Podcasts about Jersey Boys

2005 jukebox musical

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Latest podcast episodes about Jersey Boys

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation
160: Communication is a Gift with Renée Marino

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 41:04


Renée Marino is a professional communication coach named by Yahoo Finance as one of the “Top 10 Communication Coaches to Follow in 2021!” She was the co-host of Tony Robbins and Dean Graziosi's “World Summit'' and has spoken, performed, and been interviewed on thousands of live and virtual stages, including Dean Graziosi's podcast The Dean Graziosi Show, and on David Meltzer's Instagram Live. Her best-selling book, Becoming a Master Communicator, has recently been launched and is endorsed by Bryan Adams, Dean Graziosi, Chazz Palminteri, Russell Brunson, Jenna Kutcher, Dhomonique Murphy, Bari Baumgardner, and many more! Renée helps professionals communicate with confidence through simple and easy tools…all while having fun! Renée can be seen as the female lead, Mary Delgado, in the film “Jersey Boys,” directed by Clint Eastwood. She has been featured in People.com's “Ones to Watch,” Variety, and The Huffington Post, which stated: “The Broadway star -- who is basically Tina Fey's celebrity doppelganger -- is a scene-stealer, spouting swears and put-downs with aplomb. ‘Jersey Boys' pops whenever she's onscreen.” Renée wrote and performed her solo show called, “I Am Me, Because of Three” which she sold out in both NYC and LA, and received incredible reviews. Broadway credits: “Pretty Woman”—Ensemble/ Dance Captain/Assistant to the Choreographer, Rosalia in “West Side Story,” Mary Delgado in “Jersey Boys”, “Chaplin” and “Wonderland.” National tours: “Cats”, “Disney's High School Musical” and “Jersey Boys. Television: Regina on Fox's “Weird Loners,” and “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.” As a coach, keynote speaker, and longtime performer, Renée Marino has inspired people worldwide with her energy, relatability, and authentic spirit. JONES.SHOW is a weekly podcast featuring host Randall Kenneth Jones (author, speaker & creative communications consultant) and Susan C. Bennett (the original voice of Siri). JONES.SHOW is produced and edited by Kevin Randall Jones. RENEE MARINO Online: Web: https://www.reneemarino.com/ TedX: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTxwLQmVx1U LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ren%C3%A9emarino/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsSkET6muRFdrKhnW2yyr7g Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoachReneeMarino Twitter: https://twitter.com/reneemarino JONES.SHOW Online: Join us in the Jones.Show Lounge on Facebook. Twitter (Randy): https://twitter.com/randallkjones Instagram (Randy): https://www.instagram.com/randallkennethjones/ Facebook (Randy): https://www.facebook.com/mindzoo/ Web: RandallKennethJones.com Follow Randy on Clubhouse Twitter (Susan): https://twitter.com/SiriouslySusan Instagram (Susan): https://www.instagram.com/siriouslysusan/ Facebook (Susan): https://www.facebook.com/siriouslysusan/ Web: SusanCBennett.com Follow Susan on Clubhouse LinkedIn (Kevin): https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-randall-jones/ Web: KevinRandallJones.com www.Jones.Show

Swoll Tide
Giants lose against Cowboys; Prepare for Commanders Next | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Aroch, Byron Jones and Joe Toscano

Swoll Tide

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 78:36


The Sports Cast Giants lose against Cowboys; Prepare for Commanders Next | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Aroch, Byron Jones and Joe Toscano Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 1:18:36 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file |...

Poorly Made Police Podcast
S3E1 - The Jersey Boy

Poorly Made Police Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 126:18


Yooooooooo This episode we meet the new host of the podcast and speak with Jim of GymTanPatrol. He is a cop from the Garden State. We discuss him humble beginnings as a poor Jersey boy to the Top memelord in the State. We discuss the absolute madness of New Jersey policing - PBA cards, LEOSA, can cops smoke weed, ETC? We also talk about the death of the job, why he hates fat people, finishing in second place, why everyone in Jersey can't drive, why they are angry, pineapple on Pizza, Snooki, Spray Tans, Jim's love of Crown Vics and much much more. Please patronize and support the LEO businesses that made this podcast possible. How are First Responders hitting huge fitness / body/ health goals? Don't miss this one! Fit Responder Fit Responder is the top remote coaching program for first responders around the US. Having support that understands the demands and stressors of the job helps when you need an effective and realistic action plan to make your goals reality. Follow FIT RESPONDER for tips, guides, memes, etc. https://fitresponder.com/ Pick up some PMPM Christmas Ornaments from https://kfrantadesigns.com/collections/poorly-made-police-memes-christmas-ornaments PMPM coins - www.ghostpatch.com PMPM Merch - https://poorly-made-police-memes.creator-spring.com/? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/poorly-made-police-memes/support

Ten Eight Podcast
Jersey Boys Podcast - "At some point we have to be Eskimo brothers..."

Ten Eight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 66:49


Today's episode Frank and Ten talk about our first cars, misadventures in college and dating, video games and a bunch of other topics! Check it out. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teneightpodcast/support

Sunday Arts Magazine

Many of Australia's favourite musical theatre stars including Lucy Durack (Wicked, Legally Blonde, Shrek), Verity Hunt-Ballard (Mary Poppins, Sweet Charity), Thomas McGuane (Frozen, Jersey Boys), Matt Lee (Mary Poppins, Frozen)... LEARN MORE The post Midnight appeared first on Sunday Arts Magazine.

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants win after BYE; Lions next | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho and Byron Jones

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 69:34


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants win after BYE; Lions next | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho and Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 1:09:34 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new...

Ten Eight Podcast
Jersey Boys Podcast - "If you didn't like Hanson you're lyin!"

Ten Eight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 61:56


On today's episode of the Jersey Boys Podcast, your two favorite Jersey Boys (Ten and Frank) discuss weddings, Salem Mass, candy, beer, our musical roots, and Thanksgiving as we compete head to head in a Side Dish Draft. In the comments, tell us who you think has the best plate for Thanksgiving and chime in with your favorite Thanksgiving sides and traditions. Also, if you feel so inclined, contact the Ten Eight voicemail at ‪(352) 610-1692‬! Follow us on Instagram, @jerseyboyspodcast! See ya in two weeks for more silly conversations! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teneightpodcast/support

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants Back from Bye, Looking towards Texans | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho and Byron Jones

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 68:39


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants Back from Bye, Looking towards Texans | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho and Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 1:08:39 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 1:08:39 | Recorded on November 11, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In the episode, Victor and Byron are back, and they discuss what the Giants needs to do after their bye week. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1

BFM :: Front Row
Big Men in Town - A Jersey Boys Tribute

BFM :: Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 9:55


Filled with singalong songs you're sure to recognise, Big Men In Town is a revue of the best of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, whose hits include Oh What A Night, Sherry, Big Girls Don't Cry, My Eyes Adored You, Beggin, and more. Set to be performed by tribute specialists The Jersey Boys, Big Men in Town will bring to life the rise and fall of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons, and tells the story behind the Jersey Boys sound. Presented by Homme Productions, the show is being held in aid of Yayasan Tunku Naquiyuddin (YTN) and the Tuanku Ja'afar Educational Trust (TJET). We find out more from Dato' Nicholas Pinder, the Director of Homme Productions.Image Credit: Homme Productions

SweeTalks
74: Alejandro and Matia Share How Much They've Made From Their Sugar Daddies and The Start Of The Jersey Boys

SweeTalks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 94:06


Joining the show is Alejandro and Matia, two of the biggest influencers across Tiktok and YouTube, both originally from Jersey, sharing their hilarious experiences about going on tour and how much you could really make having a sugar daddy.

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants-Seahawks Recap; Extension for Barkley? | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Byron Jones and Santiago Leon

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 58:42


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants-Seahawks Recap; Extension for Barkley? | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Byron Jones and Santiago Leon Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 58:42 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 58:42 | Recorded on November 3, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher The Sports Cast Giants-Seahawks Recap; Extension for Barkley? | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Byron Jones and Santiago Leon   Play Episode Pause Episode     Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 58:42       Subscribe Share         Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed         Share   Link   Embed Giants-Seahawks Recap; Extension for Barkley? | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Byron Jones and Santiago Leon " title="Embed Code" class="input-embed input-embed-46840" readonly="">         Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 58:42 | Recorded on November 3, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher   Byron and Santiago discuss:Giants lossNo trades during deadlineExtension Barkley/Jones/Love/LawrenceCan Eagles go undefeatedDallas Is Elliott done in Big DWashington for sell finally Byron Allen ??Is Denver gonna fire Hackett after this year. Contributors Byron Jones - @ByronCJones1 Santiago Leon - @sleon 

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Debbie Williams 11/01/2022

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 62:00


For VIdeo Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/NuUJtfZg55M Debbie Williams was born to gold medal Ice skaters and literally was born in a trunk. Her mom and dad traveled with the ice shows of that era and moved from town to town 11 months out of the year. When she was 2, they put her in a show and she performed with her family in Holiday on Ice and Ice Follies as a featured performer until the age of 15. Later, she did a show in Europe with Peggy Fleming where she met choreographer Bob Paul and he went on to choreograph the skating numbers for the 70's Donny and Marie Show. They needed Skater/ Dancers and he was hired. 4 years on that show and when it was over, Debbie switched into TV production. Produced Casey Kasem's Americas Top Ten TV Show for 5 years among other shows like Portrait of a Legend and others. Debbie had her son and decided to change jobs so that she would have more time with her son…. That's how stage managing happened. Soon she was doing all the big shows like the Oscars, Emmys, Grammys as the token female. It gave me time off to raise her son and it clicked. She did every live special, award show, live tv dramas like Fail Safe with Clooney, ER live, West Wing Live and On Golden Pond live with Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. It it was live, I did it and became the only woman Lead Stage Manager to do live Variety tv in LA. I eventually did American Idol the first 15 seasons on Fox as the lead stage manager. Debbie is now semi retired but do occasional shows that I want to do. I use my talents to help with activism in LA and DC for Womens March. My kids are 28 and 38. My son was on Broadway in Jersey Boys and my daughter is a therapist. I'm also a new grandma to a 6 month old. And back living in LA after a 4 year Park City adventure and commuting for work in LA.

THE LIZZY JANE PODCAST
#81 - Jason Paige [ Pokémon, Blood Sweat & Tears, Mountain Dew, Coke ]

THE LIZZY JANE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 73:22


Jason Pagie is truly the voice of a generation. Jason sings dozens of jingles every year... recognizable highlights include Coke's “Catch the Feeling”, Pepto Bizmol's “Nausea Heartburn Indigestion”, Mountain Dew's “Bohemian Rhapsody”, Taco Bell's “Think Outside The Bun”, Subway's “Eat Fresh”, Bounty's “Quilted Quicker Picker-Upper” and of course the OG theme to the cartoon phenomenon “Pokémon” which was a Billboard #1 single played by millions on Guitar Hero and scored what was at the time the # 1 most viewed / imitated video of all time on YouTube. As the featured soloist Jason has toured the world with Tommy Tallarico's legendary Video Games Live. He sang backing vocals on tour for Oleta Adams, performed with Liza Minelli in “Liza's Back” at Town Hall, with Ashanti at the Grammys, and in many concerts with superstar icon Billy Porter. He's also sung backgrounds for Ray Charles, Luther Vandross, Mark Anthony, Ricky Martin, Usher, Chaka Khan, and Patti LaBelle. Jason Paige has quickly risen again to the spotlight of the Pokémon Fans. He has been interviewed on MTV, CNN, TMZ, Nintendo News, SPIN, Cosmopolitan, Billboard, Entertainment Weekly, CNET, and more. His voice and rousing theme's popularity have generated billions of hits on youtube and his current video presence and social media venues reach millions. Jason toured for a year as the lead singer for the legendary band Blood Sweat & Tears. He shared the stage with Michael Jackson as the rap soloist for the hit song “Black or White” in Michael Jackson's 30th Anniversary concert at Madison Square Garden aired on CBS. He can be heard on Foreigner's “Can't Slow Down”, Meatloaf's “Bat Outta Hell 3”, The Scorpions' “Hour 1”, Frankie Valli's “Romancing the 60's” and “The Art of McCartney” tribute CD behind Billy Joel, Roger Daltrey, Kiss, and Smokey Robinson among others. His voice is featured in “Rick And Morty”, “Phineas & Ferb”, “Sponge Out of Water”, “The Jersey Boys”, “Annie” with Kermit and Miss Piggy in the last “Muppet Movie” and a salad of singing food characters in “Sausage Party”. He has sung and beat-boxed with Aerosmith on tour and on the Howard Stern re-mix of the hit single “Pink” and has performed with Enrique Iglesias on tour, television, and can be heard on his CD “7”. To learn more visit: https://jasonpaige.com/ This episode was brought to you by VitaPlur. VitaPLUR E-Boost Gum is a first of its kind rave supplement that provides magnesium, electrolytes and antioxidants sublingually while you chew! With no pills to take or annoying powders to mix VitaPLUR E-Boost gum is the perfect complement to your active lifestyle. Use code: "LIZZYJANE" (all caps) at check out for 10% off any item at https://www.vitaplur.io/ For ad - free podcasts, exclusive content, one on one lessons, + more visit: https://www.patreon.com/thisislizzyjane

Ten Eight Podcast
Jersey Boys Podcast - This Is Halloween

Ten Eight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 52:54


On today's episode Ten and Frank talk about their favorite halloween costumes and traditions and we also talk to our good friend, Officer Nobody. Check it out! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teneightpodcast/support

Rugby Union Weekly
Jersey Boys

Rugby Union Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 41:14


Chris takes the pod to Jersey and goes inside the England camp ahead of their opening match of the autumn. Pod favourite Marcus Smith tells us what the team have been up to on the island and why he's feeling so at home in an England shirt. We also catch up with Jack Willis who explains how it felt to be made redundant by Wasps and what is next for the England flanker. Chris also heads to the open training session at the Jersey Reds and speaks to Mako Vunipola.

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants trade Kadarius Toney to Chiefs, NFC East Recap | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 53:33


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants trade Kadarius Toney to Chiefs, NFC East Recap | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 53:33 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 53:33 | Recorded on October 28, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Allen West joins the Jersey Boys and discuss the latest trade of the New York Football Giants. Contributors Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1 Allen West – @AllenFWest Victor Arocho – @varocho

In The Frame: Theatre Interviews from West End Frame
S7 Ep22: Luke Suri, Frankie Valli in Jersey Boys

In The Frame: Theatre Interviews from West End Frame

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 53:58


Luke Suri is currently making his West End debut as Frankie Valli in Jersey Boys at the Trafalgar Theatre.Luke was previously alternate Frankie in the musical's UK tour, marking his theatre debut. Luke developed his craft working his way up through holiday parks, hotels, cruise ships and short residences. He found his agent during the pandemic, with some help from social media. In this episode, Luke discusses his incredible journey in the industry so far, and the challenge of playing one of the most demanding roles in musical theatre. Jersey Boys is booking at the Trafalgar Theatre until 23rd April 2023. Visit www.jerseyboysmusical.co.uk for information and tickets. Follow Luke on Instagram: @lukesuriHosted by Andrew Tomlins. @AndrewTomlins32  Thanks for listening! Email: andrew@westendframe.co.uk Visit westendframe.co.uk for more info about our podcasts.  

BroadwayRadio
Special Episode: Marcia Milgrim Dodge on Staging Her ‘Jersey Boys’

BroadwayRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 29:45


While the Maltz Jupiter Theatre technically opened its doors for two weeks in April 2022 after a two-year renovation, the largest LORT B+ regional theatre in the southeastern United States is thrilled to produce a full season starting this October. The highly anticipated production lineup will begin with a three-week read more The post Special Episode: Marcia Milgrim Dodge on Staging Her ‘Jersey Boys’ appeared first on BroadwayRadio.

The Sports Cast
Ravens-Giants 2022 Recap | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho & Byron Jones

The Sports Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 56:56


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Ravens-Giants 2022 Recap | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho & Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 56:56 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration:...

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Ravens-Giants 2022 Recap | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho & Byron Jones

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 56:56


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Ravens-Giants 2022 Recap | Jersey Boys Sports Talk with Victor Arocho & Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 56:56 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 56:56 | Recorded on October 21, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Vic and Byron discuss the New York Giants surprising win over the Baltimore Ravens. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1

The Catheteria
The Fabulous Mr. Fox

The Catheteria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 55:00


Bobby Fox has been described as annoyingly talented. He's a very proud Irishman who moved to Australia in the early 00's and has since carved an incredible career for himself here in Australia. He's been on your TV screen, you've seen him on stage, but you would probably remember him best for originating the role as Frankie Valli in Jersey Boys the musical. Please enjoy this interview with Green Room and Helpmann Award nominee the fantastic Mr Bobby Fox. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ten Eight Podcast
The Jersey Boys - The Reboot Pilot

Ten Eight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 64:58


"Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in" Last year, we went ahead and cancelled The Jersey Boys Podcast. Things got a little too hot for some of our participants and we decided to lay low. We resurrected once for Drunk Cops Summer Jam and had so much fun of a time that Frank and Ten decided to do it again but this time on a regular scheduled event. So that brings us to today's release. On today's episode, Frank and Ten talk about booze, Frank standing up Ten, summers in Jersey, who or what is the Shore Whore, horror movies, ghost stories... and many more. If you enjoy this, check out @jerseyboyspodcast on Instagram. More to come on 10/31! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teneightpodcast/support

Dave Fanning
Jersey Boys writer Rick Elice

Dave Fanning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 21:42


Rick Elice, writer of Jersey Boys, the absolute smash hit musical Jersey Boys joins Dave as the show returns to the Bord Gais Energy Theatre on the 2nd of November. It's a real jukebox musical, and it looks at the formation, the huge success, and the eventual breakup of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons.

The Sports Cast
Giants are the real deal 4-1; Ravens next test | Jersey Boys Sports Talk w/Victor Arocho & Byron Jones

The Sports Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 53:42


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants are the real deal 4-1; Ravens next test | Jersey Boys Sports Talk w/Victor Arocho & Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 53:42 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play...

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants are the real deal 4-1; Ravens next test | Jersey Boys Sports Talk w/Victor Arocho & Byron Jones

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 53:42


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants are the real deal 4-1; Ravens next test | Jersey Boys Sports Talk w/Victor Arocho & Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 53:42 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 53:42 | Recorded on October 14, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Vic and Byron discuss the biggest win yet for the New York Giants over the Green Bay Packers. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1

Stages Podcast
Sebastian Arcelus & Stephanie J. Block ~Be Where Your Feet Are

Stages Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 51:56 Very Popular


This week we are joined by Sebastian Arcelus and our own Stephanie J. Block. Sebastian Arcelus is known for his roles as Lucas Goodwin in the Netflix series HOUSE OF CARDS and Jay Whitman in the CBS series MADAM SECRETARY.  His Broadway credits include ELF, JERSEY BOYS, WICKED, & RENT.  He is now starring as The Baker in INTO THE WOODS. In this weeks episode, Broadway's The Baker and The Baker's Wife discuss bringing a 15-year marriage into their storytelling, getting notes to stop touching each other, the blessing of not sharing a dressing room, and finding the fairytale in new ways, every single performance.  Into The Woods It Takes Two Bag Balm

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants 3-1, can they beat the Packers? | Jersey Boys Sports Talk w/Victor Arocho & Byron Jones

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 55:40


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants 3-1, can they beat the Packers? | Jersey Boys Sports Talk w/Victor Arocho & Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 55:40 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 55:40 | Recorded on October 7, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Victor and Byron recap the New York Giants win over the Chicago Bears and preview the Green Bay Packers game in Week 5. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1

Before The Break
77. Austin Colby "It's Such A Ride"

Before The Break

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 64:22


This week on BEFORE THE BREAK, the boys sit down with actor, Austin Colby. He has had appeared in the US National Tour of Frozen: The Musical, The Off-Broadway revival of Jersey Boys, West Side Story, The Sound of Music, and South Pacific. We discuss growing up singing in church, auditioning in a tuxedo, why the arts were an escape early on, touring the country opposite his wife in Frozen, moving to NYC and getting humbled very quickly, the importance of staying ready, thanking a casting director for not having booked him, owning the audition room, the fear of bringing a famous film role to the stage, and wanting to pursue on-camera work. That and much more!Follow Before The Break - on Instagram at @beforethebreakpodon Twitter at @b4thebreakpodhttps://beforethebreak.buzzsprout.com/Follow Austin -on Instagram at @austin__colbyFollow Tommy -on Instagram at @imtommybythewayhttps://www.tommybeardmore.com/Follow Adam -on Instagram at @thatadamdecarlohttp://adamdecarlo.com/Don't forget to subscribe, leave a review, and give us a rating!

It's A Musical! Podcast
It's A Musical! Podcast Ep. 125 - Jersey Boys

It's A Musical! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 89:41


Can't take my eyes off of you… We're Jersey bound this week, as we head to the New Victoria Theatre in Woking for one of the most successful biopic musicals of all time - it's time for Jersey Boys! Oh What A Night! It's one of the longest running shows in Broadway history, as we learn all about the Four Seasons. Will Danny be Beggin' for more? Or is this one show he can't wait to say Bye Bye Baby too? I'll be your best friend if you download now! Music: Purple-Planet.com

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Eric Moe Bryan – Special Tribute | Jersey Boys Sports with Victor Arocho and Byron Jones

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 131:19


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Eric Moe Bryan - Special Tribute | Jersey Boys Sports with Victor Arocho and Byron Jones Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 02:11:19 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 02:11:19 | Recorded on September 30, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Victor and Byron pay tribute to the loss of Eric Moe Bryan, former teammate and football player. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1

Top Billin’ With Bill Bellamy
Ep. 13 featuring Shakur Stevenson

Top Billin’ With Bill Bellamy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 32:53


This episode is officially titled “The Jersey Boys'' since Bill and our next guest both hail from the one and only Newark, New Jersey aka “Brick City”! Join Bill and Olympic silver medalist, two-division world champion and current WBC Junior Lightweight champion Shakur Stevenson as he takes a break from his training camp to discuss what he thinks makes him different from other fighters in his class, what happens when you get caught in the ring and his top five rappers of all time. It's an in-depth look into the high-profile career of one of ESPN's “Top 25 Fighters Under 25”...don't miss it!! Executive Producers for Breakbeat: Dave Mays & Brett Jeffries Executive Producers: Bill Bellamy & Barry Katz Production: Tastemakers Media Recorded at DASH Radio, Hollywood, CA IG: @BreakbeatMedia @BillBellamy Comment, like and subscribe on the Breakbeat Media YouTube channel, subscribe on Apple, Spotify or wherever podcasts are available, and visit us at www.breakbeatmedia.com

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants are 2-0! | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 64:04


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants are 2-0! | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 01:04:04 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 01:04:04 | Recorded on September 22, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Santiago Leon subs in for Victor Arocho; Byron Jones and Andre Gispert joins the show. Topics WashingtonDallasPhiladelphiaGiantsKenny Golladay complaining about not playingWhy Daniel Jones needs a real #1 WRDallas Cowboys vs New York Giants MNFPicks Contributors Santiago Leon – @sleon Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1

The Rob Black Show
The acts of Desperation By The Jersey Boy

The Rob Black Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 75:16


Jersey Boys Sports Talk
2022 NFL Season Kickoffs! | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 59:46


Jersey Boys Sports Talk 2022 NFL Season Kickoffs! | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 59:46 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 59:46 | Recorded on September 9, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Byron Jones, Jon Ronnenberg and Allen West kickoff the 2022 NFL Season! Contributors Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1 Jon RonnenbergAllen West – @AllenFWest

The Sports Cast
2022 NFL Season Kickoffs! | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

The Sports Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 59:46


Jersey Boys Sports Talk 2022 NFL Season Kickoffs! | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 59:46 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 59:46 | Recorded on September...

This Day In The Mob
Jersey Boy: Angelo "Gyp" DeCarlo

This Day In The Mob

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 29:10


On THIS DAY IN THE MOB, September 2nd 1902, Genovese family caporegime Angelo Gyp DeCarlo was born. Gyp was a powerful mafiosi who helped the career of Frank Sinatra and Frankie Vallie and The Four Seasons. Yes he was depicted by Christopher Walken in the movie Jersey Boys.  But DeCarlos power and stature in the mafia went well beyond that. Listen to the life story of Angelo Gyp Decarlo NOW!

The Sports Cast
Giants Cuts Roster to 53, Russell Wilson with five-year deal | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

The Sports Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 69:40


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants Cuts Roster to 53, Russell Wilson with five-year deal | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 01:09:40 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window |...

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Giants Cuts Roster to 53, Russell Wilson with five-year deal | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 69:40


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Giants Cuts Roster to 53, Russell Wilson with five-year deal | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 01:09:40 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 01:09:40 | Recorded on September 1, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher 1, GIANTS ROSTER UPDATES EAGLES COMMANDERS RB SHOT DURING HOLDUP COWBOYS HURTING ON OLINE ( JASON PETERS 40 YEARS OLD) RUSSELL WILSON NEW DEAL/ LAMAR JACKSON STILL WITHOUT A DEAL Giants roster cuts Russell Wilson deal Jimmy G stays with 49ers Texans sign OJ Howard Contributors Santiago Leon – @sleon Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1 Allen West – @AllenFWest Giants roster cutsFull list of roster cutsAugust 30WR Keelan DossWR Robert FosterWR Bailey GaitherWR Austin ProehlWR Travis ToivonenTE Jeremiah HallOG Josh RivasOG Alex BachmanOL Eric SmithC Chris OwensDT Christopher HintonLB Quincy RocheDB Andrew AdamsDB Yusuf CorkerDB Olaijah GriffinDB Gavin HeslopDB Michael JacquetDB Jarrod WilsonK Ryan SantosoQB Davis WebbWR Alex BachmanS Nate MeadorsWR C.J. BoardOG Jamil DouglasOT Will HoldenDE Jalyn HolmesRB Jashaun CorbinWR Jaylon MooreTE Austin AllenOL Garrett McGhinOL Roy MbaetekaDL David MoaDL Ryan AndersonLB Quincy RocheCB Khalil DorseyCB Darren EvansCB Zyon GilbertCB Harrison HandS Trenton Thompson Notable free agents as teams start focusing on Week 1:WR Odell Beckham JrLT Eric FisherDT Ndamukong SuhWR Will FullerWR Cole BeasleyCB Joe HadenDE Jason Pierre-PaulWR Emmanuel SandersWR TY HiltonCB Chris Harris JrS Landon CollinsDT Sheldon RichardsonWR Antonio Brown Russell Wilson, Broncos agree to five-year, $245M extensionThe Denver Broncos and nine-time Pro Bowl quarterback Russell Wilson have agreed upon a lucrative contract extension. The five-year extension is worth $245 million, and includes $165 million in guarantees, per Ian Rapoport. As Jones notes, “the Walton-Penner group took over on Aug. 9 and got this deal done within the first 4 weeks of ownership.”

Grief and Rebirth: Finding the Joy in Life Podcast
Noah Hammond Tyrell: A “Jersey boy” turned spiritual mystic who has coached high level entrepreneurs, helped his dad heal from a “death sentence” diagnosis...

Grief and Rebirth: Finding the Joy in Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 63:39


Noah Hammond Tyrell's passion is talking about Spirit, Human Potential, and creating lasting change in ourselves and on this planet. Educated as an engineer, he discovered spirituality through the study of Quantum Physics. A bad breakup in college sent him searching for answers and he became inspired to unlock the secrets of human potential and live a deeply fulfilling life. Noah is now a personal development and self-healing teacher and philosopher who has coached high level entrepreneurs, helped his dad heal from a “death sentence” diagnosis, and helped people to heal old emotional hurts to unlock their higher self and potential. In addition, he is the co-founder and CEO of Feel-Good Hemp, the only hemp products company that offers a free self-empowerment program and community to its clients. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/griefandrebirth/support

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Thibodeaux with MCL Sprain; Giants with the injury bug | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 56:35


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Thibodeaux with MCL Sprain; Giants with the injury bug | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 56:35 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 56:35 | Recorded on August 25, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Vic and Byron discuss the injury bug that the New York Giants are having this preseason. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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Jersey Boys Sports Talk
Deshaun Watson settlement, Giants QB Daniel Jones Neck Surgery | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 80:13


Jersey Boys Sports Talk Deshaun Watson settlement, Giants QB Daniel Jones Neck Surgery | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 01:20:13 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 01:20:13 | Recorded on August 18, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Victor and Byron discuss Giants depth chart and injuries. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1 Santiago Leon – @sleon

Ten Eight Podcast
2x45 - Drunk Cops Summer Jam Jersey Boys Pt 2

Ten Eight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 123:54


We go back to the Garden State and now things are getting hectic. We keep drinking and we keep talking. Put your babies to bed, it's gonna get spicy! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teneightpodcast/support

Don't Kill the Messenger with movie research expert Kevin Goetz
Film Producer Graham King on Movie Making & Research

Don't Kill the Messenger with movie research expert Kevin Goetz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 36:21 Transcription Available


Kevin is joined by Academy Award winning movie producer Graham King to discuss film producing, his experiences with audience test screenings,  making and testing Bohemian Rhapsody, and more. 

Jersey Boys Sports Talk
NFL Preseason Begins: Giants at Patriots | Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Jersey Boys Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 65:43


Jersey Boys Sports Talk NFL Preseason Begins: Giants at Patriots | Jersey Boys Sports Talk Play Episode Pause Episode Mute/Unmute Episode Rewind 10 Seconds 1x Fast Forward 30 seconds 00:00 / 01:05:43 Subscribe Share Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher RSS Feed Share Link Embed Download file | Play in new window | Duration: 01:05:43 | Recorded on August 11, 2022 Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher In this episode, Victor and Byron talk about the beginning of the NFL Preseason! Santiago Leon and Jon Ronnenberg joins the show. Contributors Victor Arocho – @varocho Byron Jones – @ByronCJones1 Santiago Leon – @sleon Jon Ronnenberg

Ten Eight Podcast
2x44 - Drunk Cops Summer Jam: The Jersey Boys (Pt 1)

Ten Eight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 131:59


Welcome back to the garden state everyone! Welcome to a crossover episode! It's Drunk Cops! It's the Jersey Boys!!! It's Summer Jam!! Sit back and laugh and the ridiculous and raunchy humor of Ten Eight, Frank Castle and Red Gun Squad!!! Also joining us on this crazy part one... Bindi, Officer (Deputy) Nobody and Pork Roll (Secret Agent Meme). Check your decency at the door and get ready to rage Jersey Style! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teneightpodcast/support

Bacon is My Podcast
Hanging with America Part Two!

Bacon is My Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 82:29


Jimmy and Mike hang out with some Jersey Boys making a lot of noise (didn't mean for that, it won't happen again), America Part Two!  We talk all about how the Jersey hardcore-metal scene factors into their eclectic style of music, songwriting, their favorite eats on tour and so much more!!   Check out America Part Two on all streaming platforms and their social medias @americaparttwo Get some more helpings of BIMP at http://www.patreon.com/baconismypodcast   Find everything else BIMP: Twitter: @BaconisMyPod Instagram: @BaconisMyPod Facebook: www.facebook.com/baconismypod And of course our website: www.baconismypodcast.com   Want some visual Bacon is My Podcast? Check out this episode and all others on Strangerhood TV on YouTube. www.strangerhoodtv.com and make sure to check out all the other great content on the channel! Get additional BIMP content at www.patreon.com/baconismypodcast We're proudly sponsored by Manscaped and when you use the promo code BACONPOD at manscaped.com you'll get 20% your entire order! Don't forget to use the promo code BACON at our sponsors DrinkWildBills.com, PodDecks.com and GrillYourAssOff.com for 10% off your order!   #podcast #baconismypassion #strangerhoodtv #youtubechannel #youtubepodcast #cravingstrange #somethingheavy #betterthanradio #baconismypodcast #poweredbypoddecks

Entertainment(x)
Mike Isaacson Part 2 The Muny, Moving Forward and Honesty

Entertainment(x)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 14:26


Mike Isaacson, Currently in his ninth season and only the third person to hold this position in The Muny's 103-year history. To date, he has produced 56 Muny shows, 23 of which had never been on the Muny stage before. He has collaborated at The Muny with many Tony award winners and breakthrough talents, including Christian Borle, Colin Donnell, Marcia Milgrom Dodge, Gary Griffin, Heather Headley, Jennifer Holliday, Denis Jones, Laura Michelle Kelly, Dan Knecht- ges, Beth Leavel, Norm Lewis, Beth Malone, Kathleen Marshall, Patti Murin, Josh Rhodes, Emily Skinner and Ken Page. The Riverfront Times wrote, “Under the leadership of executive producer Mike Isaacson, the quality of Muny productions rose like the proverbial phoenix.” The St. Louis Post-Dispatch named him “Theatre Artist of the Year,” noting that by “staging one impressive production after another, he made The Muny simultaneously hip and – be- lieve it – important to our community.” During Isaacson's tenure, The Muny has produced new developmental productions of Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn, Lerner and Loewe's Paint Your Wagon and The Unsinkable Molly Brown. During its record-breaking 100th season, The Muny became the first theatre in the world to produce the legendary Jerome Robbins' Broadway, doing unprecedented archival work on both the artistic and business side. During that same season, The Muny produced the U.S. regional premiere of Jersey Boys. Isaacson has changed the look and feel of a Muny production, overseeing a transformation in every aspect of pro- duction that culminated in 2019 with the arrival of the theatre's extraordinary James S. Mc- Donnell stage, a state-of-the art stage house that includes revolutionary LED technology, automated sets and a host of other innovations. During the summer of 2020, when The Muny was closed due to COVID-19, Mike produced and created The Muny 2020 Variety Hour Live!, an online show that reached more than a worldwide audience of over 400,000.   With Kristin Caskey, Isaacson has produced more than 23 Broadway musicals and plays, national tours, off-Broadway and London productions. All told, his productions have received more than 122 Tony nominations and 34 Tony Awards. Last year, he produced the highly ac- claimed David Byrne's American Utopia, which made every major “Top 10” list, and became a highly acclaimed film by Spike Lee on HBO, for which he also served as an executive produc- er. Just as the COVID-19 shutdown of Broadway began, he was awaiting the first preview of Neil Simon's Plaza Suite, starring Mathew Broderick and Sarah Jessica Parker.   Also, during the shutdown, Isaacson served as a supporting producer of the acclaimed re- vival of The Unsinkable Molly Brown at New York's Transport Group. Other career highlights include: Fun Home (2015 Tony Award, Best Musical; 2018 Olivier nominee for Best Musical), Legally Blonde the Musical (2011 Olivier Award, Best Musical), Thoroughly Modern Millie (2002 Tony Award, Best Musical), Red (2010 Tony Award, Best Play), The Humans (2016 Tony Award, Best Play), If/Then, starring Idina Menzel, Lanford Wilson's Burn This, starring Adam Driver and Kerri Russell (2019 Tony nomination for Best Revival of a Play), Bring It On: The Musical (2013 Tony nomination for Best Musical), A Doll's House 2 (2017 Tony nomination for Best Play), You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown (1999 Tony nomination for Best Revival of a Musical), The Seagull, starring Kristin Scott Thomas, Carey Mulligan and Peter Sarsgaard, Caroline, or Change (Tony nomination for Best Musical); One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (2001 Tony Award, Best Revival of a Play) and Death of a Salesman (1999 Tony Award, Best Revival of a Play). For the Independent Presenters Network, Isaacson served as producer for Spamalot (2005 Tony Award, Best Musical), Ragtime (revival) and The Color Purple (2006 Tony nomination for Best Musical).   He has received the St. Louis Arts and Education Council's Award for Excellence in the Arts and has been awarded The Broadway League's and Theatre Development Fund's Commercial Theater Institute “Robert Whitehead” Award for excellence in producing. He has served on the board of governors and executive committee of The Broadway League and received the Samuel J. L'Hommedieu Award. He has also received the Equality Award from the St. Louis Chapter of Human Rights Campaign.

You Can't Say That!
Ep142 - Richard Hester (Part 1)

You Can't Say That!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 32:38


Stage Management, Celebrity, Pandemic, Blog, Author of HOLD PLEASE. Richard Hester's career as a stage manager and production supervisor spans forty years. His credits include everything from the off-Broadway premiere of Harold Pinter's MOUNTAIN LANGUAGE to the hit Broadway musical JERSEY BOYS. For the latter, after serving as its original Production Stage Manager in La Jolla, CA and in New York, he spent sixteen years staging and maintaining productions of it both in the US as well as all over the world. After more than two decades, he continues to tour with Patti LuPone as well as with Mandy Patinkin for their concerts, both nationally and internationally. Twenty-thr