get about shopping for an old farmhouse. This topic can be intimidating to someone unfamiliar with this realm, but Cathy and Garrett break it down in such an approachable way. Maybe you have no intention of purchasing an old farmhouse, but you want to add that vintage charm to your existing home– Cathy and Garrett have some great tips for that, too! In this episode, we cover: - The top qualities to look for in an old house - Where to begin the process of renovating a house - Awkward layouts in old houses and when it's a deal breaker - How to add character to a newly-built home - What you need to know about a home's foundation - Tips for evaluating the natural light in a home - The biggest red flags to look for in an old home - DIY decor projects to complement an old home RESOURCES An Easy (And Inexpensive) Kid's Nature Gallery Wall Planning A Vintage Art Gallery Wall In The Pantry DIY Pinch Pleat Curtains // How To Make Budget IKEA Curtains Look Like A Million Bucks How To Replace A Skeleton Key For An Old Door We Sampled 8 Popular White Paint Colors, Here Are Our Favorites... Posts about marble on The Grit and Polish blog Farmhouse Pantry // A Solid Marble Backsplash With Curved Corners (I Really, Really Love It!) CONNECT Cathy & Garrett Poshusta of The Grit and Polish | Website | Instagram | YouTube | Pinterest | Facebook Lisa Bass of Farmhouse on Boone | Blog | YouTube | Instagram | Facebook | Pinterest | TikTok Join us in the Simple Farmhouse Life Facebook community! GET MORE FROM THIS EPISODE Watch this episode on YouTube. View full show notes and transcript on the blog.

Acts 29 Europe Podcast
// Polish Plants

Acts 29 Europe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 41:32


https://www.acts29.com/church/holy-trinity-church/ - Christcentered Worship : https://www.10ofthose.com/uk/products/24734/christcentered-worship- Systematic Theology : https://www.10ofthose.com/uk/products/26998/systematic-theology- The Good God : https://www.10ofthose.com/uk/products/12328/the-good-god- Putting Amazing Back Into Grace : https://www.amazon.co.uk/Putting-Amazing-Back-into-Grace/dp/0801014212/ref=sr_1_1?crid=16IJSSNN9T177&keywords=amazing+grace+horton&qid=1648220864&sprefix=amazing+grace+horton+%2Caps%2C172&sr=8-1- The Whole Christ :  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Whole-Christ-Antinomianism-Assurance-Why-Controversy/dp/1433548003/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=the+whole+christ+sinclair+ferguson&qid=1648220906&sprefix=sinclair+ferguson+whole+christ+%2Caps%2C61&sr=8-1

Faces of Digital Health
EIT Health Germany Series 5/12: How Can We Help With Medical Aid in Ukraine?

Faces of Digital Health

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:58


When the war in Ukraine began, Marta Kaczmarek welcomed one of the refugee families to her home. She then thought about how more could be done to help Ukrainians and started an incentive called  EIT Health Ukraine. EIT Health, which is a European organsation connecting stakeholders in healthcare, partnered with the Polish Medical Mission. PMM is a 22 years old Polish humanitarian organization that provides medical aid to the countries most in need in the world. Since 1999, the Polish Medical Mission Association has been helping victims of wars, catastrophes and natural disasters. Their volunteers include doctors, paramedics, nurses, rehabilitators, as well as psychologists and medical analysts.  In this episode, speakers: Ewa Piekarska, President of the Board, Head of the Development Aid Program, Polish Medical Mission andMarta Kaczmarek, Coordinator of the EIT Health Ukraine Appeal explain the current needs for medical support, what supplies are in demand and more.  EIT Health Ukraine appeal is ongoing, so if you're a medical device manufacturer or have the ability to donate medical equipment, please go to the link in the show notes and coordinate with EIT Health to provide help to Ukraine. Please complete the form on EIT Health's website:  https://eithealth.eu/ukraine-appeal/    This episode is supported by EiT Health Germany, which is one of eight Knowledge and Innovation Communities (KICs) currently funded by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). If you're a startup working in the field of digital health or biotech and don't know EiT Health Germany yet, I would encourage you to visit eit-health.de, where you will find more about innovation, acceleration, and education programs. And as you will hear from Marta, it doesn't matter if you're a startup, a small or a large business. If you would like to contribute to support Ukraine, anything you can do to help, will help.

London Review Podcasts
Women on the Brink

London Review Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 40:41


Azadeh Moaveni talks to Tom about the situation on the Polish border, where women and children fleeing Ukraine face numerous dangers, including kidnapping, trafficking and forced labour. Moaveni describes the way social media has changed the way traffickers work, the dramatic range of conditions refugees face in Poland, and how this displacement crisis compares to others she's seen.Read Azadeh's piece: https://lrb.me/moavenipodSubscribe to the LRB from just £1 per issue: https://mylrb.co.uk/podcast20bTitle music by Kieran Brunt / Produced by Anthony Wilks See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Metal On The Brain
#026 Azaab Rocky

Metal On The Brain

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 109:00


Rock & Rolla Hall Of Fame! Judas Priest (FINALLY) get into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (KINDA)! Plus new songs from Polish thrashers Sanity Control, Pakistani riff princes Azzab, & more! Metal On The Brain - https://linktr.ee/motbww Sanity Control - https://sanitycontrol.bandcamp.com/ Et Moriemur - https://etmoriemurdoom.bandcamp.com/ As The World Dies - https://astheworlddies.bandcamp.com/album/agonist-death-metal Azzab - https://linktr.ee/azaabdm Labyrinth - https://linktr.ee/labyrinthrash Intoxicated - https://linktr.ee/Intoxicatedflorida Support: Slayer Spring Mix - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HPiB4u995g&t=53s ThunderMother - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtrKaTxIHyo Gino Vento - https://www.imdb.com/name/nm4519283/ Transcending Obscurity Records - https://tometal.com/ MOTB theme music by Rhythm Of Fear - https://linktr.ee/rhythmoffear MOTB logo by @thepitforge (Instagram) - https://www.instagram.com/thepitforge/?hl=en --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/motbww/support

Fanwidth
My Dinner With Rainn Wilson

Fanwidth

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 53:13


John, Fūnk-é and Imran endure yet another arbitrary set of tasks for merritt's amusement, this time testing their knowledge of mid-century Polish filmmaking and Barbie® video games, among other things. Segments: Before and After, Speed Pitching (Polish Cinema Edition), Barbie's Malibu Dream Quiz More from Fanbyte: Fanbyte Podcast Network (We do other podcasts too!) Follow us on Twitter (Yell at us on Twitter in good ways.) Talk to us on Discord (Talk to us and our loving community. Also we have a pets channel that is very good.) Twitch Live Streams (Hang out with us live.) Rate and review our show (Let us know how we're doin'!) And hey, get in touch if you want to advertise with us: advertising@fanbyte.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lachlansavestheworld
SFE #10 Conscious Parenting, Healthy Love & Grounding In The Spiritual With Tomorrow

Lachlansavestheworld

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 68:45


Welcome to Your place for all things deep connection, inspiration and Spirit Full Explorations. In todays episode Kat & Lachlan connect with Tomorrow SimeConnect With Tomorrow: https://www.primalhacker.com/https://www.youtube.com/c/PrimalHackerAbout TomorrowI am Tomorrow Sime, mother of 4 children, 2 stepsons and truth seeker. I know life through design, art, biohacking, primal living, experimenting, meditating, celebrating, welding, metal working, archery, drawing, painting, reading, sailing, bindi wearing, love, traveling, exploring, hiking, sleeping, parenting, loving all the essential things that make up a woman too young for my age and too old for my snappy outfits. I was born from hot Polish gypsy blood, experimented with all that life has to offer both deviant and holistic. I was biohacking before biohacking was “coined” by making molecular water and experimenting with high fat sardine/berry/nut fasts way back in the late 1990s….haha. I am Devoted to parenting, Emotional intelligence & seeking higher spiritual truths.Topics discussed:Spirit Full experiences that significantly shaped TomorrowIts not BodyMindSpirit Its SpiritMindBodyWhat conscious parenting means and looks likeThe Celestine prophecyDrawing Boundaries Clearing Anger and energy. How to do that in a relationshipImportance of a strong and safe male container Louis Hay Meditation How common females have sexual trauma and much moreThankyou to all the co-produces investing and supporting the showValue For Value Funding Model:https://pod.fan/transcending-explorations-with-lachlan-dunTo Share Your Time + Talents / Collab Email me: Lachlandunn23@gmail.comWork With Me: https://calendly.com/lachlandunn23/callConnect With Kat:https://www.instagram.com/nourishednomadco/https://www.instagram.com/alchemoryPRODUCT DISCOUNTSMedicinal Mushrooms And Superfoods: https://teelixir.com/  Code lachlan10StoneAge Supplement Discounts 15% Store Wide: http://www.stoneagehealth.com.au?afmc=4a10% off grounding and emf protection products : https://www.earthingoz.com.au/?ref=lachlandunn

Awakening
#156 What is Really Happening on the Polish Border with the Ukraine Refugees

Awakening

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 35:47


About my Guest: Curtin was a citizen of the world before the war. Working in tech or metals in Asia, then logistics in Africa, starting his own consulting business and apparel line in Europe or guiding river tours in the USA... he now finds himself building supply chains that support cities across Ukraine. What we Discussed: - Why he decided to go to the Polish Border - Other Leaders going to Kiev - Lviv is like a Resort in the Ukraine - The problems with 3000 volunteers in a small Polish town - The Bad things happening in some parts of Ukraine - People Resorting to Eating Pigeons - Medical Problems - Morning after pill and STD drugs needed - Some Ukrainians' going back - The Difference with East African Refugee Camps - The Trauma for the Children - Lights on 24hrs in the Camps - Suitcases Badly Needed and more Links https://logcluster.org/document/ukraine-non-addressed-contributions-april-2022 https://www.linkedin.com/in/gcurtin/ Things Currently Needed *hemorrhoid medication *canned, ready to eat food *high calorie/carb dry snacks (portable) *hospital beds More about Awakening: All Podcasts and Social Media https://bio.link/podcaster https://awakeningpodcast.org/ Video https://www.bitchute.com/channel/y2XWI0VCPVqX/

Books and Beyond with Bound
4.16 Anupama Chopra: Writing Unbiased Critiques Of The Biggest Blockbusters

Books and Beyond with Bound

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 33:16


Find out how she covers and critiques films from different eras in her book.  Anupama Chopra of Film Companion takes Tara and Michelle through the sets of some of the biggest blockbusters in film history as they chat about her latest book ‘A Place In My Heart'. How did she get into films? How is she able to review films without biases? What tips and techniques can writers learn from cinema? Tune in to find out! Anupama Chopra is a film critic, journalist and National Award-winning author. She is chairperson of the Film Critics Guild and director of the Jio MAMI Mumbai Film Festival. She has covered cinema since 1993, across multiple mediums-print, television and digital. She has authored several books, including King of Bollywood: Shah Rukh Khan and the Seductive World of Indian Cinema, which featured on the Editors' Choice list of The New York Times Sunday Book Review and has been translated into German, Indonesian and Polish.'Books and Beyond with Bound' is the podcast where Tara Khandelwal and Michelle D'costa of Bound talk to some of the best writers in India and find out what makes them tick. Follow us @boundindia on all social media. We know how important visibility is in this content boom age! We offer book marketing services for books that we feel strongly about. More details here: https://pdfhost.io/v/n12mxMGvL_Bound_Book_Marketing 

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Real Estate Investing Made E.A.S.Y.

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 21:07


Looking for an effective and efficient way to raise capital?   Marcin Drozdz joins us today to talk about the system that secured him 9 figures of private investment capital for several business ventures. An active investor with a several hundred unit real estate portfolio, Marcin developed the E.A.S.Y. system, and he breaks it down for us in this episode. He also shares the inspiring story of his family as immigrants in the United States and the mindset and values that led him to his current success.   [00:01 - 04:54] Getting in the Game Early Jumping into real estate in his mid-20s Transitioning from employee to entrepreneur A lesson he learned early on Find out if you're a finder, a minder, or a grinder   [04:55 - 11:12] E.A.S.Y. System to Raise Capital Building and maintaining rapport with your contacts Make them understand what's exciting and unique about the opportunity Talk to a lot of people Generate scarcity through demand Know the amount they're considering   [11:13 - 19:36] There is No Plan B Bring people along for the journey Have a “This is going to work” mindset Remove self-doubt and believe in your own worth and capabilities Look for the right inspiration and the right next step for you   [19:37 - 21:07] Closing Segment Reach out to Marcin! Check out the free E.A.S.Y. System Mini Course! Final Words Tweetable Quotes “Find your inspiration, the guy that's out there killing it at a level that you're just like, that's godly. That's God-like. Sure. But then bring that back to Earth and find that next peg on the ladder. That's somebody that can help you, you know, actually more directly.” - Marcin Drozdz “Never lie. Always use real numbers. Don't say things that aren't consistent, because it's a small sandbox… If you start making up stories, it's not going to work.” - Marcin Drozdz “If you don't put yourself in a position where you can speak with some authority on what you're doing, if you don't buy into and you don't believe what you're doing, you know, it's a really difficult thing to sell.” - Marcin Drozdz -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Marcin! Learn more about him and the E.A.S.Y. System by going to his website and downloading the free E.A.S.Y. System Mini Course!   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.   Facebook LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in! Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com   Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   Marcin Drozdz  00:00 Find your inspiration, the guy that's out there killing it at a level that you're just like, that's godly. That's God-like. Sure. But then bring that back to Earth and find that next peg on the ladder. That's somebody that can help you, you know actually more directly.   Intro  00:14 Welcome to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Show. Whether you are an active or passive investor, we'll teach you how to scale your real estate investing business into something big.   Sam Wilson  00:26 Marcin Drozdz is the managing partner of M1 Real Capital where he and his team focused on acquiring value add multifamily properties throughout the southeast. Marcin, welcome to the show.   Marcin Drozdz  00:36 Thank you, sir. That's quite an introduction. I appreciate I'm all excited now. Love it.   Sam Wilson  00:41 Great, man. I'm looking forward to it. There's three questions I ask every guest who comes on the show: in 90 seconds or less, can you tell me where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?   Marcin Drozdz  00:49 Sure. I started out reading Rich Dad, Poor Dad, probably like millions of other people, thought it was a good idea that I could figure it out, started buying houses while I was in college, got recruited into private equity on the real estate side. Probably brought me in a little young, but I'm glad they did got to immediately go from you know, looking at single-family homes, to multifamily land assemblies, commercial, recreation, just all kinds of stuff. So seeing that for a couple of years was tremendous. A couple of years after that broke out on my own, sort of putting together my own LPs trusts structures. And fast forward today, we focus on value ad today, primarily in the south and southeast.   Sam Wilson  01:32 But what a great way to get your early education in real estate   Marcin Drozdz  01:37 Drinking from a firehose, literally.   Sam Wilson  01:39 I'm sure it was but it didn't take you long. I mean, a couple of years is not a long time really to spend under somebody else's tutelage and then just go out and do it on your own. What were some of the things that finally pushed you over the edge and said, hey, I can repeat this.   Marcin Drozdz  01:52 Well, you know, what it was, the firm that I worked for was family-owned, good people, well-intentioned, but I knew that I would never be anything more than just a well-paid piece of the puzzle here, a cog in the machine. And you know, being young enough, maybe naive enough in my mid-20s at that point, I was like, You know what, I can do this. So, you know, went out on my own very quickly realized the things that I didn't know, as I left that space, because everything was kind of, in and around what you do, there's a ton of things that happened for you that I didn't really understand at that point. And then, you know, a couple of million dollars later, with my own money, a bunch of mistakes later, I finally realized, maybe I'm not, as you know, well-versed, you know, as I initially thought, but again, you know, you take your bumps along the way, you know, 37 now, so, you know, a lot of experience, a few gray hairs and all things considered, I'm glad I did it when I did,   Sam Wilson  02:43 What were some of the things just, you know, top of your mind that you say, Man, those were some of the early mistakes I made that somebody else could be spared from?   Marcin Drozdz  02:51 You know, the biggest thing is you got to recognize, if you're better, there's three types of people, there's finders, there's minders, and there's grinders. So that's probably the best way I'm able to articulate it. And you know, finders typically the front of the business, whether it's the deal side, the money side, it's the person that goes out and makes things happen. The minders are the operations, the ongoing maintenance, the making sure the buses run on time, so to speak, and everything happens the way it's supposed to. And then the grinders are the people that are typically just happy with the nine to five, or nine, and nine, or whatever it is, and they have a very specific role within an organization. And they're happy just to grind it out. They don't want to have to go outside of their parameters. So for me, I thought everybody thought like me when I left the PE space. And I very quickly realized that was not the case.   Sam Wilson  03:44 Which of those three do you put yourself in?   Marcin Drozdz  03:48 Well, when you start a business, you're all three, my friend, as you very well know. I'm definitely a finder, I love to find opportunity, find talent, find the right people around me and execute on a vision. But you definitely need to be aware of the fact that you need the minders, and you need the grinders to actually execute things. And that was probably for me, that was my biggest lesson in my 20s.    Sam Wilson  04:11 Yeah, that's a tough one. You're absolutely right. And I'm just a slow learner altogether. And so this is something that I've been actually researching quite a bit, because you're right, I've made the same assumption many over the years, like everybody thinks like me, like no, and goes back to the whole like visionary, integrator. And then there's just like you're saying, so like I would put the visionary is the finder or the integrator is the minder, and then kind of the employee person that just wants to be an employee as the grinder. And yeah, the idea of being just an employee, not just, being an employee and just kind of being happy with, you know, the way that things go, like, I don't understand that. And so because I can't relate to that myself. Like, I assume everyone's me that just wants to go, you know, go nuts and go find stuff and take deals. Yeah, that's just not the case. One of the things you're known for is the system you call the E.A.S.Y. System to Raise Capital for real estate deals. Can you break that down for us?   Marcin Drozdz  05:03 Sure, easy stands for Exclusive, Abundant, Scarce and Your allocation. So essentially, the system is part of a much larger process of how to find, nurture, maintain contacts and eventually get the commitment in a way where you don't, you know, you don't come across pushy, don't come across sales-y. It's very consultative, very process-driven. And ultimately, as you very well know, just because somebody isn't a fit for a deal today, doesn't mean that they won't be a fit in three months, or three years for that matter. So how you approach that situation, how you maintain that rapport with that person is, I mean, it's everything it really is, you know, everything I'm at 16 years now, and you end up getting a compounding benefit for all the work you do early on. And if you do it in, you know, if you always approach things from I'm here for a long time, not just a good time perspective, then you'll have that flow. So the E, the exclusive is your deal. So in other words, so many people, when they tie up the deal, they totally undersell it when they're explaining it to somebody else, or they focus on the wrong things that most people don't understand. So I can't tell you how many of our students or some of my partners are like, yeah, like going in cap rate is X, and we're going to come out at Y, and the replacement costs is Zed, and here's why that matters. And I'm just like, dude, honestly, I understand. But the business owner that's trying to give you 250 grand, is just gonna stare at you and go, Oh, okay. And a confused mind doesn't buy, right. So exclusive is, you know, break it down to a level of what would have got you excited about the opportunity. If you didn't understand real estate, for example, is it on Main & Main? Is it one of the last remaining buildings before the codes change? Is it of a certain size, a certain stature? Is there certain finish within the units? Are there certain opportunities for you to do things to add value that is unique in your market, in your city, in your state, whatever it is. Like, focus on the things that the everyday person can understand. Like, if you tell me, hey, the rents in this area are $800. And if we just put new counters down the guy down the streets renting for 1200, I can understand that, you can tell me that the cap rate is going to go from X to Y, but I'm just going to stare at you and go okay. So that's exclusive. Abundant is make sure you have a ton of people to talk to. So in other words, just because you don't have a deal, doesn't mean you shouldn't be talking to investors about past deals, things you're looking at. Because when you do have that deal, and you can call somebody and say, Listen, you know, I have this deal. It's exclusive, because of these reasons, I have X amount of people that I need to talk to. But I know you told me you want to hear about this. So here we are. And then S for scarcity is, so we're only looking for $2 million. Our average investment is you know, let's just say 150,000. So we're probably looking for another eight or so investors in the opportunity. And then the Y. So scarcity got to create, you know, if you're doing a great deal, and it's exclusive, and you've got tons of people to talk to there's natural scarcity, both within the amount of allocation somebody can take, and the amount of room you have for people because of the size of the deal. So then, you know, you'll obviously have a conversation back and forth to that person. And when you think it's appropriate, you can say, Look, I know you still got to do your due diligence, I got to send you the package, you gotta review everything. But if everything does check out, what amount would you potentially consider investing, like, ask for some kind of a soft... So again, I'm oversimplifying all this, Sam. But all of this breaks down to a process that has helped me secure well into nine figures in capital. And whether you're raising 50,000, 500,000, or commitment for $5 million, it really is the same process.   Sam Wilson  08:44 I love that. It's not playing mind games. I don't want to use that word, but it is a process. And it's getting used to even some of your phrasing there, I think is really unique. Just you know, where it's like, hey, you know what, we're only asking for two and a half million dollars. That's all the raise is average investment, would you say? 150 grand is your example.   Marcin Drozdz  09:02 Yeah, I mean, whatever it is for you, right? It's 25. It's 25. It's 50. It's 50. It's 250 or whatever, it makes it real for you. By the way, never lie. Never BS. Always use real numbers. Don't say things that aren't consistent, because it's a small sandbox, as you and I both know, Sam, and, you know, if you start making up stories, it's not going to work.   Sam Wilson  09:22 What was the Y in the E.A.S.Y.?   Marcin Drozdz  09:25 The Y? I'll tell you why I created two, but the Y is your allocation. So in other words, it's asking for some kind of a call to action. So in other words, when you're talking to somebody can say, Look, I know you got to look through the package or lawyer or accountant, whatever it is, but if everything does check out what amount would you potentially be considering? And that's, you know, soft commit, I mean, in PE it's a soft commit. So in other words, you know, because you got to give them the opportunity to do their due diligence, obviously, to make sure they're qualified and make sure they can, you know, comply with the rules with your lawyers and everything else and make sure everything's done clean. But if at all didn't checkout, what amount would they be considering? Because if someone isn't considering it, they would tell you there, you know, but if they're already telling me I love it, if it all checks out, I'd probably do 100-200, then that's a good indicator of at least somebody who's semi-serious.   Sam Wilson  10:14 Right. I really liked that. I mean, that breaks it down into a very easy-to-understand step-by-step process for people who are out there raising capital. It sounds like maybe this was developed for you just because you needed something that was repeatable.    Marcin Drozdz  10:29 So when I left PE, again, I started thinking that I could do things my own way. And there were various forms that encouraged us to incorporate what I've now coined as the E.A.S.Y. system. But I had a property, I personally had three properties that I was closing in a month. And these were smaller properties. I remember my investor in the last week or so decided to pull out. And it was like, you ever see the movie, Jerry Maguire or buddy gets fired in the restaurant, and he just doesn't know what to do next. That was my Jerry Maguire moment. So, you know, I sweated it out, I figured it out. But after that, I swore and we closed on the properties. But after that, I swore to myself, I would never put myself in a position like that again, and at a sheer necessity created this thing.   Sam Wilson  11:11 Yeah, absolutely. I love that. Tell me some other lessons, you know that you would say that you've incorporated? I mean, raising nine figures is no small amount of money. Is there anything else that comes to top of mind? You said, Hey, here's some other things I've learned along the way.   Marcin Drozdz  11:24 Yeah, I think the best way to sum it up is dig your well before you get thirsty. And I forget where I heard that I didn't coin that, I read that in a book somewhere in the author's... The origin of that escaped me. So for that, I apologize. But that saying to me, it was always resonated true on the fundraising side. So many people wait till they have a deal in hand before they start talking to people. My whole thing is bring people along for your journey, because you don't know if it's going to take someone three days, three months, or even three years to finally decide to engage with you. So if you can share your journey, and I mean, you do it well, other people, you know, some people attempt to do it well. You add value, do video walkthroughs. I mean, just the last property we were buying. As we were doing some of the rentals, I literally just FaceTimed with some of the investors, some of the buddies of mine, as guys were working on-site, I was just walking through the site with a hard hat on and just like, hey, so here are the new units. Here's this, here's this, buddy's not available, that's fine, crank out a two, three-minute video. And understand it's not very professional, because they get the professional newsletters and the quarterly updates and things like this as well. But on top of that, they feel like they're part of the journey when you share that type of authentic, you know, here's what's going on with your money in this project. So bring people along for the journey. And again, if you did that, well before you're thirsty, when you do have an opportunity, those people that have responded favorably to past things, it's a much easier transition, because they're already engaged in your world to some extent.   Sam Wilson  12:52 Absolutely. And that's something, taking your advice to heart even, I started a year and a half ago, like I never had a regular newsletter, right? But it's been for a year now we've sent out every single, almost a year, every single Friday 10 am my newsletter goes out. And you know, Marcin, I haven't closed the deal since September of 2021. But we're constantly talking. But now we've got three deals under contract, right? And it's just like, hang on, like it's coming. Here's the things we're working on. And at times, it feels like Gosh, what do I talk about? I mean, really aren't doing a deal, right? Other than the deals we have, you know, in operation, like we're not doing something actively. But yeah, keeping that lead warm, because it's like, Hey, here's all the stuff we're actually still doing out here, even though we're not presenting deals, because there's nothing that made sense for us. But then all of a sudden, you know, out of the blue, and now we got three deals all at once. And so you know, having that prep ahead of time, I think is just really absolutely key. Talk to us a little bit about maybe your mindset. You seem to indicate or at least I hear that there's a mindset. Is that a true statement?    Marcin Drozdz  13:52 It is. You know, it's interesting, because to me, when I started in this business, I knew that it was going to work. I wasn't sure how I, just in my mind, I was already wired that this is happening, this is going to work. And that's probably due to the fact that I mean quick story about me. I was born in communist Poland and my parents, my dad got arrested for selling corn on the black market corn with a C, those of you...   Sam Wilson  14:17 P as in Papa I'm like, okay. Charlie, corn.   Marcin Drozdz  14:21 C as in Charlie. In Polish, it's called kukurydza. So, the point is my dad was selling this stuff. And during communist times, you couldn't run a business. So he got arrested, they were going to send him to jail. He didn't like that too much. So he and my mom and I was a couple of months old at the time, they ran off to East Germany, and eventually migrated to North America. Well, when I finally got out of Poland, it was because my grandpa snuck me out four years later, so I didn't see my parents for four years. They stuck me out, literally drove me across the border, you know, quote, unquote, legally in the trunk. And we came to North America settled down, but my point is when we got here, there was no plan B. There was no safety net. There was no relatives. There was no family, there was no friends. So the language was foreign. I mean, I spoke Polish and German and now learn English, right? So I always grew up with no plan B. And that forced me to whatever I'm doing, this is going to work. And so mindset is so important for people. Because if you don't put yourself in a position where you can speak with some authority on what you're doing, if you don't buy into and you don't believe what you're doing, you know, it's a really difficult thing to sell, especially for fundraising. If you think about it, you're not giving so, like, when somebody invests with you, they're not getting a house, they're not getting a car, they're not getting anything tangible there that says that they own a piece of this apartment building, or warehouse or trailer park, or whatever it is. And that's it. So it's so important to make sure that you have the mindset that you feel like you're worthy, you're capable, you're competent. And that element of self-doubt has to, over a period of time, leave the mind, because I can tell you right now, when I raised that first $5,000, I was more terrified when I was downtown New York, getting a term sheet for 25 or $50. million, like, but the process is the same. So what change? Obviously, my knowledge, my competence created confidence, which is something I say all the time, but it's the mindset to know that you're worthy of that. And consistency is what's going to give you that. If you think that, you know, if you have feelings, like why are people going to invest with me? I can't find any deals. Do I really know what I'm doing? What if I screw up? Like, if you go into conversations with those thoughts, then you're already shooting yourself in the foot. And that mindset piece is a starting point, it is everything. It really is.   Sam Wilson  16:44 That's an incredible story. First of all, and I love the comment there. You said there's no Plan B, it's the burning of the ships. And it's like, Well, guys, no option. This is what you have to do. What do you say to someone that, you know, is struggling with those things, or, you know, maybe, you know, hasn't done enough deals to really be able to say, hey, you know what, this is how I can confidently, you know, lead on this? What do you do for those people? Or how do they develop that?   Marcin Drozdz  17:13 So, Sam, look, we're all struggling with things. We're all in different scenarios where sometimes we feel like we're not equipped or prepared. I mean, I'll give you an example. I was on the phone with a fund manager at in New York right before, actually right when COVID hit. And he's talking to me, I'm walking through where we're at where we're going, and I'm you know, I'm looking for equity, right, large checks. He says to me, he goes, Well, what's your asset size? And I tell him and he goes, Okay, so look, you're a little small. For me, I go really? Like how much? He goes, well, our smallest client is 1 billion. And I just laughed, I go, okay. So I actually said to him, I go, so what you're telling me is I'm trying to get from the kids' table to the grown-up table, and you won't let me yet. He just starts laughing, right. But the point is, look, whether you're at 100,000, a million, 10 million, 100 million, there's always someone that's going to make you feel like you're at the kids' table. And my advice is to get that person or those people just a little bit ahead of you, or maybe a little bit more ahead of you, when you get to know these people, you'll see that they're just like you and me, we're the same. And when you can see that it's attainable. You get past those self-doubting components. Because yeah, if you see guys on Instagram, or YouTube and buddy's buying Lamborghinis, private jets, whatever it is, and he's billion dollars, whatever it is. And you're like, dude, I'm just trying to buy, you know, a 10 Plex, so that I can put my daughter through college, there's a disconnect there. It's such a huge disconnect, that that's not your man. I mean, those are great people for like inspiration. But that's not the next step for you. The next step for you is the guy or girl that's already at 40-50 units, and trying to get to 100, or something along those lines. So find people that are just ahead of you, or maybe slightly ahead of you to actually have some real connection to be able to engage in growth, because otherwise, you know, there's nothing more, you know, okay, I want to play in the NFL. Great. I'm gonna go play with Brady. Yeah, right. Come on, right, like the guys doing, you know, so I have people call me sometimes and they want to play and I go, Look, you know, it sounds like you want to do algebra, but I need you to learn how to count first, like, you got to work your way up. Right? So the best action item is to find people like yeah, find your inspiration, the guy that's out there killing it at a level that you're just like, that's godly. That's God-like, sure. But then bring that back to Earth and find that next peg on the ladder that somebody that can help you, you know, actually more directly, I think.   Sam Wilson  19:37 I love it, Marcin, thanks for taking the time to come on today. I certainly learned a lot. I've loved hearing your story. All the things that you've been involved in, you know, ideas on how to develop a system for raising capital, just, you know, coming from the institutional side than just going out and doing it the idea that we don't need a plan B. We just need a really good plan A and to go execute. So I've certainly enjoyed having you come on today. If our listeners want to get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?   Marcin Drozdz  20:04 Best way to do that is my website marcindrozdz.com. And then for those of your listeners who want to pick up the E.A.S.Y. System, or at least get introduced to it, because there's a lot more to it than we talked about, I've got a free download there. There's a mini-course there on the website. It's free to anybody so they can go on my website marcindrozdz.com. Hopefully you can spell that in the show notes for them. And they can download the E.A.S.Y. System. It's a 15-20 minutes set of video tutorials that will walk them through the specifics of that.   Sam Wilson  20:31 Yep, absolutely. Yeah, look for marcindrozdz.com. We will put the spelling exactly of that in the show notes. Marcin, thank you again for your time. Certainly enjoyed it.   Marcin Drozdz  20:39 Really appreciate it. Thanks, Sam.   Sam Wilson  20:41 Hey, thanks for listening to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Podcast. If you can do me a favor and subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, whatever platform it is you use to listen, if you can do that for us, that would be a fantastic help to the show. It helps us both attract new listeners as well as rank higher on those directories so appreciate you listening. Thanks so much and hope to catch you on the next episode.  

Interviews with Innocence
Part 5: Diary of a Compassionate Polish Couple Welcoming 30 Ukrainian Refugees Into Their Home to Flee the War

Interviews with Innocence

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 17:58


  Today I am honored to continue reading the war diaries, a compilation of small essays by Amber Kieniewicz detailing the experiences, emotions, and lessons learned from hosting Ukrainian people, primarily mothers and children, as the war continues to destroy their home country.    For more information on this episode and how to donate, please visit: https://www.interviewswithinnocence.com/blog/140

True Crime Fiction
66. SHORT STORY: Nuts About You by award winning Camilla Macpherson

True Crime Fiction

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 15:59


Camilla Macpherson is a writer and lawyer who lives in The Hague in the Netherlands. She recently won the Crime Writer's Association Margery Allingham Short Mystery Competition. Crime fiction is her favourite genre, and she has a particular interest in writers of the Golden Age.Her debut novel, Pictures at an Exhibition, was a work of literary fiction revolving around the masterpieces of the National Gallery during the Second World War. It was published by Random House in 2012 and has since been translated into Dutch, German and Polish. She has also been recognized in a number of writing competitions, including: the Promis Prize in the London Writers Competition; the Wundor short fiction prize for her novella The Inaugural Iraq Garden tour; and the Fish Publishing short story competition. She is also a previous finalist in the Daily Mail First Novel Award and quarter-finalist in the Amazon/Penguin Breakthrough Novel Award 2009.She is currently working on a detective story set in the Netherlands in 1940.Support the show

Polski Daily
PD129 Stanisław Ulam, bomba atomowa i Enigma

Polski Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 25:11


W poprzednim miesiącu mogliście usłyszeć o geniuszu matematycznym Stanisławie Banachu, a tym razem zapraszam Was na historię Polaka, który miał udział w stworzeniu bomby atomowej (o.O) i Polaków, którzy podobno skrócili II wojnę światową o 3 lata! W tym odcinku będzie trochę trudnych słów, więc tutaj jest mała pomoc:Stanisław Ulam - mieć o sobie wysokie mniemanie - mieć o sobie wysoką opinię- zaczepić - zatrzymać osobę w miejscu publicznym - iść za głosem serca - kierować się uczuciami i emocjami, a nie logiką i rozumem- zdobyć renomę - stać się szanowanym i znanym- obronić doktorat - zdać egzamin na doktora nauk- robić coś w pocie czoła - pracować nad czymś bardzo ciężko - mieć coś za sobą/ mieć coś z głowy - skończyć z czymś, zamknąć jakąś sprawę - antysemityzm się szerzył - antysemityzm był coraz bardziej popularny - zmienić się na gorsze - pogorszyć się- być w czepku urodzonym - mieć zawsze szczęście- uśmiechnęło się do niego szczęście - miał szczęście - mieć ciepłą posadę - mieć stabilną, bezpieczną pracę- stać w ogniu - być w centrum konfliktu- zaciągnąć się do wojska - zapisać się do armii- wyciągnąć do kogoś rękę - pomóc komuś- może się przydać - może być potrzebne Enigma - złamać kod - zrozumieć kod- maszyna szyfrująca - maszyna kodująca- szyfr - sekretny kod- wywiad - organizacja, która wysyła agentów na misje do innych krajów, żeby zbierali informacje- instrukcja obsługi - książka z informacjami, jak używać jakiegoś urządzenia- coś jest piekielnie trudne - coś jest bardzo trudne- rozłożyć ręce - przyznać, że się nie umie lub nie może czegoś zrobić - depesza - bardzo szybki list- rozkodowywać - odczytać tekst zapisany za pomocą kodu- zakodowywać - zapisać tekst tak, żeby ktoś, kto nie zna kodu nie mógł go przeczytać- znaleźć się w niebezpieczeństwie - być w groźnej sytuacji - przekazać informacje - podać dalej informację, wiadomość- z trudem wiązać koniec z końcem - być biednym, nie mieć pieniędzy na koniec miesiąca- uwierzyć na słowo - uwierzyć bez dowodów, nie musieć czegoś zobaczyć na właśne oczy, żeby uwierzyćHave you discovered the Polski Daily Club yet? If not go to https://www.polskidaily.eu/signup and join the club!

Learn Polish Language Online Resource

In this episode of the Learn Real Polish podcast, I talk about the massacre of Poles in Volhynia. I will present to you what I know about this historical event. I encourage you to find information on your own as well. Full Polish transcription is available for all premium users. The post RP422: Rzeź wołyńska appeared first on Learn Polish Language Online Resource.

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 290: 18290 Ivo Pogorelich Plays Chopin

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 70:28


Ivo Pogorelich has a special relationship with the piano music of the Polish Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin. It is Chopin, after all, whom he has to thank for his international breakthrough. When, at the age of 22, Pogorelich took part in the 1980 Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, his exceptional playing caused an immediate sensation. Martha Argerich, who was on the jury, described him as a “genius.” Since that time, Pogorelich has been increasingly committed, on recording and in concert, to an image of Chopin that is far from the commonplace cliché of the brilliant and pleasing composer of salon music. Now Pogorelich once again offers completely new insights into Chopin's world and the soul within the sound in what is in fact his fifth Chopin album, but the first for more than twenty years. He has selected works from the 1840s, the last decade of the Polish master's life. These include the Nocturnes op. 48 no. 1 and op. 62 no. 2, the Fantasy op. 49 and Chopin's third and last Piano Sonata, op. 58. Track Listing:1 Fantasy in F Minor, Op. 49 .mp32 I. Allegro maestoso3 II. Scherzo. Molto vivace4 III. Largo5 IV. Finale. Presto non tanto6 Nocturne Op. 48, No. 1 in C Minor7 Nocturne Op. 62, No. 2 in E MajorPurchase the music (without talk) at:Ivo Pogorelich Plays Chopin (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @CMDHedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.comThis album is broadcasted with the permission of Crossover Media Music Promotion (Zachary Swanson).

Classics For Kids
Frederic Chopin 1: About Frederic Chopin

Classics For Kids

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 6:00


Frederic Chopin was one of the greatest pianists of his day. Every single piece of music he wrote used the piano. The name Chopin doesn't sound very Polish because Chopin's father was born in France. Even though he was fiercely proud of being Polish, Frederic Chopin wound up moving to France, and never returned to Poland.

The Gramophone podcast
Jakub Józef Orliński on his Polish song album, 'Farewells'

The Gramophone podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 27:09


Jakub Józef Orliński was Gramophone's Young Artist of the Year in 2019 and in the three years since has established himself as one of the world's leading countertenors. An exclusive Erato artist, he's made a trio of recordings of Baroque music, but his new album, ‘Farewells', for which he's partnered by Michał Biel, features a selection of Polish art songs that ranges over two centuries. James Jolly caught up with Jakub Józef Orliński by Zoom to talk about 'Farewells' and how he chose the songs for the album. Gramophone Podcasts are presented in association with Wigmore Hall.

Lynckup
Ep 165 Keith Cannon from Validkixx and R&Beef DAWGz

Lynckup

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 137:15


On this episode we had the pleasure of having an eclectic conversation with Keith and Angela from Validkixx and R&Beef DAWGz. They are both about making the city of Memphis a better place.  R&BeeF DAWGz Serving fresh Chicago style Polish sausages, Brats and BEEF HOT DOGS across MEMPHIS (262-672-8641) https://validkixx.com/ https://linktr.ee/Validkixx https://ask.fm/g5sofly https://www.instagram.com/validkixx/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/g5sofly/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/validkixx901/?hl=en https://www.instagram.com/randbeefdawgz/?hl=en https://story.snapchat.com/search?q=validkixx262  

Of the Publishing Persuasion
Of the Publishing Persuasion - With Literary Agent Larissa Melo Pienkowski

Of the Publishing Persuasion

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 55:35


So honoured to have literary agent Larissa Melo Pienkowski as our guest today on the podcast! Larissa is a literary agent at Jill Grinberg Literary Management with a list of talented authors in various genres, including our girl Angela

Consider This from NPR
The Harrowing Journey To Get Premature American Twins From Kyiv To The U.S.

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 9:39


Twin babies Lenny and Moishe were born via surrogate in Ukraine, just as Russia invaded the country. Their parents live in Chicago and had been anxiously awaiting the arrival of their new sons.Rescuers exfiltrated the babies, dodging Russian artillery fire and driving through a snowstorm before finally arriving at a Polish hospital, where new father Alex "Sasha" Spektor met the boys for the first time. But a more difficult journey for the family was just beginning. NPR's Ari Shapiro followed up with Spektor and his partner, Irma Nuñez, as they navigated the complicated bureaucratic process of getting their twins from Poland to the United States.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Mocs on the Mic
Mocs on the Mic 107 - Mocs Men's and Women's Golf

Mocs on the Mic

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 27:42


On this week's episode of Mocs on the Mic presented by SmartBank, host Chris Goforth is talking Chattanooga golf and the NCAA. The Chattanooga Mocs recently wrapped up play in the Southern Conference Women's & Men's Golf Championships. The ladies went first in scenic Myrtle Beach, S.C., battling rainy, windy conditions at Barefoot Landing Resort's Dye Course. The men had a whole other experience battling a hot humid three days at plush Reynolds Lake Oconee tucked away in eastern Georgia on the Oconee Course. The women have endured quite the spring being limited to four student-athletes available for play. Coach Colette Murray's side soldiered on and competed well finishing fourth led by the seventh SoCon Champion in school history, junior Dorota Zalewska. It was a dramatic one-shot win for the Polish native with a hole-in-one on 17 offsetting Wofford's Becca Earl birdieing the final two as the paired dueled in the same group over 54 holes. The men were paced by sophomore Paul Conroy who shot 7-under 209 over three days battling the Geogia heat later that week. Conroy finished fourth as the team settled for fifth. Our host Chris Goforth is joined by our champ, Dori, along with women's coach Colette Murray and men's interim leader Miles Moseley. Join us each week for Mocs on the Moc as we talk all things Chattanooga Mocs!

Curious City
The Story Of Chicago's Polish Constitution Day Parade

Curious City

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 15:34


For more than a century, Chicago's Polish community has celebrated Polish unity and identity at the annual Polish Constitution Day Parade. This year, the parade has a new theme and anti-war message. Curious City's Adriana Cardona-Maguigad tells us the history of the parade and what it has meant to the Polish diaspora in the Chicago area

Reflections from the River
How Ukraine has changed my view of a Polish tragedy

Reflections from the River

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 4:59


Flight Safety Detectives
How to Polish Rusty Pilot Skills

Flight Safety Detectives

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:26


Episode 116 Todd Curtis has decided to return to the cockpit after decades and he's sharing his experience. Whether you are new to aviation or are rusty after a brief or long time away from flying, this discussion is for you. Todd and John walk through the steps and how to have a safety mindset from day one. How to find the right instructor Having an honest health conversation with your doctor Getting started Approaches to preflight inspections and checklists Making your logbook an essential reference. Listen for tips that will help you fly safe!

Learn Polish | PolishPod101.com
The 800 Core Words and Phrases #29 - Core Words: How to Say "Headache," "Bored" and More!

Learn Polish | PolishPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 11:07


learn 20 high-frequency expressions, including words for illnesses and common adjectives

New Books in Literary Studies
Stanley Bill, "Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 74:50


In Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity (Oxford University Press, 2021), Cambridge professor Stanley Bill offers a profoundly original, fine-grained, and rich interpretation of the poetic œuvre of Nobel laureate Czesław Miłosz. The book presents Miłosz's poetic philosophy of the body as an original defense of religious faith, transcendence, and the value of the human individual against what he viewed as dangerous modern forms of materialism. The Polish poet saw the reductive “biologization” of human life as a root cause of the historical tragedies he had witnessed under Nazi German and Soviet regimes in twentieth-century Central and Eastern Europe. Stanley Bill argues that Miłosz's response was not merely to reconstitute spiritual or ideal forms of human identity, which no longer seemed plausible. Instead, he aimed to revalidate the flesh, elaborating his own non-reductive understandings of the self on the basis of the body's deeper meanings. For Miłosz, the double nature of poetic meaning reflects the fused duality of the human self. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Stanley Bill, "Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 74:50


In Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity (Oxford University Press, 2021), Cambridge professor Stanley Bill offers a profoundly original, fine-grained, and rich interpretation of the poetic œuvre of Nobel laureate Czesław Miłosz. The book presents Miłosz's poetic philosophy of the body as an original defense of religious faith, transcendence, and the value of the human individual against what he viewed as dangerous modern forms of materialism. The Polish poet saw the reductive “biologization” of human life as a root cause of the historical tragedies he had witnessed under Nazi German and Soviet regimes in twentieth-century Central and Eastern Europe. Stanley Bill argues that Miłosz's response was not merely to reconstitute spiritual or ideal forms of human identity, which no longer seemed plausible. Instead, he aimed to revalidate the flesh, elaborating his own non-reductive understandings of the self on the basis of the body's deeper meanings. For Miłosz, the double nature of poetic meaning reflects the fused duality of the human self. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Stanley Bill, "Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 74:50


In Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity (Oxford University Press, 2021), Cambridge professor Stanley Bill offers a profoundly original, fine-grained, and rich interpretation of the poetic œuvre of Nobel laureate Czesław Miłosz. The book presents Miłosz's poetic philosophy of the body as an original defense of religious faith, transcendence, and the value of the human individual against what he viewed as dangerous modern forms of materialism. The Polish poet saw the reductive “biologization” of human life as a root cause of the historical tragedies he had witnessed under Nazi German and Soviet regimes in twentieth-century Central and Eastern Europe. Stanley Bill argues that Miłosz's response was not merely to reconstitute spiritual or ideal forms of human identity, which no longer seemed plausible. Instead, he aimed to revalidate the flesh, elaborating his own non-reductive understandings of the self on the basis of the body's deeper meanings. For Miłosz, the double nature of poetic meaning reflects the fused duality of the human self. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Biography
Stanley Bill, "Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 74:50


In Czesław Miłosz's Faith in the Flesh: Body, Belief, and Human Identity (Oxford University Press, 2021), Cambridge professor Stanley Bill offers a profoundly original, fine-grained, and rich interpretation of the poetic œuvre of Nobel laureate Czesław Miłosz. The book presents Miłosz's poetic philosophy of the body as an original defense of religious faith, transcendence, and the value of the human individual against what he viewed as dangerous modern forms of materialism. The Polish poet saw the reductive “biologization” of human life as a root cause of the historical tragedies he had witnessed under Nazi German and Soviet regimes in twentieth-century Central and Eastern Europe. Stanley Bill argues that Miłosz's response was not merely to reconstitute spiritual or ideal forms of human identity, which no longer seemed plausible. Instead, he aimed to revalidate the flesh, elaborating his own non-reductive understandings of the self on the basis of the body's deeper meanings. For Miłosz, the double nature of poetic meaning reflects the fused duality of the human self. Piotr H. Kosicki is Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author of Catholics on the Barricades (Yale, 2018) and editor, among others, of Political Exile in the Global Twentieth Century (with Wolfram Kaiser). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

Classical Music Discoveries
Episode 287: 18287 Weinberg: Sonatas for Violin Solo

Classical Music Discoveries

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 70:24


Gidon Kremer's ardent championing of the work of Mieczyslaw Weinberg (1919-1996) has helped to bring about a re-evaluation of the Polish composer's music. “I am very pleased,” Kremer has said, “that the world is slowly recognizing Mieczyslaw Weinberg as an important composer. For me personally, the treasure trove of his compositions remains a constant source of enthusiasm and inspiration."  Sonata No. 3, Op. 126 Sonata No. 2, Op. 95 Sonata No. 1, Op 82 Purchase the music (without talk) at:Weinberg: Sonatas for Violin Solo (classicalsavings.com)Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @CMDHedgecock#ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalMusicAlive#LaMusicaFestival #CMDGrandOperaCompanyofVenice #CMDParisPhilharmonicinOrléans#CMDGermanOperaCompanyofBerlin#CMDGrandOperaCompanyofBarcelonaSpain#ClassicalMusicLivesOn#Uber Please consider supporting our show, thank you!http://www.classicalsavings.com/donate.html staff@classicalmusicdiscoveries.comThis album is broadcasted with the permission of Crossover Media Music Promotion (Zachary Swanson).

Bob After Dark
104 – Polish Lore

Bob After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 57:52


It's never easy to say goodbye to someone. Especially with that someone being Bob's father. However, we had to honor him the best way we could. You see, Bob Anderson SR was two things: An avid Chicago White Sox fan, and a proud Polish man. Until the White Sox Organization comes out and says that Guaranteed Low Rates Field is haunted, then we have to look across the globe to find the best way to honor dad. Welcome to Poland, home of the fateful story of the Polish Disco Demon that we refer to from time-to-time. However, in this case we look at few creatures of Poland Lore. We talk about the The Wawel Dragon, The Lublin Serpent, The Treasurer, The Sea Bishop, The Golden Duck, and finally The Basilisk. Learn this history of Bob's people and creatures of lore. A special thank you to https://culture.pl/en/article/10-fantastic-beasts-from-poland-where-to-find-them for help with this episode!

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Storm chasers killed University of Oklahoma meteorology students Drake Brooks, Nicholas Nair, Gavin Short die in crash Olympian Coxsey defends climbing during pregnancy Dutch boy, 4, takes mothers car for a joyride Afghan interpreters fear families forgotten by Canada Wynonna and Ashley Judd Accept Country Music Hall of Fame Induction in Tears After Mom Naomis Death Netflix cancels Meghan Markle animated series Pearl Russia Ukraine war live updates Nancy Pelosi meets Polish president Duda Mariupol evacuees due in safer city Philippines fire kills eight, including children Ukraine latest news Mariupol evacuees describe dire conditions in steelworks bunkers South Africas Cyril Ramaphosa abandons May Day rally after booing Orange skies as Iraq hit by dust storm Israel outrage at Russian claim that Hitler was Jewish Authorities dont know what kind of vehicle an Alabama inmate and corrections officer disappeared in. Theyre working now to find out Big majority of Americans back sanctions on Russia, aid to Ukraine, poll finds Trumpworld braces for a couple of ugly nights in May EU energy ministers hold crisis talks after Russian gas cuts Israel demands apology after Lavrov says Hitler had Jewish roots Alabama hunt for missing prison inmate and guard Live updates Russias war in Ukraine, Mariupol evacuations continue Georgia official frantically texted Mark Meadows as Trump badgered secretary of state to find votes

Beauty and the Biz
The Jump Into Private Practice - with Brock Ridenour, MD (Ep.151)

Beauty and the Biz

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 65:51


Hello and welcome to Beauty and the Biz where we talk about the business side of cosmetic surgery, and how Brock Ridenour, MD decided to take the plunge and start over at 45 by going into private practice. On this Beauty and the Biz podcast, my guest is Dr. Brock Ridenour, board-certified facial cosmetic surgeon running a very successful private practice in St. Louis, MO. However, before private practice, he was director of the division of facial plastic surgery at the prestigious Washington University in St. Louis for more than a decade, so we'll talk more about that. Dr. Ridenour has authored several book chapters and articles and is a member of numerous professional medical organizations, as well as frequent national and international speaker on facial cosmetic surgery and rhinoplasty. He works with several industry pharma companies and vendors of laser devices and is a strong supporter of many charitable causes throughout St. Louis. We talked about… What finally pushed him to private practice His challenges and regrets and, The many lessons he learned along the way   Visit Dr. Ridenour's website at: https://www.ridenourplasticsurgery.com   Enjoy and I look forward to your feedback –