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Country on the north coast of South America

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Latest podcast episodes about venezuelan

Dreaming in Color
Carmen Rojas, Ph.D.: The Promise & Curse of Philanthropy

Dreaming in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 36:52


Show description Welcome to Dreaming in Color, a show that provides a platform for BIPOC social change leaders to candidly share how their lived experiences (personal and professional) have prepared them to lead their work and drive the impact we all seek.  In this episode, Dr. Carmen Rojas, the President and Chief Executive Officer at the Marguerite Casey Foundation, joins the show. She shares stories of her upbringing as a child of Venezuelan and Nicaraguan immigrants, confronts the complexities and contradictions of the social sector, and offers us a space to think and dream boldly. We learn of the familial roots and values that shaped her path toward a Ph.D., brainstorm around collective liberation in an age of mass wealth and inequality, and discuss how philanthropy can sharpen its focus on social justice. Join us as we bask in Carmen's wit and wisdom.  Jump straight into: (00:21) - Introducing Dr. Carmen Rojas, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. (1:51) - Carmen shares a quote on optimism from Freedom is a Constant Struggle by Angela Davis. (03:24) - Moving to the US ​​at the peak of the civil rights movement: A cultural perspective on Carmen's roots and the family dynamics that shaped her. (09:19) - Liberation for the public sector: The people and events that encouraged Carmen to focus on social work. (14:18) - Everyone should be able to dream: Discussing the radical change that Carmen is working to achieve. (18:51) - Our collective being: How Carmen embraces the concept of contradiction to make it powerful and meaningful. (22:24) - The urgency of naming: Working to repair a broken system and shift philanthropy in a new direction (32:27) - A world organized around liberation: The hopes Carmen carries for our future Episode resources Follow Carmen Rojas through https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmen-rojas-phd-she-her-1b521316/ (LinkedIn) and https://twitter.com/crojasphd (Twitter) Read https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/780-freedom-is-a-constant-struggle (Freedom is a Constant Struggle) by Angela Davis Read https://www.amazon.com/Song-Solomon-Toni-Morrison/dp/140003342X (Song of Solomon )by Toni Morrison Learn more about Dr. Manuel Pastor's https://dornsife.usc.edu/eri/manuel-pastor/ (research) Know more about https://www.caseygrants.org/ (Marguerite Casey Foundation) Learn more about https://greenlining.org/ (the Greenlining Institute)  Learn more about https://www.kaporcenter.org/ (the Kapor Center) Learn more about https://sff.org/team-members/fred-blackwell/ (Fred Blackwell) and https://sff.org/ (the San Francisco Foundation) Thank you for listening to Dreaming in Color a https://www.bridgespan.org/ (Bridgespan) supported https://www.studiopodsf.com/ (StudioPod) production. Nicole Genova is the Show Coordinator and Teresa Buchanan is the Show Producer. The production team from The Bridgespan Group includes Cora Daniels, Michael Borger, Christina Pistorius, and Britt Savage. Additional music and editing provided by https://nodalab.com/ (nodalab).

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
My White Coat Doesn't Fit

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 35:52


“My White Coat Doesn't Fit” by Narjust Florez (Duma): a medical oncologist shares her story about exclusion, depression and finding her way in oncology as a Latina in medicine and oncology.   TRANSCRIPT Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. If you enjoyed what you heard today, don't forget to give us a rating or review on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. While you're there, be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode of JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. This is just one of many of ASCO's podcasts. You can find all of the shows at podcast.asco.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Narrator: My White Coat Doesn't Fit, by Narjust Duma, MD (10.1200/JCO.21.02601) There I was, crying once again all the way from the hospital's parking lot to my apartment, into the shower, and while trying to fall asleep. This had become the norm during my internal medicine residency. For years, I tried hard every day to be someone else in order to fit in. It started with off-hand comments like “Look at her red shoes,” “You are so colorful,” and “You are so Latina.” These later escalated to being interrupted during presentations with comments about my accent, being told that my medical school training in my home country was inferior to my US colleagues, and being assigned all Spanish-speaking patients because “They are your people.” Some of those comments and interactions were unintentionally harmful but led to feelings of isolation, and over time, I began to feel like an outsider. I came to the United States with the dream of becoming a physician investigator, leaving behind family, friends, and everything I knew. Over time, I felt pigeonholed into a constricting stereotype due to my ethnicity and accent. Back home, I was one of many, but in this new setting, I was one of a few, and in many instances, I was the only Latina in the room. I was raised by divorced physician parents in Venezuela; my childhood years were often spent in the clinic waiting for my mother to see that one last patient or outside the operating room waiting for my father to take me home. The hospital felt like my second home, growing up snacking on Graham crackers and drinking the infamous hospital's 1% orange juice. “She was raised in a hospital,” my mother used to say. Sadly, that feeling of being at home in the hospital changed during medical training as I felt isolated and like I did not belong, making me question my dream and the decision to come to the United States. I remember calling my family and crying as I asked “Why did I leave?” “Why didn't you stop me from coming here?” and seeking permission to return home. I felt like I was disappointing them as I was no longer the vivid, confident young woman who left her home country to pursue a bright future. I remember one colleague, Valerie (pseudonym), from Connecticut. Valerie attended medical school in the United States, did not have an accent, and was familiar with the American health care system. She understood how the senior resident-intern relationship functioned, a hierarchy that continually confused me. Over the following weeks, I took a closer look at how my colleagues and other hospital staff interacted with Valerie. I noticed that people did not comment about her clothing or personality. She was “normal” and fit in. I remember my senior resident asking me, “Narjust, why can't you be more like Valerie?” Ashamed, I mumbled that I would try and then ran to the bathroom to cry alone. That interaction was a turning point for me; I got the message. I needed to change; I needed to stop being who I was to be accepted. As the years passed, I kept key pieces of my personality hidden, hoping I could earn the respect of my colleagues. I refrained from sharing my personal stories as they were different from those around me. I grew up in a developing  country with a struggling economy and an even more challenging political situation. It was clear that we simply did not share similar experiences. When I sought help from my senior residents and attending physicians, my feelings were often minimized or invalidated. I was told that “residency is tough” and that I should “man up.” A few even suggested that I mold my personality to fit the box of what a resident physician was supposed to be. I slowly realized that my clothing changed from reds and pinks to greys and blacks because it was “more professional”; my outward appearance faded, as did my once bright sense of humor and affability. All these issues led to depression and an overwhelming sense of not belonging. A few months later, I was on antidepressants, but the crying in the shower continued. Rotation by rotation, I looked for a specialty that would help me feel like I belonged, and I found that in oncology. My mentor embraced my research ideas; my ethnic background or accent did not matter; we had the same goal, improving the care of our patients with cancer. I got to travel to national and international conferences, presented my research findings, and received a few awards along the way. From the outside, it looked like I was thriving; my mentor often called me a “Rising Star,” but in reality, I was still deeply depressed and trying to fit in every day. My career successes led me to believe that not being myself was the right thing to do. I felt isolated; I was trying to be someone I was not. A year later, I matched at my top choice oncology fellowship program; the program had the balance I was looking for between clinical care and research. This meant that I needed to move to the Midwest, further away from family, and to an area of the country with less racial and ethnic diversity. After 2 years on antidepressants and the 10 extra pounds that came with it, my white coat did not fit. My white coat felt like a costume that I would put on every day to fulfill the dream of being a doctor. I would often wake up in the middle of the night exhausted and depressed. I had all the responsibilities of a hematology/ oncology trainee and the additional full-time job of trying to fit in every day; I was using all my energy trying to be someone I was not. Regardless of my fears, I felt in my element when talking to patients and interacting with my cofellows. Despite having a different skin color and accent, I felt accepted by my patients with cancer. I remember when one of my patients requested to see me while in the emergency room because “Dr Duma just gets me.” She had been evaluated by the head of the department and attending physicians, but for her, I washer doctor. Tears of happiness accompanied my bus ride to see her; at that moment, I knew I was an oncologist, and oncology was the place I belonged. The next day, I realized that it was time to be myself: Narjust from Venezuela, a Latina oncologist who was her true self. I searched the bottom of my closet for the last piece of colorful clothing I had saved, a yellow dress. I put on that brightly colored dress for the first time in 5 years and finally felt comfortable being my authentic self; the yellow dress represented freedom and embraced the culture and colors I grew up seeing in my hometown. I finally understood that I brought something special to the table: my unique understanding of the challenges faced by Latinx patients and trainees, my advocacy skills, and my persistence to endure the academic grindstone. Psychotherapy was also an essential part of my recovery; I learned that happiness lived within me as a whole person—hiding my accent, cultural background, and past experiences was also hiding the light and joy inside me. Along the way, I found colleagues who faced the same challenges and validated that my experiences resulted from an environment that excludes the difference and values homogeneity. This route to self-discovery helped me find my calling to support others in situations similar to mine.3 I learned how to incorporate and celebrate my ethnicity in the world of academic oncology by teaching others the power of cultural humility, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Together with newfound friends and colleagues, I cofounded the #LatinasinMedicine Twitter community for those who face similar burdens during their training and careers. The #LatinasinMedicine community was created to share our stories, embrace our culture, and amplify other Latinas in medicine—to create connections that alleviate the sense of isolation that many of us have experienced and serve as role models to the next generation of Latinas in medicine. To help drive systemic change, I founded the Duma Laboratory, a research group that focuses on cancer health disparities and discrimination in medical education. Through research, the Duma Laboratory has shown that my experiences are not unique but rather an everyday reality for many international medical graduates and other under-represented groups in medicine. The Duma Laboratory has become a safe environment for many trainees; we seek to change how mentorship works for under-represented groups in oncology, with the hope that the isolation I felt during my training is not something that future physicians will ever have to endure. After years of depression and self-discovery, my white coat now fits. However, this is not your regular white coat; it has touches of color to embrace my heritage and the ancestors who paved the way for me to be here today. The face of medicine and oncology is changing around the world; young women of color are standing up to demonstrate the strength of our experiences and fuel the change that medical education needs. For all minority medical students, residents, fellows, and junior faculty, we belong in medicine even during those moments when our identity is tested. Through my journey, I learned that we can and must challenge the status quo. I hope to inspire others to join me in this path of advocating for diversity, equity, and inclusion because the time for change is now. I was finally free the moment I realized I could not be anyone else but myself, a proud Latina in medicine and oncology. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by the ASCO Podcast Network, which offers a range of educational and scientific content and enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all of the shows including this one at podcast.asco.org. I'm your host, Lidia Shapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology and Professor of Medicine at Stanford. And with me today is Dr. Narjust Duma, Associate Director of the Cancer Care Equity Program and Medical Thoracic Oncologist at Dana Farber and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. We'll be discussing her Art of Oncology article, ‘My White Coat Doesn't Fit.' Our guest has a consulting or advisory role with AstraZeneca, Pfizer, NeoGenomics Laboratories, Janssen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Medarax, Merck, and Mirati. Our guest has also participated in a speaker's bureau for MJH Life Sciences. Narjust, welcome to our podcast. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for the invitation and for letting us share our story. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It's lovely to have you. So, let's start with a bit of background. Your essay has so many powerful themes, the story of an immigrant in the US, the story of resilience, the story of aggression and bullying as a recipient of such during training, of overcoming this and finding not only meaning, but really being an advocate for a more inclusive and fair culture in the workplace. So, let's untangle all of these and start with your family. I was interested in reading that you're named after your two grandmothers, Narcisa and Justa. And this is how your parents, both physicians, Colombian and Dominican, gave you your name, and then you were raised in Venezuela. So, tell us a little bit about your family and the values that were passed on in your family. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you for asking. Having my two grandmothers names is something that my mother put a lot of effort into. She was a surgery resident with very limited time to decide to do that. And I don't have a middle name, which is quite unique in Latin America, most people in Latin America have one or two middle names. So, my mother did that to assure that I will use her piece of art, which is my first name. But little does she know that my grandmothers were going to be such an important part of my life, not only because they're in my name, but also because I am who I am thanks to them. So, the first part of my name, Narcisa was my grandma who raised me and she gave me the superpower of reading and disconnecting. So, I'm able to read no matter where I am and how loud it can be and disconnect with the world. So, it is often that my assistants need to knock on my door two or three times so, I don't like being scared because I'm able to travel away. That was also very unique because you will find me in the basketball games from high school or other activities with a book because I was able to block that noise. But it also makes very uncomfortable situations for my friends that find it embarrassing that I will pull a book in the basketball game. And as I grow, thanks to the influence of my grandmothers, I always have these, how can I say, mixed situation, in which they were very old school grandmothers with old school habits and values, and how I'm able to modify that. My grandma told me that you can be a feminist, but you still take care of your house. You can still, you know, cook. And that taught me that you don't have to pick a side, there is no one stereotype for one or another. Because as my mother being a single mother and a surgeon, my parents divorced early on, told me, ‘Yes, I can be the doctor but I can also be the person that has more than a career that's able to have hobbies.' I love cooking, and when I'm stressed, I cook. So, I had a grant deadline a few weeks ago and I cooked so much that there was food for days. So, having the names of my grandmothers is very important because I have their values, but I have modified them to the current times. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let me ask a little bit about reading. I often ask the guests of this podcast who have written and therefore I know enjoy reading and writing, what their favorite books are or what is currently on their night table. But I'm going to ask you a second question and that is what languages do you read in? Dr. Narjust Duma: I prefer to read in Spanish. I found that books in Spanish, even if it's a book that originated in English, have these romantic characteristics. And I often tell my editors, ‘Just take into account that I think in Spanish, and write in English'. Because I grew up with Gabrielle Garcia Marquez, and when he describes a street, that's a page of the little things that he describes. So, that's how I write and that's how I read in a very romantic, elaborate way. The aspects of realistic imagism, which is my favorite genre in literature, and there are so many Latin American and South American writers that I don't think that I am going to run out. And when I run out, I reread the same books. I have read all of Gabrielle Garcia Marquez's books twice, and Borges, too. It's the type of stories that allows you to submerge yourself and you imagine yourself wearing those Victorian dresses in the heat of a Colombian street, as you try to understand if, you know, Love in the Time of Cholera, if they were more in love with being in love or what it was happening in the story. And that just gives me happiness on a Sunday morning. Dr. Lidia Schapira: That's beautiful. I must confess that reading Borges is not easy. So, I totally admire the fact that you have managed to read all of his work. And I think that you're absolutely right, that magical realism is a genre that is incredibly fresh, and perhaps for the work that we do in oncology, it's a wonderful antidote in a way to some of the realities, the very harsh realities that we deal with on a daily basis. So, let me ask you a little bit about growing up in Venezuela in the 80s, 90s, early aughts. That must have been difficult. Tell us a little bit about that, and your choice of attending medical school. Dr. Narjust Duma: So, growing up in Venezuela, with a Colombian mother, it was quite a unique perspective because she was very attached to her Colombian roots. So, a lot of the things that happened in the house were very Colombian, but I was in Venezuela. So, it was a unique characteristic of being from a country but your family is not from there. So, my parents are not from Venezuela, my grandparents either, and I'm Venezuelan because I was born and raised there. So, that brought a unique perspective, right? The music that I played in my house was Colombian music, not Venezuelan music. So, my family migrated from Colombia to Venezuela due to the challenges in the early 80s with violence and the Medellin, due to the drug cartels. So, we moved to Venezuela for a better future. And growing up in the first years, Venezuela was in a very good position. Oil was at the highest prices. Economically, the country was doing well. I remember, in my early years, the dollar and the bolivar had the same price. But then little by little I saw how my country deteriorated, and it was very heartbreaking. From a place where the shells were full of food to a place now when there is no food, and you go to the supermarket, and many of them are close. And now you're only limited to buying certain things. And you used to use your federal ID that has an electronic tracking on how much you can buy because of socialism. So, you're only allowed to buy two kilograms of rice per month, for example, you're only allowed to buy this number of plantains. So, every time I go home, because Venezuela is always going to be my home, it doesn't matter where I am., I see how my country has lost pieces by pieces, which is quite very hard because I had a very good childhood. I had a unique childhood because I was raised in hospitals. But I had a childhood in which I will play with my friends across the street. We were not worried about being kidnapped. We were not worried about being robbed. That's one thing that children in Venezuela cannot do right now. Children of doctors – there's a higher risk of being kidnapped as a kid right now if your father is a doctor or your mother. So, my childhood wasn't like that. When I teach my students or talk to my mentees, I'm often selling my country, and saying that's not what it used to be. That's not where I grew up. But every year I saw how it no longer is where I grew up. That place doesn't exist, and sometimes, Lidia, I feel like my imagination may have to fill it out with more good things. But I think it was a good childhood. It's just that nobody in Venezuela is experiencing what I experienced as a kid. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, both parents were doctors and you chose to study medicine, was this just right out of high school? Dr. Narjust Duma: Even before high school, I found myself very connected to patients. So, since I turned 15, my father would give his secretary a month of vacation because that's the month that we fill in. So, I was the secretary for a month every summer since I was 15 until I was 20. That early exposure allowed me to like get to know these patients and they know I was the daughter, but I was also the secretary. So, I really cherished that. Growing up in my household, we're a house of service. So, our love language is acts of service. That's how pretty much my grandmas and my parents were. So, in order to be a physician, that's the ultimate act of service. I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 11. I think my mother face horrible gender harassment and sexual harassment as a female in the surgery in the early 80s, that she tried to push me away from medicine. Early on, when I was 11, or 12, being an oil engineer in Venezuela was the career that everybody should have, right? Like, people were going to the Emirates and moving to different parts of the world and were doing wonderful. So, my mother, based on her experience in the 80s, was pushing me away from it. She's like, ‘You can do other things.' My father always stayed in the back and said, ‘You can do what you want.' This is how our parents' experiences affect our future. If I wouldn't be this stubborn, I would probably be an oil engineer today, and I wouldn't be talking to you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, you went to medical school, and then after you graduated, what did you decide to do? Because when I look at what we know about the history there is I think you graduated in '09, and then the story that you write about sort of begins in '16 when you come to New Jersey to do training in the US, but what happened between '09 and '16? Dr. Narjust Duma: I started residency in 2013. '16 was my fellowship. So, going to medical school was one of the hardest decisions I made because right in 2003 and 2004 was a coup in Venezuela where part of the opposition took over the country for three days, and then the President of the time came back and the country really significantly destabilized after that coup. Most schools were closed. Entire private industries were closed for a month. And I think for some people, it's hard to understand what happened. Everything closed for a month, McDonald's was closed for a month. There was no Coke because a Coke company was not producing. Everything was closed. The country was just paralyzed. So, my mother and I, and my family, my father, took into account that we didn't know when medical school would resume in Venezuela. We didn't know if the schools would ever open again. I decided to apply for a scholarship and I left Venezuela at the age of 17 to go to the Dominican Republic for medical school. Very early on, I noticed that I was going to be a foreigner wherever I go because I left home. And since then, I think I became very resilient because I was 17 and I needed to move forward. So, that is what happened in 2004. I left everything I knew. I left for the Dominican. I do have family in the Dominican, but it was very hard because even if you speak the same language, the cultures are very different. And then I went to medical school in the Dominican and when I was in the Dominican Republic, I realized I really wanted to do science and be an advocate and focus on vulnerable populations with cancer. So, then I made the decision to come to the United States, I did a year of a research fellowship at Fred Hutchinson, and then I went to residency in 2013. Dr. Lidia Schapira: I see. And that's when you went to New Jersey, far away from home. And as you tell the story, the experience was awful, in part because of the unkindness and aggression, not only microaggression but outright bullying that you experienced. In reading the essay, my impression was that the bullying was mostly on two accounts. One was gender. The other was the fact that you were different. In this particular case, it was the ethnicity as a Latin or Hispanic woman. Tell us a little bit about that so we can understand that. Dr. Narjust Duma: I think what happened is that perfect example of intersectionality because we are now the result of one experience, we're the result of multiple identities. So many woman have faced gender inequalities in medicine, but when you are from a marginalized group, those inequalities multiply. I have an accent and clearly a different skin color. I grew up in a family in which you were encouraged to be your true self. My grandmothers and my mother said, ‘You never want to be the quiet woman in the corner because the quiet woman never generates change.' That's what they said, and I bet there are some who do. But that intersection of my identities was very challenging because I was seen as inferior just for being a woman and then you multiply being one of the few Latinas you are seen like you are less just because you are - it doesn't matter how many degrees or papers or grants you had done and all, I was the most productive research resident in my residency for two years in a row - but I would still be judged by my identity and not what I have produced, or what I do on my patients' experiences, which were great – the feedback from my patients. It's just because I was the different one. Dr. Lidia Schapira: When I hear your story about your origins, it seems to me that you came from a very capable loving family, and they basically told you to go conquer the world, and you did. And then you arrive and you're a productive successful resident, and yet, you are marginalized, as you say. People are really aggressive. Now that you've had some years that have passed, if you think back, what advice would you give that young Narjust? Dr. Narjust Duma: My number one advice, would be that, I will tell myself is that I belong, in many instances, I feel like I didn't belong. It makes me question all the decisions to that day because when you're doing a presentation, and I still remember like today, and you're interrupted by someone, just for them to make a comment about your accent, it really brings everything down to your core, like, 'Is my presentation not accurate? Is the information not all right? And why am I here? Why did I left everything I love to be treated like this?' Dr. Lidia Schapira: Of course. So, from New Jersey, you write in your essay that you really discover your passion for cancer research, and you land in a fellowship with a mentor who is encouraging, and things begin to change for you. Can you tell us a little bit about that phase of your training in your life where you slowly begin to find your voice in the state, that also where you crash, where you find yourself so vulnerable that things really fall apart? Dr. Narjust Duma: So, when I was a resident, I didn't know exactly - I was interested in oncology, but I wasn't sure if it was for me. So, Dr. Martin Gutierrez at Rutgers in Hackensack is the person who I cold emailed and said, ‘I'm interested in studying gastric cancer in Hispanic patients because I think that patients in the clinic are so young.' He, without knowing me or having any idea, he trusted me. We still meet. He still follows up with me. He encouraged me. I think him being a Latino made the experience better, too, because I didn't have to explain my experience to him. I didn't have to explain that. He understood because he went through the same things. And he's like, ‘I got you. Let's follow what you want to do.' He embraced who I was, and how I put who I was into my research. And thanks to Dr. Gutierrez, I'm at the Mayo Clinic as an international medical grad. So, finding a place in which my ideas were embraced was very important to allow me to stay in medicine because, Lidia, I can tell you several times, I decided to leave. I was very committed to finding something else to do or just being a researcher and leaving clinical medicine behind. So, when I went to Mayo, I still followed with that mentor, but I already knew what I wanted to do. I wanted to do cancer health disparities. I wanted to do inclusion and diversity. And that allowed me to develop the career I have now and is having that pathway because I, with my strong personality and everything else, faced this discrimination, and I can imagine for other trainees that may still be facing that or will face that in the future. So, I use the negative aspects to find my calling and do many things I have done after that. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Speaks to your strengths and your determination. Let's talk a little bit about the people who may also feel different but whose differences may not be so apparent. How do you now as an emerging leader, and as a mentor, make sure that you create an inclusive and safe environment for your younger colleagues and your mentees? Dr. Narjust Duma: One of the things that resulted was the founding of the Duma Lab, which is a research group that focuses on cancer, health disparities, social justice as a general, and inclusion in medical education. So, one of the things that I practice every day is cultural humility. I continue to read and remember the principles. I have them as the background on my computer at work. The number one principle in lifelong learning is that we learn from everyone and that we don't know everything and other people's cultures, and subculture, we learn their culture is rich. So, in every meeting, I remind the team of the principles of cultural humility when somebody is joining the lab. I have one-on-one meetings, and I provide information and videos about cultural humility because the lab has been created as an environment that's safe. We have a WhatsApp group that is now kind of famous - it's called The Daily Serotonin. The majority of the members of the lab are part of marginalized groups, not only by gender but race, religion, sexual and gender orientation. So, we created this group to share good and bads, and we provide support. So, a few weeks ago, a patient made reference to one of their lab member's body, the patient was being examined and that was quite inappropriate. The member debriefed with the group and we all provided insights on how she had responded, and how she should respond in the future. That's not only learning from the person that brought the scenario but anybody else feels empowered to stop those microaggressions and stop those inappropriate behaviors that woman particularly face during clinical care. So, cultural humility, and having this WhatsApp group that provides a place where, first, I remind everybody that's confidential, and a place in which anything is shared has been very successful to create inclusivity in the group. Dr. Lidia Schapira: You have such energy and I'm amazed by all of the things that you can do and how you have used social connection as a way of bringing people up. So, can you give our listeners perhaps some tips for how you view creating a flatter culture, one with fewer hierarchies that makes it safer for learners and for those who are practicing oncology? What are three quick things that all of us can do in our work starting this afternoon? Dr. Narjust Duma: The concept is that we all can be allies. And being an ally doesn't take a lot of time or money because people think that being an ally is a full-time job, it is not. So, the first one tip will be to bring people with you. Your success is not only yours. It's a success of your mentees. It's a success of your colleagues. So, don't see your success as my badge on my shoulder. It's the badge that goes on everyone. So, bring people in, leave the door open, not only bring them but leave the door open because when you do it helps the next generation. Two, little things make a difference. I'm going to give you three phrases that I use all the time. When you think somebody has been marginalized in a meeting, bring them up, it takes no time. For example, 'Chenoa, what do you think we can do next?' You're bringing that person to the table. Two, you can advocate for other women and minorities when they're easily interrupted in a meeting. This takes no time. ‘I'm sorry you interrupted Dr. Duma. Dr. Duma?' So, that helps. The third thing is very important. You can connect people. So, one of the things is that I don't have every skill, so I advocate for my mentees and I serve as a connector. I have a mentee that is into bioinformatics. Lidia, that's above my head. I don't understand any of that. So, I was able to connect that person to people that do bioinformatics. And follow up. My last thing is to follow up with your people because they need you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Well, I'm very glad that you're not an oil engineer in the Emirates. I'm sure your family is incredibly proud. I hope that you're happy where you are. We started a little bit about where you started, I'd like to end with your idea of where you imagine yourself 10 years from now? Dr. Narjust Duma: That is a question I don't have an answer prepared for. I guess my career development plans I think I want to be in a place where I look back and I can see that the careers of my mentees being successful. And I think that we measure my success based not on myself, I would measure my success in 10 years based on where my mentees are. And medical education is a more inclusive place. That will be the two things I want to see in 10 years. In the personal aspect, I don't know if we have art, don't know if we have those grants as long as my mentees are in a better place. Dr. Lidia Schapira: It has been such a pleasure to have this conversation. Thank you so much, Narjust. Dr. Narjust Duma: Thank you. Dr. Lidia Schapira: Until next time, thank you for listening to this JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology podcast. 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Art District Radio Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 8:00


BREAKING GLASS hosted by Dennis Broe. Tuesday and Friday at and 13:00 pm CET. Dennis Broe presents an overview of TV series shows and events. This week, Dennis talks about a parody of Frank Capra's Meet John Doe ​about the Venezuelan "man of the people" Juan Guaido.

KUCI: Film School
BEBA / Film School Radio interview with Director Rebeca Huntt

KUCI: Film School

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022


First-time feature filmmaker Rebeca "Beba" Huntt undertakes an unflinching exploration of her own identity in the remarkable coming-of-age documentary/cinematic memoir BEBA. Reflecting on her childhood and adolescence in New York City as the daughter of a Dominican father and Venezuelan mother, Huntt investigates the historical, societal, and generational trauma she's inherited and ponders how those ancient wounds have shaped her, while simultaneously considering the universal truths that connect us all as humans. Throughout BEBA, Huntt searches for a way to forge her own creative path amid a landscape of intense racial and political unrest. BEBA is a courageous, deeply human self-portrait of an Afro-Latina artist hungry for knowledge and yearning for connection. Director Rebecca Huntt joins us for a conversation on her collaboration with producer Sofia Gold and how that impacted her poetic, powerful and profound project. For news and screenings go to: bebafilm.com

Crashing the War Party
Now that we need Venezuelan oil, what should the US do? w/ William Neuman

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 43:58


The Russian invasion of Ukraine and subsequent oil and gas embargoes have triggered an energy crisis and sent the Biden Administration in search of the dreaded fossil fuels to increase world supplies and stave off price hikes. This is where Venezuela comes in. William Neuman, author of "Things Are Never So Bad That They Can't Get Worse: Inside the Collapse of Venezuela," gives us a clear-eyed view of the recent history of Venezuela's economic collapse, its broken relations with Washington, and America's regime change desires. He also talks about how Ukraine has upended all of that, opening a window for new relations. Maybe. In the first segment, Kelley & Dan talk about the assassination of Iranians in Tehran, and Israel's suspected links to them.More on William Neuman:Venezuela Sanctions Aren't Working. Don't Repeat the Mistakes of the Cuba Embargo — The Guardian, 6/2/22The Disaster That Is Venezuela -- New York Times book review, 3/15/22Venezuela's Train to Nowhere -- The Atlantic, 3/7/22 This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit crashingthewarparty.substack.com

Medellin Podcast
A Venezuelan Girl Dating in Medellin - Gaby's Episode

Medellin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 20:59


Daniela is an ambitious young woman in her early 20's. One of her jobs is working as a waitress at a popular sports bar in Medellín where the regular patrons are mainly male expats and travellers. As you can imagine, she meets all types of people and gets a lot of attention - Not always the positive type. Daniela tells us about her interesting and funny experiences meeting and dating men in Peru and Colombia.

I am Mantuana with Patricia Manley
Episode 54 - Autism without fear with Federika Tovar

I am Mantuana with Patricia Manley

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 57:35


Don't let the diagnosis scare you—being parents of children within the autism spectrum can teach you many things and value others. Notwithstanding the diagnosis, our children are still those little ones we love so much since day one. Nothing has changed about them, only the perception of others towards them.Being a neurodiverse family is just handling a family dynamic different from others. Children with autism are still human beings and can live their lives normally; they just see the world from a different perspective.In this episode, we will be talking about autism without fear with our guest, Federika Tovar. A topic that I think is necessary to be spoken about to spread knowledge about it since its ignorance can lead to multiple misconceptions.Today you will hear Federika's story and how her life changed positively after receiving the autism diagnosis of her two children. In addition, Federika will be talking about the different stages of grief that people experience after receiving an autism diagnosis and how to overcome them. Also, she will be giving a piece of advice to those parents starting this path.Enjoy the episode!EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS[2:50] A Venezuelan nomad.Getting to know Federika Tovar.[9:41] From New York to Miami.Our guest tells us her story of what it was like to have her children in the Big Apple city. Federika shares what it was like for her to "go with the flow" and end up in Miami, the beginning of new goals and successes.[13:51] The first signs of autism.Something that we must always keep in mind is that each autistic person is different. We should never compare our children with others. In this segment, Federika tells us how her speech delay led her to make the decision to take her daughter to a professional to be evaluated.[27:27] Where did fearless Federika come from?Our guest tells us how covid helped her leave her fears behind, change her life and move forward with her projects.[37:35] Top tips for parents of autistic children.1) Find family support.2) Find therapeutic support.3) Work on your patience.4) Have a space for yourself.[53:50] What lesson did you learn about being a mum of neurodiversity kids?Federika tells us that being a mother of two children on the autism spectrum has taught her patience, empathy, inclusion, and the ability to adapt.QUOTES"Find the beauty and fun in the little things." —Federika"We need to be a bridge and fight for inclusion." —Patricia.ABOUT FEDERIKA TOVARFederika Tovar mourned the expectation of idealized motherhood after the arrival of the Autism diagnosis for both of her children. For many years, she felt isolated and misunderstood. Only with the radical acceptance of her new reality did she decide to launch her podcast "Autism Without Fear," a space to demystify this condition, break taboos, and face all the fears.The most important thing in this turbulent world of Autism is NOT to suffer in silence. Fears must be appreciated as allies and thus try to get society to respect and accept Neurodiversity with a bit of humor, an enthusiastic approach, and the occasional tear.Website: https://www.autismosinmiedo.com/Instagram: @fdktovar | @autismosinmiedo

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast
Oil and Gas This Week – June 22, 2022 – Ep 268

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 54:46


Brought to you on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. This episode is made possible by IBM. Don't forget to ask a question for our next First Friday Q&A. You ask the questions and we answer them. Have a question? Click here to ask. This week Mark and Paige cover  News Stories Is Big Oil to blame for high gas prices, as Biden says? Here's what to know. https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Is-Big-Oil-to-blame-for-high-gas-prices-as-Biden-17243290.php Erin Cartwright Oil Companies Unload On Biden After His Thinly-Veiled Threats https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/oil-companies-unload-on-biden-after-his-thinly-veiled-threats/ar-AAYy8js?li=BBnbfcL ExxonMobil statement regarding President Biden Letter to Oil Industry https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220615006025/en/ExxonMobil-statement-regarding-President-Biden-Letter-to-Oil-Industry Harold Hamm Launches $4.4 Billion Cash Offer to Take Continental Resources Private https://www.hartenergy.com/exclusives/harold-hamm-launches-44-billion-cash-offer-take-continental-resources-private-200667 EU lawmakers endorse ban on combustion-engine cars in 2035 https://apnews.com/article/climate-european-parliament-union-and-environment-336524fead81e58eb755ba004880f201 Russia's Largest Gas Field On Fire After Pipe Bursts https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Russias-Largest-Gas-Field-On-Fire-After-Pipe-Bursts.html Eni Says Gazprom Cuts Gas Flows to Italy by About 15 Percent https://www.rigzone.com/news/wire/eni_says_gazprom_cuts_gas_flows_to_italy_by_about_15_percent-16-jun-2022-169349-article/ USA Sells More Oil from Strategic Reserve https://www.rigzone.com/news/usa_sells_more_oil_from_strategic_reserve-16-jun-2022-169352-article/ Venezuelan oil exports to Europe set to resume after two years https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/venezuelan-oil-cargo-eni-departing-supertanker-load-next-document-sources-2022-06-17/   The Weekly Rig Count by Baker Hughes https://rigcount.bakerhughes.com/rig-count-overview  More from OGGN ...PodcastsLinkedIn GroupLinkedIn Company PageGet notified about industry events     Paige Wilson LinkedInMark LaCour Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

Intelligence Matters
Strategic Opportunities and Challenges in Latin America: Pedro Burelli

Intelligence Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:51


In this episode of Intelligence Matters, host Michael Morell speaks with Pedro Burelli, a Venezuelan citizen, a former senior Venezuelan oil official, and an astute observer of Latin America and the world. Burelli and Morell exchange observations about Latin America's political and economic trajectory, including key influences and inflection points in Cuba, Chile, Mexico and other countries. They discuss shifts in political leadership, the degradation of democratic norms, and the opportunistic entrances of Russia and China into the region. Burelli also reflects on the achievements of the Biden administration's recent Summit of the Americas. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Geopolitical Pivot
George Kennan Roundtable Part 16: What does Venezuela and Argentina have in common? Iran

The Geopolitical Pivot

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 34:42


Before explaining what the episode is about...NEWS AND UPDATE: The Geopolitical Pivot is coming under the umbrella of Aethon Enterprises, a new national security enterprise being formed by the Pivot's founder Semaj McDowell! Furthermore, we have launched a YouTube channel as well! To show your support and to gain access to published report assessments and visual graphics, follow the links below and follow, like, share, and subscribe! Aethon Enterprises LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/aethon-enterprises/ Geopolitical Pivot Podcast: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCJ6Hez8V_bRHwbGAJYlbvA/featured Thank you all for the continued support! The team is back together for an episode to discuss Iranian operations and presence in South America, primarily in Venezuela and Argentina. With the recent Venezuelan aircraft investigations ongoing in Argentina with speculation of IRGC-Quds Force personnel onboard, this episode looks to begin examination of Iran's strategy within South America and how crucial it is for policymakers to understand this asymmetric approach to formulating and implementing grand strategy. #SouthAmerica #Iran #Hezbollah #Tri-BorderArea #Geopolitics #NationalSecurity #Venezuela #Argentina

The Writing Coach Podcast with Rebecca L. Weber
WCP184 Human rights reporting with Sara Cincurova

The Writing Coach Podcast with Rebecca L. Weber

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 43:30


Sara Cincurova is a freelance human rights journalist from Slovakia, focusing on migration, conflict, human rights, humanitarian issues, and women's rights. She has written for The Guardian, BBC News, The New York Magazine, Al Jazeera English, Der Spiegel, Foreign Policy, The HuffPost, The New Humanitarian, Women's Media Center and many more. Sara extensively covered the conflict in eastern Ukraine since 2014 and reported from Kharkiv and other cities in Ukraine as of  February 24, 2022. She has reported from more than twenty countries, and investigated issues such as sexualized violence against women dissidentents in Venezuelan prisons, violence against pregnant refugees in Libyan detention centers, women who were forced to cross the Mediterranean during pregnancy, forced sterilizations of transgender people in Slovakia, and investigated how domestic abuse impacted disabled victims in Covid times.  In this episode, Sara shares: How pitching, reporting, and writing stories that matter differs for smaller and larger reaching publications Challenges of being embedded on a search-and-rescue vessel in the Mediterranean as a journalist on board, and participated in the rescue of 408 refugees Follwing up with pregnant refugees, documenting what happened to them and their babies Using deep reporting for multiple outlets Interviewing sources about prior and current trauma Establishing safety and the importance of authenticity when reporting on a humanitarian crisis Desire to share the truth and protect others Working as a freelancer when war broke out 

Speaking of Mysteries
Episode 238: Dwyer Murphy

Speaking of Mysteries

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022


In his debut novel, An Honest Living, Dwyer Murphy takes readers on an odyssey through time and space in turn-of-the-21st-century New York City, complete with its own Ulises, who just happens to be a Venezuelan poet. Along this journey with nods to past noir novelists such as Ross Macdonald and Raymond Chandler (think mysterious beautiful... Read more »

He Said, Ella Dijo with Eric Winter and Roselyn Sanchez

Ros is back and lucky her because Alejandro Nones is our guest! The Venezuelan actor began his career with the film Así del precipicio, and later was hired by Televisa to act in the telenovela Lola, érase una vez. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rethinking the Dollar
Prices Dropping! Venezuelan Bolivar Strengthened Against The Dollar (RTD Q&A ft. Jose G. Martinez)

Rethinking the Dollar

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 62:26


The Venezuelan economy has been improving with a lowering of inflation and the people starting to feel for hopeful as a result of Russia supplying more dollars to stabilize the economy.

Radio Menea
Ep 181: Changa Tuki

Radio Menea

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 44:08


Thirty years ago in the hilly barrios of Caracas, an electronic music genre began to emerge away from the gaze of Venezuela's elite. Today, after millions of Venezuelans have dispersed throughout the globe in a massive displacement crisis, Changa Tuki is quietly making moves. Featuring music by DJ Baba, DJ Yirvin, Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande, and Arca. Show notes: https://bit.ly/3NdWKwN Follow us: instagram.com/RadioMenea twitter.com/RadioMenea tinyletter.com/RadioMenea

Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino
Venezuelan Jazz Saxophonist, Composer, Singer & Producer/Arranger Rafael Greco

Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022


Welcome to a new edition of the Neon Jazz interview series with Venezuelan Jazz Saxophonist, Composer, Singer & Producer/Arranger Rafael Greco .. We talked about his new 2022 CD Dice Que Vive (Signs Of Life) .. It is an album that is a tribute to his family, to the music of his homeland, to his memories, to the places and people that marked the way her perceives my surroundings. We cover this and more .. Enjoy .. Click to listen.Thanks for listening and tuning into yet another Neon Jazz interview .. where we give you a bit of insight into the finest players and minds around the world giving fans all that jazz ..  If you want to hear more interviews, go to Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino on the iTunes store, visit the YouTube Neon Jazz  Channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/neonjazzkc, go The Home of Neon Jazz at  http://theneonjazz.blogspot.com/ and for everything Joe Dimino related go to www.joedimino.com When you are there, you can donate to the Neon Jazz cause via PayPal https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=ERA4C4TTVKLR4 or through Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/neonjazzkc - Until next time .. enjoy the music my friends ..

Trish Intel Podcast
Jun 15 - Warning: Biden Threatens Venezuelan-Style Socialism

Trish Intel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 17:33


The President has a warning for American corporations - and it sounds a lot like the warnings of Hugo Chavez in Venezuela years ago. Meanwhile, the Fed is desperately trying to manage inflation...but, its latest move will cost the U.S. economy. With so much economic turmoil, one thing has become quite certain; the Dems cannot run Biden in 2024.  LIKE and *SUBSCRIBE* FOR DAILY SHOWS. Get more from me on my website https://TrishIntel.com and connect with me on social media:  Twitter — https://Twitter.com/Trish_Regan Facebook — https://www.facebook.com/RealTrishRegan Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/Trish_Regan Locals — https://TrishRegan.Locals.com Today's Links: https://LegacyPMInvestments.com Support the show: https://trishregan.store/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wilson Center NOW
Beyond Sanctions: Is a Global Response to Rising Authoritarianism Possible?

Wilson Center NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 23:51


In this edition of Wilson Center NOW, we are joined by Venezuelan political leader, pro-democracy activist and Sakharov prize laureate Leopoldo López.  He discusses his project at the Wilson Center, “Facing the Rise of Authoritarianism,” which examines the growth of autocratic regimes throughout the world.  He also highlights how his own time as a political prisoner under the Maduro regime has influenced his life and activism.

Jim Bohannon
Jim Bohannon 06-14-22

Jim Bohannon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 118:28


Rich Valdes fills in for Jim Bohannon. He speaks with: Louie Gohmert, US Congressman (R-TX), On to discuss the news of the day. Julio Gonzales, Tax Expert, On to discuss the current economic turbulence. Bryan Leib, Executive Director of Iranian Americans for Liberty, On to discuss the Venezuelan president visiting Iran. Brandon Brice, Media Personality, On to discuss US Congressman Jamaal Bowman's civil war comments. And ... Your thoughts on the news of the day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

106.1 & 1400 WSJM Sports
Abreu’s pair of 2 run homers leads Sox over Tigers – Tuesday Morning Sports Update

106.1 & 1400 WSJM Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 2:56


MLB – Major League Baseball Last Night Chicago White Sox 9, Detroit Tigers 5 San Diego Padres 4, Chicago Cubs 1 White Sox 9, Tigers 5 – Abreu hits pair of 2-run homers, White Sox beat Tigers 9-5 Jose Abreu hit a pair of two-run homers and Luis Robert singled home the go-ahead run in the fifth inning to help the Chicago White Sox beat the Detroit Tigers 9-5. Abreu sent a soaring shot over the left-center fence in the first to give the White Sox a 2-0 lead. He hit a line drive in the ninth over a row of hedges beyond the wall in center to give Chicago a four-run cushion. White Sox right-hander Lance Lynn made his season debut, coming back from surgery on his right knee, and gave up three runs on 10 hits over 4 1/3 innings. Lynn had a heated exchange with Chicago third base coach Joe McEwing in the dugout after the second inning. Padres 4, Cubs 1 – Darvish returns to Wrigley, lifts Padres over Cubs 4-1 Yu Darvish pitched a season-high eight innings of five-hit ball, Manny Machado hit a tiebreaking single and Eric Hosmer had a two-run double to cap a three-run eighth inning as the San Diego Padres beat the Chicago Cubs 4-1. Darvish, pitching at Wrigley Field for the first time since the Cubs traded him to the Padres as the centerpiece of a seven-player trade on Dec. 29, 2020, didn't allow a runner past second base after Yan Gomes hit a home run in the second. The Padres won for the fifth time in their last seven games. The Cubs have lost seven consecutive games, matching their longest skid since Sept. 21-28, 2021. Tonight Chicago White Sox (Cease 4-3) at Detroit (Hutchison 0-3), 7:10 p.m.              WSJM/WCSY 6:50 San Diego (Manaea 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 2-5), 8:05 p.m. MLB – Tigers' Rodriguez on restricted list due to personal matters Detroit Tigers left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez has been placed on the restricted list. Tigers general manager Al Avila announced that Rodriguez will not rejoin the team due to personal matters. The Tigers signed Rodriguez to a $77 million, five-year contract last November, banking on him to boost a turnaround. He and the team have struggled this season. Rodriguez is 1-3 with a 4.38 ERA in eight starts. The 29-year-old Venezuelan spent the first seven seasons of his career with the Boston Red Sox. He is 65-42 with a 4.17 ERA over his career. MLB – Donaldson's 1-game ban upheld by MLB, fine cut to $5,000 Major League Baseball has upheld Josh Donaldson's one-game suspension, a penalty that was assessed after the New York Yankees third baseman made a remark to White Sox star Tim Anderson about Jackie Robinson that Chicago manager Tony La Russa called racist. A person familiar with the discipline told The Associated Press that MLB special adviser John McHale upheld the penalty after hearing Donaldson's appeal. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because McHale's decision was not announced. Donaldson will serve the penalty during the Yankees' series opener against Tampa Bay on Tuesday night. The fine he received was cut in half to $5,000. NBA – National Basketball Association – 2022 NBA Finals Last Night Golden State Warriors 104, Boston Celtics 94                 (GSW Leads 3-2) Warriors 104, Celtics 94 – Wiggins delivers on both ends, Warriors lead NBA Finals 3-2 Andrew Wiggins delivered the biggest game yet in his eight-year career with 26 points and 13 rebounds, Klay Thompson scored 21 points, and the Golden State Warriors beat the Boston Celtics 104-94 for a 3-2 NBA Finals lead. Stephen Curry contributed 16 points and eight assists but the all-time 3-point leader's NBA-record streak of 132 straight postseason games with at least one 3 ended along with his NBA-best run of 233 consecutive games with a 3 between regular season and playoffs combined.  NBA Commissioner Adam Silver did not attend Game 5 because of the league's health and safety protocols.

SuperHits 103.7 COSY-FM
Abreu’s pair of 2 run homers leads Sox over Tigers – Cosy Sports Update

SuperHits 103.7 COSY-FM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 2:56


MLB – Major League Baseball Last Night Chicago White Sox 9, Detroit Tigers 5 San Diego Padres 4, Chicago Cubs 1 White Sox 9, Tigers 5 – Abreu hits pair of 2-run homers, White Sox beat Tigers 9-5 Jose Abreu hit a pair of two-run homers and Luis Robert singled home the go-ahead run in the fifth inning to help the Chicago White Sox beat the Detroit Tigers 9-5. Abreu sent a soaring shot over the left-center fence in the first to give the White Sox a 2-0 lead. He hit a line drive in the ninth over a row of hedges beyond the wall in center to give Chicago a four-run cushion. White Sox right-hander Lance Lynn made his season debut, coming back from surgery on his right knee, and gave up three runs on 10 hits over 4 1/3 innings. Lynn had a heated exchange with Chicago third base coach Joe McEwing in the dugout after the second inning. Padres 4, Cubs 1 – Darvish returns to Wrigley, lifts Padres over Cubs 4-1 Yu Darvish pitched a season-high eight innings of five-hit ball, Manny Machado hit a tiebreaking single and Eric Hosmer had a two-run double to cap a three-run eighth inning as the San Diego Padres beat the Chicago Cubs 4-1. Darvish, pitching at Wrigley Field for the first time since the Cubs traded him to the Padres as the centerpiece of a seven-player trade on Dec. 29, 2020, didn't allow a runner past second base after Yan Gomes hit a home run in the second. The Padres won for the fifth time in their last seven games. The Cubs have lost seven consecutive games, matching their longest skid since Sept. 21-28, 2021. Tonight Chicago White Sox (Cease 4-3) at Detroit (Hutchison 0-3), 7:10 p.m.              WSJM/WCSY 6:50 San Diego (Manaea 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 2-5), 8:05 p.m. MLB – Tigers' Rodriguez on restricted list due to personal matters Detroit Tigers left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez has been placed on the restricted list. Tigers general manager Al Avila announced that Rodriguez will not rejoin the team due to personal matters. The Tigers signed Rodriguez to a $77 million, five-year contract last November, banking on him to boost a turnaround. He and the team have struggled this season. Rodriguez is 1-3 with a 4.38 ERA in eight starts. The 29-year-old Venezuelan spent the first seven seasons of his career with the Boston Red Sox. He is 65-42 with a 4.17 ERA over his career. MLB – Donaldson's 1-game ban upheld by MLB, fine cut to $5,000 Major League Baseball has upheld Josh Donaldson's one-game suspension, a penalty that was assessed after the New York Yankees third baseman made a remark to White Sox star Tim Anderson about Jackie Robinson that Chicago manager Tony La Russa called racist. A person familiar with the discipline told The Associated Press that MLB special adviser John McHale upheld the penalty after hearing Donaldson's appeal. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because McHale's decision was not announced. Donaldson will serve the penalty during the Yankees' series opener against Tampa Bay on Tuesday night. The fine he received was cut in half to $5,000. NBA – National Basketball Association – 2022 NBA Finals Last Night Golden State Warriors 104, Boston Celtics 94                 (GSW Leads 3-2) Warriors 104, Celtics 94 – Wiggins delivers on both ends, Warriors lead NBA Finals 3-2 Andrew Wiggins delivered the biggest game yet in his eight-year career with 26 points and 13 rebounds, Klay Thompson scored 21 points, and the Golden State Warriors beat the Boston Celtics 104-94 for a 3-2 NBA Finals lead. Stephen Curry contributed 16 points and eight assists but the all-time 3-point leader's NBA-record streak of 132 straight postseason games with at least one 3 ended along with his NBA-best run of 233 consecutive games with a 3 between regular season and playoffs combined.  NBA Commissioner Adam Silver did not attend Game 5 because of the league's health and safety protocols.

KilmerKast
The Salton Sea w/ Scott Murphy - Ep. 45

KilmerKast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 124:04


Grab your trumpet, put on some skull rings, and make sure your back tattoos look cool, because we're heading to The Salton Sea for a meth bender with Val Kilmer and pals! Joining us on this long, strange trip is returning KilmerKast guest Scott Murphy (New Horror Express, All '90s Action All the Time.) We talk janky heists, famous cameos, Venezuelan coups and way more. We even play a game! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/francis-rizzo-iii1/message

The John Batchelor Show
#NewWorldReport: The mysterious, grounded #Venezuelan cargo plane. Senadora Maria Fernanda Cabal. @MariaFdaCabal (on leave) Joseph Humire @JMHumire @SecureFreeSoc https://www.securefreesociety.org Ernesto Araujo, @ernestofaraujo. former Foreign Minister

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 9:10


Photo:  A cargo plane.  Here:  Straight-on view inside the cargo bay of a German C-160 Transall cargo plane as the aircrew loads pallets of 100 pound bags of foodstuff at Mombasa Airport in Kenya #NewWorldReport:  The mysterious, grounded #Venezuelan cargo plane.  Senadora Maria Fernanda Cabal. @MariaFdaCabal (on leave) Joseph Humire @JMHumire @SecureFreeSoc https://www.securefreesociety.org Ernesto Araujo, @ernestofaraujo. former Foreign Minister of Brazil. https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20220613-argentina-seizes-passports-of-grounded-plane-s-iranian-crew

CounterSpin
‘Calibrated' Dishonesty: Western Media Coverage of Venezuela Sanctions

CounterSpin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022


US officials have free rein to continue inflicting collective punishment on Venezuelans without challenge or scrutiny. The post ‘Calibrated' Dishonesty: Western Media Coverage of Venezuela Sanctions appeared first on FAIR.

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Friday, June 13th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 17:38


Good Monday everyone! This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Monday, June 13th, 2022… and I’m here to bring you what you missed over the weekend… so buckle up, and let’s get to it. Today we’ll start off with the Senate announcing bipartisan framework for gun control package… https://www.foxnews.com/politics/senate-bipartisan-framework-gun-control This is from Fox News, A bipartisan group of senators announced a "commonsense" agreement on a gun package Sunday. "Today, we are announcing a commonsense, bipartisan proposal to protect America’s children, keep our schools safe, and reduce the threat of violence across our country. Families are scared, and it is our duty to come together and get something done that will help restore their sense of safety and security in their communities," the group of senators said in a press release on the announcement. The senators include: Chris Murphy, John Cornyn, Thom Tillis , Kyrsten Sinema, Richard Blumenthal, Roy Blunt, Cory Booker, Richard Burr, Bill Cassidy, Susan Collins, Chris Coons, Lindsey Graham, Martin Heinrich, Mark Kelly, Angus King, Joe Manchin, Rob Portman, Mitt Romney, Debbie Stabenow, and Pat Toomey. "Our plan increases needed mental health resources, improves school safety and support for students, and helps ensure dangerous criminals and those who are adjudicated as mentally ill can’t purchase weapons. Most importantly, our plan saves lives while also protecting the constitutional rights of law-abiding Americans. We look forward to earning broad, bipartisan support and passing our commonsense proposal into law," the senators continued in their group statement. The proposal includes initiatives to support state crisis intervention orders; a national expansion of mental health services for children and families; expanding mental health programs in schools; enhanced review process for gun buyers under the age of 21; penalties for straw purchases; additional funding for school resource officers. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement in support of the agreement later Sunday, saying he was "glad Senators Cornyn and Murphy are continuing to make headway in their discussions." "I continue to hope their discussions yield a bipartisan product that makes significant headway on key issues like mental health and school safety, respects the Second Amendment, earns broad support in the Senate, and makes a difference for our country," McConnell added in his statement. If you needed another reason to despise public school, get a load of this: NYC shells out $200K in taxpayer dollars to bring drag performers to public schools: report https://www.foxnews.com/us/nyc-200k-taxpayer-dollars-drag-performers-public-schools This from Fox News, by the way, Fox News, New York City shelled out more than $200,000 in taxpayer funding in the past five years to have drag queens come into classrooms and interact with schoolchildren as young as age 3, according to a report. The nonprofit Drag Story Hour NYC, previously known as Drag Queen Story Hour NYC, received approximately $207,000 in taxpayer funding since 2018, the New York Post reported, citing city records. The total includes a $50,000 contribution from New York State through its Council on the Arts, along with $157,000 earmarked from New York City’s Departments of Education, Cultural Affairs, Youth and Community Development, and even from the Department of Transportation, according to the Post. Records show that the non-profit received $46,000 from city contracts for appearances at public schools, street festivals and libraries in May alone ahead of Pride month. The events involve cross-dressed drag performers reading to school children at public schools, libraries and other LGBTQ centers, but has expanded to also include coloring activities. Photos show drag performers also instructing children in classrooms how to apply drag makeup. According to a reading list the non-profit shared online, performers read a variety of books ranging from classics like "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" and "The Rainbow Fish," which discuss topics like growth, acceptance and diversity, to others that more overtly discuss gender identity, such as "The Hips on the Drag Queen Go Swish Swish Swish" and "The Dragtivity Book." Sigh… I know I’m preaching to the choir here on CrossPolitic when I say, “get your kids out of Public School…” well, here’s an alternative option to that kind of marxist education. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute. Did you know that more than 75% of those raised in evangelical, Presbyterian, and Reformed churches don’t pursue any kind of Christian higher education? Surprising isn’t it. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute is seeking to provide a new, exciting, and affordable option for Christians. Their mission is to build Kingdom culture in the workplace by equipping their students in a Trinitarian worldview and vocational competencies. Their low-cost full-time program offers integrative course modules, internships, and mentoring so their students can finish debt-free with vocational preparation, a robust faith, and financial potential to build strong godly families and homes rooted in their communities and churches long-term. Visit their website at www.cornerstonework.org to find out more about enrolling. Now shifting to news across the globe: Tasty name but no Big Mac: Russia opens rebranded McDonald's restaurants https://financialpost.com/pmn/business-pmn/tasty-name-but-no-big-mac-russia-opens-rebranded-mcdonalds-restaurants It might look and smell like McDonald’s but now it’s Vkusno & tochka. The golden arches are gone, the Filet-O-Fish is simply a fish burger. The Big Mac has left Russia. A new era for Russia’s fast-food and economic scene dawned on Sunday, as McDonald’s restaurants flung open their doors in Moscow under new Russian ownership and with the new name, which translates as “Tasty and that’s it.” The unveiling of the rebranded outlets, more than three decades after the American burger giant first opened its doors in Moscow in a symbolic thaw between East and West, is once again a stark sign of a new world order. The reopenings took place on Russia Day, a holiday celebrating national pride. The fortunes of the chain, which McDonald’s sold when it exited the country over the conflict in Ukraine, could provide a test of how successfully Russia’s economy can become more self-sufficient and withstand Western sanctions. On Sunday, scores of people queued outside what was formerly McDonald’s flagship restaurant in Pushkin Square, central Moscow. The outlet sported a new logo – a stylised burger with two fries – plus a slogan reading: “The name changes, love stays.” The queue was significantly smaller than the thousands of people who thronged to the original McDonald’s opening there in 1990 during the Soviet era. Vkusno & tochka’s menu was also smaller and did not offer the Big Mac and some other burgers and desserts, such as the McFlurry. A double cheeseburger was going for 129 roubles ($2.31) compared with roughly 160 under McDonald’s and a fish burger for 169 roubles, compared with about 190 previously. The composition of burgers has not changed and the equipment from McDonald’s has remained, said Alexander Merkulov, quality manager at the new company. McDonald’s closed its Russian restaurants in March and said in mid-May that it had decided to leave the country altogether. In a sign of the haste the new owners have had to rebrand in time for the launch, much of the packaging for fries and burgers was plain white, as were drink cups, while takeaway bags were plain brown. The old McDonald’s logo on packets of ketchup and other sauces were covered over with makeshift black markings. Sergei, a 15-year-old customer, saw little difference though. “The taste has stayed the same,” he said as he tucked into a chicken burger and fries. “The cola is different, but there really is no change to the burger.” Iran and Venezuela sign a 20-year agreement https://www.theblaze.com/news/-2657497477 Venezuela’s socialist leader Nicolas Maduro and Iran’s hardline theocratic president Ebrahim Raisi recently signed a 20-year cooperation agreement. The Associated Press reported that this new agreement came just one day after Maduro praised the Iranian Islamic Republic for sending badly needed fuel to Venezuela despite American sanctions. In an interview with Maduro after he arrived for a two-day visit in TAY-RON, Iranian state media reported that Maduro heaped praise upon Iran’s efforts to send fuel tankers in support of his country. Maduro said, “TAY-RON’s delivery of oil to Caracas was a great help to the Venezuelan people.” Maduro’s visit to Iran comes as tensions heighten across the Middle East as negotiations over Iran’s nuclear deal fell apart and as U.S. sanctions and rising global food prices choke Iran’s suffering economy. This was Maduro’s first visit to Iran. A high-ranking delegation from Venezuela comprised of political and economic officials joined Maduro on his visit to Iran after receiving an invitation from Raisi. Venezuela, like Iran, is under heavy sanctions from the U.S., which hinder its economic growth. In a joint press conference on Saturday, Raisi and Maduro signed the 20-year agreement that solidified the country’s commitment to economic, political, and militaristic cooperation. Maduro reportedly said that Venezuela and Iran are united by “a common vision.” The two presidents are aligned on international issues, and both have suffered economic difficulties, which are said to be caused by sanctions from America and its allies. Club Membership Plug: Let’s stop and take a moment to talk about Fight Laugh Feast Club membership. By joining the Fight Laugh Feast Army, not only will you be aiding in our fight to take down secular & legacy media; but you’ll also get access to content placed in our Club Portal, such as past shows, all of our conference talks, and EXCLUSIVE content for club members that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Lastly, you’ll also get discounts for our conferences… so if you’ve got $10 bucks a month to kick over our way, you can sign up now at flfnetwork.com/product/fightlaughfestclub. Now let’s wrap this news brief up with the topic I love. Sports! Commanders' Jack Del Rio leaves Twitter following Jan. 6 remarks https://www.foxnews.com/sports/commanders-jack-del-rio-leaves-twitter-jan-6-remarks Washington Commanders defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio’s comments about the Jan. 6 Capitol riot and the 2020 George Floyd protests have now cost the coach his social media account. The longtime NFL coach deactivated his Twitter account following the controversy about his remarks and the $100,000 fine levied by Washington coach Ron Rivera. Del Rio on Wednesday downplayed the Jan. 6, 2021, riots at the Capitol and questioned why the intense protests in the summer following Floyd’s death didn’t receive the same scrutiny. Del Rio called the Jan. 6 riot a "dust-up at the Capitol" and later attempted to backtrack on his remarks. "I made comments earlier today in referencing the attack that took place on the United States Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Referencing that situation as a dust-up was irresponsible and negligent, and I am sorry," Del Rio said in a statement. "I stand by my comments condemning violence in communities across the country. I say that while also expressing my support as an American citizen for peaceful protest in our country. I have fully supported all peaceful protests in America. I love, respect and support all my fellow coaches, players and staff that I work with and respect their views and opinions." Rivera on Friday announced a fine and said the comments were hurtful to the community and didn’t reflect the views of the organization. "He understands the distinction between the events of that dark day and peaceful protests, which are a hallmark of our democracy," Rivera said. "Words have consequences, and his words hurt a lot of people in our community. I want to make it clear that our organization will not tolerate any equivalency between those who demanded justice in the wake of George Floyd's murder and the actions of those on Jan. 6 who sought to topple our government." Rivera said Del Rio’s fine would be donated to the United States Capitol Police Memorial Fund. There were also calls for Del Rio to resign, or be fired if you can believe that… shocking I know. But his team doesn’t appear to feel that way. Commanders defensive lineman Jonathan Allen said he wasn’t bothered by Del Rio’s opinion. "Me personally, I don’t care about his opinion. As long as he shows up every day, and he works hard, that’s what I want from my defensive coordinator," Allen told NBC Sports Washington. "In my opinion, everyone’s entitled to their own opinion. Some guys decide to share it on Twitter; some guys don’t. It doesn’t make one person better than the other. At the end of the day, you can have a difference in opinion and still respect one another. I feel like that’s what our country is about. That’s what our team is about." And finally, for those of you who may have missed game 4 of the NBA Finals between the Boston Celtics, and the Golden State Warriors, here’s a brief recap, courtesy of Hall of Fame broadcaster, Mike Breen. Final 4:32 WILD ENDING Warriors vs Celtics - Game 4 NBA Finals

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Friday, June 13th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 17:38


Good Monday everyone! This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Monday, June 13th, 2022… and I’m here to bring you what you missed over the weekend… so buckle up, and let’s get to it. Today we’ll start off with the Senate announcing bipartisan framework for gun control package… https://www.foxnews.com/politics/senate-bipartisan-framework-gun-control This is from Fox News, A bipartisan group of senators announced a "commonsense" agreement on a gun package Sunday. "Today, we are announcing a commonsense, bipartisan proposal to protect America’s children, keep our schools safe, and reduce the threat of violence across our country. Families are scared, and it is our duty to come together and get something done that will help restore their sense of safety and security in their communities," the group of senators said in a press release on the announcement. The senators include: Chris Murphy, John Cornyn, Thom Tillis , Kyrsten Sinema, Richard Blumenthal, Roy Blunt, Cory Booker, Richard Burr, Bill Cassidy, Susan Collins, Chris Coons, Lindsey Graham, Martin Heinrich, Mark Kelly, Angus King, Joe Manchin, Rob Portman, Mitt Romney, Debbie Stabenow, and Pat Toomey. "Our plan increases needed mental health resources, improves school safety and support for students, and helps ensure dangerous criminals and those who are adjudicated as mentally ill can’t purchase weapons. Most importantly, our plan saves lives while also protecting the constitutional rights of law-abiding Americans. We look forward to earning broad, bipartisan support and passing our commonsense proposal into law," the senators continued in their group statement. The proposal includes initiatives to support state crisis intervention orders; a national expansion of mental health services for children and families; expanding mental health programs in schools; enhanced review process for gun buyers under the age of 21; penalties for straw purchases; additional funding for school resource officers. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell issued a statement in support of the agreement later Sunday, saying he was "glad Senators Cornyn and Murphy are continuing to make headway in their discussions." "I continue to hope their discussions yield a bipartisan product that makes significant headway on key issues like mental health and school safety, respects the Second Amendment, earns broad support in the Senate, and makes a difference for our country," McConnell added in his statement. If you needed another reason to despise public school, get a load of this: NYC shells out $200K in taxpayer dollars to bring drag performers to public schools: report https://www.foxnews.com/us/nyc-200k-taxpayer-dollars-drag-performers-public-schools This from Fox News, by the way, Fox News, New York City shelled out more than $200,000 in taxpayer funding in the past five years to have drag queens come into classrooms and interact with schoolchildren as young as age 3, according to a report. The nonprofit Drag Story Hour NYC, previously known as Drag Queen Story Hour NYC, received approximately $207,000 in taxpayer funding since 2018, the New York Post reported, citing city records. The total includes a $50,000 contribution from New York State through its Council on the Arts, along with $157,000 earmarked from New York City’s Departments of Education, Cultural Affairs, Youth and Community Development, and even from the Department of Transportation, according to the Post. Records show that the non-profit received $46,000 from city contracts for appearances at public schools, street festivals and libraries in May alone ahead of Pride month. The events involve cross-dressed drag performers reading to school children at public schools, libraries and other LGBTQ centers, but has expanded to also include coloring activities. Photos show drag performers also instructing children in classrooms how to apply drag makeup. According to a reading list the non-profit shared online, performers read a variety of books ranging from classics like "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" and "The Rainbow Fish," which discuss topics like growth, acceptance and diversity, to others that more overtly discuss gender identity, such as "The Hips on the Drag Queen Go Swish Swish Swish" and "The Dragtivity Book." Sigh… I know I’m preaching to the choir here on CrossPolitic when I say, “get your kids out of Public School…” well, here’s an alternative option to that kind of marxist education. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute. Did you know that more than 75% of those raised in evangelical, Presbyterian, and Reformed churches don’t pursue any kind of Christian higher education? Surprising isn’t it. Cornerstone Work & Worldview Institute is seeking to provide a new, exciting, and affordable option for Christians. Their mission is to build Kingdom culture in the workplace by equipping their students in a Trinitarian worldview and vocational competencies. Their low-cost full-time program offers integrative course modules, internships, and mentoring so their students can finish debt-free with vocational preparation, a robust faith, and financial potential to build strong godly families and homes rooted in their communities and churches long-term. Visit their website at www.cornerstonework.org to find out more about enrolling. Now shifting to news across the globe: Tasty name but no Big Mac: Russia opens rebranded McDonald's restaurants https://financialpost.com/pmn/business-pmn/tasty-name-but-no-big-mac-russia-opens-rebranded-mcdonalds-restaurants It might look and smell like McDonald’s but now it’s Vkusno & tochka. The golden arches are gone, the Filet-O-Fish is simply a fish burger. The Big Mac has left Russia. A new era for Russia’s fast-food and economic scene dawned on Sunday, as McDonald’s restaurants flung open their doors in Moscow under new Russian ownership and with the new name, which translates as “Tasty and that’s it.” The unveiling of the rebranded outlets, more than three decades after the American burger giant first opened its doors in Moscow in a symbolic thaw between East and West, is once again a stark sign of a new world order. The reopenings took place on Russia Day, a holiday celebrating national pride. The fortunes of the chain, which McDonald’s sold when it exited the country over the conflict in Ukraine, could provide a test of how successfully Russia’s economy can become more self-sufficient and withstand Western sanctions. On Sunday, scores of people queued outside what was formerly McDonald’s flagship restaurant in Pushkin Square, central Moscow. The outlet sported a new logo – a stylised burger with two fries – plus a slogan reading: “The name changes, love stays.” The queue was significantly smaller than the thousands of people who thronged to the original McDonald’s opening there in 1990 during the Soviet era. Vkusno & tochka’s menu was also smaller and did not offer the Big Mac and some other burgers and desserts, such as the McFlurry. A double cheeseburger was going for 129 roubles ($2.31) compared with roughly 160 under McDonald’s and a fish burger for 169 roubles, compared with about 190 previously. The composition of burgers has not changed and the equipment from McDonald’s has remained, said Alexander Merkulov, quality manager at the new company. McDonald’s closed its Russian restaurants in March and said in mid-May that it had decided to leave the country altogether. In a sign of the haste the new owners have had to rebrand in time for the launch, much of the packaging for fries and burgers was plain white, as were drink cups, while takeaway bags were plain brown. The old McDonald’s logo on packets of ketchup and other sauces were covered over with makeshift black markings. Sergei, a 15-year-old customer, saw little difference though. “The taste has stayed the same,” he said as he tucked into a chicken burger and fries. “The cola is different, but there really is no change to the burger.” Iran and Venezuela sign a 20-year agreement https://www.theblaze.com/news/-2657497477 Venezuela’s socialist leader Nicolas Maduro and Iran’s hardline theocratic president Ebrahim Raisi recently signed a 20-year cooperation agreement. The Associated Press reported that this new agreement came just one day after Maduro praised the Iranian Islamic Republic for sending badly needed fuel to Venezuela despite American sanctions. In an interview with Maduro after he arrived for a two-day visit in TAY-RON, Iranian state media reported that Maduro heaped praise upon Iran’s efforts to send fuel tankers in support of his country. Maduro said, “TAY-RON’s delivery of oil to Caracas was a great help to the Venezuelan people.” Maduro’s visit to Iran comes as tensions heighten across the Middle East as negotiations over Iran’s nuclear deal fell apart and as U.S. sanctions and rising global food prices choke Iran’s suffering economy. This was Maduro’s first visit to Iran. A high-ranking delegation from Venezuela comprised of political and economic officials joined Maduro on his visit to Iran after receiving an invitation from Raisi. Venezuela, like Iran, is under heavy sanctions from the U.S., which hinder its economic growth. In a joint press conference on Saturday, Raisi and Maduro signed the 20-year agreement that solidified the country’s commitment to economic, political, and militaristic cooperation. Maduro reportedly said that Venezuela and Iran are united by “a common vision.” The two presidents are aligned on international issues, and both have suffered economic difficulties, which are said to be caused by sanctions from America and its allies. Club Membership Plug: Let’s stop and take a moment to talk about Fight Laugh Feast Club membership. By joining the Fight Laugh Feast Army, not only will you be aiding in our fight to take down secular & legacy media; but you’ll also get access to content placed in our Club Portal, such as past shows, all of our conference talks, and EXCLUSIVE content for club members that you won’t be able to find anywhere else. Lastly, you’ll also get discounts for our conferences… so if you’ve got $10 bucks a month to kick over our way, you can sign up now at flfnetwork.com/product/fightlaughfestclub. Now let’s wrap this news brief up with the topic I love. Sports! Commanders' Jack Del Rio leaves Twitter following Jan. 6 remarks https://www.foxnews.com/sports/commanders-jack-del-rio-leaves-twitter-jan-6-remarks Washington Commanders defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio’s comments about the Jan. 6 Capitol riot and the 2020 George Floyd protests have now cost the coach his social media account. The longtime NFL coach deactivated his Twitter account following the controversy about his remarks and the $100,000 fine levied by Washington coach Ron Rivera. Del Rio on Wednesday downplayed the Jan. 6, 2021, riots at the Capitol and questioned why the intense protests in the summer following Floyd’s death didn’t receive the same scrutiny. Del Rio called the Jan. 6 riot a "dust-up at the Capitol" and later attempted to backtrack on his remarks. "I made comments earlier today in referencing the attack that took place on the United States Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Referencing that situation as a dust-up was irresponsible and negligent, and I am sorry," Del Rio said in a statement. "I stand by my comments condemning violence in communities across the country. I say that while also expressing my support as an American citizen for peaceful protest in our country. I have fully supported all peaceful protests in America. I love, respect and support all my fellow coaches, players and staff that I work with and respect their views and opinions." Rivera on Friday announced a fine and said the comments were hurtful to the community and didn’t reflect the views of the organization. "He understands the distinction between the events of that dark day and peaceful protests, which are a hallmark of our democracy," Rivera said. "Words have consequences, and his words hurt a lot of people in our community. I want to make it clear that our organization will not tolerate any equivalency between those who demanded justice in the wake of George Floyd's murder and the actions of those on Jan. 6 who sought to topple our government." Rivera said Del Rio’s fine would be donated to the United States Capitol Police Memorial Fund. There were also calls for Del Rio to resign, or be fired if you can believe that… shocking I know. But his team doesn’t appear to feel that way. Commanders defensive lineman Jonathan Allen said he wasn’t bothered by Del Rio’s opinion. "Me personally, I don’t care about his opinion. As long as he shows up every day, and he works hard, that’s what I want from my defensive coordinator," Allen told NBC Sports Washington. "In my opinion, everyone’s entitled to their own opinion. Some guys decide to share it on Twitter; some guys don’t. It doesn’t make one person better than the other. At the end of the day, you can have a difference in opinion and still respect one another. I feel like that’s what our country is about. That’s what our team is about." And finally, for those of you who may have missed game 4 of the NBA Finals between the Boston Celtics, and the Golden State Warriors, here’s a brief recap, courtesy of Hall of Fame broadcaster, Mike Breen. Final 4:32 WILD ENDING Warriors vs Celtics - Game 4 NBA Finals

Crazy Wisdom
Is Bitcoin the Universal Basic Income? w/ Michael Hawaii

Crazy Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 77:22


Michael Hawaii Founder of Ocean Bit Are there a lot of Brazilians in Hawaii? Is Honolulu more beautiful than Rio? How about San Francisco? What is Ocean Energy Thermal  (O-Tech)? What type of businesses are high kpax?  Why aren't you a fan of the word innovation? Are you going to build your business remotely? What is the difference between a moral opinion and data driven opinion? How are data packets different from digital money? What was your trip like to Venezuela?(25:00) What did you learn from your trip to Venezuela? Who are the Venezuelans to follow about Bitcoin? What don't you like about custody? What are food labs? How does Hawaii get its energy? Where does it come from? How long does it take to get ships? Remembering people comes down to their name and where they come from. When did King Hamea Hamea conquer? (45:00) Who is Tim May? Has the FBI ever turned off a Coinbase account of someone who they didn't like? What is Hanai?  Who is Troy Cross @michaelhawaii

AP Audio Stories
Venezuelan leader, Iranian president sign 20-year agreement

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 1:00


AP correspondent Karen Chammas reports on Iran Venezuela.

Politics at Work
087 - Mexican President Skips the Summit of the Americas, Bilderberg Meeting, Record Inflation

Politics at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 28:33


·       Vigilance Elite - YouTube·       Mexico's AMLO will skip US-hosted Summit of the Americas | Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador News | Al Jazeera·       The Summit of the Americas Is an Instrument of US Hegemony in Latin America (jacobin.com)·       Participants 2022 (bilderbergmeetings.org)·       Record-high US inflation has analysts gloomy (nypost.com)·       US to allow Venezuelan oil to be shipped to Europe: report | The Hill

NewsNight
NewsNight | June 10, 2022

NewsNight

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 27:14


Florida lawmakers and activists are calling on the Biden administration to extend Temporary Protected Status for Venezuelans who fear returning to the conditions in their country under Nicolás Maduro. And the U.S. government shifts its policy on Cuba, lifting some Trump-era restrictions. The panel looks at the potential impact for Florida.

World Business Report
US inflation hits fresh 40-year high

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 26:27


Inflation continues to squeeze American households with an 8.6% rate in May, the highest since 1981. Food and energy prices lead the rally with double-digit increases. A consumer and a business owner in different parts of the country share their struggles as we ask Peter Jankovskis, vice president of Arbor Financial Services in Chicago, for his input on how the Federal Reserve may react to this rise. The US is dropping its Covid test requirement for air travellers and Japan has reopening its borders to holidaymakers from almost 100 nations after two years of strict restrictions. We talk to Yukari Sakamoto who takes tourists on tours of food markets in Tokyo. The president of Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, is on his first international trip for three years for political and economic talks. He has visited Turkey, Algeria and Iran after being excluded by the US from the Summit of the Americas. Venezuelan economist Francisco Rodriguez explains the current situation of the country's economy. The government of Saudi Arabia has introduced a lottery system for Westerners who want to attend year's Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. We ask the director of The Ayaan Institute, Jahangir Mohammed, about the controversy this has created.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Federalist Radio Hour: Did Biden Just Give Maduro A Big Win? This Venezuelan Says Yes

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Jorge Galicia, an outreach fellow for The Fund for American Studies, joins Federalist Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how socialism under Venezuelan dictator Nicolás Maduro ravaged Galicia’s home country and explain how President Joe Biden has emboldened Maduro’s regime.

The Federalist Radio Hour
Did Biden Just Give Maduro A Big Win? This Venezuelan Says Yes

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 38:01


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Jorge Galicia, an outreach fellow for The Fund for American Studies, joins Federalist Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how socialism under Venezuelan dictator Nicolás Maduro ravaged Galicia's home country and explain how President Joe Biden has emboldened Maduro's regime.

American Conservative University
Steve Bannon, Naomi Wolf, Dennis Prager, The New Authoritarians and the War Against the Human.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 36:03


Steve Bannon, Naomi Wolf, Dennis Prager, The New Authoritarians and the War Against the Human.   Naomi Wolf Unveils New Book: The Bodies of Others Bensman: ‘1.3 Million Have Illegally Entered Since Inauguration Day' Dennis Prager Fireside Chat Ep. 239 — Essential Lessons: Gratitude   Naomi Wolf Unveils New Book: The Bodies of Others Author Naomi Wolf visits “War Room: Pandemic” in studio to talk to host Steve Bannon about her new book “The Bodies of Others,” which was officially released today. The subtitle says it all: “The New Authoritarians, Covid-19 and the War Against the Human.” Wolf has been one of the leading voices against vaccine passports and loss of civil liberties during the pandemic, and one of the few true libertarians on the left. Order the book from Amazon here. Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join   Bensman: ‘1.3 Million Have Illegally Entered Since Inauguration Day' Todd Bensman of the Center for Immigration Studies talks to host Steve Bannon about the invasion on our southern border. Don't expect Title 42 to stop it. “The judge's order to keep Title 42 in place, I don't think anybody should put too much hope on that because the Biden administration has punched so many holes in the soup bowl that it can't really hold any soup any more. I'm talking about Venezuelans, exemptions for them, Nicaraguans, Colombians, Africans from all over Africa, anybody who comes to that border who is not a Mexican or from northern Central America, pretty much is going to be waived right through Title 42… and we're seeing this really tremendous spike because of it.” Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join   Fireside Chat with Dennis Prager Fireside Chat Ep. 239 — Essential Lessons: Gratitude  May 26 2022   This week Dennis covers one of his favorite subjects: Gratitude. He offers a warning—don't base your primary identity on victimhood. The key to living a happy and good life is to be grateful. Note: This episode was filmed before the recent tragedy in Uvalde, Texas   Book Mentioned- The Bodies of Others: The New Authoritarians, Covid-19 and the War Against the Human by Naomi Wolf.  May 31, 2022 Our pre-March 2020 world is gone forever. Irretrievable. For in league with mass surrender to all-powerful technology, the “restrictions” against human assembly, speech and gathering, culture and worship brough on by pandemic panic have brought new cultural norms frighteningly at odds with traditional Western notions of freedom and independent thought. Indeed, in our fear of public ostracism and shaming and our ready abandonment of free, open, spontaneous, individualistic, egalitarian and tolerant expression, we in the West today live in a world of CCP-style regimentation and conformity. It is a world in which all human endeavor—all human joy, all human fellowship, all human advancement, all human culture, all human song, all human drama, all worship, all surprise, all flirtation, all celebration—is behind a digital pay wall. A world in which we must ask permission of technology to be human. This is a world we must challenge and change.   Thanks for listening to the Daily Dennis Prager Podcast. To hear the entire three hours of my radio show as a podcast, commercial-free every single day, become a member of Pragertopia. You'll also get access to 15 years' worth of archives, as well as daily show prep. Subscribe today at Pragertopia dot com. --------------------------------------------------------------------  Visit Pragertopia  https://pragertopia.com/member/signup.php  The first month is 99 cents. After the first month the cost is $7.50 per month. If you can afford to pay for only one podcast, this is the one we recommend. It is the best conservative radio show out there, period. ACU strongly recommends ALL ACU students and alumni subscribe to Pragertopia. Do it today!  You can listen to Dennis from 9 a.m. to Noon (Pacific) Monday thru Friday, live on the Internet  http://www.dennisprager.com/pages/listen  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ For a great archive of Prager University videos visit- https://www.youtube.com/user/PragerUniversity/featured   Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h Get PragerU bonus content for free! https://www.prageru.com/bonus-content Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/2aozfkP JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2aoz2y9 -------------------------------------------------------------------- The Rational Bible: Exodus by Dennis Prager   NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Dennis Prager has put together one of the most stunning commentaries in modern times on the most profound document in human history. It's a must-read that every person, religious and non-religious, should buy and peruse every night before bed. It'll make you think harder, pray more ardently, and understand your civilization better." — Ben Shapiro, host of "The Ben Shapiro Show" "Dennis Prager's commentary on Exodus will rank among the greatest modern Torah commentaries. That is how important I think it is. And I am clearly not alone... It might well be on its way to becoming the most widely read Torah commentary of our time—and by non-Jews as well as by Jews." — Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, bestselling author of Jewish Literacy Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today's issues, but completely consistent with rational thought. Do you think the Bible permitted the trans-Atlantic slave trade? You won't after reading this book. Do you struggle to love your parents? If you do, you need this book. Do you doubt the existence of God because belief in God is “irrational?” This book will give you reason after reason to rethink your doubts. The title of this commentary is, “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. As Prager says, “If something I write does not make rational sense, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible to people of every faith, and no faith. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world and to your life. His goal: to change your mind – and then change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Exodus-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621577724   The Rational Bible: Genesis by Dennis Prager  USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller Wall Street Journal bestseller Many people today think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is not only outdated but irrelevant, irrational, and even immoral. This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, demonstrates clearly and powerfully that the opposite is true. The Bible remains profoundly relevant—both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. It is the greatest moral guide and source of wisdom ever written. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will give you many reasons to rethink your doubts. Do you think faith and science are in conflict? You won't after reading this commentary on Genesis. Do you come from a dysfunctional family? It may comfort you to know that every family discussed in Genesis was highly dysfunctional! The title of this commentary is “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager's words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible—whose Hebrew grammar and vocabulary he has mastered—to people of every faith and no faith at all. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you personally. His goal: to change your mind—and, as a result, to change your life.

Borderless Podcast
Ep 10: This Week in the Americas: Is AMLO Giving Mexico over to the Cartels and Pushing for a North American Union?

Borderless Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 45:16


Hrvoje and I do an update on last week's news in the Americas. Recorded 6/7/2022. 3:20 - Is AMLO Giving Mexico over to the Cartels? 11:00 - Covid back in the news 17:03 - 15,000 Migrant Caravan 24:00 - In-person shopping increasing in Mexico 25:40 - A.I. increasing use in businesses 29:30 - Water rationing in Monterrey 31:40 - Update on the Summit of the Americas 39:20 - AMLO Calls for American Superstate 42:30 - Opening up Venezuelan oil to Europe

La Ventanita
Harry Coleman, Smoke & Dough BBQ and Empanada Harry's founder

La Ventanita

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 56:11


Harry Coleman is making some of the best barbecue anywhere in South Florida at his Kendall – yes Kendall – restaurant Smoke & Dough. And he's making some of the most unique empanadas at his restaurant next door, Empanada Harry's. What makes both special is he tries to bring a multicultural element to his food that reflects Miami.  Although he's Venezuelan, he bakes empanadas from all different Latin American styles, from crispy fried Colombian and Cuban to powder-coated Chilean. Same at Smoke & Dough where he barbecues dishes like a cafecito-rubbed brisket and timba guava and cheese sausage, and a smoked flan you would sell your children for. He took a circuitous route to get here. He started out as a sportswriter and got into the family biz when no one was hiring. And then just before opening Smoke & Dough, which was delayed by the pandemic, he had a heart attack that nearly killed him. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rachman Review
Poverty and inequality drive change in Latin America

The Rachman Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 19:31


Gideon talks to Venezuelan economist Moisés Naím about the reasons for the collapse of the political centre in Latin America, and about the tactics used by populist politicians to rise to power in the region and beyond.Clips: Euronews; AP; Al Jazeera; NBC; Andrés Manuel López Obrador channelWant to read more?How the Colombia election could change Latin AmericaColombia's Rodolfo Hernández goes from also-ran to the brink of powerConservative young Brazilians complicate Lula's path to presidencySubscribe to The Rachman Review wherever you get your podcasts - please listen, rate and subscribe.Presented by Gideon Rachman. Produced by Fiona Symon. Sound design by Breen TurnerRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WealthStyle Podcast
Financial Planning for Immigrant Families with Dr. Daniel Crosby

WealthStyle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 38:55


Like many Americans, Iván Watanabe is a descendant of immigrants. He was born to a Venezuelan mother and a Japanese father, with an extended family on both sides.  With the majority of his maternal family forced to leave Venezuela and his father's family still living in Japan, Iván's family grants him a unique insight as … Continue reading Financial Planning for Immigrant Families with Dr. Daniel Crosby →

Expanding Reality
138 - Jose Miguel Perez-Gomez - The Ultimate Explorer - The Archaeology of the Lost World

Expanding Reality

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 89:54


Thank you for listening! Expand Your Experience and Check out the Video conversations, ExpandingRealityPodcast.com Jose Miguel Perez Gomez is a Venezuelan explorer and archaeologist. Since very early age he was captivated by nature, for having grown up in the midst of a natural park area, known as the “Peaks of Europe”, in the Asturias southeastern region, in Spain. He is a rock climber, a mountaineer, an expert in survival, a skydiver and one of the first scuba divers that have explored and traversed flooded caves in South America. With more than 40 years of explorations in the Guiana highlands he has become an expert guide for these unknown territories of Venezuela, where he has organized and led over 100 expeditions to the present, including scientific, (GEO Magazine # 4. April Issue.  pp.11-48, Hamburg, Germany, 1986. National Geographic Magazine, May issue, 1989), discovering new geographical features and reaching places where no human has ever been before.   Jose Miguel is an accomplished athlete and has performed in several triathlons, survival and adventure  racings. He is also a naturalist and environmentalist, and has presented scientific conferences, including  archaeological, at schools, universities, and other institutions internationally. In addition, he is a Heli-tactic,  a rescuer and has worked as a survival instructor with the military in Venezuela. He has also worked as  director of sports, in the government administration, developing social programs of sporting activities for  low-income communities. Jose Miguel is also an inventor and designer of sporting goods. His fitness  product “Superbar” not only is a social program for sport massification, attending thousands of people of  all ages at the present in Venezuela, but this same product has earned him an Invention Patent in the US,  where actually he is launching this product to the US fitness enthusiasts.  Despite the many activities undertaken by Jose Miguel, he considers himself a born explorer and a  passionate for archeology. His archaeological skills have led him to discover several pre-Hispanic sites in  remote savannas and forest areas, some of them containing rock art, as well as several Colonial  archaeological sites in distinct places of Venezuela, such as the salt mining operations during the XVII and  XVIII centuries at “La Tortuga Island”, or the discovery of a small Spaniard fortress in the middle of the  Orinoco river, dating around 1777. In 1998 he promoted and participated as a scuba diver in the  international underwater expedition that discovered to the world the shipwreck of the “sun king” of  France Louis XVI, considered one of the largest and most important shipwrecks in the Atlantic World and  the Caribbean Sea.  Since 2007 Jose Miguel has been leading a team of international researchers in the search for the “Lake Parime”, which after several years of study finally has been found by using state of the art satellite remote  sensing technologies. In October 2019 Jose Miguel and his team presented the results of this research at  the TerraSAR-X / TanDEM-X Science Team Meeting, held at the “Microwave and Radar Institute, German  Aerospace Center” (DLR), in Germany, where the results were confirmed by several scientists. This fossil  lake has been searched for most conquerors and explorers since the beginning of the XVI century, until  early XIX century, being depicted in most manuscript maps of the continent, and mentioned by the Indians. Leicester.Academia.edu/JPerezGomez Facebook.com/JoseMiguel.PerezGomez Superbar.ultimatepredator.com Resource Links  Food Forest Abundance Start Your Own Podcast! Use THIS LINK for Amazon OPUS Expand Your Experience  ExpandingRealityPodcast.com Rokfin YouTube Shirts N Such Random Acts of Kindness Tik Tok Music By Vinny The Saint Bo Shaftnoski - Production Expert

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
26 May | Lucid Air Sets New Hypermiling Record Of 687 Miles

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 20:44


Show #1479…(headline story). Stick around and we'll get you up to speed! Well…Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily, your trusted source of EV information. It's Thursday 26th May, my penultimate day of hosting the show. I'm Blake Boland, and I've gone through every EV story today so that you don't have to! Watch Lucid Air Set New Hypermiling Record Of 687 Miles - The Lucid Air Dream Edition Range remains the world's longest-range production car, with an EPA rating of 520 miles (836 kilometers). - Tom Moloughney got remarkably close to that in the real world by covering 500 miles in the Lucid Air in InsideEVs' 70 mph range test. But how far can the electric luxury sedan go if the driver's only concern is range? - The plan was to drive the car at a constant 27 mph (43 km/h), switching drivers roughly every three hours. Any time the Lucid Air needed to stop or turn around, the driver would switch into neutral and coast before accelerating slowly back to 27 mph. - However, the vehicle did not manage to break the 700-mile threshold, with the 118-kWh battery running completely out of juice after 687.4 miles (1,106.2 kilometers). That was still good enough to qualify as a world record for the longest range achieved by production electric vehicle on public roads, but still a long way from the 999-mile Guinness World Record that includes prototypes on private tracks. Original Source : Watch Lucid Air Set New Hypermiling Record Of 687 Miles (insideevs.com) Harley-Davidson selling out its newest electric motorcycle in 18 minutes - When Harley-Davidson first unveiled its original LiveWire electric motorcycle and began taking orders nearly four years ago, the industry was largely in consensus about the bike itself. It scored impressive marks and high acclaim for performance and style, but its sales suffered due to the original lofty price of nearly $30,000 (though the price did drop to $22,000 after entering the LiveWire sub-brand). And so it's no surprise that ever since the original launch, significant hype has been building for Harley-Davidson's next lower-cost electric motorcycle. Original Source : Harley-Davidson LiveWire Del Mar electric motorcycle sold out in 18 mins (electrek.co) CATL partners with European electric bus maker Solaris on battery supply - Contemporary Amperex Technology Co Ltd (CATL, SHE: 300750) recently entered into a partnership with European electric bus maker Solaris to help drive the transition to electric urban mobility in Europe, the largest Chinese power battery maker announced today. - CATL will provide Solaris' buses with lithium iron phosphate (LFP) batteries using CTP (cell to pack) technology to drive the electrification of buses, the company said. - Thanks to the long life and high thermal stability of CATL's LFP system, Solaris' electric buses will demonstrate significant advantages in safety and temperature resilience, CATL said. - Solaris, based in Poland, is one of Europe's leading bus and trolleybus manufacturers, having built more than 22,000 vehicles in the past 25 years. Original Source : CATL partners with European electric bus maker Solaris on battery supply - CnEVPost ADS-TEC Energy Extends Battery-Buffered Ultra-Fast EV Charging - ADS-TEC Energy plc is extending its battery-buffered, ultra-fast EV charging portfolio in Europe, despite global supply chain and other market challenges, with the addition of ChargePost later this year. Unlike the currently-available, battery-buffered ChargeBox, which consists of a separate battery-booster module and two charging dispensers, the ChargePost consolidates battery-buffering and dispensers into a single "all-in-one" system with a large display that provides revenue-generating advertising opportunities. Original Source : ADS-TEC Energy Extends Battery-Buffered Ultra-Fast EV Charging | Green Technology Progress (greentechprogress.com) Tesla releases new software update with better range calculation - Tesla has started to release a new software update (2022.16.0.2) with a better range calculation incorporating more environmental factors and the ability for media accounts to be linked to driver profiles. “Energy prediction for your route has been improved by incorporating forecasted crosswind, headwind, humidity and ambient temperature when using online navigation.” Original Source : Tesla releases new software update with better range calculation and media accounts linked to driver profiles - Electrek Battery startup Sparkz, United Mine Workers of America announce labor-management agreement for W Va Gigafactory - Sparkz, a battery startup with exclusive licenses from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to produce domestic cobalt-free lithium batteries (earlier post), and the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) signed a memorandum of understanding establishing a labor-management agreement that would mark one of the largest climate-tech union workforce partnerships in the United States. - Sparkz announced in March it will begin construction in 2022 of a Gigafactory in West Virginia to commercialize their zero-cobalt battery which will initially employ 350 workers and could grow to as many as 3,000. Original Source : Battery startup Sparkz, United Mine Workers of America announce labor-management agreement for W Va Gigafactory - Green Car Congress Over 300 battery gigafactories in the global pipeline - As EV demand steadily grows, automakers and their suppliers are wisely hustling to increase battery production capacity—preferably close to their auto plants and markets. Benchmark Mineral Intelligence reports that there are currently over 300 battery gigafactories in the construction or planning stages around the world. - This represents some 6,388 GWh worth of battery capacity, a 68% increase compared to the figure a year ago. Original Source : Charged EVs | Over 300 battery gigafactories in the global pipeline - Charged EVs Micro presents variants for the compact Microlino - ‘'In total, however, the Microlino will be available in four variants, all of which will be powered by an electric motor with an output of 12.5 kW. The top speed of the electric two-seater is 90 km/h. In addition, the Microlino will be available with three battery sizes (6, 10.5 or 14 kWh), which should enable ranges of 91, 177 and 230 kilometres respectively. The respective chemical storage can be recharged via type 2. With a maximum charging power of 1.35 kW, the small battery needs four hours, the medium battery with 2.6 kW three hours and the largest battery (also 2.6 kW) four hours.'' Original Source : Micro presents variants for the compact Microlino - electrive.com Volkswagen rumoured to name their estate car ID.7 Tourer - It is no secret that Volkswagen is planning an all-electric estate car. Now it has been revealed that the electric counterparts to the Passat series, previously announced by VW as Aero A and Aero B, could come onto the market as the ID.7. Original Source: Volkswagen rumoured to name their estate car ID.7 Tourer - electrive.com Buick Electra-X Teased As Brand's First Ultium-Based SUV Concept - Buick China has dropped two teaser photos of an upcoming all-electric concept vehicle named Electra-X, the brand's first electric SUV concept developed on GM's Ultium platform. - The new design study could be a more production-ready follow-up to the Buick Electra Concept from 2020, at least judging by the name and the fact it's an electric SUV. Set to debut at the upcoming Buick China Brand Day in early June, the Electra-X is said to offer "a sneak peek at future Ultium-based EVs for Buick in China." Original Source: Buick Electra-X Teased As Brand's First Ultium-Based SUV Concept (insideevs.com) The commodities giant Glencore will pay $1.1 billion to settle bribery and price-fixing charges. - The settlement was not a surprise. In February, the company set aside $1.5 billion in reserves to pay for fines and clawbacks that might result from international investigations into its operations in a handful of resource-rich countries in Africa and South America. Original Source: Glencore Will Pay $1.1 Billion to Settle Bribery and Price-Fixing Charges - The New York Times (nytimes.com) Tesla, GM supplier Glencore pleads guilty to $1.1bn penalty for FCPA violations - Glencore admitted that, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, it offered to pay $27.5 million to third parties to secure improper business advantages. In Venezuela, Glencore paid $1.2 million to an intermediary company that made corrupt payments that benefitted a Venezuelan official. - Tesla receives Cobalt from Glencore's Kamoto Copper mine in the DRC and Nickel from the company's Murrin Murrin mine in Australia, it said in its 2021 Impact Report. GM receives Cobalt from the Murrin Murrin mine as well. Original Source: Tesla, GM supplier Glencore pleads guilty to $1.1bn penalty for FCPA violations (teslarati.com) New Smart #1 SUV available to order in December 2022 - Customers will be able to reserve the all-new Smart #1 towards the end of this year, with the first 100 cars arriving in Launch Edition guise. - The new Smart #1 is based on an all-new electric architecture from Geely, called SEA. This will underpin Smart's forthcoming new range. - From launch the #1 is installed with a 66kWh battery, for a claimed headline range of up to 440km (273 miles). It's likely that more affordable, smaller battery options will be available in time, too.  Original Source:  New Smart #1 SUV available to order in December 2022 | Auto Express QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM What's your dream driveway?  But there are some rules: 2 or 3 vehicles, budget is $150,000 USD or equivalent wherever you are.  Email your answers to Martyn: hello@evnewsdaily.com For the week that's in it…catch me on Twitter @evlifeireland It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. 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