Podcasts about auschwitz

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German network of concentration and extermination camps in occupied Poland during World War II

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Best podcasts about auschwitz

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Latest podcast episodes about auschwitz

Savage Minds Podcast
Haim Bresheeth-Žabner

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 105:43


Filmmaker, photographer and film studies scholar Haim Bresheeth-Žabner discusses his latest book, An Army Like No Other: How the Israel Defense Force Made a Nation (2020) analysing the IDF within the larger project political project of Zionism. Reflecting upon his parents who survived Auschwitz, his birth in Cinecittà in a displaced persons’ camp, to his childhood and formative years in Israel growing up in an Arab house in Jaffa, Bresheeth-Žabner explains how his life and family heritage have informed his political values with a deep understanding of being displaced. Bresheeth-Žabner criticises the unnecessary formation of the Israeli state to resolve the refugee crisis after the Second World War while contending that the creation of Israel was emblematic of a state “where the value system of the army becomes the value system of a nation” noting that the IDF was never a defensive army but instead one of aggression. Discussing how international powers led to the dispossession of an entire nation of its home and the conterminous destruction that is connected to the Nakba (النكبة‎), Bresheeth-Žabner notes how Zionism was implemented to control power bases within the Middle East. Discussing recent accusations of anti-Semitism within the British Labour Party, Bresheeth-Žabner ridicules the tactics of aligning criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism and details how he reported himself to the Labour Party as “anti-Semitic” according to its regulations two years before resigning from the party. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

How Magicians Think
Magic in the Holocaust

How Magicians Think

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 32:26


Werner Reich was sixteen years old when his life was turned upside down. His father passed, his mother perished in a concentration camp, and he found himself in Auschwitz. His peculiar bunkmate there turned out to be... a magician. That man--The Great Nivelli--taught Werner a card trick. And in doing so, he saved his life. Werner Reich has been a magician ever since. Joshua Jay delves into the fascinating life of ninety-four-year-old Reich in this riveting conversation.

Eifel Fellowship: Forgiveness, Healing, Reconciliation
The Writing Room: "Jesus Came So We Can Become"

Eifel Fellowship: Forgiveness, Healing, Reconciliation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 24:14


This is The Writing Room, a podcast created by Quellen International to share the words and teachings of George Miley. In this episode, George Miley begins his teaching by sharing the story of a town in Eastern Europe, and how its people rounded up their Jewish neighbors to deport them to the death camp at Auschwitz in 1942. 70-years later, the people and leaders of that same town (Dolny Kubin, Slovakia) came together again, this time to publicly acknowledge the wrongs of the past, to ask for forgiveness, and to honor Israel and the Jewish people. What power is able to make such events possible? Jesus! He came so that we might become. Learn more about the ministry of Quellen by visiting quellen.org. Don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter and following us on Facebook & Instagram.

The Neveh Podcast
Reporting from Auschwitz / פרשת לך לך/ Rabbi Falk

The Neveh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 16:39


Help support the teachings of Rabbi Falk: https://thechesedfund.com/nevehzion/rabbifalk Send a message to Rabbi Falk

Democracy in Question?
Challenges of the Israeli democracy today

Democracy in Question?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:38


Democracy in Question? is brought to you by:• Central European University: CEU• The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD• The Podcast Company: Novel Follow us on social media!• Central European University: @CEU• Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: @AHDCentreSubscribe to the show. If you enjoyed what you listened to, you can support us by leaving a review and sharing our podcast in your networks!  BibliographyBurg, A (2018). In Days to Come["A New Hope for Israel"]. Israel: Nation BooksBurg, A. (2016). The Holocaust Is Over; We Must Rise From Its Ashes. UnitedStates: St. Martin's Publishing Group.Burg, A (2012). Very Near to You: Human Readings of the Torah, Jerusalem,Israel: Gefen Pub House.Elkana, Yehuda (1988), ‘The Need to Forget'. Ha'aretz.Hirschman, A (1970). Exit, Voice, and Loyalty: Responses to Decline in Firms,Organizations, and States. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.GlossaryJewish Agency (for Israel)The Jewish Agency since 1929 provides the global framework for Jewish people, ensures global Jewish safety, strengthens Jewish identity and connects Jews to Israel and one another. Source:Benjamin NetanyahuBenjamin Netanyahu, Israeli politician and diplomat who served as Israel's permanent representative to the United Nations in the ‘80s and twice as his country's prime minister (1996–99 and 2009–21) and was the longest-serving prime minister since Israel's independence. Source:Nation LawIsrael as the Nation-State of the Jewish People informally known as the Nation-State Bill  or the Nationality Bill, is an Israeli Basic Law largely symbolic and declarative in nature,passed by the Israeli Parliament (Knesset) on 19 July 2018. The legislation declares that Israel is the historic homeland of the Jewish people, and that “the right to exercise national self-determination in the State of Israel is unique to the Jewish people.” It establishes Hebrew as the official language of Israel and downgrades Arabic to a language with “special status”. The law also asserts that Jewish settlement—without specifying where—is a national value, and promises to encourage and advance settlement efforts. Source:Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT)The OPT consists of the West bank (including East Jerusalem) and Gaza. Israel occupied the West Bank and Gaza during the 1967 war. The launch of the 1993 Oslo peace process between Israel and the PLO (Palestine Liberation Organization) led to the creation of  the Palestinian Authority (PA). Source:Targeted prevention or targeted killings by the Israel Defence Forces (IDF): Targeted prevention occurred in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict against persons accused of carrying out or planning attacks on Israeli targets in the West Bank or inside Israel. Source:Yehuda Elkana (1934-2012)Yehuda Elkana was a historian and philosopher of science, the third President and Rector of Central European University (1999-2009), an Auschwitz survivor who became an international scholar and public intellectual with a deep commitment to open society. He was an academic pioneer, leading CEU for nearly half the life of the University. Source:Green LineIsrael's territory according to the agreed 1949 Armistice Demarcation Line encompassed about 78% of the Mandate area, while the other parts, namely the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, were occupied by Jordan and Egypt respectively. The 1949 Armistice Lines between Israel and its Arab neighbors came to be known as The Green Line. Source:'73 WarYom Kippur War, also called the October War, the Ramadan War, the Arab-Israeli war of October 1973, or the Fourth Arab-Israeli War, was initiated by Egypt and Syria on October 6, 1973, on the Jewish holy day of Yom kippur. It also occurred during Ramadan, the sacred month of fasting in Islam. The war was launched with the diplomatic aim of persuading Israel to negotiate on terms more favourable to the Arab countries. The Six-Day War in 1967, the previous Arab-Israeli war, in which Israel had captured and occupied Arab territories including the Sinai Peninsula and Golan Heights was followed by years of sporadic fighting. When Anwar Sadat became President of Egypt  shortly after the War of Attrition (1969–70) ended, made overtures to reach a peaceful settlement if, Israel would return the territories it had captured. Israel rejected those terms, and the fighting developed into a full-scale war in 1973. Source:Peace with Egypt known as Camp David AccordsCamp David Accords, agreements between Israel and Egypt signed on September 17, 1978, that led in the following year to a peace treaty between those two countries, the first such treaty between Israel and any of its Arab neighbours. Brokered by U.S. President Jimmy Carter between Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and officially titled the “Framework for Peace in the Middle East,” the agreements became known as the Camp David Accords because the negotiations took place at the U.S. presidential retreat at Camp David, Maryland. Sadat and Begin were awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1978 for their contributions to the agreements. Source:IntifadaIntifadah, (“shaking off”), either of two popular uprisings of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza aimed at ending Israel's occupation of those territories and creating an independent Palestinian state. The first intifada began in December 1987 and ended in September 1993 with the signing of the first Oslo Accords which provided a framework for peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians. The second intifada, sometimes called the Al-Aqṣā intifada, began in September 2000. Although no single event signaled its end, most analysts agree that it had run its course by late 2005. The two uprisings resulted in the death of more than 5,000 Palestinians and some 1,400 Israelis. Source:Oslo accordsThe Oslo Accords were a landmark moment in the pursuit of peace in the Middle East. A set of two separate agreements signed by the government of Israel and the leadership of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO)—the militant organization established in 1964 to create a Palestinian state in the region—the Oslo Accords were ratified in Washington, D.C., in 1993 (Oslo I) and in Taba, Egypt, in 1995 (Oslo II). While provisions drafted during the talks remain in effect today, the relationship between the two sides continues to be marred by conflict. Source:  

Happy, holy & confident. Dein Podcast fürs Herz und den Verstand
Wie du Hass in Mitgefühl transformierst - Interview Special mit Dr. Edith Eger

Happy, holy & confident. Dein Podcast fürs Herz und den Verstand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:57


Mein heutiger Interviewgast ist wirklich ein ganz besonderer Gast und eine Frau, die ich schon seit Jahren unbedingt mal im Podcast interviewen wollte. Dr. Edith Eger ist heute 94 Jahre alt und teilt seit vielen Jahren ihre Geschichte vom Überleben des Holocaust und ihrer Gefangenschaft in Auschwitz. Als Psychologin und Traumaexpertin hilft sie traumatisierten Menschen, wieder ihre innere Freiheit zu erlangen. Im Interview sprechen wir darüber, wie wir lernen können, sogar die schlimmsten Erfahrungen zu vergeben und wie wir Liebe anstatt Hass wählen. Dr. Edith Eger erzählt, warum es so wichtig ist, sich nicht als Opfer zu sehen und auch nicht mit der eigenen Geschichte zu identifizieren. Sie schenkt Hoffnung und teilt mit uns ihre Erfahrungen, warum es sich lohnt niemals aufzugeben. Sie ist ein so inspirierendes Vorbild und ich bin so unendlich dankbar dieses berührende Gespräch heute mit dir teilen zu können. Viel Freude beim Anhören! Im Interview mit Dr. Edith Eger erfährst du… ✨ wie du es schaffst, traumatische Erfahrungen in etwas Kraftvolles zu verwandeln, ✨ was es bedeutet, bewusst die Opferrolle zu verlassen und zu vergeben, ✨ warum du nicht deine Vergangenheit bist, ✨ wie du voller Hoffnung eine bessere Zukunft gestalten kannst und ✨ was du tun kannst, um liebevoller zu dir selbst zu sein.   Ich hoffe sehr, dass dich dieses Gespräch genauso inspiriert und du viel für dich mitnehmen kannst.   Was hat dich am meisten berührt? Was nimmst du daraus für dich mit?   Ich freue mich auf deine Erkenntnisse und Gedanken zur Folge. Kommentiere super gerne auf Instagram @lauramalinaseiler oder auf dem Blog.   Ich würde mich von Herzen freuen, wenn du diese Folge teilst, damit so viele Menschen wie möglich diese Botschaft hören und erkennen, dass wir uns immer für die Liebe und das Mitgefühl entscheiden können.   Links zur Folge: Website: https://dreditheger.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dreditheger Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.editheger/  Buch “Ich bin hier, und alles ist jetzt”: https://amzn.to/3mNpUHz Buch “Das Geschenk: 12 Lektionen für ein besseres Leben”: https://amzn.to/2YIBxHG    Ich möchte Danke von Herzen sagen! Danke für all eure wundervollen Bilder, lieben Nachrichten und wertschätzenden Rezensionen zu meinem neuen Buch und ersten Roman “Zurück zu mir”. Ich kann es gar nicht in Worte fassen, wie sehr es mich berührt. Dass mein Roman direkt Platz 1 der SPIEGEL-Bestsellerliste wurde, bedeutet, dass meine Vision keine Vision mehr ist, sondern bereits Realität wird und Spiritualität in der Mitte unserer Gesellschaft ankommt und sich dadurch immer mehr Menschen öffnen, auch ihre eigene Spiritualität zu entdecken, zu leben und zu feiern. Und das alles ist möglich - auch dank dir und weil du diesen Weg bereits gehst.   Rock on & Namasté Deine Laura

Mamamia Out Loud
The Fastest Way To Lose Any Argument

Mamamia Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:55


Yesterday, Australia lost someone very, very significant. The self-proclaimed Happiest Man On Earth - Eddie Jaku.  Eddie was 101 years old, a best-selling author, a holocaust survivor, and a German-born Jew whose parents were murdered in the gas chambers of Auschwitz. Eddie's mission was to teach people not to hate. It's beyond ironic then, that also yesterday, an Australian influencer dressed her family up in yellow stars, supposedly to represent the Star of David that Jewish people in Nazi-occupied Europe were forced to wear. So what was her message? And why is it such a lazy and dangerous comparison? Plus, we need to talk about Megan Fox and Machine Gun Kelly's latest interview. Are they 2021's answer to Angelina Jolie and Billy Bob Thornton?  And should we stop telling women they have imposter syndrome? The End Bits: Recommendations: Mia wants you to preorder the illustrated edition of Eddie Jaku's book, The Happiest Man on Earth, out November 9.  Learn more about MPlus here Follow us on Instagram @mamamiaoutloud CREDITS Hosts: Jessie Stephens, Holly Wainwright and Mia Freedman Producer: Emma Gillespie  CONTACT US Via our PodPhone on 02 8999 9386 Via our email at outloud@mamamia.com.au  Via our Outlouders Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/groups/329632330777506/ Mamamia Out Loud is a podcast by Mamamia https://www.mamamia.com.au/author/mamamiaoutloud/ Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. Learn more about MPlus here Read the Mamamia article on Re-Entry Anxiety here Follow us on Instagram @mamamiaoutloud CREDITS Hosts: Jessie Stephens, Holly Wainwright and Mia Freedman Producer: Emma Gillespie  CONTACT US Via our PodPhone on 02 8999 9386 Via our email at outloud@mamamia.com.au  Via our Outlouders Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/groups/329632330777506/ Mamamia Out Loud is a podcast by Mamamia https://www.mamamia.com.au/author/mamamiaoutloud/ Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information. Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Anonymous Was A Woman Podcast

This week Jamila Rizvi and Astrid Edwards are joined by Future Women's Ella Jackson.  Chapter 1: Jamila, Astrid and Ella consider the different ways women choose to tell their own stories, and the stories of those who have come before them. Chapter 2: Jamila brings Lucy Adlington's historical fiction novel 'The Dressmakers of Auschwitz' to the podcast.  Chapter 3: This week Astrid chooses a non-fiction read and recommends 'My Life in Full: Work, family, and our future' by Indra Nooyi (the first female CEO of PepsiCo!). Join us on Thursday for an interview with journalist Lisa Millar. CHAT WITH US Join our discussion using hashtag #AnonymousWasAWomanPod and don't forget to follow Jamila (on Instagram and Twitter) and Astrid (also on Instagram and Twitter) to continue the conversation. This podcast is sponsored by Hachette Publishing and is brought to you by Future Women. The podcast is produced by Bad Producer Productions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Today In History
Today In History - Eight hundred children are gassed to death at Auschwitz

Today In History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/eight-hundred-children-are-gassed-to-death-at-auschwitzSupport the show on Patreon

Pola Retradio en Esperanto
E_elsendo el la 08.10.2021

Pola Retradio en Esperanto

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:52


La 1107-a E_elsendo el la 08.10.2021 ĉe www.pola-retradio.org Nunsemajne ni proponas viziti kun ni felietone la Kastelon en Wiśnicz en la suda Pollando, ekde la pasinta jaro portanta distingan nomon Historia Monumento. La komencaj kulturkronikaj aktualaĵoj rilatas al la finiĝinta 1-a etapo de Chopin-konkurso, al premio Cherasco Storia por la direktoro de Auschwitz-muzeo, al la […]

All The Wiser
How suffering makes you stronger with Holocaust survivor Dr. Edith Eger

All The Wiser

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 58:30


With so many losing so much during the pandemic, how should we think about the nature of suffering? Holocaust survivor and psychologist Dr. Edith Eger has some powerful words to offer us. Her message? Concentrate not on what you lost, but what you still have. In this inspiring conversation, Dr. Edie reveals her greatest lessons on loss, rejection, the power of choice, finding strength in suffering, ways to think about guilt, and why the word “can't” isn't in her vocabulary.Brought to you by All The Happier: we took the inspirational lessons and wisdom from All The Wiser Podcast and created a course… All The Happier - to help you live with less stress and more meaning, connection, and joy! Enrollment is now OPEN!In this episode we talk about:Dr. Edith's experience while at Auschwitz.The role her faith played during her time there.How she turned her pain into her purpose.Discovering her inner strength.The foundation of her theory as a psychologist.Dr. Edith is the author of THE GIFT: 12 Lessons to Save Your Lifeand the NYT Bestseller THE CHOICE: Embrace the PossibleEpisode benefitting USC Shoah FoundationSubscribe to All The Wiser wherever you listen to podcasts - we're on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! That way you'll never miss an episode. We'd love to hear what you think about the show, too - it helps us know what stories are resonating with you. Head over to Apple Podcasts to write your review!Stay in the know with all things All The Wiser! Sign up for our newsletter for personal reflections from Kimi, new episodes, and recommendations from our team! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
313: The Importance of Finding Meaning in Life: 9 Lessons taught by Viktor E. Frankl

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 58:54


"Man's search for meaning is the primary motivation in his life and not a 'secondary rationalization' of instinctual drives. This meaning is unique and specific in that it must and can be fulfilled by him alone; only then does it achieve a significance which will satisfy his own will to meaning." —Viktor E. Frankl First published in Germany in 1946, Viktor Emil Frankl's seminal work Man's Search for Meaning and the desire to write his first book (to be titled The Doctor and the Soul: An Introduction to Logotherapy) that largely gave him the will to live while imprisoned at Auschwitz during WWII. Marrying psychology and philosophy, a primary focus of his work throughout his life, Frankl shares "Certainly, my deep desire to write this manuscript anew helped me to survive the rigors of the camps I was in." Now with more than 16 million copies sold worldwide, Man's Search for Meaning continues to be a book to read, understand and reread. While not having the opportunity to read it until now, I am grateful that at least I finally did read it, and I would like to share with you today nine lessons learned about the importance of finding meaning in our lives. Much of the premise of a simply luxurious life is centering our lives, our selves, or perhaps a better word is grounding ourselves in priorities that marry what we can uniquely give, but also what the world desperately needs to progress and cultivate a more civil, loving and peaceful place for not only ourselves, but future generations. At first, such a task given to each of us may sound ginormous and far too weighty a task, but when we drill down, ultimately, love, sincere love, being able to share our true selves and be accepted begins to create a harmony of contentment that cannot help but create a symphonic awareness grounded in a desire to live more peacefully and lovingly with each other. Too far reaching some may contest, but if my own life journey, which indeed is filled with good fortune and privilege beyond my choice or control, demonstrates, when we have not found our meaning, when we are discontent, building healthy relationships is incredibly difficult, and often fraught as while trying to make sense of our lack of purpose, we displace our pain, so I wholeheartedly find worthwhile value in exploring what Viktor Frankl teaches, and hope it will offer tools for you as well to tap into what gives you meaning and share it with not only the world but yourself so that your everydays may be full of contentment. Let's take a look at the nine lessons. 1.Choose to pursue the will to meaning Frankl defines the will to meaning as "the striving to find a concrete meaning in personal existence". For when we find our individual will to meaning, the healing begins. Existential frustration subsides, neuroses find solutions, anxieties wane and contentment soars. 2. Find your meaning, find your way forward Frankl shares an anecdote of an American diplomat who came to his (Frankl's) in Vienna discontent with his current career. Following five unfruitful years with his former psychological analyst who claimed the discontent came from the need to reconcile himself with his father as the analyst made a parallel with the father and the U.S. being a superior figure, upon visiting Frankl, and following only a few visits, the patient realized with clarity that his "will to meaning was frustrated by his vocation, and he actually longed to be engaged in some other kind of work. As there was no reason for not giving up his profession and embarking on a different one, he did so, with most gratifying results." 3. Nothing is wrong with you if you feel existential distress; in fact, you are heading in the right direction Frankl points out, moreso for practicing therapists, to not equate existential distress with mental disease. Asserting, "it is [the task of the therapist], rather, to pilot the patient through [their] existential crises of growth and development." So often in my own life journey, the distress of frustration by my career, my relationships (or lack thereof), and what I was meant to do with my finite days on earth, felt as though it was a burden, not good fortune. Something was 'wrong' with me for not having figured out my life journey immediately, quickly and feeling at ease. Thankfully, the opposite is true, all was well. I was listening to myself, I was acknowledging something didn't 'fit', what I was giving, what I was spending my time doing either wasn't enough or it wasn't aligned with my talents and what the world potentially needed. In this post - 9 Ways to Think Like a Monk, as taught by Jay Shetty - Shetty's idea of Dharma is shared. Passion + Expertise + Usefulness = Dharma In many ways, finding our Dharma is to find our will to meaning. 4. The unexpected gift of tension "What man actually needs is not a tensionless state but rather the striving and struggling for a worthwhile goal, a freely chosen task. What he needs is not the discharge of tension at any cost but the call of a potential meaning waiting to be fulfilled by him." I chose to bold the phrase 'freely chosen' because I find it to be an essential element to finding true contentment. Even if your life is charmed, yet you still feel discontent and frustration, yet society applauds, your family applauds, your friends cheer for what you are doing with your life, most likely, you have unconsciously not chosen for yourself the life you are living, but rather have been steered by approval, expectation and mores to take the steps and make the choices you have without truly acknowledging what you long for. Which leads me to the next item on the list, but first . . . Welcoming tension in your life must be thoughtfully done. After all, unnecessary stress is harmful to our health. No, what Frankl means by stating tension is healthy has everything to do with pursuing what gives you meaning. If you derive meaning from advocating for a cause, then the path forward will undoubtedly be fraught as you are striving for progress, but you strive forward anyway because it is your will to meaning. If you derive meaning from raising a family, nurturing your children as to give them their own wings with which to fly, the journey together will be a mingle of emotions, but you strive forward because it is your will to meaning. If you derive meaning from contributing through your chosen career path to improve the lives of others, you navigate through the frustrations, setbacks and hurdles because it is your will to meaning and you know why you are pursuing it. When the path we are on does not fulfill our will to meaning, similar to the anecdote of the American diplomat mentioned above, then the tension becomes unhealthy. Then we must be frank with ourselves and find the courage to change course and bravely do so, not only for our own well being, but for those we love and the world at large. Why? Because the world needs what you uniquely have to give. Figure out what that is and then begin giving what you discover. Your tension will be reduced to a healthy amount and your contentment will soar. 5. Discover what you long for and find your contentment The term Logotherapy as defined by Viktor E. Frankl derives its meaning from the Greek root Logos which is defined as "meaning". Logotherapy "strives to find a meaning in one's life as the primary motivational force of man". Logotherapy opens itself up while including 'instinctual facts within the individual's unconscious [it] . . . also cares for existential realities, such as the potential meaning of his existence to be fulfilled as well as his will to meaning." In other words, Logotherapy assists the patient to become aware of "what he actually longs for in the depth of his being". Understanding the language of your true self can sometimes be difficult and take time especially if we have suppressed it for some time; however, we are each capable of learning our language when we choose to be a student of ourselves. As I share in my About page (I recently updated it to reflect more accurately and specifically what TSLL is all about, but the shared portion below remains the same as it did in 2009), while I valued and gave my all to teaching, in 2009 I finally acknowledged that something wasn't entirely being satiated by solely working in the classroom." (see the excerpt below) The Simply Luxurious Life came into fruition in 2009 when I realized the life I enjoy living—a life full of simplicity, yet punctuated with everyday luxuries found even in the most routine of days, was something I wanted to explore more fully due to the immense contentment it brought into my life. In fact, I needed to explore it more intentionally because while many people didn't understand how I could live well and contentedly on the everyday income as a public school teacher (I retired in 2021 after twenty years), I had a curiosity for the world, especially the French culture followed by my appreciation for the British countryside and their gardening wonderland, that wasn't entirely being satiated by working in the classroom. And this is an example of our lives speaking to us.  Thankfully I listened and decided to share my discoveries, passions, and ideas as a way to inspire others so that they too could find their passion as a way to living a life full of true contentment by clearing out the clutter (figurative and literal) and bringing in the luxurious necessities to enliven and inspire each day no matter what their income, age, location or relationships status. —TSLL's About page (Start Here) When we find meaning, even if nobody else understands why such a path speaks to us and brings us to life, we have found the motivation of infinite energy, creativity, tenacity and strength. 6. Find your meaning, eradicate boredom Frankl coins the term 'Sunday neurosis" as "that kind of depression which afflicts people who become aware of the lack of content in their lives when the rush of the busy week is over and the void within themselves becomes manifest." He goes on while speaking about the existential vacuum to share that without the will of meaning, and with the improved automatization of our 21st century, "many will not know what to do with all of their newly acquired free time". Which is to say boredom, anxiety, distress and lack of direction cause more solvable problems that he argues can be largely solved when we find our will to meaning. This is not to say you have to be busy every moment, pack your schedule with appointments; in fact, I would argue, it is the opposite. Or perhaps, more accurately, it is a knowing what supports and nourishes your will to meaning and thereby finding comfort with your down-time that is a part of your self-care and confidently engaging in your productive time when on task. 7. Your next best step toward meaning is what is best for you "The meaning of life differs from [person] to [person], from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person's life at a given moment." I found it helpful to note that Frankl directly advises not to search for an abstract meaning of life, but rather a concrete 'assignment which demands fulfillment'. In other words, don't commodify yourself, but rather what is it you bring that is helpful and that you find fulfillment in giving? "Thus, everyone's task is as unique as is his specific opportunity to implement it." 8. Finding strength during times of suffering "When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves." Just as Frankl's own life exemplifies harnessing his will to meaning to survive the unthinkable tragedies and struggles during WWII, he writes, "In some way, suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning, such as the meaning of a sacrifice." However, and this is crucially important to absorb, he continues on in the same section of the book to point out "But let me make it perfectly clear that in no way is suffering necessary to find meaning. I only insist that meaning is possible even in spite of suffering—provided, certainly, that the suffering is unavoidable." 9. Hold yourself in the present fully for all the days of your life Frankl writes that we must refrain from being pessimistic and instead be activistic when it comes to our human existence. That is to say, "The pessimist resembles a man who observes with fear and sadness that his wall calendar, from which he daily tears a sheet, grows thinner with each passing day. On the other hand, the person who attacks the problems of life actively is like a man who removes each successive leaf from his calendar and files it neatly and carefully away with its predecessors, after first having jotted down a few diary notes on the back. He can reflect with pride and joy on all the richness set down in these notes, on all the life he has already lived to the fullest." He goes on to suggest there is no need to envy the young because we have lived fully each of our days, holding ourselves in the present, motivated by our will to meaning, and "instead of possibilities . . . have realities [from our past experiences] . . . not only the reality of work done and of love loved, but of sufferings bravely suffered." Just as happiness cannot be experienced in every moment, suffering cannot be wholly avoided when we find our will to meaning and let it guide us forward. However, by holding ourselves in the present moment, while we cannot avoid experiencing the loss of loved ones, we can love fully, so that when we reflect, we are filled with joy and reminded of the riches of our lives, riches we, by bravely living well, engaging with our humanity, courageously stepping into what we discover is our will of meaning, helped to bring forth into our lives. Upon learning about Viktor E. Frankl's approach to therapy and perspective on the meaning of humans, I found an alignment that has unconsciously spoke to me to honor for decades. Although never making sense, and not having the opportunity, nor pursuing more intentionally philosophy courses in college, the ideas danced about in my mind, and while I, at the time, wanted them to leave me alone because they were so perplexing, they thankfully waited for me to make sense of them, to trust them. The world swirling around us via media, messaging, our community can be deafening and hold us off course if we let it. But when we understand that the feeling of frustration is actually a sign that we are hearing our inner voice, we can find peace. Because in that moment of aha, we can take a breath, and continue to pursue the questions that keep bouncing around in our mind, because, if my own journey is any indication it is a path that will lead you to everyday contentment. I do hope you enjoy this week's episode of the podcast. Thank you for stopping by and tuning in. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl SIMILAR POSTS/EPISODES YOU MIGHT ENJOY: How to Live a Life with Less Stress and Why It's Vital for Good Health, episode #299 How to Step into Your Fullest True Self —The Way of Integrity, as taught by Martha Beck, episode #307 Petit Plaisirs —Ted Lasso, Apple TV+ (click here to learn more about the recommendation, watch the trailers of both seasons and the original ad which began the idea for the show) —Sautéed Oyster Mushroom Appetizer (view the recipe here) View more Petit Plaisirs here. ~The Simple Sophisticate, episode #313 ~Subscribe to The Simple Sophisticate:  iTunes | Stitcher | iHeartRadio | YouTube | Spotify | Amazon Music

The Ultimate Health Podcast
433: Holocaust Survivor SHARES How to Confront Your Past to HEAL YOUR MIND & Enjoy Life | Dr. Edith Eger

The Ultimate Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 70:16


Watch the full video interview on YouTube here: https://bit.ly/dreditheger433 Dr. Edith “Edie” Eger (IG: @dr.editheger) is a sought-after clinical psychologist and lecturer. She helps individuals discard their limitations, discover their powers of self-renewal, and achieve things they previously thought were unattainable. Using her own past as a Holocaust survivor and thriver as a powerful analogy, she inspires people to tap their full potential and shape their very best destinies. Today we're chatting about Edie's latest book, The Gift. In this episode, we discuss: Facing discrimination for being a Jew We are born with joy and learn to hate Edie recalls being taken to Auschwitz in 1944 Last words of advice from Edie's mother Letting go of victim mentality Curiosity helped Edie survive Live in the present and never give up Do you play enough? The spirit never dies The cherished wound Relive the experience and revise your life The positive impact of going back to Auschwitz When you forgive, you free yourself Finding hope in hopelessness Daily life inside a concentration camp The bond of sisters The moment of liberation Show sponsors: Four Sigmatic

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
If you have an opportunity to jump into a mountain lake that is ice cold...Take it!

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 11:22


I brought one book on my camping trip.  Victor E Frankl's “Man's Search For Meaning".  And circumstances allowed me to read the whole thing.  And after a long hike there is nothing like jumping in a mountain lake and drying off on a granite slab.Administrative: (See episode transcript below)Check out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript: Mischa Z: 00:04 This episode is going to be more, well, this episode is going to be about "Man's Search For Meaning". "Man's Search For Meaning", Victor E Frankl, and not necessarily about the book, but just about an idea that I had on how to, how to talk about the book, I suppose. Um, and then the serendipitous events on how I got to read the whole book during my camping trip. So again, if you're just jumping in, I just got back from this amazing two or three day camping trip at, uh, at mammoth lakes in mammoth, um, which is in the Southern Sierras, I believe, you'd think I'd know. Um, anyhow, uh, so I go on this trip on this camping trip. I bring a book. This book happens to be "Man's Search For Meaning" Viktor E Frankl. I just noticed too, I'm a trip that his name is Victor E victory.Mischa Z: 01:14 I mean, how great is that? I cannot believe I've never noticed that before. So I bring Victor Victor's book, "Man's Search For Meaning" with me and plan on reading. Some of it I don't was absolutely not planning on reading the whole thing. But the hike and was pretty strenuous for me. It was a good, you know, eight miles plus, uh, you know, two or 3000 elevation gain. And you've got a 25 pound pack on 25 pound plus pack on. And so that can be...it was hard on my knees. I'll just be honest with you. So I was definitely knees were sore on day two. So day one, we hike up there. It's beautiful. Great hike. Just unbelievable. We pass, um, a few lakes. Let's see if I can remember what they are. Ghost lake, I think was one of them. I doesn't matter. We ended up at the third lake, however, iceberg lake iceberg lake, which I've talked about and we got to jump in iceberg lake and then lay on the granite, which is just so good. If anybody, if you have an opportunity to jump on a mountain lake that is ice cold and then dry off and heat yourself on a granite slab mother earth, it does not get much better.Mischa Z: 02:44 So the next day we were planning on doing a 10 mile hike with a little bit of elevation gained, moving on to another campsite. But my knees were pretty sore. And I talked about this on a previous episode two ago, maybe, but that I was being encouraged to hike by my camping partner, Kyle, hello, Kyle, if you're listening and Kyle was like, Hey, let's go. And I was like, I listened to my body and did the self care and was like, no, I am not going. I need a down day. And I cannot tell you what a miracle that is because oftentimes I will just push through it, take some Advil, you know, charge, make it happen, like be strong. And uh, I said, you know what? The universe is telling me, "listen to your body". And I did. And thank goodness I did. So that gave me a full day to hang out at Iceberg lake, which is about, I think it's, you know, nine or 10 it's.Mischa Z: 04:00 I think it was 9,800 feet elevation God's country. It is so beautiful. Just this lake is surrounded on all sides by these massive granted peaks, you know? Um, and then the outlet is where you hike up. That's where the, the, the, um, the lake, you know, turns... The river, drains down, you know, drains out of, out of this out of, I don't know how if I'm saying this right, but it's just beautiful. And the solitude is incredible and the quiet is incredible. And, um, you're far enough out there that a couple people you run into. Um, and so I had an opportunity to dive into "Man's Search For Meaning ",Viktor Frankl and what an intense, heavy, deep book, um, you know, ultimately Viktor Frankl, Viktor Frankl was, and, uh, the death camps during world war II, you know, he started at Auschwitz and then went to three others.Mischa Z: 05:13 So for three years, and he somehow survived and, you know, hence Man's Search For Meaning. And he, you know, he defines his logo therapy, L O G O therapy. I'm not sure if I'm saying that right, but logo, I believe is Latin for "meaning". I believe it is. Anyway. I'll dig back in. I'm not necessarily, this episode is not necessarily to tell you about the meaning of the book, but just to say, I had an opportunity to read the book. And at the same time I need to start. Part of my project is to go on to you...pick three to five groups. Facebook groups that have combined a combined audience of a hundred thousand people. And then you start every day, you do a value post. So a post that adds value to each of those groups, your three to five groups. And every day you answer, it's either two or three questions.Mischa Z: 06:23 Um, question threads, there is three, three questions per group. So to build that habit, those are next steps for me. And so "Man's Search For Meaning”. I just dog-eared so many pages. There were so many great, great sentences and bits of awareness. So my thought was, and hopefully I'll be able to turn some of those inspirations into podcast episodes, but for now I'll finish my thought. It was to take those sentences and create a value post for the group. So what's the sentence. Perhaps I could relate it to an experience of my life in my life. Bam, there's a value post. And that was very exciting to me to be like, oh yes, here's a way here is a way that you can do these daily posts, add value, hopefully create some inspiration or some, you know, some contemplation for people. And then hopefully you inspire them and you inspire them enough that they come look at your Facebook page.Mischa Z: 07:39 Hey, where, who is this guy? Mischa, that's talking about giving us these value bobs as what you'd call them. So that's the theory. So you have that to look forward. You have you get to hear me talk about my progress with that. Does this, as a way to build an audience and to suss out your perfect customer, does it work? Is it effective? And, uh. I thought it was really cool that I listened to my body, held the boundary with my camping friend. Kyle. Stayed at the campsite, just meditated and rested and relaxed and detached and read "Man's Search For Meaning" and had all this great inspiration. So there you have it. I think that's enough for me. I hope I've closed the loop. I'll open another loop. The other loop is next episode. I'm going to talk about how in "Man's Search For Meaning" part of what Victor Frankel's theory is, is that meaning is what drives man, and not pleasure, as Freud says, but meaning. Having meaning and he breaks down meaning and all sorts of cool ways, three ways in particular actually. And they don't have to be...You can still find meaning in the face of your executioner. Which is one thing which is pretty wow. Right? That's what he's talking about. I'm not going to claim to have no that, um, but he does talk about that. But he talks about being of service as one of the ways, you know? Um, and I'm going to tell you how I got to be of service literally after I finished the book. So fun. All right. Love to all. Peace out.

New Books in History
Dora Osborne, "What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture" (Camden House, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 61:53


With the passing of those who witnessed National Socialism and the Holocaust, the archive matters as never before. However, the material that remains for the work of remembering and commemorating this period of history is determined by both the bureaucratic excesses of the Nazi regime and the attempt to eradicate its victims without trace. Dora Osborne's book What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture (Camden House, 2020) argues that memory culture in the Berlin Republic is marked by an archival turn that reflects this shift from embodied to externalized, material memory and responds to the particular status of the archive "after Auschwitz." What remains in this late phase of memory culture is the post-Holocaust archive, which at once ensures and haunts the future of Holocaust memory. Drawing on the thinking of Freud, Derrida, and Georges Didi-Huberman, this book traces the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the archival turn in contemporary German memory culture across different media and genres. In its discussion of recent memorials, documentary film and theater, as well as prose narratives, all of which engage with the material legacy of the Nazi past, it argues that the performance of “archive work” is not only crucial to contemporary memory work but also fundamentally challenges it. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Dora Osborne, "What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture" (Camden House, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 61:53


With the passing of those who witnessed National Socialism and the Holocaust, the archive matters as never before. However, the material that remains for the work of remembering and commemorating this period of history is determined by both the bureaucratic excesses of the Nazi regime and the attempt to eradicate its victims without trace. Dora Osborne's book What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture (Camden House, 2020) argues that memory culture in the Berlin Republic is marked by an archival turn that reflects this shift from embodied to externalized, material memory and responds to the particular status of the archive "after Auschwitz." What remains in this late phase of memory culture is the post-Holocaust archive, which at once ensures and haunts the future of Holocaust memory. Drawing on the thinking of Freud, Derrida, and Georges Didi-Huberman, this book traces the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the archival turn in contemporary German memory culture across different media and genres. In its discussion of recent memorials, documentary film and theater, as well as prose narratives, all of which engage with the material legacy of the Nazi past, it argues that the performance of “archive work” is not only crucial to contemporary memory work but also fundamentally challenges it. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Dora Osborne, "What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture" (Camden House, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 61:53


With the passing of those who witnessed National Socialism and the Holocaust, the archive matters as never before. However, the material that remains for the work of remembering and commemorating this period of history is determined by both the bureaucratic excesses of the Nazi regime and the attempt to eradicate its victims without trace. Dora Osborne's book What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture (Camden House, 2020) argues that memory culture in the Berlin Republic is marked by an archival turn that reflects this shift from embodied to externalized, material memory and responds to the particular status of the archive "after Auschwitz." What remains in this late phase of memory culture is the post-Holocaust archive, which at once ensures and haunts the future of Holocaust memory. Drawing on the thinking of Freud, Derrida, and Georges Didi-Huberman, this book traces the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the archival turn in contemporary German memory culture across different media and genres. In its discussion of recent memorials, documentary film and theater, as well as prose narratives, all of which engage with the material legacy of the Nazi past, it argues that the performance of “archive work” is not only crucial to contemporary memory work but also fundamentally challenges it. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in German Studies
Dora Osborne, "What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture" (Camden House, 2020)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 61:53


With the passing of those who witnessed National Socialism and the Holocaust, the archive matters as never before. However, the material that remains for the work of remembering and commemorating this period of history is determined by both the bureaucratic excesses of the Nazi regime and the attempt to eradicate its victims without trace. Dora Osborne's book What Remains: The Post-Holocaust Archive in German Memory Culture (Camden House, 2020) argues that memory culture in the Berlin Republic is marked by an archival turn that reflects this shift from embodied to externalized, material memory and responds to the particular status of the archive "after Auschwitz." What remains in this late phase of memory culture is the post-Holocaust archive, which at once ensures and haunts the future of Holocaust memory. Drawing on the thinking of Freud, Derrida, and Georges Didi-Huberman, this book traces the political, ethical, and aesthetic implications of the archival turn in contemporary German memory culture across different media and genres. In its discussion of recent memorials, documentary film and theater, as well as prose narratives, all of which engage with the material legacy of the Nazi past, it argues that the performance of “archive work” is not only crucial to contemporary memory work but also fundamentally challenges it. Lea Greenberg is a scholar of German studies with a particular focus on German Jewish and Yiddish literature and culture; critical gender studies; multilingualism; and literature of the post-Yugoslav diaspora. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

SOFREP Radio
Episode 580: George Hand 'Geo', Author, Former Delta Force Member, and Dear Friend

SOFREP Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 64:14


On this week's special podcast SOFREP Senior Editor and SOFREP Radio host Steve Balestrieri talks with George Hand IV, better known as "Geo" among his many readers and fans. Geo was a member of 1st and 7th Special Forces Groups before joining the tip of the American military's spear, the Delta Force. Geo stayed in the Unit until his retirement from the Army. His civilian career has taken him to many places from working for the Department of Energy in the Nevada Desert to tracking down human traffickers to writing for such sites as SOFREP, WE ARE THE MIGHTY, Sandboxx, and contributing expert commentary to Business Insider. From traversing Morocco on camelback to visiting Auschwitz to training SEALs on breaching techniques the interview is filled with exciting details of Geo's military and civilian life. Steve and Geo also talk about Geo's book Brothers of the Cloth. The book is a collection of short stories from Geo's days in the Unit. The stories focus on and memorialize Geo's brothers in Delta Force making Brothers of the Cloth perhaps the definitive account of life in Delta Force. The book is elevated by Geo's inimitable writing style, which accentuates both the lighthearted and the more poignant moments of the stories. You can visit Geo's website at https://georgehand.org/. Join us for a very special episode with a dear friend. Thank you, Geo!   Editor's Note: We would like to apologize to our listeners as, due to a production issue, small sections of the interview have an echo. But don't worry! You'll be able to hear Geo loud and clear throughout! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

SWR2 Wissen
Klaus Barbie – Grausamer Nazi und US-Agent

SWR2 Wissen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 28:05


Klaus Barbie war als „Schlächter von Lyon“ berüchtigt – ein besonders grausamer Gestapo-Folterer. Außerdem veranlasste er die Deportation der „Kinder von Izieu“ nach Auschwitz, worüber Reinhard Mey ein berührendes Lied schrieb. Nach dem Krieg diente Barbie dem US-Geheimdienst und wurde erst mit einem Trick gefasst, nachdem er nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg lange unbehelligt in Bolivien gelebt hatte. Von Rainer Volk | Manuskript und mehr zur Sendung: http://swr.li/klaus-barbie| Bei Fragen und Anregungen schreibt uns: wissen@swr2.de | Folgt uns auf Twitter: @swr2wissen

Luke and Susie Podcast
Luke and Susie: Heather Morris - Three Sisters

Luke and Susie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 24:53


In 2003, I was introduced to an elderly gentleman "who might just have a story worth telling". The day I met Lale Sokolov changed my life, as our friendship grew and he embarked on a journey of self scrutiny, entrusting the inner most details of his life during the Holocaust. I originally wrote Lale's story as a screenplay - which ranked high in international competitions - before reshaping it into my debut novel, The Tattooist of Auschwitz. Latest novel - Three Sisters When they are little girls, Cibi, Magda and Livia make a promise to their father – that they will stay together, no matter what. Years later, at just 15, Livia is ordered to Auschwitz by the Nazis. Cibi, only 19 herself, remembers their promise and follows Livia, determined to protect her sister, or die with her. Together, they fight to survive through unimaginable cruelty and hardship.

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
The women who sewed to survive Auschwitz

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 27:35


In the depths of the Holocaust, twenty-five young inmates of the infamous Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp were selected to make high-end fashion for the Nazi elite. The Upper Tailoring Studio, housed in an SS admin block, became a vital hub of resistance as the dressmakers of Auschwitz used their sewing skills to survive.   

Late Night Live - ABC RN
Sewing to survive in Auschwitz and the fate of the displaced colonial ayahs and amahs

Late Night Live - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 53:36


Lucy Adlington recounts the story of 25 women who sewed to survive in Auschwitz. And the ayahs and amahs who travelled to their colonial employers' home countries - not only to England but also to Australia. What happened to them?

The Sarah Silverman Podcast
E52 Norm, Rory's Balls, Auschwitz

The Sarah Silverman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 47:01


Sarah speaks about the loss of Norm Macdonald. She calls Rory for his “side of the Albanese” on the topic of men's balls. Find out about Sarah's religion and sexism discussion at the dog park, learn some Jewish colloquialisms, and get useful advice from callers this week who weigh in on the last episode's abortion discussion. Leave Sarah a voicemail: https://www.kastmedia.com/MessageSarah Start building better habits for healthier, long-term results. Sign up for your trial at https://www.Noom.com/Silverman. Enjoy MeUndies super soft undies and loungewear. To get 15% off your first order, free shipping, and a 100% satisfaction guarantee, go to https://www.MeUndies.com/Sarah. Snag a pair of the coolest sunglasses around. Visit https://www.BlendersEyewear.com and enter promo code SILVERMANVIP.  Vuori makes clothing that is so comfortable, you'll never want to take it off. Visit https://www.Vuori.com/Silverman for 20% off your first purchase plus free shipping on any U.S. orders over $75, and free returns. Follow Sarah on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/sarahkatesilverman and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SarahKSilverman. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pola Retradio en Esperanto
E_elsendo el la 14.09.2021

Pola Retradio en Esperanto

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 28:11


La 1100-a E_elsendo el la 14.09.2021 ĉe www.pola-retradio.org Nia nunsemajna marda elsendo enhavas la 115-an fragmenton de la romano „Quo Vadis” de Henryk Sienkiewicz en la E-traduko de Lidia Zamenhof. La komencaj aktualaĵoj informas pri stipendioj por poldevenaj studantoj en Pollando, pri la unia bierproduktado kaj pri speciala leciono de Auschwitz-muzeo dediĉita al la deportitaj […]

Pola Retradio en Esperanto
E_elsendo el la 14.09.2021

Pola Retradio en Esperanto

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 28:11


La 1100-a E_elsendo el la 14.09.2021 ĉe www.pola-retradio.org Nia nunsemajna marda elsendo enhavas la 115-an fragmenton de la romano „Quo Vadis” de Henryk Sienkiewicz en la E-traduko de Lidia Zamenhof. La komencaj aktualaĵoj informas pri stipendioj por poldevenaj studantoj en Pollando, pri la unia bierproduktado kaj pri speciala leciono de Auschwitz-muzeo dediĉita al la deportitaj […]

The Craig Fahle show on Deadline Detroit
Remembering 9/11 - 20 Years Later

The Craig Fahle show on Deadline Detroit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 26:05


Craig and  Allan Lengel of DeadlineDetroit.com sit down to discuss the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.   Deadline Detroit Editor Allan Lengel was a reporter at The Washington Post, working on the disappearance of an intern from California named Chandra Levy. On Sept. 11, 2001, his assignment changed. Around 9:30 a.m., he was walking to the subway in northwest D.C., heading to work, when he bumped into a friend who told him that two planes had just crashed into the World Trade Center in New York. By the time he got off the subway, a jet had also crashed into the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., just outside D.C.To mark the attack's 20th anniversary, Lengel talks with Deadline Detroit's Craig Fahle about what happened next, including his conversation with his mother who survived Auschwitz and flying days later to Detroit to cover a terrorism hearing. 

Top of the Pile, Simon & Schuster Australia
Start listening to The Nazis Knew My Name by Magda Hellinger and Maya Lee

Top of the Pile, Simon & Schuster Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 15:51


The extraordinarily moving memoir by Australian Slovakian Holocaust survivor Magda Hellinger, who saved an untold number of lives at Auschwitz through everyday acts of courage, kindness and ingenuity. In March 1942, twenty-five-year-old kindergarten teacher Magda Hellinger and nearly a thousand other young Slovakian women were deported to Poland on the second transportation of Jewish people sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp. The women were told they'd be working at a shoe factory. At Auschwitz the SS soon discovered that by putting Jewish prisoners in charge of the day-to-day running of the accommodation blocks, camp administration and workforces, they could both reduce the number of guards required and deflect the distrust of the prisoner population away from themselves. Magda was one such prisoner selected for leadership and over three years served in many prisoner leader roles, from room leader, to block leader – at one time in charge of the notorious Experimental Block 10 where reproductive experiments were performed on hundreds of women – and eventually camp leader, responsible for 30,000 women. She found herself constantly walking a dangerously fine line: using every possible opportunity to save lives while avoiding suspicion by the SS, and risking torture or execution. Through her bold intelligence, sheer audacity, inner strength and shrewd survival instincts, she was able to rise above the horror and cruelty of the camps and build pivotal relationships with the women under her watch, and even some of Auschwitz's most notorious Nazi senior officers including the Commandant, Josef Kramer. Based on Magda's personal account and completed by her daughter Maya's extensive research, including testimonies from fellow Auschwitz survivors, this awe-inspiring tale offers us incredible insight into human nature, the power of resilience, and the goodness that can shine through even in the most horrific of conditions.

Max LucadoMax Lucado
Satan's Tool Kit

Max LucadoMax Lucado

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021


​How do we explain our stubborn hearts and conniving ways? How do we explain Auschwitz, human trafficking, abuse? If I...

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More
A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy by Thomas Buergenthal

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 11:59


You may have heard of the Auschwitz Concentration Camps, where German Nazis performed unspeakable acts of ethnic cleansing against the Jews during the Second World War. Over the course of this calamity, about six million Jews lost their lives to the scourge of Nazism. Six million is a figure that we as bystanders are used to applying in a generalized sense to this profound tragedy, unintentionally turning the victims into a faceless, soulless and replaceable mass. Yet in reality, for those who personally lived through this experience, every person who perished was once an individual soul, and each had precious stories worth telling. The author Thomas Buergenthal is one such survivor. At the Auschwitz concentration camp, he was robbed of his name and labeled B-2930. Thereafter, this serial number remained branded on his left arm, a permanent scar like all that he had experienced in his childhood. In this book, he recounts to us in vivid and honest detail every moment spent at the concentration camps and every face that he encountered. He does all this from the perspective of a child who was lucky enough to have survived the Holocaust.

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review
Phyllida Lloyd, Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings and Here Today

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 124:00


Mark and Simon's guests are director Phyllida Lloyd and producer Sharon Horgan, who talk about their new film Herself, about a young mother who escapes her abusive husband and fights back against a broken housing system. Mark reviews Leos Carax's collaboration with Ron and Russell Mael of Sparks, Annette; Misha and the Wolves, the story of a woman whose holocaust memoir took the world by storm; Marvel's Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, about the master of unarmed weaponry-based Kung Fu, who is forced to confront his past after being drawn into the Ten Rings organization; drama The Champion of Auschwitz, the story of the pre-war boxing champion Tadeusz "Teddy" Pietrzykowski, who in 1940 arrives with the first transport of prisoners to the newly created concentration camp; Here Today, Billy Crystal's comedy drama about a veteran comedy writer who meets a New York street singer; Wildfire, the story of two sisters who grew up on the fractious Irish border; and Kay Cannon's modern take on Cinderella. Plus we'll be attempting to solve those maddening movies you half-remember from years ago in WTF - What's That Film. Mark and Simon also talk you through the best and worst films on subscription-free TV next week, and recommend a home entertainment purchase in DVD of the Week. Send us your sub 20 second instant reaction to any film attached to an email to mayo@bbc.co.uk for our feature ‘Lobby Correspondents'. Download our podcast from the Baby Sea Clowns app. We welcome your contributions: Email: mayo@bbc.co.uk Twitter: @wittertainment 03.44- Correspondence 16.34- Welcome 20.20- Celebrating Cinema 24.36- Box Office Top Ten 37.10- WTF 43.45- Shang-Chi review 49.33- Herself, interview with Phyllida Lloyd 1.02.01- Cinderella review 1.08.10- WTF 1.11.30- Annette 1.18.30- TV Movies of the Week 1.22.50- Here Today review 1.28.35- Correspondence 1.33.00- WTF 1.34.35- Wildfire review 1.44.10- Misha and the Wolves review 1.49.37- Champion of Auschwitz review 1.53.30- Correspondence 1.58.13- DVD of the week

TOK FM Select
Walczył na ringu w Auschwitz. O pięściarzu Tadeuszu Pietrzykowskim i filmie "Mistrz"

TOK FM Select

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 13:42


Był przedwojennym mistrzem Warszawy w boksie. Jak trafił do obozu koncentracyjnego w Auschwitz i co zrobił, żeby przeżyć? O tym w rozmowie z Piotrem Głowackim, odtwórcą głównej roli w filmie "Mistrz"

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast

Im Interview: Die ARD Programmdirektorin Christine Strobl über die Öffentlich Rechtlichen Rundfunk Gebühren, die fehlende Berichterstattung aus Kabul und die zwingende Programmreform im Ersten. Bahnstreik trotz Friedensangebot! Die Börsen-Reporterinnen Sophie Schimansky und Annette Weisbach berichten über die aktuelle OPEC-Förderpolitik und die Haltung der Deutschen Bundesbank zur Inflation. Der Boxer von Auschwitz! Das außergewöhnliche Leben des Tadeusz Pietrzykowski wurde jetzt verfilmt. Der Finanzminister von Baden-Württemberg fördert das “Steuer-Denunziantentum” in seinem Ländle.

Warfare
The Boy Who Followed His Father to Auschwitz

Warfare

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 43:42


In 1939, Gustav Kleinmann, a Jewish upholsterer in Vienna, was arrested by the Nazis. Along with his sixteen-year-old son Fritz, he was sent to Buchenwald in Germany, where a new concentration camp was being built. What followed is a remarkable story of horror, love and the impossible survival of a father and his son. In this episode from the archive, Dan Snow and historian Jeremy Dronfield explore Gustav's secret diary, Fritz' accounts and other eyewitness testimony, and build a picture of this extraordinary father and son team. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Awestruck
Immersive Design

Awestruck

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 19:44


I no longer believe that we can change anything in the world until we first change ourselves. And that seems to me the only lesson to be learned. Etty Hillesum Etty Hillesum, like Anne Frank, was arrested by the Nazis and transported to camp Westerbork. And, like Anne Frank, she wrote diaries of her experiences before her arrest. Etty continued to write at Westerbork, documenting not just the atrocities taking place around her, but the inward transformation taking place within her. Though surrounded by evil, she chose to immerse herself in the good she believed permeated even her increasing darkness.  At Westerbork she wrote, "The sky is full of birds, the purple lupins stand up so regally and peacefully, two little old women have sat down for a chat, the sun is shining on my face – and right before our eyes, mass murder.... "Those two months behind barbed wire have been the two richest and most intense months of my life, in which my highest values were so deeply confirmed. I have learnt to love Westerbork." Etty Hillesum wrote these words not long before she was ushered aboard a train to Auschwitz. There, in the crowded boxcar, she wrote her last known words on a postcard that she then tossed out of the train. It read, "We left the camp singing..." When evil and suffering surround us, it is easy to let the darkness take hold of us and become part of us. We know no other response than to fight back in rage or attempt to escape the pain with unhealthy distractions or curl up in the fetal position on the floor and weep. Those will be our responses if we immerse ourselves in the shadows we face. But where there is shadow, there is light. It is not easy to overcome the darkness. We need help. The good news is we have it. We have been invited to immerse ourselves in a new way of thinking and living. We are designed to walk in this light.  But in order to let go of our current way of thinking and living, we must first immerse ourselves over a period of time fully in the light until it begins to penetrate the darkness within us. Source Scripture Mark 3:13-19; Luke 6:12-16 Connect Twitter: @AwestruckPod Email: info@awestruckpodcast.com Extras The Awestruck Podcast musical playlist  (Apple I Spotify) Resources to Explore the Life of Etty Hillesum Wikipedia Book: An Interrupted Life Book: A Life Transformed Quotes from Goodreads

Awarepreneurs
215 | Climate Change & Your Business: Can We Talk?

Awarepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 41:06


On the pod this week, Awarepreneurs CEO and founder Paul Zelizer shares some thoughts on climate change and social entrepreneurship after the recent "Code Red" report.  Specifically, Paul goes into the 3 key areas that social entrepreneurs can actually contribute to moving the climate needle in a positive direction and how we can maintain our sense of optimism and resiliency while we do this work.  Resources mentioned in this episode: The Opposite of Positive Toxicity article Man's Search for Meaning book The Librarian of Auschwitz book Gretta Thornberg on fast fashion UN-17 coworking space The UN Sustainable Development Goals Paul's business coaching

Behind The Shield
Dr Edith Eger - Episode 500

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 67:56


Dr Edith Eger is a psychologist, author and survived Auschwitz. We discuss her early life in Hungary, living through ballet, seeing kindness amongst immense cruelty, her own journey of healing, counselling veterans, finding the bigot within yourself, the first responder community and so much more.

Take One Daf Yomi
Take One: Sukkah 44 and 45

Take One Daf Yomi

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 8:26


Today's Daf Yomi pages, Sukkah 44 and 45, tell us again, in no uncertain terms, that each one of us has the power to change and redeem the entire world. We're inspired by the story of Father Maximilian Kolbe, a Polish priest who gave his life for another inmate at Auschwitz, teaching us how to be free and holy even in the world's darkest place. What might we learn from his example? Listen and find out. Like the show? Send us a note at takeone@tabletmag.com. Follow us on Twitter at @takeonedafyomi and join the conversation in the Take One Facebook group. Take One is hosted by Liel Leibovitz and produced by Josh Kross, Sara Fredman Aeder, and Robert Scaramuccia. Check out all of Tablet's podcasts at tabletmag.com/podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Listening - Impact beyond words - Oscar Trimboli
The power of listening and how it forever changed the life of Heather Morris

Deep Listening - Impact beyond words - Oscar Trimboli

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 45:39


Heather Morris is most well known for being the author of The Tattooist of Auschwitz, which has sold over 8 million copies since its first publication in 2018. The story, is a story of beauty and hope and it's based on years of interviews by Heather Morris and the interviews she conducted with real-life Holocaust survivors and Lale, The Tattooist of Auschwitz. The Three Sisters is the next book in the series, an astonishing story about a promise to stay together, an unbreakable bond, and a fierce will to survive. ” People have been telling stories long before they've been writing them down. That storytelling is literally what makes the world go round, it is what connects us, not only with our friends and family, but with the past, and also with the future. I'm all about storytelling and to be able to tell your stories, you've got to listen to them in the first place. The two are intrinsically entwined.”. The irony for me is that to help everyone become better listeners, I had to become better at telling stories. For many of us sharing our own stories is as uncomfortable as listening to someone else's story. So, what am I taking away from Heather's conversation today? I need to tell more stories. I need to be comfortable telling stories about myself, about my family, about others. Listen for Free

Foundations
031. From Auschwitz to MetLife Stadium | On the Shoulders of Giants ep3

Foundations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 59:30


Holocaust Remembrance - What is the proper approach to establishing an everlasting memorial for the 6 million Kedoshim? 1975, 30 years after the great Churban of European Jewry, in which 6 million of our brothers and sisters had their lives so brutally snuffed out on the מזבח of Kiddush Hashem. 30 years of working to rebuild the beautiful world that was so cruelly destroyed.But how do we eternalize the memory of those that fell? What is the proper and befitting way for us, the survivors and rebuilders, to keep their precious legacy alive forever? So many people, so many opinions! Join us as we sit in with Rabbi Shmuel Bloom and experience the series of meetings in which the Moetzes Gedolei Hatorah dealt with this crucial and sensitive topic. This program is sponsored L'iluy NishmasIn loving memory of our precious grandparentsReb Binyomin ben Moshe z"lAlta Chana bas Yechiel a"hIf you would like to sponsor an episode send an Email to info@jfoundations.com.Visit our website https://www.jfoundations.com/Contact:info@jfoundations.comWhatsApp +972 55-711-6220

St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church (Gilbert, AZ) Podcasts
Father Chris Axline Video Chat - Aug. 13, 2021

St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church (Gilbert, AZ) Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 4:42


Assumption and Maximilan Kolbe Hello St. Mary Magdalene, Happy Sunday and feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary! We also though celebrate St. Maximilian Kolbe on Saturday August 14th. He's a saint with a fantastic story of heroic, self-sacrificial love in the midst of great evil. Trading his life for another man in Auschwitz, Kolbe is a great example of devotion to the Blessed Mother and of the power of mercy to overcome evil! The man who Kolbe saved would survive the war and would be reunited with his family. Have a great week and God bless you, Fr. Chris Visit us: www.smarymag.org Donate online: https://membership.faithdirect.net/AZ754

Travel With Meaning
Episode 64: Joanna Wallfisch

Travel With Meaning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 52:52


Described by Downbeat Magazine as "an exquisite singer-songwriter", Joanna's music conveys a beauty of a many-coloured sort that speaks to straight to the human condition. Her songs reveal personal truths about love, loss, adventure, home and hope. World Music Report described it as "quintessential heart-music by a vocalist who seems to have connected with the deepest recesses of her being emerging into brightness again with songs of haunting beauty." Joanna is a master in the art of live vocal looping and as a multi-instrumentalist plays baritone ukulele, piano, flute, Indian shruti box, kalimba and melodica. Her music defies genre classification as she effortlessly imbues her songs with nuances of jazz, classical, art-song, and folk, carrying her "clear-eyed poetry" (Boston Globe) and "striking vocals" (Hothouse). Her songwriting extends beyond just lyrics and melody - Joanna also arranges for ensembles including string quartets, winds, a cappella voices and more.  Joanna's career has taken her around the globe.  She first studied to be a painter at Central Saint Martins, London. This led her to Paris, where she sang on the bridges of the Seine with the "Rene Miller Wedding Band". Following this formative time she did a masters in jazz at Guildhall School of Music and Drama.  In 2012 she moved to New York City where she forged an indelible musical path, appearing and collaborating with musicians including Dan Tepfer, Wynton Marsalis, Kenny Werner, Sam Newsome, Lee Konitz, to name a few. She released her debut album, Wild Swan, in 2011, featuring Joe Martin, Sam Newsome, Rob Garcia and Art Hirahara. In 2015 she signed with Sunnyside Records who released The Origin of Adjustable Things, an intimate duo project with pianist Dan Tepfer. As a follow up to this success she recorded Gardens In My Mind, her third album of self-penned songs and arrangements, featuring the award winning string ensemble The Sacconi Quartet, and Dan Tepfer on piano. In 2018 she self-released her fourth record, Blood and Bone, which London Jazz said, "overflowed with creativity and musical resources." 2019 marks the release of her fifth record entitled Far Away From Any Place Called Home.  Joanna's unique musical background shines through in her own compositional style, evoking her classical routes with her love of jazz, art-song, folk and pop, pushing boundaries of genre and stylistic expectations. Her musical heritage is something to behold. Raised by classical musician parents, Australian violinist Elizabeth Wallfisch and London born cellist Raphael Wallfisch, her grandmother Anita Lasker Wallfisch, now 94, survived Auschwitz because she played the cello in the camp's women's orchestra. Post liberation she became a founding member of the English Chamber Orchestra. Brother Simon is a renowned cellist and opera singer, and eldest brother Benjamin is an Oscar and Grammy nominated film composer. The Great Song Cycle: An adventurer at heart, in August 2016 Joanna embarked on a solo concert tour of the West Coast of the USA, by bicycle. Over the course of 1,154 miles she performed 16 solo shows between Portland and Los Angeles carrying her instruments, camping gear, and everything else she needed upon her bike. In her inimitable way she turned this once-in-a-lifetime experience into a 60-minute song-cycle, a recorded album and a memoir. She has performed the live piece in theatres including: National Sawdust, NYC, Boston Court Performing Arts Centre, LA, The Edinburgh Fringe Festival, UK, Phoenix Theatre, UK and Joe's Pub, NYC. In June, 2019 Joanna celebrates the release of her fifth album Far Away From Any Place Called Home, and her debut memoir "The Great Song Cycle; Portland to Los Angeles on Two Wheels and a Song", which is being published by Australian Publishers UWA Press.

Daily Rosary
August 14, 2021, Memorial of St. Maximilian Mary Kolbe, Holy Rosary (Joyful Mysteries)

Daily Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 28:18


[Comment: Win the World for the Immaculata] Friends of the Rosary: Today we honor a spectacular, contemporary saint and martyr, Maximilian Mary Kolbe, a Franciscan priest born in Poland, martyred in Auschwitz during the Second World War. Imprisoned in this death camp, he offered himself in exchange for the father of a large family who was to be executed. Filled with love for the Virgin, he founded in 1917 – the year of Fatima apparitions — the Militia of the Immaculate Mary. It was an evangelization movement intended to promote a Marian consecration and "win the world for the Immaculata." Maximilian Mary Kolbe developed an intense apostolic mission in Europe and Asia by creating newspapers, magazines, and radio stations. He was an "apostle of the mass media" and a ground-breaking theologian. He understood and promoted the role of Mary as "Mediatrix" of all the graces of the Trinity, and "Advocate" for God's people. Ave Maria! Jesus, I Trust In You! St. Maximilian Mary Kolbe Pray for Us! + Mikel A. | TheRosaryNetwork.org, New York Watch this Podcast in Video and/or attend the community-driven daily prayer every day at 7:30 pm ET on YouTube.com/TheRosaryNetwork

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, August 14, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Maximilian Kolbe, Priest and Martyr Lectionary: 418All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe“I don't know what's going to become of you!” How many parents have said that? Maximilian Mary Kolbe's reaction was, “I prayed very hard to Our Lady to tell me what would happen to me. She appeared, holding in her hands two crowns, one white, one red. She asked if I would like to have them—one was for purity, the other for martyrdom. I said, ‘I choose both.' She smiled and disappeared.” After that he was not the same. He entered the minor seminary of the Conventual Franciscans in Lvív--then Poland, now Ukraine-- near his birthplace, and at 16 became a novice. Though Maximilian later achieved doctorates in philosophy and theology, he was deeply interested in science, even drawing plans for rocket ships. Ordained at 24, Maximilian saw religious indifference as the deadliest poison of the day. His mission was to combat it. He had already founded the Militia of the Immaculata, whose aim was to fight evil with the witness of the good life, prayer, work, and suffering. He dreamed of and then founded Knight of the Immaculata, a religious magazine under Mary's protection to preach the Good News to all nations. For the work of publication he established a “City of the Immaculata”—Niepokalanow—which housed 700 of his Franciscan brothers. He later founded another one in Nagasaki, Japan. Both the Militia and the magazine ultimately reached the one-million mark in members and subscribers. His love of God was daily filtered through devotion to Mary. In 1939, the Nazi panzers overran Poland with deadly speed. Niepokalanow was severely bombed. Kolbe and his friars were arrested, then released in less than three months, on the feast of the Immaculate Conception. In 1941, Fr. Kolbe was arrested again. The Nazis' purpose was to liquidate the select ones, the leaders. The end came quickly, three months later in Auschwitz, after terrible beatings and humiliations. A prisoner had escaped. The commandant announced that 10 men would die. He relished walking along the ranks. “This one. That one.” As they were being marched away to the starvation bunkers, Number 16670 dared to step from the line. “I would like to take that man's place. He has a wife and children.” “Who are you?” “A priest.” No name, no mention of fame. Silence. The commandant, dumbfounded, perhaps with a fleeting thought of history, kicked Sergeant Francis Gajowniczek out of line and ordered Fr. Kolbe to go with the nine. In the “block of death” they were ordered to strip naked, and their slow starvation began in darkness. But there was no screaming—the prisoners sang. By the eve of the Assumption, four were left alive. The jailer came to finish Kolbe off as he sat in a corner praying. He lifted his fleshless arm to receive the bite of the hypodermic needle. It was filled with carbolic acid. They burned his body with all the others. Fr. Kolbe was beatified in 1971 and canonized in 1982. Reflection Father Kolbe's death was not a sudden, last-minute act of heroism. His whole life had been a preparation. His holiness was a limitless, passionate desire to convert the whole world to God. And his beloved Immaculata was his inspiration. Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe is a Patron Saint of: Addicts Recovery from drug addiction Click here for more on Saint Maximilian Kolbe! Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

In Your Presence
Kolbe and Conscience

In Your Presence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 27:13


From Ernescliff College in Toronto, Fr. Eric Nicolai prepares for the solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary on August 15, and the memorial of St. Maximilian Kolbe on August 14. The evil that took place in Auschwitz is difficult for us to understand. How can one stand by and allow this to happen? Here we see the pressing need for the formation of conscience. Music J.S. Bach, BACH Cello Suite no. 1 - Prelude in G, BWV 1007 For more meditations, check my channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/EricNicolai/videos www.ernescliff.ca www.opusdei.ca

History Hack
History Hack: The Dressmakers of Auschwitz

History Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 48:03


Lucy Adlington joins us to talk all about her new book, which looks at a group of women forced to produce high end fashion for Nazi women at the infamous camp.

Daily Rosary
August 9, 2021, Memorial of St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, Holy Rosary (Joyful Mysteries)

Daily Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 27:33


[Comment: Martyr] Friends of the Rosary: Today is the Memorial day of St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, Edith Stein, an amazing virgin and martyr. Born of Jewish parents in 1891 in Breslau, Poland, she became an influential, brilliant doctor in philosophy and a major force in German intellectual life. In 1933, Edith Stein entered the Discalced Carmelites after a remarkable conversion. One day, ten years before, while reading the autobiography of Teresa of Avila she exclaimed: “This is the truth”. St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross was arrested by the Nazi regime in 1942 in the Netherlands, along with all Catholics of Jewish extraction, and transported to the death camp of Auschwitz in a cattle train. She died in a gas chamber at Auschwitz on August 9, 1942. Ave Maria! Jesus, I Trust In You! St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross Pray for Us! + Mikel A. | TheRosaryNetwork.org, New York _ Watch this Podcast in Video and/or attend the community-driven daily prayer every day at 7:30 pm ET on YouTube.com/TheRosaryNetwork

Economist Radio
A dangerous games? A muted start to the Olympics

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 23:14


Tokyo is under a state of emergency; covid-19 cases are piling up. But for Japan, a super-spreader event is just one of the potential costs of this year's games. We ask why Britain's government has essentially given amnesty to those involved in Northern Ireland's decades of deadly violence. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of an Auschwitz accordionist.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What It Takes
Nadine Gordimer, Athol Fugard and Elie Wiesel: Messengers of Humanity

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 42:12


These three writers used the power of their pens to expose and explore man's inhumanity to man.  You'll hear the presentations they gave at the Academy of Achievement's International Summits.  South African novelist and anti-Apartheid activist Nadine Gordimer was the author of "Burger's Daughter" and "July's People", and she received the 1991 Nobel Prize in Literature.  Playwright Athol Fugard, also South African and an outspoken critic of Apartheid, received the Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2011.  His most famous plays include "Master Harold and the Boys" and "The Blood Knot". The third writer we'll hear from is Elie Wiesel, the legendary Auschwitz survivor who wrote many novels and non-fiction books about the horrors of the Holocaust, but always with a sense of hope for humankind.  He was also an unrelenting advocate for human rights around the world, and received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.  All three writers speak here about their lives and give profound advice to young people about how to live a meaningful life. 

Global News Podcast
The widow of the former Haitian president says he was riddled with bullets

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 27:02


Martine Moise, who was injured in the attack which killed her husband, speaks for the first time. Also: a statue that sparked deadly US rally is taken down, and Auschwitz orchestra member Esther Bejarano dies aged 96.