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Latest podcast episodes about indians

Dr. History's Tales of the Old West
Trappers and Trailblazers - Part 3

Dr. History's Tales of the Old West

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 22:41


Jim Beckworth became a war chief of the Crow, trapped for the Rocky Mountain and American fur companies. Trappers struggled to survive severe cold, Indians, dysentery, smallpox, tetanus, bears and rattlesnakes. A good year could net him as much as $2000 at the rendezvous to buy supplies for another perilous year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Offbeat Oregon History podcast
Portuguese treasure story unlikely, but possible

Offbeat Oregon History podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 11:39


Stories about buried treasure are very seldom completely untrue. Many of the wildest flight of golden fantasy started out, hundreds or thousands of augmented and embellished retellings ago, as true stories. Maybe that's why people love them so much: One gets to speculating about just how much truth has survived, and if any of that fantasy gold might just be still out there waiting to be discovered. One particular tale from the Indians of the northern Oregon coast is especially tantalizing in that way, because it's so close to its source. The old treasure hunter who recounted it to author Ruby El Hult in 1958 had it directly from the grandson of the man who originally (according to the story) buried the loot. ... (Nehalem Bay, Tillamook County; 1840s) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/21-11.portuguese-gold-legend-nehalem-603.html)

AmiTuckeredOut
Meg Indurti Laughs All The Way To The New Yorker

AmiTuckeredOut

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 46:56


So 2022 has been...déjà vu?I decided to kick off 2022 talking to  stand-up comedian and humor writer, Meg Indurti.  Indurti writes for The New Yorker and Reductress and is a headline contributor for The Onion. In 2019, she was featured in the NBC Breakout Comedy Festival and in 2020, she was featured in the San Francisco Sketchfest.She performs regularly at Laugh Factory, Zanies, Comedy Bar, and Comedians You Should Know.  In 2019, she was a writer for a comedic short directed by Natasha Lyonne featuring John Mulaney, Maya Rudolph, Melinda Gates, and more.We talk about the real reason her parents immigrated to the US, why most Indians need to go through steps to figure out their "Indianness", our prom and first dance stories, how Nicholas Cage got her a job interview, and how finally feeling confident led her to a book deal.

BaseballBiz
94- 95 MLBPA Strike, Lou Schiff on Justice Sotomayor's decision plus the 2022 Lockout

BaseballBiz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 40:06


The Honorable Louis Schiff discusses the 94 - 95 baseball strike & Justice Sotomayor's critical decisionWhat happened?Team & Player Achievements stalled & never metMontreal ExposMatt Williams with 43 runs could have matched or exceeded Roger Maris recordTony Gwynn - closing in on .400 BA but came up short with less gamesLou's dual-fan status with Mets & MarlinsMLB Rob Manfred 2021 Baseball LockoutOther Baseball Labor issues today – Staten Island YankeesInternational Signings What is Baseball missing? – Fans  Late Night Games and loss of a younger audience Will we have a 2022 season and what will it look likeThe Honorable Lou Schiff's book on Baseball and The Law casesBaseballBiz is also on iheartradio, Stitcher, Spotify, Apple & Google podcasts You can reach Mark @TheBaseballBiz on Twitter & Brandon @SportsBlitzPod Lou can be reached on Twitter at @BaseballandLawSpecial thanks to XTaKeRuX for the music "Rocking Forward"

Bad Table Manners
The Dream of Two Kitchens

Bad Table Manners

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 39:58


This episode presents a micro-history of contemporary Indian kitchen design, as told by Manju Sara Rajan, the editor of a prominent design magazine, and Madhav Raman, an award-winning architect in New Delhi. We look at what lies behind the urban, aspirational dream of two kitchens — one visible and one concealed — which has roots in a historical wet and dry kitchen binary. We also look at what interventions open and modular kitchens have made in this history, and what it means for gender and caste politics that still lie at the heart of Indian kitchen design. How do urban Indians negotiate the waves of aromas and the inevitability of oil splatters that come with making Indian food with their desire to showcase their Scandinavian-inspired kitchens in India all at once? We talk about how in urban India, the aspiration is really to have it all. Learn more about this episode of Bad Table Manners at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG at @whetstoneradio, Twitter at @whetstone_radio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio. Guests: Manju Sara Rajan (@manjusararajan), Madhav Raman (@anagramarchitects)

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

new york canada japanese europe fighting american thailand man greece god history tower french spanish live oregon england british european human rights germany hawaii council burning babylon dc dungeon alaska united states vermont roman empire russia death washington public act arizona holy fbi maine north carolina pennsylvania new england philadelphia massachusetts west virginia middle ages netherlands delaware maryland new mexico rhode island connecticut romans norse new jersey bc ohio dutch portugal iowa michigan nevada wwii violence count dracula indians code new hampshire christians politicians argentina mrs controversy assholes ironically game of thrones commonwealth kentucky trial parliament european union divine rock and roll rats christianity ancient greece draco ac punishment britain chile soviet union henry viii family guy san marino armenian sri lanka death row jews voltaire bce roman law aristotle romania king henry viii boiling dugan execution old testament jesus christ moral conqueror shocking vikings jerusalem drawn san quentin prison wallachia communists ethel rosenberg vlad impaler european union eu laws ordeal athenian nero thomas jefferson belarus tong bradford european convention juries fundamental rights pressing latvia convicted allegedly siam ottoman voters reforms charter mythbusters montesquieu mesopotamia onlookers attorney general sing sing solon gunpowder plot draconian electrocution elizabethan england communist party holy roman empire guy fawkes south jersey english american babylonians ceylon bentham clipping river thames uzbekistan emperor constantine penalties roman candle john howard william bradford ossining beheadings islam karimov benjamin rush hammurabi euphrates river hittite theodosius twelve tables english quaker
Cyrus Says
Suchita Salwan (LBB) & Varun Duggirala (The Glitch) | Hosts of 'Think Fast' Podcast

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 67:54


On Cyrus Says today, Cyrus is Joined by Suchita Salwan and Varun Duggirala, hosts of the 'Think Fast' podcast. They talk about how they started the podcast and the idea behind it, what the conversation on the podcast are like, how they have never met each other other than over video call, and lots more. They also talk about Suchita working with Wizcraft, Varun's upcoming book 'Everything is Out of Syllabus' and what its about, and both the guests share stories of launching of LBB and The Glitch. They also discuss the qualities they like about each other, and what both would change about the other. Further, Suchita gives us her views on why Elon Musk is being persuaded by many states in India to come and invest, what Varun has to say on ASCI's study of what Indians find 'offensive', and more. Tune in for an amazing episode. Follow 'Think Fast" Podcast on website: https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/show/think-fast-with-varun-and-suchita-j3rd-R1TlLHtCesjirRuv Check out Varun Duggirala's upcoming book https://www.amazon.in/Everything-Out-Syllabus-Instruction-Manual/dp/0143455028 You can follow Varun Duggirala on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/varunduggi and on Instagram at https://instagram.com/varunduggi Follow Suchita Salwan on Twitter at https://twitter.com/suchitasalwan and on Instagram at https://instagram.com/suchitasalwan Subscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQ Also, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8A You can follow Amit on Instagram & Twitter @DoshiAmit: https://twitter.com/doshiamit and https://instagram.com/doshiamit You can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antariksht Do send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.com Don't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha) In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussays You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Let’s Buy a Business
Patel Motel Cartel - Why are 70% of Motels Owned by Indians?

Let’s Buy a Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:54


Indian Americans account for about 1% of the population but own about 70% of the motels in America. Entrepreneurship Self-Employment Teaching the Next Generation Funding the Next Generation Sticking to Industries They Know Episode Resources https://buffalonews.com/news/the-patel-motel-phenomenon-immigrant-entrepreneurs-from-india-many-with-the-same-last-name-now/article_b5404a8b-1e03-5632-9dbb-e197d9ee3254.html https://yourmileagemayvary.net/2021/05/07/why-so-many-motels-hotels-are-owned-by-indian-americans/ 10 Step Video series to Finding a Company to Buy Mushfiq's Content Website Buying Course Connect with Ryan Condie http://linkedin.com/in/ryancondie http://letsbuyabusiness.com/ https://forms.gle/RRcXpe3dK7pNGqv16 

Building Men
Slowing Down the Game With Sean Casey

Building Men

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 63:35


Sean Casey, a 12-year Major League first baseman, was a three-time National League All-Star during his Reds tenure, Casey batted .302 with 130 home runs and 735 RBI in his career. Casey played for the Indians (1997), Reds (1998-2005), Pirates (2006), Tigers (2006-07) and Red Sox (2008). Casey finished in the top 10 in National League batting average three times in his career and had six seasons in which he hit better than .300. After being traded to the Tigers in 2006, he went on to hit .529 with 2 home runs in the World Series. He is the only player in MLB history to open two new stadiums with the first hit, a single to open Miller Park in Milwaukee followed by a home run at PNC Park.The University of Richmond graduate received the Ernie Lombardi Award in 2004 as the Reds' most valuable player, and in June 2012, Casey was inducted into the Reds Hall of Fame.Known as "The Mayor," Casey was one of baseball's most outgoing and likeable players. His personality helped propel him to become a regular at the MLB Network working as a commentator and studio analyst where he has been a part of an Emmy winning team on MLB Tonight.He has received many honors for his service to the community throughout his playing career, including the coveted Hutch Award in 1999. Today, Casey is invested in supporting children and adults with special needs through his foundation the Miracle League of the South Hills. Located in his backyard of Upper St. Clair, PA, he spearheaded the initiative to raise over $2.5 million to build the Miracle League of the South Hills field and playground where children of all abilities can be a part of a team and play the great game of baseball. Currently, Sean and his team have raised another $1 million to help with facility improvements and build a concession stand called The Next Inning where he has started a job training program, teaching kids and adults with special needs important life and job skills. The program has hired the Miracle League athletes, some for their first ever paying job!You will often find Sean Casey during the Miracle League of the South Hills season announcing games, pitching to the kids, or showing off his lefty swing. You can also find him doing his The mayor office show on all podcast platforms.Sean Casey Instagram Connect with Sean CaseyBuilding Men InstagramBuilding Men WebsiteBuilding Men YouTubeBuilding Men FacebookBuildingmencoach@gmail.comBook a free coaching call with Building MenCheck out our sponsors Finish The Race – Home of the official Building Men gearBecome Stronger Industries - Handmade steel maces and hammers - use code “buildingmen” for 10% off your orderFor more information about our Hero's Journey Men's Retreat email us at: Buildingmencoach@gmail.com

Cyrus Says
Cock & Bull feat. Amit and Antariksh | Visiting Cards, Previous Words-of-the-Weeks, Complimentary Restaurant Snacks & Beatles Doc

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 69:12


It's Cock and Bull time!! Cyrus rants about visiting cards going out of fashion, whether Amit ever had fancy designations on his business cards, and Silverie and Amit take a little revenge on Cyrus by presenting previous Words-of-the-week from previous epiodes to see how many Cyrus actually remembers. Also, what's with Antariksh and the Grand Center connection? Why do restaurants charge for 'chakna'? Further, they also discuss ASCI's study about what Indians find 'offensive' in ads. Also, Cyrus answers some AMAs about the The Beatles 'Get Back' Documentary, if Cyrus can be our Ben Shapiro, and movies that can be watched again and again and again. Tune in for this and much more. Subscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQ Also, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8A You can follow Amit on Instagram & Twitter @DoshiAmit: https://twitter.com/doshiamit and https://instagram.com/doshiamit You can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antariksht Do send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.com Don't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha) In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussays You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

Motorcycles & Misfits
Podcast 454: Twisted Road Test Rides

Motorcycles & Misfits

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 120:33


This week on our motorcycle podcast we are joined by one of our favorite regular guests, Austin from Twisted Road. There's been lots of changes and new features on this motorcycle rental website, and we had the pleasure of taking advantage of one of them. More and more dealerships are signing up with Twisted Road, which means we were able to pick up 2 Indians and 2 Triumphs at one location, and take them for an all day ride to put them through their paces. We share our ride report, our feedback and ideas on the Twisted Road experience, as well as reviews of the bikes we chose to ride. Next up we hit Emma with a Tell Me Why question, which is why aren't there more motorcycle brands coming our of Germany? And lastly, we read some announcements and listener emails. With Liza, Stumpy John, Miss Emma, Austin, Naked Jim and Bagel. https://www.twistedroad.com/ recyclemotorcyclegarage@gmail.com motorcyclesandmisfits.com www.patreon.com/motorcyclesandmisfits www.zazzle.com/store/recyclegarage www.youtube.com/channel/UC3wKZSP0J9FBGB79169ciew

Money Talk With Tiff
Minority Mindset with Jaspreet Singh

Money Talk With Tiff

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 6:30


Live from FinCon 2021, Tiffany sits down with this year's keynote speaker for FinCon, Jaspreet Singh. Jaspreet and Tiffany talk about Jaspreet's journey with his company and how to adopt the 'minority mindset.' About Our Guest Jaspreet Singh is a serial entrepreneur, licensed attorney, and the founder of Minority Mindset, a financial media company & YouTube Channelwith over one million subscribers.  Although he didn't receive any formal financial education – he's on a mission to make financial education fun and accessible. Jaspreet is the Chief Executive Money Nerd at Minority Mindset and the host of the Minority Mindset YouTube Channel. Jaspreet is self-taught. His parents are immigrants from the state of Punjab, India. Like many of his second generation Indians, Jaspreet grew up thinking that he needed to become a doctor. But he found a new path. He started his first business – an event planning company – when he was in college. He started Minority Mindset as a hobby just to teach others how to not make the same mistakes he made. Jaspreet pursued Minority Mindset full time after graduating law school. Now Minority Mindset has grown into a full media company. His company is completely bootstrapped. As he likes to say, YouTube funded his business. He uses his viral YouTube channel's revenue to fund and grow Minority Mindset. His brand has helped countless people get out of debt, start investing, and create a plan towards building wealth. Connect with Jaspreet Website: https://theminoritymindset.com Instagram: @minoritymindset Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/minoritymindset Connect with Tiffany on Social Media Facebook: Money Talk With Tiff Twitter: @moneytalkwitht Instagram: @moneytalkwitht LinkedIn: Tiffany Grant

Dr. History's Tales of the Old West
Trappers and Trailblazers

Dr. History's Tales of the Old West

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 24:29


John Colter was returning to St. Louis with Lewis and Clark when he returned to the wilderness to guide and trap beaver. He traveled through Idaho, Wyoming and Montana searching for beaver and working with Indians. He was chased for six miles by Blackfeet Indians, running naked he survived by hiding in a river. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bad Table Manners
The Juice of Mango Clichés

Bad Table Manners

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 34:19


To speak about Indian mangoes may be cliché, but because Indians never seem to tire of the subject, there’s always some juice. London-based writer, Nikesh Shukla, will humorously tell us how to devour one correctly – a skill most South Asians seem to inherently possess – while halfway justifying why our obsession for the fruit can and should live on. A conversation with food historian Vikram Doctor follows as he talks about the colonial legacy that underpins this obsession, and the parochialism that most Indians adopt as they cultivate their specific mango fetishes. I conclude in a kitchen with a Delhi-based pastry chef, Ruchi Vaish, who turns herself in as a Mango Obsessive. For her, mango season is the very best. Topics covered in this episode: Min 00:31: Meet Nikesh Shukla Min 3:27: How to eat a mango properly Min 4:30: Mango in literature Min 7:55: Meet Ruchi Vaish Min 8:02: Ways to cook and bake with mango Min 9:01: Meet Vikram Doctor Min 10:30: Alphonso mango, the “king of kings” Min 12:49: Is mango parochialism political? Min 17:37: The British love for mango pickles Min 21:08: Income hanging from a tree Min 30:20: A mango that’s “good for diabetics” Min 31:55: Making mango cheesecake with Ruchi Learn more about this episode of Bad Table Manners at www.whetstoneradio.com, on IG at @whetstoneradio, Twitter at @whetstone_radio, and YouTube at /WhetstoneRadio. Guests: Nikesh Shukla (@nikeshshuklawriter), Vikram Doctor (@vikram.doctor), Ruchi Vaish (@intheknowkitchen)

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 661: 02.11 - Is Vedanta a part of the Maya creation?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 5:04


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 660: 02.10 - Why do some people experience Vibrations and some do not?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 3:28


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda 

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 659: 02.9 - What is the timeline of the Yugas?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:44


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 658: 02.8 - Are Vasanas negative? Why should we overcome positive vasanas also?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:59


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 657: 02.7 - What do Hindu scriptures have to say about Intercaste Marriage?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:11


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 656: 02.6 - Where did the first vasana come from?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 3:13


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 655: 02.5 - What is collective consciousness?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:36


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 654: 02.4 - What do Upanishads say about Live-In relationships and Same Sex marriage?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 17:04


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda 

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 653: 02.3 - How should I find my Satguru?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 4:41


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 652: 02.2 - What are the different types of Mukti?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 4:24


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 651: 02.1 - Difference between a Guru and a Sadguru?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 1:21


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 650: 01.11 - Is not our Purushartha also a result of our prarabdha?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:43


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda 

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 649: 01.10 - Can a woman go to temples during her periods?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:48


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 648: 01.9 - What is the significance of Temples?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 5:54


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 647: 01.8 - How can I serve with balance and focus?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:00


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 646: 01.7 - Do Mahatmas have vasanas?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:36


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 645: 01.6 - Is Caste relevant today?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 7:29


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 644: 01.5 - What is the difference between selflessness and egolessness?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:15


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 643: 01.4 - What is the Significance of 108 beads in a Japa Mala?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:14


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 642: 01.3 - Can we have 2 Gurus?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 1:50


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatman For Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution. For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com  These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google Podcast  FB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampage Insta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomt Twitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivam Blog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.com LinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 641: 01.2 - Does Vedanta say destiny is pessimistic?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 3:29


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 640: 01.1 - How to choose one's Ishta Devata?

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:03


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

New Books in African American Studies
Warren E. Milteer Jr., "North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885" (LSU Press, 2020)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 43:24


In this episode, Siobhan talks with Warren Eugene Milteer, Jr. about his book North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885 (LSU Press, 2020). He is an assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. His publications include two academic books, Beyond Slavery's Shadow: Free People of Color in the South (UNC Press, 2021) and North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715-1885 (LSU Press, 2020), the independently published Hertford County, North Carolina's Free People of Color and Their Descendants (2016), as well as articles in the Journal of Social History and the North Carolina Historical Review. Milteer was the recipient of the Historical Society of North Carolina's R. D. W. Connor Award in 2014 and 2016 for the best journal article in the North Carolina Historical Review. In North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715–1885, Warren Eugene Milteer Jr. examines the lives of free persons categorized by their communities as “negroes,” “mulattoes,” “mustees,” “Indians,” “mixed-­bloods,” or simply “free people of color.” From the colonial period through Reconstruction, lawmakers passed legislation that curbed the rights and privileges of these non-enslaved residents, from prohibiting their testimony against whites to barring them from the ballot box. While such laws suggest that most white North Carolinians desired to limit the freedoms and civil liberties enjoyed by free people of color, Milteer reveals that the two groups often interacted—praying together, working the same land, and occasionally sharing households and starting families. Some free people of color also rose to prominence in their communities, becoming successful business people and winning the respect of their white neighbors. Milteer's innovative study moves beyond depictions of the American South as a region controlled by a strict racial hierarchy. He contends that although North Carolinians frequently sorted themselves into races imbued with legal and social entitlements—with whites placing themselves above persons of color—those efforts regularly clashed with their concurrent recognition of class, gender, kinship, and occupational distinctions. Whites often determined the position of free nonwhites by designating them as either valuable or expendable members of society. In early North Carolina, free people of color of certain statuses enjoyed access to institutions unavailable even to some whites. Prior to 1835, for instance, some free men of color possessed the right to vote while the law disenfranchised all women, white and nonwhite included. North Carolina's Free People of Color, 1715–1885 demonstrates that conceptions of race were complex and fluid, defying easy characterization. Despite the reductive labels often assigned to them by whites, free people of color in the state emerged from an array of backgrounds, lived widely varied lives, and created distinct cultures—all of which, Milteer suggests, allowed them to adjust to and counter ever­-evolving forms of racial discrimination. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

ThePrint
ThePrintPod: Will Omicron make Indians stay home? Data on how much they socialise offers a clue

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 5:00


Data reveals that the poor dedicate more time to social and community activities — about 142 minutes more than the average time spent by the overall population. ----more---- https://theprint.in/opinion/will-omicron-make-indians-stay-home-data-on-how-much-they-socialise-offers-a-clue/794953/

CHINMAYA SHIVAM
Episode 639: 05 - Atmabodha - Verse 4,5

CHINMAYA SHIVAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 62:22


Please support this podcast by pressing the follow button and support Chinmaya Mission Mumbai projects taken up by Swami Swatmananda, through generous donations. Contribution by Indians in INR can be made online using this link: https://bit.ly/gdswatmanFor Foreign contributions please request an Indian National with Indian passport to use the above link and make the contribution.For any queries please send a mail to sswatmananda@gmail.com These podcasts @ChinmayaShivam are also available on Spotify, Apple iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Podomatic, Amazon music and Google PodcastFB page: https://www.facebook.com/ChinmayaShivampageInsta: https://instagram.com/chinmayashivam?igshid=1twbki0v3vomtTwitter: https://twitter.com/chinmayashivamBlog: https://notesnmusings.blogspot.comLinkedIN: www.linkedin.com/in/swatmananda

Grit & Growth
Profiles of Purpose: A Fundamental Right

Grit & Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 8:08


Meet Sriram Gopal, founder and CEO of Future Farms, a hydroponics company on a mission to deliver clean, healthy food to all Indians. With a trillion dollar market potential and a vision to make clean food a fundamental right, not a privilege, Sriram is growing his company for a greater good.Sriram always wanted to be an entrepreneur because his father was one, too. Motivated by his role model, Sriram set out to build a business that would also create an impact. Hydroponic farming seemed to be a perfect solution, saving 90% more water than traditional farming and protecting people from pesticides, bio toxicity, and heavy metal contaminants. “The main reason why we do this is because in India there are no mechanisms to check where the food comes from and it can be very, very, contaminated. People can choose organic food, but they're paying like three times more. What it actually means is only people who can afford to pay three times more, can actually have access to clean food. And to me that just feels wrong because I think clean food is not a privilege. If anything, it should be a fundamental right.”Future Farms didn't become the largest hydroponic and controlled-environment agriculture technology company in India overnight. Like most startups, it happened one small step at a time — from building small hobby kits with his father to creating rooftop farms and quarter acre commercial farms. Sriram has set his sights beyond India, expanding his greenhouses and technology to Nepal, Bhutan, Thailand, and Singapore…so far. “I want to grow a company that is global and that creates a lot of good. And if our technology works in India, I'm pretty sure it will work in all the other parts of the world where people are still struggling.”Listen to Sriram's mini profile to learn how doing the right thing for people can be the right thing for your business, too.To participate in Grit & Growth's paid focus group, visit http://stanfordseed.co/podcastsurveySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Baseball Connection
Cleveland Indians 2021 Season Recap

Baseball Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 8:08


The Indians finished below .500 for the first time since 2012. They were close, though, at 80-82. With such a young team, Cleveland is trying to establish their identity at this point. For 2022, expect Cleveland to show some growth, growing pains, and more flashes of star performance from Jose Ramirez.

Patrick E. McLean
A Man Goes on A Journey

Patrick E. McLean

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 12:23


The team had been hitched to the wagon before dawn, but Virgil still hadn’t left. As Laura Miller folded and sorted the new fabrics for display, she could see the stout draft horses through the front window of the store. They stood, patient as time itself, in the first light of the day. Laura liked this frontier town best in the morning. If she were to walk Grantham’s two streets now, she would undoubtedly see bodies. Almost all of them would be sleeping off a drunk, but one or two might be dead, of overwork or disease or from that lethal combination of being too quick with a mouth yet not quick enough with a pistol. Grantham was a boom town, flush with silver. That made it a hard place for honest folk to get a good night’s sleep. But at dawn, wasn’t every place born anew? And if you squinted, and were careful to step over the drunks and look past the w****s, you could see the potential of the place, the potential of the West. This was a place to grant new hope for saints and sinners, miners and cowboys, outlaws and lawmen, w****s and mothers. And everyone, no matter who they were, wanted for a thousand things to make their dreams real or bring an end to their nightmares. Most of the time the things they needed were simple like shovels and pans, beans and thread, rope and coffee, cartridges and knives. Which meant that all of them, good and bad alike, needed the Miller General store. In contrast with the patient horses outside, her husband Virgil hadn’t stopped pacing. She wanted to say that she had never before seen a man move so much without actually going anywhere, but she knew to hold her tongue. She loved him, and knew him to be was a worrier. As Virgil paced the length of the store, he checked the shelves, straightening things that had already been straightened. He looked upstairs to where their daughter slept, and out back at their son, gathering wood. Laura folded a sample of the new Gingham and pretended she wasn’t watching her fierce man and his tender conundrum. She had never seen Virgil afraid of anything, at least not while facing it. But since the children had come, he had become a worrier. Grantham was a rough, wild town, and she knew the last thing he wanted was to have his son turn out like him. Virgil had been a wild, murderous falcon of a man when they had met. Every time he went on a journey, they both remembered that falcons were never tamed for life. A falcon would always go back to the wild. She had snared him with all the subtle and ancient ties that women use to capture wild men. She had done it, at first, because she had needed him to survive, but now she realized, the cords that bound them together were woven from the stuff of her own heart. She had trapped them both in the same snare. Virgil looked to the wagon, then paced back to pour more coffee from the pot on the cast-iron stove. Mac came in with the firewood and dumped it in the bin next to the stove. By noon, they’d have the doors open and the heat of the day would be oppressive, but night in the high desert was cold no matter the time of year. “Pa, you want I should come with you?”Virgil smiled, his sharp face softened by love. “No. I need you to stay here and look after the store.” She thought it a foolish thing to say. Mack was still so young, but boys were fragile at his age. And her husband knew how badly his son wanted to be a man. As he took in the words, Mack straightened nervously, nodding, taking the responsibility seriously.With this new respect, Mac dared a question. “Pa, when you get back, can we shoot the big gun?” he asked, looking to the Sharps .50 rifle hanging high on the wall above the vertical rack of smaller caliber rifles and carbines. “Not until you’re full-grown, if then. But ain’t much point in it.”Virgil resumed pacing, but Mac continued to look at him so insistently, he stopped and resumed his answer instead. “They were used to hunt buffalo, and they’re about all gone now, son. And there never was any down here anyway.”“Couldn’t you hunt other things with it?”“You could, but most men can’t even fire it. Or wouldn’t want to. Least not more than once. Kicks like a mule. Probably break your shoulder.”“But not your shoulder,” said Mac, with pride.Virgil considered the gun and winced a little. “I’d only fire that thing if I absolutely had to. You don’t even need something that big to kill a grizzly.”“Then why do you have it Pa?”“Because everyone wants to come in here and have a look at the biggest rifle they’ve ever seen. And once they come, they buy their flour and their sugar here instead of at somebody else’s store.”“Will you ever let me shoot it?”Virgil smiled and put his hand on the boy’s shoulder. “Alright, someday, when you’re taller than me or when the town gets overrun by elephants, whichever comes first.” Laura placed the last of the fabric in the glass case and closed the top. She walked over to her husband, kissed him on the cheek, and took his coffee from him. “You’re wasting daylight, Mr. Miller.”“I’m admiring the view, Mrs. Miller,” he said, as he took her in his arms and kissed her. Then he turned to Mac and said, “Mind your Mother and keep her and your sister safe.”Mac nodded, taking that seriously too.Virgil stepped behind the main counter and took his gun belt off a peg beneath the cashbox. Unlike the fancy rigs the cowboys liked to wear around town, this belt had pistols in two cavalry holsters that closed with heavy flaps. Also on the belt was a knife with a carved antler handle in a fringed sheath like the Indians wore.The heavy Colt Army pistols were set in the holsters with the handles facing forward, so they’d be easier to draw in a gallop. Where other men wore belts of fancy, tooled leather, worked with silver, the leather on this belt was all but invisible. Every free inch of the belt was covered with fabric loops, and in every loop was a .45 caliber bullet. It was ugly and worn. Mack watched, wide-eyed, as his Father belted it on. His father rarely wore his pistols and Mack had never even seen shoot them, not even for target practice. In fact, he had never seen the pistols out of their holsters. All he knew of them were that the handles were made of simple wood, nothing special.Virgil took his hat off the peg on the wall and snugged it on his head. This hat had once been white, but he had worn it so long it was battered and scuffed and stained in places, and fit all the better for it. Virgil walked out of the front door of the store and looked down at the wagon, its emptiness enhanced by the loose canvas tarp in the back. Then he looked up at the sky. Clear, no sign of weather. Laura and Mack came to see him off. Virgil was about to ask Laura to go get Pen, but Laura indicated the back of the wagon with a nod of her head. He took the hint and said, “Well, shame that no-account daughter of mine ain’t here to see her father off. But all the same, I never liked her frowning face overmuch anyways.”The canvas cover in the back of the wagon exploded upwards and a tornado of strawberry blonde hair announced itself by saying, “I was going to come with you!”And there was Penelope in all her 8-year-old glory. She pouted savagely at her father with a face that was like to break his heart. She had Daddy’s number, that was sure, thought Laura. Virgil held out his arms and Penelope dove into them crying, “Don’t go!”He stepped down from the porch and stood the little girl on the wagon so he could look her in the eyes. Then he said, “Just a couple of days. I have to go remind Mr. Fetterman of his contract with us and collect our flour at the price he promised. Otherwise, people here in town aren’t going to be able to have bread and cakes and cookies. And you wouldn’t want that, would you?”“No biscuits either?”“No biscuits either.” “Well that’s okay,” said Penelope, playing at trapping her father, “I don’t like biscuits anyway.” They all laughed. Mack climbed up in the back of the wagon and he and his sister played at bouncing the wagon on the springs by jumping up and down. Only their children could make riding in the back of a wagon on a bad road a game. Virgil said to Laura, “Just a couple of days. Less than three if I don’t have to go to Tuscon.”“Why would you have to go all the way to Tuscon?” Laura asked.“If we need a new supplier, that’s the place. Gonna have to happen sooner or later if Fetterman is holding us ransom over the price.”She saw another look of worry cross Virgil’s face and said, “You’re a good man, Virgil.”“No, I’m not,” he said without a smile.“You weren’t, but you are now,” said Laura.Virgil pressed his lips together and looked sideways down the street.“Oh Virgil, sooner or later, your present is going to catch up with you. You’re going to have to resign yourself to being happy.”A look of fear filled Virgil’s eyes. A deep terror that Laura had never seen in her husband before. He said, “That ain’t how life works.”“We’ve come through our bad spell and you know it,” she said, getting angry, even though she didn’t want to. “Why can’t you just enjoy things when they are good?”She was shocked to see tears brimming in his eyes. “Because everything good I ever had was taken from me in the end.”She hugged him tight and whispered in his ear, “Nothing is taking us from you. Or you from us. You understand?” Her words were quiet but had power in them, like the sound of a storm far, far off over the prairie. Then she looked him in the eye, forced a smile on her face, and said, “All this fatalism is scaring me, Mr. Miller. Now you go, you get our business straightened out and you come back to us.”“Yes ma’am. Not wild horses, nor loose women can keep me away.” Laura didn’t smile. She looked in him dead in the eye, as serious as the barrel of a gun, and said, “You promise.”He nodded. Then she said, “Get gone and get back Mr. Miller.” She kissed him in a way that made it hard to leave.Virgil drove the wagon East through town just as it was waking up. Past the Morning Star mine, the Morning Star saloon, the First Bank of Grantham on the left, Johnson’s livery on the right with its overflowing stables, the foundry already throwing off heat and the smells of sweat and slag. He continued down the hill across the dry wash that never saw water but for a trickle in the early spring. The horses scrambled up the rocky cut on the far side and then he was on the road to Bisbee. He didn’t look back, but as the sun rose and the day went on, he thought long and hard about the man he would have been if he hadn’t met her. He was pretty sure he wouldn’t have been proud of that man. And certain that man would have been dead by now. Get full access to Patrick E. McLean at patrickemclean.substack.com/subscribe

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #153 "Permanent Outsider ft. Vishnu Vaka"

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 45:54


Usama gets sexually harassed on the road! Our Brown of the Week is Parag Agarwal, the new Indian head of Twitter, and we discuss the racial backlash against Indians in positions of power. The new Indian twitter. We talk to comedian Vishnu Vaka about his transient upbringing and how being a permanent outside has influenced his comedy. Similarities between rural Andhra Pradesh and…West Virginia? How Apu on the Simpsons was a symbol of representation. In our advice portion for Patreon subscribers, we advise EM on how she can finally get a date! Apu, The Simpsons, Parag Agarwal, twitter, hookup culture, shahrukh khan, Amitabh BachchanSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Newshour
South Africa holds state funeral for Desmond Tutu

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 47:30


The South African president, Cyril Ramaphosa, has delivered the eulogy for Archbishop Desmond Tutu, describing him as a crusader in the struggle for freedom, justice, equality and peace. Mr Ramaphosa said the anti-apartheid campaigner's influence had been felt not only in South Africa but around the world. Canada says it will take in more than two-hundred Afghan female judges and their families who have fled from the Taliban. We hear from one of them. And former armed forces chiefs and other prominent Indians have written to their Prime Minister, accusing Hindu fundamentalists of dangerous hate speech and violence. (Photo credit: Reuters)

Research Radio
Will the Insurance Model Save Indian Healthcare?

Research Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 31:03


In 2018, Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched an ambitious plan to achieve universal health coverage in India: by covering medical expenses upto Rs 5 lakh per family for one in every three Indians. The government called the scheme Ayushman Bharat and also promised to revamp the primary health care system alongside the insurance coverage. How has the Ayushman Bharat scheme fared? Scholars Sylvia Karpagam and Shailender Kumar Hooda join us on the podcast to examine key aspects of the program. Dr Sylvia Karpagam is a public health doctor and researcher who is part of the Right to Food and Right to Health campaigns. She is specifically interested in the regulation of the private healthcare sector and in the social determinants of health, especially caste and nutrition. Dr Shailender Kumar Hooda teaches at the Institute for Studies in Industrial Development, New Delhi, India. He has over a decade of teaching and research experience with a specialization in the political economy of health and healthcare, health economics and policy, pharmaceutical industry, institutional economics and applied econometrics. We will be discussing Hooda's articles titled “Decoding Ayushman Bharat: A Political Economy Perspective” and “Health Insurance, Health Access and Financial Risk Protection.” We will be discussing Karpagam's articles titled “Falling Through the Gaps: Women Accessing Care under Health Insurance Schemes in Karnataka” and “Critique of the Model of Universal Health Coverage in Karnataka.” Our Reading List contains insights from EPW's archive on the Ayushman Bharat. Audio courtesy: YouTube/Narendra Modi

The Indian Startup Show
The Best of The Indian Startup Show & a quick announcement.

The Indian Startup Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 133:53


Hello everyone, Thank you for downloading the last episode 2021. After 5 years of interviewing amazing Indian Entrepreneurs I am thinking about investing in a few Indian startups in 2022! if you are building something exciting and need some seed funding  to get your startup off the ground please contact me. Today you will hear some of the best guests I have spoken to over the past 12 months. You will hear from Newslaundry co-founder Abhinandan Sekhri  (2.39m) on building an alternative news model & paying to keep the news free! Next up is Siddharth Manvati (Ph.D) Co-Founder of ClearMeat.  (35.06) He talks about building India's first cell based meat company. Next is ​​Vivek Bajaj co-founder of StockEdge & Elearnmarkets (59.40) he talks about building the Bloomberg ecosystem for retail Investors in India. And last not least Minakshi Singh Co-founder & CEO of Sidecar & Speakeasy  (1hr34m)  She talks about building India's best bar & being featured in the coveted Asia 50 best bars in 2020. So sit back  & enjoy some of the best moments of The Indian Startup show and I wish you all the very best for 2022!  Newslaundry co-founder Abhinandan Sekhri on building an alternative news model & paying to keep the news free!(2.39m)Indians don't pay for news! Well they do and today my guest is Abhinandan Sekhri, co-founder of Newslaundry, a news, current affairs & media analysis organisation. They are building an alternative news model , so in this episode he talks about building this high risk venture. Old media & new media business models. Not being dependent on eyeballs. Find out which newspaper is worth reading. Dealing with Twitter trolls. Govt interference in the news. Thoughts on PM Modi, Arnab Goswami and what kept him going in the early days. And why the 'self made man' is a myth. Finally we talk about his experience of directing/producing Highway On My plate , the award winning travel and food program.Where are they now? Dr Siddharth Manvati (Ph.D) Co-Founder of ClearMeat. On building India's first cell based meat company. Chicken 2.0I catch up with Dr Siddharth Manvati, co-founder of Clear Meat. He came on the podcast last year (EP125) And a lot has changed since we last spoke. He finally talks about the magical moment he finally tasted the first product. He talks about the science behind evaluating taste and smell. The economics of making lab based chicken. Talks about raising finance. Talks about proof of concepts, having 14 sleepless nights , why they are moving from the Indian market to the global markets. When will this be available to the general public? And how they plan to scale the company.Vivek Bajaj co-founder of StockEdge & Elearnmarkets on building the Bloomberg ecosystem for retail Investors in IndiaVivek Bajaj is back on the show! He is co-founder of StockEdge & Elearnmarkets.com. He appeared back in August 2016 (EP39) and since then his app has gone from 50K downloads to 1.5million downloads. And has gone from employing 25 staff to over 140 staff. So in this episode he talks about how they have scaled the operation. Talks about finding great business partners. Thoughts on the current stock market. Common mistakes first time investors make. Shares formulas for investing including the ‘10 10 10' rule. Talks about his best investments and worst. Why Reliance stock is a ‘buy'. Why he doesn't invest in Bitcoin. Talks about raising finance. Gives great advice for entrepreneurs And finally the most important lesson about money he has learned so far!Minakshi Singh Co-founder & CEO of Sidecar & Speakeasy on building India's best bar & being featured in the coveted Asia 50 best bars in 2020Minakshi started with an Excel spreadsheet back in 2006. And this year has recently been awarded the best bar in India , and in Asia's 50 best bars list of 2020. Amazing achievement considering women working in bars is extremely uncommon. it's a bit of a taboo subject. So she talks about how she overcame those challenges. She talks about finding her passion, Working 14-15 hours a day. She reveals how she got people in India to drink an Old Fashioned & Whisky Sour's! What she learned about herself during lockdown. We talk about india's complicated relationship with alcohol. And finally she shares her secrets to making a great cocktail. It's truly an amazing story and one that will inspire you as well.THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING THE PODCAST & SEE YOU IN 2022!P,Sif you need something to do during these challenging and difficult times and want some inspiration and need some creativity. check out Skillshare. Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes in design, business, tech, and more. Anyone can join the millions of members in our community to learn cutting-edge skills, network with peers and discover new opportunities.Try Premium free for 2 months and access all my classes!https://www.skillshare.com/r/user/neilpatelmusic by Punch Deck.https://open.spotify.com/track/4XfCbGXHPfStMMtghzjqfe?si=f79e5abeed7c480e

The Jaipur Dialogues
Did Non Violence Win Us Independence_ _ Prof Kapil Kumar and Sanjay Dixit

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 57:39


The Establishment historians have strained every sinew to tell the Indians that it was the Gandhian non-violence that won India its independence. Prof. Kapil Kumar joins Sanjay Dixit to examine the theory.

That Shakespeare Life
Ep 193: King of Moors Pageant with Maria Shmygol

That Shakespeare Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:04


When London established a new mayor every October, there was a pageant put on to celebrate the appointment and introduce the new mayor to the city known as the Lord Mayor's Show. This event was an extravagant affair, featuring a huge parade that followed an established route through the city. In one of the earliest accounts we have of the Lord Mayor's Show, from 1585, records indicate that part of the parade that year was a pageant known as the King Of Moor's pageant. This pageant is described by our guest this week, Maria Shmygol, as a Moor pageant that was performed by an actor in blackface, and other such pageant devices and dark-skinned personages (variously described as ‘Moors' and ‘black Indians'). Maria writes that this pageant and this presentation of black moors would come again in close to 10 other mayoral inaugurations across the early to mid 17th century, including 3 within Shakespeare's lifetime. Maria Shmygol joins us today to explain the King of Moors pageant, including what we know about the actors, blackface makeup, and whether there was a distinction culturally between African, Indian, and Arabic, or if “moor” was a more general term. Since the images of the King of Moor's pageant also includes drawings of a giant leopard, Maria will share with us the purpose and place of that specific animal in the pageant as well.

Mango Bae
Mango Bae #152: “Indian Americans"

Mango Bae

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 43:08


This episode of Mango Bae starts off with a story about one of Usama's crazy exes - was he in the wrong? Our Brown of the Week is Suraj Kumar, a man who killed his wife with a COBRA?!? Doesn't get more Indian than that, people. Out topic: Indians vs. Indian-Americans. Desis of the diaspora and South Asians who live on the subcontinent are always squabbling over something! The ones who live in the countries we're from always bristle when when we Americans weigh in on their issues and we in the U.S. of A. seem to think we have the right to! Who's in the wrong? Mango Bae jokes it out as always!! Thanks for watching the ep and sticking with us - if you didn't get your fill from this ep, don't forget that we have hours of exclusive Mango content on the Patreon at Patreon.com/mangobae. Go be a Mangostani TODAY!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Completely Booked
#50 Lit Chat with Keith Ashley and Denise Bossy

Completely Booked

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 63:52


Join Keith Ashley and Denise Bossy from the University of North Florida as they discuss Jacksonville's indigenous history and share research tips!  Ashley and Bossy will debunk some major myths about the indigenous communities of Northeast Florida and share research tips to those interested in conducting their own research. Dr. Keith Ashley is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Florida (UNF) and is UNF's Archaeology Lab Director. His research focuses on the cultures and histories of the indigenous peoples of southeastern North America, with a special interest in Northeast Florida. Dr. Denise Bossy is an Associate Professor of History at the University of North Florida. Bossy specializes in cross-cultural relations between Indians, Europeans, and Africans in the early South. Her current research specializes specifically with the Yamasee Indians of Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina. One of her current book projects include The Yamasee Indians: A New History of the Early South. Ashley and Bossy are currently co-writing a book titled Heca Utimile/Our Land: The Indigenous History of Northeast Florida. --- Sign Up for Library U to hear about the latest Lit Chats and catch them live! — https://jaxpubliclibrary.org/library-u-enrollment  Keith AshleyRead: Late Prehistoric Florida: Archaeology at the Edge of the Mississippian World, edited by Keith Ashley Denise BossyThe Yamassee: From Florida to South Carolina, edited by Denise Bossy Jacksonville Public LibraryWebsite: https://jaxpubliclibrary.org/  Twitter: https://twitter.com/jaxlibrary  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JaxLibrary  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jaxlibrary/  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/jaxpubliclibraryfl  Contact Us: jplpromotions (at) coj.net