Podcasts about ROI

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Best podcasts about ROI

Show all podcasts related to roi

Latest podcast episodes about ROI

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1771: Protect Yourself From Inflation, Largest Wealth Transfer We've Ever Seen, Are We in a Housing Bubble? Hartman Comparison Index™

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:19


Today Jason talks about the debt-based asset class, how we should never have the FOMO- fear of missing out when investing in real estate, how to ride the economic storms! He also shares his speech at an Investment Fund Conference in Utah about inflation, government intrusion and censorship, and why you should use his inflation induced debt destruction strategy to protect yourself from the hidden tax of inflation and the largest wealth transfer we've ever seen! Key Takeaways: [1:43] Stock vs. Bond market and how it affects real estate [2:34] Competitive Markets and a deep dive on the Hartman Comparison Index [4:40] Debt-based asset class and economy [6:00] Money is LENT into existence [8:36] FOMO and riding the economic storms [10:35] Timing the money [11:57] Tax planning and the two economies Investment Fund Conference Utah Part 1 [12:50] Welcome Jason Hartman [13:25] Are we in a bubble? Winning with inflation [16:30] A background on Jason Hartman [17:45] The dollar has lost 96% of its value since its inception [19:50] Shorting the dollar- a very powerful strategy [22:00] Long term macroeconomic view [23:03] The two major value drivers: scarcity and utility [25:45] Tweedledee and Tweedledum [27:05] Reserve currency of the world [28:45] "Eat the rich!" [30:10] The best business plan of governments and central banks [31:35] Inflation- a thief with an army [33:45] My favorite four letter word [35:15] Mortgage payment obligation [36:05] Joe the plumber and wealth distribution   Mentions:  Debt: The First 5,000 Years Paperback by David Graeber The Collective Mastermind with Ken McElroy (and George Gammon)   The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization          

Inbound Success Podcast
Ep. 222: Using humor to get better results from your marketing videos ft. Joseph Wilkins

Inbound Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 51:45


While there's no formula for making a video go viral, there IS a tried and true process for creating a funny video that will get significantly stronger business results than your typical corporate video. Joseph Wilkins has been helping businesses make marketing and sales videos for years, but it wasn't until he started using his 8 step process for creating humorous videos that he saw consistently strong ROI for his clients. Today, he uses that process as the foundation for his work at funnysalesvideos.com. On this week's episode of The Inbound Sales Podcast, Joseph breaks down the details behind each of the 8 steps in his video creation process and shares details on everything from hiring writers and actors, to using your ads budget to test different iterations and discover the right combination of opening hook, video content, format and channel.

Ready. Set. Go. Real Estate Investing Podcast
”Cyber Monday Special With Your Host Brandon Elliott” (EP199)

Ready. Set. Go. Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:54


Cyber Monday Special Text "Gold" OR "Elite" To: (609) 231-9018 NOTE: Sale Ends Wednesday Midnight 12/01/21 ---------------------------- About Your Host, Brandon Elliott @BrandonElliottInvestments  Top 100 Yahoo Finance in 2020, Brandon Elliott is a leading authority on real estate and credit. He is experienced and proven in utilizing credit to invest in real estate and implement the "BRRRR Strategy." Brandon has a thriving credit repair and tradelines company but prefers teaching people the credit hacks he's been applying for years such as building huge credit lines for both personal/business up to 7 figures and manufactured spending techniques- showing ways to create millions of points equivalent to cash, free travels, and even buying properties using credit cards. From the credit knowledge that is taught in his Elite Credit Course, Brandon was able liquidate $200K+ for a safety-net when purchasing a 4-PLEX in one of the most desirable locations in San Diego, just 8 minutes walking distance from the famous San Diego Zoo. His passion in helping others reach their financial freedom too, lead Brandon to host "Ready. Set. Go. Real Estate Investing" podcast every Monday sharing how you can invest in real estate successfully with little to no money utilizing credit. Brandon has completed numerous of Fix & Flips locally in San Diego as well as across the country out of state virtually with his worst project still being 60% cash-on-cash ROI. ----------------------------

Smarter Building Materials Marketing
TikTok Strategies for Building Materials Manufacturers

Smarter Building Materials Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 21:22


One of the most talked about social media platforms today is TikTok. It's where a ton of online trends start, and in this episode, we bring back Venveo's own Ashley Stevenson to help us understand which building materials brands should be on the platform and how they can be successful. In a recent episode of the show, we talked about the ROI of social media in building materials, and it quickly became the most commented-on podcast we've done to date. So this time, we're taking a deep dive into the wildly popular platform of TikTok.

Innovation in Compliance with Tom Fox
Gold in the Compliance Hills: Part 1, ROI on Compliance Purchase Decisions

Innovation in Compliance with Tom Fox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 17:34


Welcome to a special five-part podcast series on how to unlock the gold in your program, hosted by Tom Fox with guests Gio and Nick Gallo from ComplianceLine. One of the ongoing questions in compliance is to demonstrate the Return on Investment (ROI) in your compliance program, by demonstrating the extended value of compliance literally across your entire company. When overlaid with an ESG component, you can begin to see the gold in your compliance hills. In addition to showing how you can unlock the gold in your own compliance hills, Gio and Nick walk you through how demonstrate ROI for your internal budgeting process which can provide to you the financial resource to strengthen and improve your compliance program.  Join us for the full 5 episodes and learn to see your compliance program in an entirely new light. In this Part 1, we consider how compliance can be seen as a corporate ROI multiplier by looking at the impact of compliance across your entire organization.  Some of the highlights of this episode include:  ·      The financial principles in unlocking the ROI of compliance.  ·      Why the alignment of compliance with other disciplines in your organization is not only critical but a key to unlocking compliance gold.  ·      Compliance budgeting is not simply about a cost center mentality. It requires a different type of discussion.  ·      Frameworks for improving your thinking about compliance.  ·      Building a complex and transparent case to OPEN the discussion about your assumptions rather than only including unobjectionable assumptions Resources Gio Gallo on LinkedIn Nick Gallo on LinkedIn ComplianceLine

Partnered 2020, The Partner Programs Podcast
Part 2 with Site-seeker and Lead forensics; What's needed to make a new partnership successful.

Partnered 2020, The Partner Programs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 25:53


In this episode of "Make Them Famous" - The Partner Enablement podcast, we catch up with our friends at Site-Seeker agency and their new technology partner Lead Forensics to find out what has transpired in the first 6 months of Site-Seeker's deployment of their new white label service relationship with Lead Forensics. Guests: Michael Graham, Lead Forensics Thomas Armitage, Site-Seeker Find all episodes on your favorite channel: https://www.makethemfamous.fm/ Here's the show: [00:00:24] Intros [00:04:24] What services Lead Forensics enables for Site-Seeker [00:07:28] The progression of the sales system [00:11:01] Strategy to be repeating [00:12:18] Definition of partner enablement [00:14:40] What makes Lead Forensics attractive for agencies [00:17:05] Operationalizing partnerships [00:19:56] ROI [00:21:57] Advice for agencies considering this type of partnership [00:23:49] What we learned Resources: Sendoso - The leading sending platform. Partnerstack - Partner tracking and payouts. Reveal - A free account mapping solution.

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
What to Measure to Create a Successful Lead Generation Strategy

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 20:34


What metrics should you track to create a successful lead generation strategy? Kara Brown had been working on a string of supply chain corporate jobs where she oversaw IPOs and eventually decided to create her own business and focus on lead generation. She believes filling the top of the funnel now will be the first to capture market share in the recovery. With LeadCoverage, she focuses on B2B revenue operations and acquisition strategies for scaling companies. In her conversation with Jason, they spoke about what she has seen working for lead generation, what every company should be measuring to keep a profitable business, and how you can save time on prospects that won't become customers. 3 Golden Nuggets Measure what's happening in your funnel. Many agencies don't have a really good lead generation source and are leaning on word of mouth to get new clients. You really have to find that source to keep growing. Where do most businesses fail? Kara says most companies she works with fail at truly measuring what's happening inside their funnel. At the top of her lead generation strategies are “share good news, track who's interested, and then follow up.” Another successful strategy is getting as niche as possible. “When your niche is small, you can be hyper-targeted in your approach,” she says. This will save you a lot of time with clients that don't meet your criteria. Measuring volume, velocity, and value. Kara is not running a creative agency, but she is all about making her business as profitable and valuable as possible. When it comes to how valuable her consultancy or her agency is, she thinks in terms of measuring volume, value, and velocity. Velocity is how fast are they getting in your funnel? Volume is how many deals can you handle any one time and how many deals are going to fill your pipelines? This is all about close ratios and trying not to spend too much time on deals that won't close. And value is all about what is this potential customer truly going to be worth to you? For this, try to be really honest and don't overvalue customers. Lead with pricing to save time. When you are speaking with potential customers, do you lead with the budget? Doing so could really help your closing ratio and save you a lot of time on deals that aren't going to close. Kara prefers to be really straightforward with her approach and start the conversation by stating what her company does for customers and say “this is our minimum monthly rate” to find out whether it is on that potential customer's budget or not. If they're not, then she offers to use the rest of the call to give free advice. She assures this is helpful and saves her a lot of time. Sponsors and Resources Sharpspring: Today's episode is sponsored by Sharpspring, an all-in-one revenue growth platform that provides all of the marketing automation, CRM, & sales features you need to support your entire customer lifecycle. Partner with an affordable marketing automation provider that you can trust. Head over to sharpspring.com/smartagency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Measure Your Way to a Successful Lead Strategy and Stop Wasting Time on the Wrong Prospects {These transcripts have been auto-generated. While largely accurate, they may contain some errors.} Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here, and have another amazing digital agency podcast guest for you. We're going to talk about lead generation for your digital agency. It's going to be a fun show, so let's go ahead and get into it. Hey, Kara. Welcome to the show. Kara: [00:00:22] Hey! Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:23] Yeah, I'm excited to have you on. So tell us who you are and what do you do? Kara: [00:00:27] Yeah, I'm Kara Brown. I'm the CEO and founder of LeadCoverage and we do B2B lead gen for supply chain, heavy industrial, and tech. Jason: [00:00:35] Awesome. And so how'd you get started in creating an agency? Kara: [00:00:40] Yeah, that's a funny story. So I was the 12th employee at a company called Echo Global Logistics. Very sexy, all the trucks. Uh, actually a super sexy, the guy that started Echo Global Logistics also started Groupon. So I got to send the first Groupon email. It's a true story. It came from my inbox. Got to watch them grow like crazy and then ended up being on the team that took the company I was working for went public. So I did an IPO at about 25. Uh, I was asked to move to Nashville to do another IPO for a private equity company, for another supply chain management company. Sort of a stream of, of supply chain, corporate jobs. And then ended up back in Chicago, popped out two kids, moved to Atlanta, moved here for a sort of a garbage brokerage jobs. So it was sort of similar to supply chain but in a different space. Instead of going public, that company raised $95 million in equity. When I exited that, the question was like, what to do next? And someone told me the statistic that less than 2% of female founders will ever break a million dollars in revenue. And I said, well, that doesn't sound that hard. So I did it with an all female team. It took us about 10 months and now we're on the path to ten million. Jason: [00:01:54] Awesome. So is Groupon still around? I haven't heard anything from them. Kara: [00:01:58] Yes. They're still around. They're a publicly-traded company. Please buy some Groupon things. Jason: [00:02:05] So you must have some stock. Kara: [00:02:08] Yeah, I think… They still exists. They're still out of 600 West Chicago and sort of a Chicago tech darling from the early two thousands. Jason: [00:02:15] Very cool. Uh, funny story, my wife got me a Groupon in a helicopter, like 10 years ago for my birthday. And I'm like, I'm not doing it. I'm scared to death of helicopters. That's right. Let's talk about lead generation. You know, I find a lot of digital agencies, they take on the wrong clients and they take on the wrong clients because they haven't been building their pipeline. They haven't been building their pipeline because they don't have a really good lead generation source in order to really kind of tap on because they're based on word of mouth. So what have you seen working for lead-generation? Kara: [00:02:55] Sure. So we have nine lead gen strategies, but I'll start sort of at the top. So at the top is share good news, track who's interested, follow up. Most companies that we interact with, either customers or people that would just help out as friends. Are doing one or two of those and almost none of them, almost none of them, of the companies we talked to are tracking any of it, right? Like really, truly measuring what's happening inside their funnel. And so one of the things that we've found successful for Lead Coverage is getting as niche as possible. So our niche is supply chain management companies over a hundred million in revenue or venture-backed. And basically, if you don't hit one or two of those criteria, we may take you on as a client, but we may not. We may say no, thank you. And that's been very successful for us. So in terms of lead gen, when your niche is small, you can be hyper-targeted in your approach. If you're wide and not very deep, it's really easy to end up talking to a lot of folks that aren't super valuable. The other thing that we like to measure, which we can definitely talk about later, we do a lot of measurement in our company, is we measure volume, velocity and value. And I think most important for agencies is value, right? So a very smart man part of the Groupon kickoff team in the very beginning of the early days said to me, hey, Kara, it is… it costs to you, just as much money to run a $250,000 account as it does a $2,500 account. So get upstream and get as big as you can. Get your, get your retainers as big as you can, as fast as you can. Because that's where the real money-making happens. Jason: [00:04:48] You mean you don't want to race to the bottom? I see a lot of people when they initially talk with us, we really kind of determined that pricing is one of their big issues. And they're like, well, my competitor is actually cheaper. We're actually more. I'm like, what does that matter? Do you want to win that race? I was like, I don't. Kara: [00:05:10] We just decided to raise our minimums. I went to a trade show last week for our very specific niche industry, right? So every single person at that show could be a customer for us, which I think is super important. We went to the show and the number that I told everyone, nobody said it was too expensive. And I came back to the office after two days in the trade show floor. And I said, we need to increase our minimum because no one told me it was too much. And when no one's telling you, you're too expensive, you're not charging enough. Jason: [00:05:40] Yeah. Yeah, totally. Yep. Totally agree. Get in a little bit more about kind of the velocity and the volume and the, the value. Let's talk a little bit more about that. Kara: [00:05:49] Yeah. We love measurement. So we are not a creative agency. We don't have a creative director. We don't do creative. We don't do color theory. We're probably very different than most of the folks that listen to your podcast. But I still listen to the two Bobs and I'm all about agency work. And I'm like all about sort of consulting and how do I make this business as profitable and valuable as possible? So when I think about how valuable my consultancy or my agency is, I think about volume, value, and velocity. So how fast are my customers finding me? And then how fast can I get them to close the deal? Velocity story is a funny one. I have a client that we have been or potential client we've been talking to for over two years. And I think I may tell him it is time to stop talking to each other. Like it's nice. But, um, I've sort of sent him enough info. I've done enough. We've had enough phone calls. I've talked to enough of his people. It's been two years. If you're not going to buy, you're not going to buy, right? So that's velocity. But we also had a few weeks ago, our first one call-close. So we were introduced to someone, they came through a LinkedIn post that I wrote, which I should definitely mention how we do LinkedIn because it's really interesting. And one call the guy was like, great. Let's do it. And our minimums, Jason, are $15,000 a month. And the guy was like, I don't want your minimum. I want to be a big fish in your pond. We were like, all right, let's do it. So those are really exciting. So velocity is how fast are they getting in your funnel? Volume is how many deals can you handle any one time and how many deals are going to fill your, fill your actual pipelines? This is all about close ratios, right? So you can have a whole bunch of conversations, but if they're only closing 5 to 10% of them, you're spending a lot of time on deals that aren't going to close. So I have a thing that I do… fair it may not be nice, but it helps me save a lot of time. I will look at who I'm talking to before I get on the phone. And if they're not in our box, I will open the call with something to this effect: It's so nice to meet you, Jason. I want to talk a little bit about what we do and who we do it for. I'm going to tell you how much. If we're not in your budget, we'll use the next 25 minutes. I'm going to give you 25 minutes of free advice. My minimum is $20,000 a month and my core market is supply chain technology and heavy industrial. Does that feel like something that you can afford? And if they're like, oh my budget's like $2,000 a month or something crazy, then I'll say, hey, no problem. Let's use the next 25 minutes and I'll give you all the free advice I can. That's really helpful. They also don't call me again. So I don't have to like go down the rigor mortise of like giving them a proposal for $20K a month. And they're like, uh, we're not on the same page. So that stops that and then value, right? What is this potential customer going to be worth to me? Like really, truly going to be worth to me. And I don't do the work you do. So I don't work with agency owners. But I would imagine that there are a lot of folks out there who overvalue potential customers, right? I think this product is going to come in at 80 grand and it comes in at 20. I think that this customer is going to stick around for two years and they stay for three months, right? So being really, truly honest with yourself on values really important. And the best way to check out value is just to have someone, probably not you, if you're the CEO. Go back and look at your, at your previous customers, right? Like take a deep dive and really be honest with yourself on how much is each customer actually truly worth to you? Jason: [00:09:21] Is your agency struggling to deliver real revenue growth results to your clients? You know, agency marketers can consolidate data and align marketing and sales teams goals to achieve real results for your agency and clients using revenue growth platforms. Sharpspring is an all-in-one platform built for agencies like yours to optimize digital marketing strategies with simple, powerful automation. Manage your entire funnel all in Sharpspring. Now for a limited time, my smart agency listeners will receive your first month free and half off onboarding with Sharpspring. Just visit sharpspring.com/smartagency to schedule your demo and grab this offer. That's sharpspring.com/smartagency. Yeah, I love it. And I love that you get right to the budget in the very beginning. There's so many people, you know, when I'm speaking to a crowd, one of the two questions I'll ask is all right, how many people get the budget every single time or almost every time? And then, you know, how many people ask for it? And by the it's about 50% of the room than ask. And then 50% of that, it's only a quarter of the percent of agencies are actually getting the budget. And that's before they put all that work in it. I would always go to them and say, I just need a range of what you're trying to stick around. Because here's the deal, especially on pricing, and I learned this the hard way when I talked to a small company, I never heard of called Berkshire Hathaway. And I pitched them like a $20,000 website. They were expecting 30,000. So like if I started out, like I would always try to lead with what's their expectation and then match them there. But I would also even have a floor. Uh, so pricing is very important. Kara: [00:11:12] So I actually disagree. I lead with our pricing. Because if they're willing to pay you $30,000 for a website, there's probably $120,000 somewhere in their budget, right? And I think as a woman, this isn't necessarily agency owner, but as a woman, knowing other women in business, we tend to undervalue ourselves. And what I've found is, as my retainers have gone from 5 to 7 to 12 to 15 to $20,000 minimums, no one's saying no, right? Like very few people say to me, I can't afford you, right? Unless they're like just out of the box, but if they're in the box and they understand the value and I've done a good job of delivering what we do and showing them what we do and how we do it and what the value is we bring. As long as I lead with my minimum… Actually, it's not even the minimum. I learned something at an EO event, the entrepreneur organization that the human brain anchors on the first number that you tell someone. So when someone says to me, Kara, how do we work with you? I say, well, our average retainer comes in between 30 and $40,000 a month, but our minimum is 20. So instead of them saying, oh, I can get this person for five grand a month because I say something like our minimum is five grand. They're already like, oh, well she's like, she's really expensive. Like, can I afford her home? Like, oh, like maybe I should find another $30,000 a month somewhere to pay this person. So I think it's really important that you set your own standards and there's always money in corporations. I have worked for enormous corporations in my corporate career. There's always money. Always. Jason: [00:12:58] Yeah. Yeah. I call it the reverse engineer effect when you're going over the range, because so many people, when they go, I just need to know a range. A thousand, fove thousand? I would literally start at a billion and then a million and then a hundred thousand and 20,000. So they echo that first number going, holy cow, no one else said that. What makes you so unique? And you can really separate yourself. And switching focus a little bit. You hinted a little bit to the LinkedIn post. Tell us how you do that. Kara: [00:13:28] Yeah, so we can attribute $480,000 to two LinkedIn posts. And that's just in 2020, not in 2021. So super proud of this whole process. I post super regularly on LinkedIn. Sometimes I post about being a woman in business. Sometimes it's about marketing. Sometimes it's just like, I don't know thoughts of the week that I've decided that I want to share. I have a ghost writer. She's on my team. Should we speak for about an hour a week. Now, because we've been working together for a while, she can get almost four LinkedIn posts out of that one hour. I also write for Forbes and Entrepreneur and other magazines. So she does those for me at the same time. And she writes the post themselves. They're my words, but she physically crafts them. They go to my team, my team adds the emojis and make sure that they're, if people are tagged and then they go into a file for me to approve. I approve. And then they get scheduled. So we have posts that are going out. We're recording this in September. We've got posts going up through the end of November and I'll be gone the entire month of October. So I'll still be posting even though I'll be in Europe, which is really nice. And so we can see attribution of almost $500,000 to LinkedIn. And this is LinkedIn thought leadership. And it cost me probably 2000 bucks a month to do this. So it's my most ROI driven piece of, of lead gen that we do for myself. And it's been a terrific way for us to meet people. You can't always track every single lead back to LinkedIn, but it was a, it was a funny story. I was at this trade show I just mentioned in our niche industry. And I ran into some guy that I had known from a million years ago. And he said Kara, I read every LinkedIn post and I was like, awesome. And he said… Jason: [00:15:11] Stalker. Kara: [00:15:12] Stalker, right? Well, that's the whole point, like, please stalk me. And he said, may I please introduce you to my CMO? I think that I'd really like to make sure that you two meet each other and now they're going to be a client. So you never know who's reading it. They may not be liking, sharing and engaging, but put it be putting yourself out there is super important. Jason: [00:15:31] Yeah. I love it. And these are just regular posts. Do you have a call to action on there or is it just helpful? Kara: [00:15:36] Yeah. So we're trying to, the LinkedIn algorithm changes pretty regularly. We do this for clients as well. So we have a human being on our team who is regularly trying to sort of like bust the LinkedIn algorithm. Not in an ugly way, just in a, how do we use it to our advantage? So one of the stats she told me that I was really surprised is that less than 2% of people that are on LinkedIn are actively posting. So just by actively engaging in LinkedIn, they're already in the top 2% of folks that are sort of voyeurs only, right? And so, as long as you just put anything out there, you're going to be sort of doing better than other folks. If you get into like exactly what, you know, doing posts, doing polls calls to action links, links back to landing pages. Links to, to form fills and video. We can, it's a whole another podcast we can do just to talk about how to like optimize LinkedIn. In my professional opinion, that this is specifically for my market, which is supply chain, heavy, industrial and tech. I don't need to put video out there. I don't need to be super complicated about it because no one's buying from LinkedIn, right? LinkedIn just keeps me front and center for the folks in my world and in my universe. That when I see them at the trade show or when I send them an email or when they see something from me that's interesting and they have a need. They're like, oh man, there's this woman who posts all the time on LinkedIn. She's really interesting. I'm going to reach out, right? So it's just about staying in the conversation. Jason: [00:17:03] Yeah. It's about consistency. You know, you mentioned you were chatting with someone for two years. Holy cow, like if I was chatting with them, but when I look at my, our stats, most people don't buy from us for about a year and a half to two years. They're digesting that content, which isn't a sweat off my back and if they never buy it and they just get helpful content, I'm perfectly fine with that as well. But, but yeah, just to go through the proposal process for two years, that is a yeah. Shit or get off the pot dude. Kara: [00:17:34] And yeah, this particular human is such a nice guy and he's so kind, and I know he does want to work with us and he is very specifically strapped by, you know, investors and sort of what these investors want to do. I get it. And it doesn't bother me to like, have a relationship with this person. He is also well connected. He's a good human, but we are going to have to at some point, be like, hey, I can't do one more deliverable for you, right? Like I can't, I can't put together another email or send you another proposal. Like they're all the same. Like, it hasn't changed. Like the same proposal you got two years ago was going to be the same one I'm going to send you now because what we do, hasn't really changed. Jason: [00:18:13] Awesome. Well, this has all been great, Kara. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience listening in? Kara: [00:18:19] You know, I think one of the things that's really important to us, Jason, is the combination of failed the market. That sales and marketing, including PR and AR analyst relations, which I know a lot of folks in digital marketing don't really touch analysts at all. Cause it's kind of boring, but really important to your senior leaders, right? So if you're going up market, and this is not small business, this is enterprise. So we're very fortunate in the, in our niche. We have sort of along the spectrum, small business, all the way up through sort of big corporate enterprise, even publicly traded companies. And so we get to touch everything from analyst relations to public relations, all the way through, but long story short, the deeper we get in the niche, the higher our prices can go and the more we get integrated with both PR AR and sales. And the stickier you get, the more you can deliver math back to your client that goes to their boss, that goes to the board. The longer you'll stay in the organization, the more valuable you are and the more sticky, just the stickier that you get in inside those orbes. And so that's my sort of best piece of advice is if you can deliver math back to your clients, specifically math that goes to the board or to some sort of senior executive, you will be very, very sticky. So find something that's meaningful to your customer that you can deliver on a regular basis. That means something to their boss. Jason: [00:19:46] Awesome. Love it. What's the agency website people can go and check you guys out? Kara: [00:19:50] Yeah. We're lead coverage.com and we'd love to hear from anyone who wants to talk more about lead gen or anything about supply chain. Jason: [00:19:58] Awesome. Well, thanks so much, Kara, for coming on the show. Make sure you guys go check out the website, connect with Kara. And if you guys want to be around the most amazing agency owners in the world, where they're sharing  what's working currently to be able to see the things you may not be able to see as well as have fun scaling your business. I'd like to invite all of you. Go to check out digitalagencyelite.com. This is our exclusive mastermind just for digital agency owners. So go to digitalagencyelite.com and until next time have a Swenk day.

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists
Episode 214: DENTAL DOMINATION: Taking The Guesswork Out of Getting New Patients, Having Current Patients Return, and Outshining Your Competition with Adam Zilko of Firegang

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 37:28


SHOW NOTES:   This week, Dr. Glenn Vo sat down with Adam Ziko (founder and owner of Firegang marketing). Let's just say he's crushing Every practice owner gets told by marketing agencies how to land leads—whether it be digital, via direct mail, or whatever technique they believe to be the key.Hint: the key lies in converting leads—not landing them.Converting leads is something Firegang marketing knows a thing or two about—especially Adam Ziko.With over 18 years of digital marketing experience under his belt, Adam is already a force to be reckoned with. Even better, he's been in the dental industry for a whopping ten years!Adam can tell you something for certain: every practice is different. He's got a knowledge of all the tactics you need to successfully market your unique businessLearn about:DSOs get a bad wrap, but what are they doing right?What can Adam do to help you and/or your practice's situation?What are the layers of marketing, according to Adam? And how can you pull levers to take your marketing game to the next level?What are the drivers of success?What sort of products is Adam extra versed in marketing?What can Adam and the Firegang team do to boost your KPIs?Why does Dr. Glenn Vo appreciate Adam's specific (“legit”) marketing methods?What's the problem with reverse-engineering a dental marketing strategy?What are the most successful digital marketing strategies Adam has observed?In Adam's eyes, what makes a good marketing partner?What's the problem with being too cocky (when it comes to marketing)?How does Adam differ from those unrelatable Fortune 500 companies?Hint: he knows all about start-ups!What's the importance of emphasizing customer service?So many solutions, important lessons about a good marketing mindset, and more!And don't forget to buy his new book, Practice Growth For The Future-Focused Dentist; How Firegang Dental Marketing is KILLING IT for our customers (and what those results are); a complimentary strategy session and assessment on their current marketing strategies.Send him a friend request on Facebook!   NIFTY DEAL:   Free copy of Practice Growth For The Future-Focused Dentist dental marketing playbook and an accompanying Complimentary Strategy Call for the first 20 dentists. This will allow dentists to finally eliminate all the guess-work out of growing their practice the right way, doing so quickly, and with tremendous ROI. Visit https://www.firegang.com/nifty to get the deal

Real Estate Professionals - Property Sales Tactics for Realtors

Regina Ozeryansky I think one thing we are all craving these days is peace in our lives.  When there are many and large changes happen in our life we can feel anxious and overwhelmed.  Feeling like that can adversely affect all aspects of our lives.  We don't normally have the skills to deal with all this and to achieve a peaceful life and it starts with inner peace. Our guest Regena Rosa Ozeryansky is going to give us insights into how to achieve inner peace which is useful for our everyday lives and success in our business. BIO As a certified Yoga instructor, Meditation Teacher, international speaker, best-selling author, and recovering perfectionist, Regena Rosa-Celeste, is called by many as the Internal Peace Revolutionist, she specializes in speaking, coaching, and teaching skills of internal peace. Conscious-minded entrepreneurs hire her to support them in releasing anxiety & overwhelm so that they can live passionate, purposeful, and peaceful lives. Regena specializes in teaching tools of lasting transformation and helping people create results that stick and has helped thousands globally to live with more joy. Changing the way the world experiences peace, she equips her clients and students to empower themselves for lasting change. By creating more inner peace in the world, there is more abundance, more wealth, greater health, and a deeper connection to each individual's life mission and purpose, creating sustainable world peace. Contact Internal Peace Now.  www.InternalPeaceNow.com      realestatereg@gmail.com Gift                                                                                                     Text the word YOGA to 64600 to create lasting peace in 90 seconds or less My Gift Learn the top upgrades in a home that increases the value, estimated costs, and return on investment, ROI.  Increase Your Wealth with Your Home  Get your free guide here: TransForm Any Home  https://stressfreeremodeling.com/transform Learn more how I can support you and your clients: www.StressFreeRemodeling.com/Optimizer My contact: emma@StressFreeRemodeling.com       www.StressFreeRemodeling.com Don't forget to subscribe to Real Estate Professionals podcast so that you don't miss a single episode, and while you're at it, won't you take a moment and do me a favor to write a short review and rate our show?  I would greatly appreciate it! Check out the Facebook group Real Estate Professionals Network is where we can continue this conversation with other peers and much more!   

The CPG Guys
Driving Omnichannel Growth Through Insights & Technology with Tiger Analytics' Kishor Gummaraju & Sari Somani

The CPG Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 47:59


The CPG Guys, Sri & PVSB are joined in this episode by Kishor Gummaraju, Chief Customer Officer & Sari Somani, Strategic Partnerships Engagement Manager of Tiger Analytics which develops bespoke solutions powered by data and technology for several Fortune 500 companies. This is a the first in a 2-episode partnership with Tiger Analytics.Visit https://www.tigeranalytics.com/omnichannel/ to know more about the Omnichannel offerings.Follow Kishor Gurramanju on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kishor-gummaraju/Follow Sari Somani on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/saraswati-somani-1a16b336/ Follow Tiger Analytics online at: https://www.tigeranalytics.com/ Follow Tiger Analytics on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tiger-analytics/Kishor & Sari answer these questions:1) You have been at various other analytics & consulting houses - what attracted you here as a CCO? What unique capability do you see here that will allow rapid growth? Why don't you start with informing our audience about the core values of the company and who Tiger analytics clients are and how you help them everyday?2) Omnichannel commerce is hot - what are Tiger's offerings here and what type of outcomes are you driving?3) Maximizing ROI on all spends? Almost cliché. How do you go about doing that?4) What do you think is the role of search & content ?5) What are you seeing happen in the Last Mile fulfillment space? And why should a large Brand bother?6) Tiger seems to see AI as an anchor for intelligence. Explain this for our audience and if you're a retailer - why do you care?7) What are thoughts on Personalization and Segmentation?7) Lot of great thoughts, but how about Activation. How do you ensure that?We are in a global supply chain crisis. What solutions or offerings do you have for CPG to manage through this?8) Kishor you have been part of large Digital Transformation (whatever that may mean). Can you demystify this term for us and What is your philosophy for scale  This is a cardinal question within any CPG organization, how do you help drive scale and adoption?Please provide the CPG Guys feedback at http://ratethispodcast.com/cpgguysCPG Guys Website: http://CPGGuys.comPlease follow the Network of Executive Women at http://newonline.org/cpgguysDISCLAIMER: The content in this podcast episode is provided for general informational purposes only. By listening to our episode, you understand that no information contained in this episode should be construed as advice from CPGGUYS, LLC or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for research on any subject matter. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by CPGGUYS, LLC. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent.  CPGGUYS LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, consequential or other damages arising out of any individual's use of, reference to, or inability to use this podcast or the information we presented in this podcast.

The Worldly Marketer Podcast
TWM 225: What You Need to Know About Global Brand Management Today w/ Laurence Minsky

The Worldly Marketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 51:00


Laurence (Larry) Minsky is an advertising & marketing consultant with clients throughout the globe. He is also a full-time Associate Professor in the Communication Department at Columbia College Chicago. With a background in psychology, Larry started his career as an advertising copywriter over 35 years ago. He went on the become a creative director and marketing strategist, and eventually launched his own consultancy in 2003. Over the course of his career, Larry has worked with for many of the world's top brands. He is known for developing effective cross-channel solutions that boost marketing ROI for his clients, and his work has been recognized with more than 125 industry awards. His client experience ranges from the Fortune 500, to startups and non-profits. Some of the global brands he has worked with include Amazon, GE, Kraft, McDonald's, and Unilever – to name just a few. Last but not least, Larry is a successful author. His articles have been published by the Harvard Business Review, the European Business Review, and MarketingProfs, among others. He is also the author and co-author of several books on marketing & advertising, most recently Global Brand Management: A guide to developing, building and managing an international brand, which he co-authored with global branding expert Ilan Geva.   Links: Larry's book: “Global Brand Management” Larry's author page on Amazon Sean Duffy on episode #222 re. international brand strategy James Ellis on episode #201 re. global employer branding Datareportal.com article on voice search and other online search trends Larry on LinkedIn   The Worldly Marketer Podcast is a Verbaccino production.  

Real Estate Marketing Dude
Appreciation Is Attraction with Cole Slate

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 33:48


Happy Thanksgiving everyone! First of all, there's a lot of things that we're thankful here for, but one of the things we are thankful for and what we're going to be chatting about on this episode, is how to be thankful for all the frickin referrals that you're receiving and how to be thankful for all of the different business that we attract versus chase. I'm telling you in 2022 is the year the personal brand and the reason why that is is because let's face it, you guys are all selling the exact same shit. Everyone's got access to the MLS, if you're a lender everyone has access to the same program, so what is really the difference between you and everybody else? Ultimately, the answer to that is going to rely on the relationship you have with the person you serve, or the brand that you have that attracts them to want to be served by you. Today we welcome Cole Slate onto the episode. As broker and owner of Slate Realty, he does everything 100% referral base. A lot of brokerage team leaders instantly shift into lead generation mode where they have to give their agents leads and do this and that, but what if you just taught your agents how to fish instead for referrals, and it didn't cost you anything out of pocket? How much more would that add to your bottom line if you're a broker owner, so if you're a broker owner, if you're a team lead, I think you're gonna appreciate this episode today.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeHow to make your business 100% referral basedWhat marketing yourself as hyper community meansMistakes to avoid when first starting out ResourcesLearn more about Cole SlateReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas to real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living.It's your job to remind them. Let's get started What's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome to another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast.It is Happy Thanksgiving. First of all, there's a lot of things that we're thankful here for. But one of the things we are thankful for our for our guests, and in the spirit of being thankful what we're going to be chatting about on this episode is how to be thankful for all the frickin referrals that you're receiving and how to be thankful for all of the different business that we attract versus Chase, because I'm telling you in 2022 is the year the personal brand, I've been saying the shift last five fucking years before Tom Ferry every set of damn thing about it. And the reason why that is is because let's face it, you guys are all selling the exact same shit. Everyone's got access to the MLS if your lender ever has access to the same program, so what is really the difference between you and everybody else? And ultimately, the answer to that is going to rely on the relationship you have with the person you serve, or the brand that you have that attracts them to want to be served by you. So what we're going to chat about today, I've been seeing this dude on Facebook, hosting events. He's always doing shit and I like indirectly know you from Facebook, and he just opened up. Another brokerage is growing rapidly, but he does everything 100% referral base, a lot of brokerages team leaders instantly shift into like the lead generation mode where they have to give their agents leads and do this and that. But what if you just taught your agents how to fish instead for referrals, and it didn't cost you anything out of pocket? How much more would that add to your bottom line if you're a broker owner, so if you're a broker owner, if you're a team lead, I think you're gonna appreciate this episode today. And without further ado, we're gonna introduce our friend Mr. Cole, slate to the show. What's up. Cool,Mike, thanks for having me. I really appreciate it. Big fan of the podcast and it's cool being on the zoom with you and hear your voice on the interview not coming through my truck speakersto tell tell us tell everybody who you are, where you're located. What you guys got going on down there. And then I got a bunch of questions for you in regards to how you're attracting all this business and attention in your local community.Yeah, absolutely. Like Mike said, my name is Cole slate, I'm from the Northeast Florida area, particularly St. Johns County. You know, your statistics and research nationally, it's one of the hottest markets in the country. Every stat that you look at has St John's in Northeast Florida and the top 10 And yeah, most liberal all referral base really a lot of people talk about you know, their, their hyperlocal Well, I market myself as being hyper community. So you know, building the brand, for doing stuff the right way. And you know, for the right reasons and you know, giving back to the neighborhood first responders to charities and things like that.I love that hyper community write that down, folks. Um, yeah, let's get right into it. So first off, when did you get licensed? And when do you start in real estate?So I got my license in September of 2012. I started I was blessed to be to earn a buyer's agent position all the top teams in the area, the Welch team with Keller Williams, and after being on that team for a year decided to try it on my own. And it's been a it's been a nine year blur, you know, ever sinceso one of the things that you like, glad you did, but you'd never do it again. Right? So like every every every career of a realtor would Did you ever buy leads, like in 2012 when you join a team, you're probably you know, getting fed a little bit maybe through open houses and or whatnot. But when you went off on your own, have you always been more referral based? Did you ever go down the Zillow lead buying platform or any of those things?So you know, I did it I bought, I got into Zillow leads one time and it was because our zip code that I'm actually from born and raised no a opportunity opened up and it goes so quickly that I kind of viewed it as a calling shotgun and I'm like, let me go and it was like the smallest increment available I think was something like 10% share, you know, five or 10% share something like that. So I did just to say that, you know, I swooped in there, and the whole my spot is a premier agent. But you know, I was so busy I talk about horrible follow up you know, I never did it because I was busy with the the family friends of referrals, you know?Yep. And a lot of times people just buy leads just to say that they have something inbound, but very seldom do they even call them back. That's why Zillow went to referral model Why realtor.com went through referral model guys, you guys don't call back the lead you're given and you start hurting their brands. So they said, Fuck it, I'm gonna bring it in house and I'll convert them for these lazy sons of bitches. And then I'll give it to him and then I'll charge them triple the amount in the form of a referral fee because I'm selling them an appointment versus a frickin name and a number. Alright guys, so let's get I want to get into this how big the community first cuz I want to break I want to paint the picture how many people would you say are in your immediate area? If you were to give me a number on the population?Oh man. I think in our county alone, it's close to 300,000 people, you know, we're very suburbia, you know, there's no there's some country, suburbs, things like that. I heard um, you know, take it with a grain of salt. It was on a commercial, but I heard the Jacksonville area population, we're looking at around one and a half million.That's a big market,it's not gonna remember to that landmass wise, Jacksonville is the biggest city in the country. So that's 1.5 million over I think everyone by definition, like five counties.So does that mean like everything's filling in right now? Building and because a lot of land,there's land for a developer to step up. They're doing everything in their power to to do so.And let's get into this. You're running the brokerage? Are you still in production yourself?Right now? Those are refer out? My wife is my business partner. And we we procure business, but we refer to our agents good and compete, or do you wanna?So what I know you have some sort of system in office, you have to have something that your agents are implementing that are generate the referrals, probably something that stemmed off your own success?What are they doing? How are you doing this? Let's start at the agent level, let's take it to the brokerage level. Andthen how I'm sure you guys have like company sponsored events, agents ship enough of that, and all that stuff. It's a team effort. But let's start at the beginning. What are the agents doing? And what did you do to consistently generate those referrals? Because it's not like that's not a small population. If you're in a town of like, 20,000 people, then yeah, you might see John dick and Mary in the fucking grocery store every other weekend, and say hello to him. And that's how you're staying in touch with people. So there's like the local realtor, but when you're in a busy area like this, you have to do more than now you have to build a brand and you can't build a brand without consistently communicating or appearing for people. So what are the agents doing? What did you do in the past that built your brand to stay in front of people?Yeah, so the first thing that agents are really buying into is my style of farming, you know, you have your stereotypical farming from two decades ago, or it's a bunch of random mailers and everyone's sets, everyone's sending the same stuff. And you know, that, you know, more, let's call them season agents thing to that's sufficient, because they're seeing their their face and their contact information from the mailbox at the end of the driveway till they get to the trash cans, and garage. So we do mailers, for example, but we provide, we provide value, you know, my my neighborhood that I live in, for example, we send out two meal two meals per month, okay? One of them is statistics broken down, not just just sold or anything like that, we send out a average price point for the most for the three most recent sold for each 1000 square foot increments. So under 1999 square feet, the top three average was x 2000 to 2999 heated and cooled square foot, the average per foot was x and just keep going on. So people have some type of idea, you know, my neighborhood, for example, still being built right now but it's going to be approximately 5000 rooftops. So that's just an idea of you know, what's one area the next is, you know, like I said, I'm from the area so I have a lot of relationships with local businesses. So I'm teaming up with these businesses like let's talk about a coffee shop for example. Go to the coffee shop I said hey, you know, I'm I'm going to design mailers I'm going to pay for the distribution the mailing I'm gonna send them out would you be down for a save 10% off of $20 tab at a you know what you're paying for them? I mean, for a coffee shop that's nothing right that's that's a free introduction and I'm handling all the distribution so you know talk about a value add you know, everyone everyone in my neighborhood comes up to me on a weekly basis just thanking me for everything not only providing the you know, the valuation statistics for the property but as well as a coupon for a free cup of coffee you know, ifthere's one piece is one piece market driven then and then one piece is just more community Correct? Awesome. All right. So this is really good guys. Here's what I I don't know why I honestly cannot stand this about the industry is that every time we fucking communicate, we feel like we have to be selling something or getting something in return and you don't understand guys like for any of you that have faith like there's a constant like, it's very simple, you give and you get in return, right? There's a reason why people tie in, they set a certain certain things. And if you truly believe your use, what's the word he saw you see, or whatever it is, what you get, you'll get back in return. And you cannot like if you're just always selling, selling, and you're always like, just so just this or all of your content has to deal with how many listings you sold, your broker sold, instead of like caring about the damn community and actually being a servant of it. You don't ever obtain anything other than that you're just a salesperson chasing your next check in the eyes of most people. But when you start creating content, events, or anything that gives you the excuse to have a conversation with people, that's how you build a brand. I would bet that I could see why those two pieces would serve each other best. I guarantee you that people enjoy the information and the statistics, but the ones that they remember that are the personal ones. And then it Re and it sort of triggers them to be like, oh, yeah, by the way, I did get that one thing like your your sales should is better received because you're creating value.Well, it's everything compounding together like that what I was saying this day and age farming is so much different than it was two decades ago, you know, so you have those mailers. And on top of that, you know, one examples we had, with all the COVID crap going on everything we had a vendor fair but suited to all being at the neighborhood beauty center, it was a tour of people's driveways on them. I'm not gonna sell a house out of my driveway. So what did I do, I threw a big old block party, I got a food truck, the time I got out houses, got a video game truck to come down a guy playing live music, you know, that's what people are gonna remember. Now, as a part of, you know, what's going on, I got more people reached out to me than the freakin president of the HOA, yet all having to do with, you know, coming in all these different ways in regards to farming the you know, the community.And I like how you're outsourcing the cost to so like, you're not just I'm sure these businesses are giving you a couple bucks, and that's paying for the distribution. You're just the guy started organizing it, but it's your brand your face all over it. So what is your out of pocket on the mailers? And how many advertisers? Are you getting to actually cover the nut?Yeah, I mean, it's, it's not much I want to say it's something like 50 cents apiece, or something like that. And we're like I said, you know, we're going out of 1500 houses, you know, so we don't we don't put actual sponsors on the mailers. But what these businesses do in regards to cross promotion, as I said, it's all about scratching the back, right? So where it might be 750 bucks coming out of my pocket for this month, you know, these pencils, drawings, and these coffee shops and everything, you know, they they give back so much to my business. You know, for example, you know, the grand opening that we had on on Thursday, we had, I think seven different restaurants involved and I didn't spend a penny they're all giving back to me for helping them promote their business and really, you know, give back to the community in them by providing, you know, sushi boats and case studies and a cornbread bar and you know, stuff like that. And it's all like he said earlier, it's all about the giving back and the back scratching, and you know, things like that.Let's even pencil this out, though. So it's just this as far as direct mail pieces and you're sending to a month you're seeing your out of pocket costs is about $700 a month on that. Yeah. Alright, so this comes out to be at $400 a year. Okay, so just as just one channel, you guys, that's why you guys ever, what's your ROI? What's your ROI? All right, let's go fucking talk about the ROI Right Now. All right, $8,400, what's your average sales price in your market? 400. Okay, so he needs to sell three quarters of a house to break even over the course of the year, three quarters of a house, this is a full house three because it was a full house $400,000 would be $10,000 commission. So you need a quarter of a house you need 84% of a house is what he needs to sell two and a percent to break even. Okay, so, but here's the thing that everyone's gonna say. How can you trace back that ROI? Oh, my God, there's not a direct thing when you're building a brand, you never will. That's the power of a brand. Because I bet I guarantee he gets people that just call him from wherever. And it's the result of a combination of all the multiple forms of communication over time. That individual single one guys look atyou look at what the mailers doing to not only am I providing the value to my neighborhood of 5000 houses, but the business that I'm promoting. Yeah. Do you think they're the for Who do you think the first firm is that they're going to call when they have a new employee moving in or someone leaving or you know, whatever the case may be. So it's about scratching as many bags as possible and creating an excuse to appreciate and promote everyone else.When people ask us all the time when we do a obviously you guys don't know yet we script and distribute videos, people and people do a lot of different strategy but a lot of times people would say, Oh, why am I gonna do a business owner strategy? Well, it's a different your YouTube channel will never blow up doing business owner interviews, I'm sorry, no one's gonna go to your YouTube channel, like, this guy's the best business owner views ever, and you're just gonna become the next YouTube celebrity, doesn't mean it's a bad business video to create. So it's just a different strategy. And why I love that strategies, because when you start scratching the back of business owners, those are the largest referral sources you're ever going to come across. Because they all share a mindset, which is very entrepreneurial, you're more likely to get a referral from a business owner that a fucking liberal, put it that way. Alright, that's just the way it is. Sorry, but that's true business owners have a mentality mindset where they know how hard it is, and they will scratch your back. And that's what happens. Business owners always give more referrals than non business owners. I don't know why that is. I think it's just the way they're all wired. They're wired to serve, they're wired to give them their natural referral numbers. So when you create a community of these business owners, you're creating a community of referral sources. And every person's referral source, no one's a client. And it's a mindset thing, like everyone has the ability to refer you. Right, everyone lives somewhere. And everyone knows someone who's moving at least two or three years if you track but a certain percentage of those people and those business owners are going to be moving this year to and they don't even know it yet. Some of them are gonna get pregnant, some of them are gonna get divorced. But there's a move that's going to happen. And when you're thought of first 80% of people closing the first one they meet with, that's why attention matters. I love the mailers what else you're doing. You're not just doing mailers in the community, though.Oh, yeah, for sure.Let's go on to channel number two, because that's just one chat on your you're crushing it. I love it.Yeah, it's doing the events in the neighborhood. You know, every time there's a vendor fair or garage sale or all the above, find a way to get involved, you know, in my neighborhood and being sticklers about, who was able to be involved with the vendor fair that they had two weeks ago. So one of our raving fans that lives in the neighborhood is a she does she owns a little in house bakery that she you know, she takes out of her home does baked goods, cookies, cupcakes and things like that? Well, when I told her what happened that they wouldn't let you know, realtors insurance people, they wouldn't let services like that evolve, she goes cold. Why don't you just throw me a couple of bucks. And I'll put your logos on half of my on all these cookies that I make? And I'll just give out your business card and cookies for free to everyone there. Yeah, that's awesome. So you know, things like that. But you know,how many events are you guys do an A in? Are you at an all your agents are inviting their friends, their families and all that, right? So you're duplicating your efforts? Like youdo probably eight to eight to 10 events a year? No, that's not necessarily just in my neighborhood. Right? That's cute. That's period. You know, we do a crossing guard appreciation, Teacher Appreciation, first responder appreciation. We do. We used to call it a customer appreciation party. But I took the customer out of it and just left it appreciation because I'm wanting to throw, you know, a one big appreciation picnic and water to happy hours for not only the people who have close business with us, but who is referred to as our top preferred partners when it comes to you know, mortgages inspectors, you know, who's who's creating excuses to appreciate them. Everyone else in our industry just expects to take them while I'm going to send you a home inspection. Where's my lead? You know, we need to appreciate them to the site agents that's in the building industry. 30% of our buyers are new construction. Not a lot of people can say that. So who's appreciate who's appreciating appreciating the site agents? You know, it's finding excuse to appreciate all the people, especially those who aren't always appreciated.Yeah. And so I always get like, how does one of my top blog posts honestly, on my website is client appreciation events. And it's about a couple of different agents doing different things in their markets. And people in agents too, would always say, Hey, dude, I don't want to do an event that's going to cost me like $2,000. So I want everyone to change their mindset. If you were to buy in, if I said I'm going to give you 100 leads a month, most agents eyes would light up, we agree that 100 leads a month, but let's just break down what you're buying a lead for. What you're really doing is you're just buying a conversation, and you're buying a conversation that happens to be about real estate, which is why the conversion rates only going to be one to 3% Some people are looky loos some people are actually serious. 80% of them already have an agent and trust me, and then that small bit that actually transacts always reserved. So that one to 3% I don't care how many autoresponders or how good your follow up is. If you converted 4% God bless you. But those guys and gals are really doing well. They have all kinds of technology hidden from every which way to do that the average person isn't going to have that advantage. But when you're having a client party, and you're running into like 400 people at a time or 150 people time, you're still having conversations now, ever. So what do you mean like? Well, let's just do statistical because none of this stuff is theory, this is mathematical science, all of the conversations you're having, regardless if you're buying them, or if you're doing them naturally 10 to 15% of those people are moving, and 100% of those people have a referral for you. So we would have a lot of these client parties, we didn't do eight a year. I love that we do two a year six months. And we would just have mega bashes is like when I was like a total party animal. And I was like literally running out nightclubs, because I didn't have a kitchen. So I got it cheap. I dropped like 15k on a frickin club event like DJs, like lights, ice sculptures and shit. People would be talking about these events, and we'd had 700 at once was our highest was 800 700 people. But they would roll in and it was just a party. Four years down the road, I was still getting business from these parties because no other real estate guy ever threw like a rave, I guess if you want to call it that, but whatever it was, it was cool at the time would have been my script now. My point is, is that when you get to those, it's the conversations you have you guys in this whole business is about conversations, I'm gonna always says this is really simple. You got to get appointments, close appointments, get appointments, close appointments, that is horrible advice, have conversations, close conversations, and then add them to your database and then stay in front of them forever, because that's what it's not a matter of if they're gonna move. It's a matter of whenfolks one of the things you said Man, I know like you and I share so much the same, you know, point of view and outlook and all that is, you know, going back to the Zillow of life or whether it's Zillow, whatever these online leads are that people were lucky to convert 3%. And how much on average, do you think per month, people are putting into leads like that? Do you have any type of idea? Lots. Alright,so let's see, let's even call it didn't say1500 bucks. Okay, talk about ROI, where's your ROI going to go further 1500 bucks a month towards these vs cold leads of people you've never met before. Or put that same 1500 bucks into your warm sphere, the people you haven't met before the people who have already closed or referrals, you know that that ROI is easy, or you should be spending your money?Well, people try to because they're chasing transactions instead of referrals. That's why there's a major difference if I'm chasing transactions, and I'm going back to that 10 to 15% game, but when I'm chasing referrals, everybody's referral source it might not be today, but it might be tomorrow or might be in three months. I don't care when the referrals come in. I know it's coming though.100% 100% And like so many people in our business don't have this you know, this big picture view you know, even if you're working with a buyer right now and they decided they want to chill out and wait a couple years. Look whether they're closing with me tomorrow, or they're closing with us three years from now. I have enough confidence and you know us and what we do and our relationships and things like that I'm not worried about when the closings happening. Yeah, what I mean it's it's keeping the relationship Yep.Three to five houses man that's what people buy over the course of their lifetime. It doesn't include any people they can refer you to so yeah, you got to play the long game with us. Let's take this to social What do you guys do in stand in front of people on social I see the events I love the in person I love the direct mail what's happening on the social side are you guys doing content guys creating content and create any media and video stuff are you guys running campaigns ads, any any of that?So I actually just in the past few weeks, got into paying for Facebook ads, I've never done it before. And what we are doing is you know my favorite my favorite button to clip whenever you're filling out your your audience is the targeting your your friends and friends of friends. Because with us being all word of mouth and having such an awesome reputation in the community. Chances are if your friends have followers of our business page you've heard of us so all we're doing is giving you that value to like our page or to click on our website or call our office. Right that makes the most sense over again that's a warm lead to me versus cold you know paying for lights or you know this these random introductions or whatever. We have an awesome social media following on Facebook. Our Facebook business page has a process Really 9300 likes. And again, same type of thing is my mindset, you know, we do a lot, you know, testimonial Tuesday new listings, open house, you know, the stereotypical stuff that you have to do. But the other half of our strategy is giving spotlights to the businesses that support our business, you know, go check out this restaurant, this is our top lender, give them a call, give them an opportunity. This is our top inspector. So if you go through our social media, I would say probably 1/3, to half of our content is, you know, throwing referrals and throwing spotlights and throw in appreciation to all the companies and businesses that we work with, not only within, but outside the industry as well.So you're telling me if you start selling every other people's stuff for them, they're start selling your stuff for you.That's for me, it's all about showing appreciation, whether it's the parties with social media content, whatever it is,I'm gonna title this podcast appreciation. Someone then in that name? Yeah, that's awesome. Do you guys have a Facebook group yet? of all your friends and family?Of course, we have these late real estate community. And how engaging is that? Oh, that's fantastic. You know, my whole mindset behind that was to not only be a resource for all of our past customers past refers everyone you know, we want to we have over 900 members of it, but we wanted to still give it a sense of exclusivity. Yep. But I also want to take a step further and say, hey, you know, y'all are 900 Something people that we have past business and relationships with? Well, what can we do for dollars to work together and cross promote and network and things like that?Great. Yeah, I love that. If you notice, like, there's a theme here and it's not about us I don't think cola said I want on the show here. He's always said you are them. us if it was I reference. And that's just a lot of this mindset, you guys that you if you if you really want to build your brand, you can't fake it. You have to actually be compassionate about your own community and compassionate about what you do and all this stuff like that. I think that's half the reason a lot of people are you know, have commission breath. And they're just looking for the, they're looking for the next transaction. But, you know, at the end of the day, what we're saying here guys, is that you'll end up with plenty of transactions if you just started serving and stop selling. serve your community and most of your business is going to come from people right in front of you. It's gonna come from your Facebook friends or Instagram followers and people will follow you on Tik Tok nowadays, it's not going to come from a bunch of strangers. So I'm gonna come from people you don't know you're going to burn out how many agents have you seen burnout just start chasing lead chasing business as a broker and MC trained some of them that didn't want to invest in themselves? How many of them have you seen just going out of business?On a there's so many because I mean all all that these agency and the especially with the market, right and particular market in the Northeast Florida Association of Realtors get approximately 11,000 realtors, okay. Think about that versus 3300 listings active on the MLS those are insane numbers. And all they see is you know the hot market social media and frickin HGTV and all this stuff and they think it's just something you just go get in and easy money easy paychecks you know, they don't understand that you don't treat it like a nine to five you don't put in you know, I laugh at 40 hours. You don't put in full time hours. You're not going to get full time.Yeah. Yeah. Do you even have listing presentation you just show up inside paperwork?So show us on paperwork? Yeah, you know, we have you know, over my time you know, I've created our presentation based off of just experiences right? And so I have stuff that I will take with me and when the you know you read you read the seller right? So if their mindset is very detail oriented Well hey, you know I brought this packet with you I'm happy to go over it with you word by word. If they just want to hang out have a drink and have a conversation show me what the house looks like they're just gonna lead the way hey, you know if you can't get to sleep tonight you need some light reading then read what's on this folder? Yeah, you know but at this point with you know, our reputation and community and things like that it is Hey Cole something came up we're getting to transfer come over to paperwork real quick. And I'll keep those done.Yeah, it's actually work man. Well, dude, this is awesome show. appreciate you sharing anything anything else you want to addon? I'm not necessarily I think you and I could go all day long. You know, such such a similar mindset and and all that. You know, one thing that we are doing actually happened today I have a really close relationship with the Sheriff of St. Johns County, the county I live in he came to our ribbon cutting and everything. One of his community community relations deputies reached out to me said hey, you know when you donate 500 bucks for families? I think it was for families that need a meal on Thursday. By the time I had the time to say yes, he had already got someone else to say yes. So I was like, You know what, I wonder what the deputies are doing on Thursday. You know, the ones that have to work instead of being with their families. So you know, we're putting together this is literally two or three hours ago I'm getting off with you and taking it down to the sheriff's office we're putting together 39 tumblers koozies a $20 Visa gift card for the deputies to go grab lunch and they can be with their families you know that all an investment is $780 It ended up being okay but when these 39 deputies get you know something something like this you know for for the holiday when it can be with their families and just like a surprise token of appreciation you know, all that stuff adds up and do you have now wellhere's what we're talking about guys that's mindset he could have easily said oh shit, fine. Could have hung up the phone. You could have stopped but then Cole here says no sports quarter got to find out another way to spend that $800 Because he didn't care about the costs he cared about the impact well done.My my buddy that's the community affairs liaison or whatever. I texted them I said man, you hit me up for 500 bucks. You spent 800That's great. That's good. People support others who care man and serve it's just you know it's just a wired Yeah, it's what we're wired and if you give you're gonna get and if you continue to do the right thing by people it'll eventually pay off for you you know that surely firm believer net? Why don't you go ahead and tell everybody where they can find you on social if they want to follow you anything if they want you got your website or any of that and then we'll get the strap?Yeah, absolutely. Again, my name is Cole slate. My personal Facebook account is called slate. Our Facebook business page is slate real estate. That username is slate real estate 904 Instagram called slate My email address is cold at Slate dot real estate and our firm's website is www dot slate dot real estate.Appreciate it man awesome show and appreciate you guys listen other episodes of real estate marketing dude podcasts anything we could help you with script that distribute this video if you liked this concept of attracting business versus chasing it give us a call. I can't stand chasing business and I know you can't either and we'd love to help you start attracting it and be just like coal out here can't build your heart and I can build the attention around your brand and make sure no one forgets about who the hell you are what you do by creating content keeping that in front of people all done for you so you can visit us a real estate marketing do.com real estate marketing comm check out some of our other products listing advocate calm and if you're a broker owner check out our software all in one transaction management at Sweet assist.com We appreciate you guys have a good one. Thanks for the follows reviews and connect with us on social media you guys next week. Peace Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule a time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1770 FBF: John Tesh – Intelligence for Your Life TV and the John Tesh Radio Show for Quick, Credible Information

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 49:14


Today is a special episode because it is both a Flash Back Friday AND a 10th episode show. It is from episode 650, first published last March 24, 2016. For decades John Tesh has been entertaining people in all walks of life. He has excelled in live performances, sports announcing, news programs and now in radio on his Intelligence for Your Life TV show, where he shares the mic with his wife Connie Sellecca. He has earned six Grammys, two Emmys and an AP award for his brilliant work. In today's podcast, John opens up to Jason about his various chosen professions, how he started his new venture and what really lights him up. Find out more about this amazing artist in this 10th episode lifestyle event.   Key Takeaways: [5:45] Jason gets an email from listeners about autonomous vehicles.  [20:53] John Tesh works in radio but sitting behind a grand piano is what lights him up. [26:13] Tesh believes his show is a credible source of information in a sea of opinions. [28:18] Is it wise to pick a lane or should you choose another path? [32:39] In today's world, you can reach your market directly through self-syndication. [35:38] You can use the “against all odds” biographies of others as a blueprint for your life. [40:53] Connie and John met at the gym.  [43:50] Apprenticeship is the best education strategy.   Mentions: Jason Hartman Venture Alliance Mastermind Property Tracker Property Evaluator Intelligence for Your Life On Demand   The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization  

Podcast diario para aprender español - Learn Spanish Daily Podcast

En este episodio Roi y Paco hablan sobre el posible gran apagón. ¡Ya está disponible la oferta por Black Friday! Hazte suscriptor premium de forma anual con un 20% de descuento extra en: hoyhablamos.com. Oferta disponible hasta el 29 de noviembre.

OTB Football
Ralf Rangnick to Man Utd | Could Ralph Hasenhüttl follow? | Why Declan Rice is the best in the league

OTB Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 27:57


Ger Gilroy and Colm Boohig are in studio and joined by former ROI player Simon Cox as we run through the weekend's slate of games in the Football Kick-off. Football with Sky Ireland.

Cash Flow Guys Podcast
311 - Getting Max Value All The Time

Cash Flow Guys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 26:30


When positioning property for sale there are several factors to consider in regard to getting top dollar.  Many homeowners feel that they need to spend money to complete improvements for the next owner of the home whom they have yet to meet.   First, how could you possibly be able to accurately pick what the future buyer would want?  How do you know they want terra cotta accent walls?  What if they don't like that shade of blue?  These are questions you should be asking yourself before you do any improvements to a property in preparation for sale.   Keep colors neutral so you can appeal to the largest number of buyers.   Cleaning and decluttering often bring more ROI than repairs do.  In over 20 years of selling real estate, I've come to the realization that 90% of buyers will complain about the improvements you choose to make.   If you are selling your current home, or perhaps one you inherited, consider first cleaning and decluttering.  Have an estate sale or garage sale and get rid of all the extra stuff.     If you are a home flipper, find a new construction model home in your market and go walk the models.   Notice the colors they choose and the amenities they provide, those choices come from market research.  Homebuilders put lots of effort into maximizing efficiency on new builds, and frankly, doing what they do can save you a fortune.   I know home flippers that follow the other flippers they see in the market in regard to finishings and such without ever visiting a new construction model.  What happens is a classic case of the blind leading the blind.  One flipper makes a bad design choice and is quickly copied by the next ten flippers behind him.  The end result is a bunch of crappy renovations that nobody wants.   I recently had a home seller ask me if they should do any improvements to their home before selling.  It was a really cool historic home located in a great neighborhood that was in full swing in regard to gentrification.  Several homes in the neighborhood have been renovated making the neighborhood a crown jewel of the area.   The seller's home did show some deferred maintenance but had curb appeal and was in an ideal location.  This home would be a great renovation project for an incoming homeowner in a neighborhood that boasted pride of ownership.  Because of the type of home, it was and the location, it would bring top dollar in its current condition with no money invested in improvements.   I explained to the seller that I could bring them a buyer willing to pay between $550K to $575k for their home as is, no repairs or upgrades, just move out and clean..  Instead, they chose to list it with “the neighborhood agent” for $515,000 in August.  They said the other agent had sold 50+ homes in the neighborhood which is what made them choose the local lady.  They went on to say that the agent said they will need to replace the roof, A/C, refinish floors, paint, on and on which wound up costing them around $30k give or take to complete.   The price dropped $16,000 twenty days after listing, then another $20,000 a week later, then $10,000 two weeks after that, two more weeks dropped the price another $10,000 and it finally went under contract on 10/15 with a list price of $459,000.  It's still not closed so only time will tell what it sold for (assuming the agent can get the deal closed).   In this case, the seller lost out on $146,000 or more ($30,000 of which was in improvements).  All due to bad advice and an ineffective marketing strategy.   To get top dollar for any property, the whole world needs to know it's for sale.  You don't have to try to trick anyone by putting lipstick on a pig, instead, invest that money in your marketing.   Run paid ads on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, Twitter, Wall Street Journal (for higher-end houses), and so on.  Make the house viral on social media.  Doing so can often bring you more money than ever thought possible in your wildest dreams.   I have so many true stories of how I have used purely marketing strategy to give my sellers heart palpitations when the offers start to roll in.  This happens because everyone with eyes and ears knows the property is for sale.   I truly believe there is a buyer for every house.  In almost every instance, the reason a property isn't selling isn't a price problem, its a marketing problem.  The buying public does not perceive the true value of the home because you simply have not found the right buyer.  Without guerilla marketing finding the highest paying buyer will never happen.   Folks, it's no rocket science to sell your next property at a price so high it sets the market, you just need to hire the right team to help you get it there.  That team can be a Realtor or Wholesaler who is a marketing expert or a marketing expert that will bring cash-wielding buyers to your front door.  Either way, unless you can get people to the front door in droves (without using price as a motivator) you'll never see top dollar and have to live with leaving money on the table.

Hilary Topper On Air
Tips for Marketing New Technologies

Hilary Topper On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 14:37


Knowing how to best market your business is often a lot of trial and error. You implement strategies, you evaluate their ROI, and you tweak your tactics based on those results. In today's tech driven world, marketing technologies, old and new, is even more nuanced. What tips for marketing new technologies are important to follow in today's COVID-19 world? About the Interview In this episode of Hilary Topper on Air, Hilary speaks with Caroline Petersen, Founder & Creative Director of Gallery Design Studio – a communications firm that specializes in B2B tech marketing. Learn how tech businesses with complex solutions can best market themselves so that their offerings are understood and the most visibility and awareness is garnered.  Learn how her firm transforms complicated information into visually engaging content which creates trust and ultimately helps her clients sell their software, products, and services. Hear her tips for marketing new technologies. About Caroline Petersen With over 10 years of marketing and communication design experience, Caroline is passionate about helping businesses solve problems by expressing what they have to offer to customers. Her strong problem-solving skills and an eye for design can help clients transmit complex information clearly, concisely, and in a visually engaging way. Relentlessly curious, she's inspired by experimentation and always looking for better ways to serve her clients. Contact Gallery Design Studio With print collateral, websites, and video, Gallery Design Studio (GDS) provides ongoing B2B communication support to its clients in the technology, finance, and healthcare sectors. GDS customizes projects to each clients' needs with individual attention and methods that reflect their identities in accessible ways for potential customers and employees. For more information visit www.gallerydesignstudio.com.

Marketing Trends
Marketing Team Metamorphosis through Company Growth with Amy Cook, CMO of Simplus

Marketing Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 44:26


Predicting exactly how much growth to expect (or strive for) in your business can be tricky to forecast. This week we look to Amy Cook, CMO of Simplus, Amy has grown, scaled, and been a part of many merging teams throughout her career. Their growth has been rapid and expansive, which definitely required great leadership. “Simplus was doing a few million and had just barely done a series A. [We had]  a growth rate of over 300% year-over-year. I attribute so much of that to our CEO who really empowered each team member on the executive team to do the very best that they could. And then he kept it all together with his vision and focus on culture. It was really an amazing opportunity; since then [in] the past 18 months we've been acquired by Infosys. That has been another humongous learning curve to learn how to be part of a massive organization of 250,000 people.”Regardless of the size of the team or the title on your email signature, Amy is all about finding the best marketing solutions to her questions. Her success in marketing can be attributed to her openness and collaboration. In this episode of Marketing Trends, Amy dives into, scaling and growing a marketing business to enterprise size, and as a part of that keeping the marketing part of the business integrated with the whole organization. Prepare to benefit from Amy's optimistic and collaborative attitude about growth and best marketing team practices up next on Marketing Trends. Main TakeawaysScaling Well and Growing to Enterprise Size: Focus on culture when merging two companies; the larger the company, the more important being able to integrate both teams becomes. Keeping a strong line of communication to the whole organization about the mission and vision is critical to help everyone work together more effectively. Looking around to see what other companies of the same size are doing can be helpful. Replicating the best methods and practices you see in their organizations is a big time-saver. Agencies Can Help if you're Struggling with Retention: If you lose someone on your team, or can't scale the team as quickly as you need, agencies are a solution to your problem. It's still best to keep the heart of the marketing department in-house, but farming out smaller portions of the marketing mix that can be executed by an agency can help you address bandwidth issues on your team. Marketing as an Integral Part of the Whole Organization: It's important to stay closely connected with the rest of the company in the marketing department. Alignment across departments spans more than just sales and marketing. Siloing yourself off in a bubble will keep you from valuable insights that the rest of the team could impart. Building relationships at every level internally and externally can help you reach more customers with a message that solves their problems.  Key Quotes“Simplus was doing a few million and had just barely done a series A. [We had]  a growth rate of over 300% year over year. I attribute so much of that to our CEO who really empowered each team member on the executive team to do the very best that they could. And then he kept altogether with his vision and focus on culture. It was really an amazing opportunity; since then [in] the past 18 months we've been acquired by Infosys. That has been another humongous learning curve to learn how to be part of a massive organization of 250,000 people.”“ [Agencies] work really well if you're having trouble retaining people, then an agency can give you that unlimited support. You can fire your agency at any time if they're not performing well for you with no consequences. At the agency, we go by the hour. And so there's a hundred percent utilization out of your team. So if the price is low enough and the utilization is a hundred percent, there's a really good case to fill in some of those gaps“When marketing [takes on] more of an ancillary role, then you lose a lot of the positivity that you can have from marketing. I have finance meetings with the team each week.. Not only do you have to connect internally [with teams], but you also need to connect with your partners with your customers and do joint co-marketing with your partners to reach the same customers. It's a whole lot of relationship-building, even more than I would have expected when I just started doing marketing deliverables all those years ago.” “I know that I'm only going to get event ROI if I empower sales leaders to lead the event. And [sales] knows that [they're] only going to get marketing support if those salespeople [are] accountable for the event. So there's a really great understanding of each other.”“Every sales leader is a little bit different and you have to be adaptable. Marketing has to take a support role, aligned behind the sales leader,  and say, ‘I'll use your playbook. What does your playbook look like?'” “I approach marketing [believing] everybody's got good ideas; the delivery team's got amazing ideas; our legal department gives us great marketing ideas; we can all flow together and collect our marketing knowledge.” “As you [grow] more into the enterprise you can see what other lines of business are doing. For us, a 30% growth rate is now what we're achieving, or what we're desiring to achieve because the account sizes are so much larger. So when you're a little company, you can expect an insane growth rate. And then when you're in an enterprise your growth rates are going to be more like 30%. When you're forecasting, [do] some underwriting on what other companies like you were doing and setting your goal, maybe 10% higher, so you can crush your competition.” BioAmy Osmond Cook, Ph.D., is the Chief Marketing Officer of Simplus, an Infosys Company. At Simplus, she led the marketing efforts from Series A through acquisition, helping the company achieve a 3-year growth rate of 1,578% and acquire seven companies before being acquired by Infosys for $250M. Amy is also the founder of Osmond Marketing, which has been named one of the fastest-growing businesses in Utah by MountainWest Capital for five years in a row. She is an adjunct faculty member at BYU-Hawaii and has taught business and communication courses at BYU, University of Utah, and ASU intermittently for the past 25 years. Amy is a columnist for the Daily Herald and a regular contributor to Forbes, the Orange County Register, and other publications. She received her doctorate from the University of Utah in Organizational Communication, and her research interests, informed by Critical Theory, include organizational identification, communication ethics, and gender dynamics in the workplace. ---Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world's number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing.

Selling To Corporate
STC058 How to map out your 2022 B2B sales strategy without stress or overwhelm

Selling To Corporate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 34:16


Have you been struggling to set your B2B sales strategy for 2022? Perhaps you're not sure what you should be including or how to make your corporate sales strategy fit your new revenue goals?  Having a solid B2B sales strategy is integral to the success and growth of your business next year - and getting your strategy mapped out before 2022 means that you have the time to make strong business decisions and create a manageable implementation plan that will help you hit your goals next year without stress or overwhelm. That's why I've recorded this episode; to help you make key decisions about your business in 2022 - and make sure that you have your best year in business.   In this episode, I'm sharing;   Who should be attending Converting Corporates in April 2022 (02:24) Why it's important to set your B2B sales goals now (04:29) What you'll be able to achieve by the end of this episode - and how you'll be able to create your B2B sales plan. (06:02) The most important considerations you need to make when creating your 2022 B2B sales strategy (07:28) How to strategically set the right revenue target for 2022 - without just hoping that it's right (08:51) Why not all customers are created equal when it comes to B2B sales (10:24) Why everyone needs to stop saying ‘I just need more leads' in 2022 (12:32) How to set realistic expectations of yourself and your B2B sales performance (14:40) Why you need to be creating your sales plan around having 40-42 working weeks in a year (17:22) The top three factors you'll need to consider when creating your B2B sales strategy (19:06) How to effectively reverse engineer your goals into practical action steps (19:46) How to utilise visibility and credibility to add value to your sales strategy (22:07) Why business plateaus aren't linked to your sales strategy… and what you really need to change to see growth (23:56) The biggest challenge / best question to ask yourself when setting your new B2B sales strategy (26:20) Why I'll be changing my referral strategy (and who I refer business to) in 2022 (28:09) The importance of assessing your ROI from 2021 investments and how it'll impact your business in 2022 (30:19) Assessing and troubleshooting the changes you'll need to make to hit your goals next year. (30:42) An introduction the the Selling to Corporate ® podcast episodes that will be appearing over the Christmas period (33:14) Key Resources Mentioned in this Episode:   Ready to attend Converting Corporates 2022 on April 12th and 13th 2022? Then make sure you grab one of our final 20 tickets here: https://selltocorporates.com/converting-corporates-2021/    Link to Suzanne Dibble's Legal Templates / Black Friday offer: https://www.smallbusinesslegalacademy.com/black-friday?_go=jessica73    Join The C Suite ® now! If you're looking to get the best support in selling your services to corporate organisations, not to mention hundreds of email templates, swipe files and proposal outlines so that you really can convert at much higher rates and sell your services more successfully then click here to join now: https://bit.ly/join-the-c-suite   Converting Corporates Bundle: If you're looking to learn the foundational pieces to successfully sell your services to corporate organisations, grab this fabulous self study programme here! You'll learn how to; Create your 250K corporate sales plan, set your business development strategy for success, understand and successfully generate qualified leads and hear from real hiring managers on their top tips for pitching to organisations! http://bit.ly/convertingcorporatesbundle   How to leave a review - http://bit.ly/howtoreviewmypodcast   Book an exploratory chat with me! I'm offering the final exploratory sessions with me so that you can ask any questions you have about The C Suite ® and how it can benefit your business. These opportunities are incredibly limited - so if you'd like my eyes on your business and a totally transparent conversation about how The C Suite ® could support your goals, book it here now: https://bit.ly/corporateexploratorysession   Top 5 Business Development Questions: If you're looking to convert more business development calls into sales? You need to be asking the right questions and getting the best information to support future work. Download my Top 5 BDQs here and start getting quality information from your prospects: https://bit.ly/top-5-business-development-questions

Group Home Riches
Will this be you in 30 days? Inspiring Interview with Nichole - The Mobile Home Mami

Group Home Riches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 51:37


In this inspiring interview, learn how a struggling social worker went from working check to check, struggling to pay bills, to investing in niche Real Estate - Mobile Homes AND Group Homes - and making HUNDREDS of thousands of dollars... ALL IN A YEAR'S TIME!!!! Folks, this is yet another story highlighting the difference in mindset... Between those who sit back in analysis paralysis, and those that TAKE ACTION! Although Nichole was successful in her Mobile Home flipping business, she was still feeling the stress of problem properties, and the feeling of always needing a deal. When she discovered www.grouphomeriches.com, she found the formula to create massive wealth (close to 100% ROI on her 1st property) while ALSO satisfying that "caretaker personality" need to help her community as well! If you too have the desire to be your own boss, earn an unimaginable return on your investments, start a business with little to no money down, and help those who are in need... Will you make the decision to start today, and take action? Or will you continue to sit back and analyze? If you decide to finally take action, Nichole has 1 question for you... "Which tomato are you going to pick???" ( make sure to listen to the end for this powerful story ;) ) Sign up for your free training material at www.grouphomeriches.com Nichole was SHOCKED at how affordable our GOLD COURSE was. Grab that to streamline things and check out all of our PRODUCTS HERE. To learn more about Nichole, head to her Instagram @mobilehome_mami

Trade Show University
Ep 124 - Thank You's to the Trade Show Industry & a Request

Trade Show University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 4:44


Hi to all my friends in the trade show industry, all the businesses that exhibit at and sponsored trade shows that any person just wide to learn more about these incredible events we call trade show. I suppose conferences and more. I want to welcome you all to a very special Thanksgiving episode of Trade Show University. Very short episode today. I'm Jim Cermak and in the spirit of Thanksgiving, I just wanted to send out some quick thank you's. But I'm the first I'm going to start off with a request. My request to you is this, I want you to take time today to say thank you to someone who maybe you haven't talked with in a while. It could be a friend, family member, somebody who impacted you in some way in your life. Maybe they're a good friend. Maybe you admire their work ethic. Maybe. Teacher who made a strong impact on your life? Whoever it could be. Take time to think about something you're thankful for and who it is as responsible for that. It could be something big can be something little, but something impactful might be something that happened yesterday, or maybe, maybe several years. Okay. Now, once you figure out that person and that thing that impacted you, pick up the phone, call that person, or maybe go visit them, leave them a voicemail, send them a text, do something to contact that person. You will never know how you can make someone's day by just reaching out and making a difference. So be sure to do that. That's my request to you. And I hope that you will take me up on that request. Now I want to send a few quick thank yous in the spirit of Thanksgiving. First of all, I have to thank the almighty God for creating me in love. And I wanted to say thank you to Jesus Christ, his son for saving me and the holy spirit for guiding my path every single day. I need to thank My beautiful bride, Mary Ann for believing in me and my dream, supporting me and supporting this podcast every step of the way. She's just amazing. For my kids, Jake and Brittany, and my son-in-law Bryan for their constant love and support. Thank you guys. I always look forward to our family mastermind sessions together where we, we talk business and just get to catch up as a family. For The trade shows the events, the expos virtual live and hybrid. Thank you for your excitement, your endless opportunities, which initially drew me in and made me such a huge fan. And for your perseverance during this past year, it has been a struggle for the industry, but coming back strong and together, we will emerge stronger. I am so hopeful for that. For all of my guests who invested the time to be part of Trade Show University, while sharing their insights, their tips, their expert advice to help all of us have better shows, stronger businesses. I thank you each and every one of you and for those listening and maybe new listeners go back and check out the amazing library of interviews that we have as I've, I'm just so blessed to have a hat on so many amazing guests, so many amazing. And lastly, but most importantly, I want to thank all of you, my listeners, the trade show professionals. And I like to call you the trade show warriors, the people that battle every day to have an amazing event, they made you make this all worthwhile. I appreciate the questions, the suggestions, the comments that you email in the ratings and reviews you leave on apple podcasts, the comments and likes on social. All means the world to me and why I do it to help make your world better, to help you make your shows better. And of course, a better ROI. So I thank you each and every one of you really from the bottom of my heart, I'm so grateful. So here is wishing you all a blessing, joyous and healthy holiday season for you and your loved ones. And of course, enjoy Thanksgiving and. I hope you all have an opportunity to feast today, keep listening in because we have so many more fantastic episodes coming up, which I just cannot wait to share with you. And one...

Lotus Life The Podcast - With Rose Tautari
Your Human Design PROFILE - Vibing with your Soul Community as a Soulpreneur

Lotus Life The Podcast - With Rose Tautari

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 74:43


Voice Marketing with Emily Binder
How to Know if Your Marketing is Working

Voice Marketing with Emily Binder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:14


How to track your marketing efforts simply and effectively and find out which tactics or channels to abandon. Don't overcomplicate things. And remember the hidden value of branding through content marketing like social media, a podcast or other voice marketing (like WealthVoice / Alexa skills): these tactics may not have a direct immediate ROI but don't discount them. Brand is everything, and it's built over time and trust. Enjoying the show? Please leave a review for this podcast on Apple Podcasts and subscribe free anywhere: https://emilybinder.com/podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1769: Happy Thanksgiving, Real ROI, Inflation Lies, Richard Nixon, Paul Volcker, Inflation Induced Debt Destruction, Jurisdictional Diversification

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 31:44


Happy thanksgiving!  We may have a bunch of problems in our country but we can still be grateful for not waking up in North Korea today!   He also talks about lessons from the 1970's, the real rates of return, the giant gap in inflation reports and the big lie that "inflation is good for the poor." We also hear from Ashley about the history of Zimbabwe and what lessons it can teach investors about jurisdictional diversification. Key Takeaways: [1:23] Happy thanksgiving! [3:10] Inflation and real rates of return, don't outrun the bear [4:51] Study the 1970s: Nixon and the big lie [7:04] Chart: High Inflation & Real Rates: 1981 vs. 2021. Review the previous Dan Amerman podcast HERE. [8:56] Giant gap in inflation- the bear in the woods is just not true [11:15] Repeating history [13:13] Another lie: "Inflation is good for the poor." [15:46] The poor are worse off compared to the prosperity that's been created. [17:03] Exalting the benefits of inflation- to the investor class [18:27] Inflation Induced Debt Destruction (Watch the video HERE) Let inflation benefit you [20:31] Putting Pandora back in the box [22:00] The Latin American experience [22:54] Single's day- Chinese Valentine's Day [25:53] The Ashley Report: What Zimbabwe can teach investors about jurisdictional diversification   Mentions:  Chart: High Inflation & Real Rates: 1981 vs. 2021 DanielAmerman.com Bureau of Labor Statistics   Tweetables: Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it.   The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization  

Mindful Multi Family Show
Mindful Multi Family Show #189 with Chris Salerno (Alex speaks about leaving his W-2 job and getting into Real Estate investing)

Mindful Multi Family Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 39:33


Alex Babayev began his real estate career at the young age of 21, when he bought his first condo in Atlanta, GA. Ever since the sale of that first property, Alex has maintained a passion for buying and selling real estate and has never looked back. Today, Alex enjoys fruitful relationships with other investors across the country who value his expert insights into property flipping, as well as his commitment to close deals that have real value for all parties involved. For Alex, cash is king. It allows him greater freedom to close deals quickly, stay competitive, and maintain a rock-solid portfolio, and he loves teaching others how to leverage this same approach. Currently, Alex specializes in value-add renovations, maximizing client ROI. Alex also works with investors from across the country who are curious about investing in real estate but who may not have the time, experience or knowledge, but do have the capital to invest. Alex manages the project from start to finish: asset acquisition, renovation, and ultimately asset disposition for a profitable short term gain. If you like what you hear be sure to like, share, subscribe!     If you like what you hear be sure to like, share, subscribe! Podcast- Mindful Multi-Family show Instagram- Chris_Salerno_ Youtube Channel- Chris Salerno Website- www.qccapitalgroup.com

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Finding & Funding Real Estate Deals with Anson Young | EP80

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:53


Anson Young is a Real Estate Agent and Investor with Hundreds of Transactions Completed in Each Category of Real Estate. Anson and his team Specialize in Marketing directly to Sellers for Off-market Deals, Using Many of the Methods that can be Found in his Book Finding & Funding Great Deals. When not Working, Anson can be Found Exploring the Wilds of Colorado's Rocky Mountains with his family, Reading Favourite Books to his Son, and Attending Loud Rock Concerts. In this episode we talked about:  • Anson's Bio & Background  • Anson's First Steps in Real Estate Business  • Becoming a Real Estate Agent   • Anson's Main Focus in Real Estate  • Raising capital   • Private Landing  • Sourcing Deals   • Building an Off-Market List  • Prospecting and finding  Opportunities  • Anson's Thoughts on Inflation and Interest Rates  • Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned   Useful links: https://www.instagram.com/younganson/?hl=en https://www.youtube.com/c/ansonyoung Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in real estate or business that you wish you knew when you started out.   Anson (31m 43s): So I kind of, I definitely always traded just short-term money for, you know, not worrying about long-term things and, you know, it's like, oh, you're in your twenties. You know, you don't really care too much about it, but once you get up into your forties and you're kind of still doing the same thing, it's probably not the best idea. And so I would, I would go back and tell myself for sure, just like, Hey, keep like even a third of the amount of houses that you're doing, and then you won't have to work when you're 40.   So   Jesse (32m 17s): There you go. That's a, that's a good point. Okay. In, in terms of, for that person, that's getting into our industry, what do you tell them in terms of your view on mentorship?   Anson (32m 32s): Yeah, that's a really, really good question. I'm a big fan of mentors, whether it's kind of formal mentors and informal mentors, you know, people who were willing to help you up. And I would say, just find somebody who aligns with your values and then see how you can provide value to them so that they can help you get to where you want to go. And then once you're at a place where, you know, a few years along the line, I think that mentorship works both ways where you should have a hand up and a hand down.   So you're, you know, you'll graduate through mentors that you're working with and every step along the way, you should be helping bring people up as well. And that teaches you a lot of things too, as you're teaching and working through things with other investors as well. So you've kind of learned by teaching and then obviously you learn by learning from somebody who's where you want to be.   Jesse (33m 31s): Yeah. That's great. Great answer as well. Okay. In terms of, let's put a pin in rich dad, poor dad. So put that one aside, but what is a book that you find yourself just recommending over and over again?   Anson (33m 45s): Yeah. So my, that is, it was a book that I also give about the most as well. And it's obstacle is the way by Ryan holiday and it's a book on stoicism and it's, it's really helped me in my personal life and also through business as well. And so it's just an, and an outlook on life and on business and situations that I wasn't exposed to until I kind of started getting into it. And that book definitely hammered it home for me.   So   Jesse (34m 19s): That's cool. I don't think we've ever had that book recommended on the show, but I've, I've definitely had people say it's a, it's a killer book. Yep. Okay. Last question. First car, make and model.   Anson (34m 32s): I had a 1979 tan VW rabbit. That is   Jesse (34m 38s): Unreal.   Anson (34m 39s): Two door.   Jesse (34m 40s): Yeah. That's pretty good, man. Like 79. I just looking at you. I would've, I would've assumed it'd be the eighties or nineties, but that's, that's quite the car.   Anson (34m 50s): That's the same year I was born. It just happened to be, my dad's always worked on VWs my whole life. And so my step-mom drove like a Cabriolet and my dad's had like dozens and dozens of bugs and, and yeah, when it came time to me, for me to start driving, you know, he bought this 79 tan rabbit that he's like, this is yours. If you get your grades up. And it took me a little while, but finally got my grades up enough to, to drive it. So   Jesse (35m 20s): I love how they're bringing back the seventies and eighties, the retro stitching for a, for a lot of their, their new models. So it got kind of that vintage look.   Anson (35m 29s): I'd love to see it. I'd love to see a new rabbit. Yeah.   Jesse (35m 32s): Oh yeah. Bring it back. Awesome. All right. Answered for those of you that want to connect or reach out or have any questions. I know you're doing work with bigger pockets. Maybe you could tell, tell listeners where they can go on the Google machine.   Anson (35m 47s): Yeah. If you go to the Google machine and if you want to connect with me bigger pockets, this is probably the easiest way to do it. It's just, if you just search my name on the site, you'll find my, my, my profile. Think I'm the only answer on the young, on there still. So that's good. Yeah. And then yeah, if you want to find me on Instagram at young Anson, and if you want to find me on YouTube, I do do videos for bigger pockets and starting to do more videos for myself as well. And so you can find me there.   Jesse (36m 16s): My guest today has been aunts and young aunts and thanks for being part of working capital.   Anson (36m 21s): Thanks, Jesse. Thanks so much.   Jesse (36m 31s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Using Data-Driven Algorithms To Find Your Agency's Sweet Spot

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:01


Do you know how using AI and data-driven algorithms could help you save money on inefficient positioning? Anne Cheng is an entrepreneur that started her business with an idea in mind: what if she could get inside the heads of people and understand what information they required to make decisions? Supercharge Lab is a cognitive artificial intelligence company that uses AI and data to try to understand what goes on inside customers' heads, or rather listen to the voice in their head. In this episode, Anne sat down with Jason to explain how this AI technology works, why business owners should embrace that it is the future and use this innovation to their benefit, and how agency owners could use it to create specific targeting and sales and marketing content that resonates with its audiences and find their sweet spot in the market. 3 Golden Nuggets Getting inside people's heads. How can we really understand what goes on inside someone's head? Anne explains that what really gives us away is how we write, instead of what we write. The tones, the structure, the number of emojis, and the type of words we use are giveaways that offer a glimpse into things like our emotional state, personality style, social styles of interaction, and conflict management. Her company uses this data to build algorithms that help them put people in categories of psychological profiles or cognitive styles. “After we applied it to sales and marketing, we've seen a significant lift in our customer ROI,” she says. How the industry will change. Will AI replace what agencies are doing for clients? This technology is becoming quickly democratized. A few years ago artificial intelligence was all about building training models and putting in huge massive slices of data. Today it costs $16 and 39 cents to run a learning model. It can be really quick and easy to train a model with a high level of accuracy. Is the technology strong enough to completely replace a human? “I think not at this point,” Anne told us. There is still a long way to go before that, but it is the future. For now, it's all about not wasting money on inefficient positioning. “Data-driven algorithms are not the enemy,” she adds. Advantages for agencies. We should always use new technologies and innovations to our benefit, and to benefit our clients. We all know that agency owners struggle with their own marketing and have a hard time treating themselves like their own clients. Anne believes this struggle comes from not really knowing where your sweet spot is and that using these technologies could help you experiment. Using algorithms can help you determine the accuracy of your targeting. For example, if you would like to go after medium-sized businesses with revenues between 10 to 50 million, you can test your response rates. Algorithms are great ways to experiment. It's cheap, it's fast, and you're not wasting time. Sponsors and Resources Gusto: Today's episode is sponsored by Gusto, an all-in-one people platform for payroll, benefits, HR where you can unify your data. Gusto automatically applies your payroll taxes and directly deposits your team's paychecks, freeing you up to work on your business. Head over to gusto.com/agency to enjoy an exclusive offer for podcast listeners. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Stop Wasting Resources and Use Data-Driven Algorithms to Find Your Sweet Spot in The Market Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk here, and we've got another great episode coming to you. And we're going to talk around AI and what you can do with really kind of targeting the right audience, as well as having the AI tool, write the copy for you to convert faster. So I'm excited to get into this episode. Uh, so let's jump in. Hey, Anne. Welcome to the show. Anne: [00:00:31] Thanks for having me, Jason. Jason: [00:00:32] Yeah. So tell us who you are and what do you guys do? Anne: [00:00:36] Well, my name is Anne and I'm the founder and CEO of Supercharge Lab. Supercharge Lab is a cognitive artificial intelligence company, which means we take AI and a lot of data and we attempt to understand what goes on inside your head, or rather listen to the voice in your head. And we do that for the purpose of applying it to sales and marketing. We try to improve the ROI as far as our clients. And so far it's been quite a ride. Jason: [00:01:04] Cool. And so how did you… how'd you, how'd you all come up with developing this? Anne: [00:01:11] Well, I guess it started with the idea that we said, what if we could get inside the heads of people and understand what information they required to make decisions? Uh, and that way we could make decision-making more predictable, uh, less noise and biased. And, well, improve results across all kinds of positions that are being made. Whether it's medical decisions or diagnosis, whether it's sales and marketing, uh, purchase behavior. Um, so, well we decided to try to figure out how people, what information people take in, in order to make decisions. And we came up with an algorithm that profiles, the information, uh, that people take in the site, the cognitive style of people, what we call or the psychological profile. And, uh, well the rest is history. After we applied it to sales and marketing, we've seen significant lift in our customer ROI. Um, we have had customers who literally renew their campaigns with us so often that they tell us they cannot see a day without, uh, using our solution. Jason: [00:02:20] Awesome. And tell us kind of, how does… How did you guys really kind of write the algorithm in order to get inside our heads? I mean, how does all that work? That's always fascinating. Anne: [00:02:34] So I think that's a great question, Jason. So a lot of people look at what we write because when we, when we write, um, whenever we write the contents of what we write is driven by who audiences is what we want to say. Uh, but a lot of people fail to realize that what, what really gives us away is how we write. The tones, the structure, the number of emojis or bullet points, or the kind of words that we use. That actually is the voice inside our head. That's the tone of the voice inside our head to tell gifts, clues into things like, you know, your emotional state, your, your personality style, your social styles of interaction. Or even your style of conflict management. Um, by understanding how it be right to be basically we're able to take these language models, parse it into an algorithm. And well, uh, we have been able to put everybody in some categories of psychological profiles or what we call cognitive styles, um, and hopefully using rules based and data-driven, uh, algorithms, were able to cut out a lot of the noise that actually, you know, gifts written comes from manual advertising and marketing. Jason: [00:03:57] I feel, I feel dirty. You're profiling me. Anne: [00:04:02] No, I don't do that. Jason: [00:04:04] Um, so. How would someone… As an agency, you know, they, and I'm talking more about not for their clients, but really for themselves, right? So we just got done as we're recording this, this week, our digital agency experience, where we have, you know, 28 of the best agency owners come out, um, to my house in Colorado, when we brainstorm on strategies and what's working. And the common theme, and this is among most digital agency owners. And if… If, uh, if you don't admit this you're supporting terrorism. But we, they struggle with doing their own marketing and creating themselves as their own clients. Um, and a lot of them struggle with just identifying who their audience… Cause they try to go after everybody. So how could, you know, AI really helped them out in order to reach more of the audience? Because they may not know who they're targeting yet. Anne: [00:05:08] Yeah. So I think one of the biggest struggles as a… well a marketing organization is actually understanding where your sweet spot is. And, uh, you know, using algorithms, you can actually do a lot of experimentation. Uh, one of the biggest things that, um, AI does, is that it gives you a score of how much you are able to resonate, how accurate, you know, your targeting is. So if, for example, you think you would like to go after, you know, a medium-sized business with revenues between 10 to 50 million, and you don't really know whether this is really the sweet spot for you. You can actually test, um, the, the targeting and you can test things like, you know, what we call your, your outbound messages as well as your response rates. And if you see that your response rates are lower than another particular industry, you know…  It's possibly time to change and don't throw good money after, you know, a bad result all the time. And so that's what Einstein says is stupidity, you know, expecting a different result by doing the same thing, all, all the time is insanity. So what I would do is use algorithms, use artificial intelligence, or what may be called big data, uh, to understand what your audience is and test the vigor at which they will respond. Now, I've done that a lot with myself, with my own audience. Um, and I've noticed that, you know, we try to grow, uh, our customers by, you know, going after bigger companies. Well, it doesn't work. Um, we, we realized that we were not getting any conversions. We were not getting any customers inquiring. So we said, you know, maybe we should go back to, uh, the smaller businesses. And at the same time, we change up the different industry. So algorithms are great ways to experiment and it's cheap. It's fast. It, it takes me three days to identify whether, you know, this is the right market. You're not wasting time. So yeah. Jason: [00:07:28] Taking care of your employees has never been more important than right now. And while paydays are great, running payroll is a major pain, calculating taxes, deductions, compliance. None of it's easy. Unless of course, you have Gusto. Gusto is a simple online payroll and benefits built for your small business. Gusto automatically applies your payroll taxes and directly deposits your team's paychecks, freeing you up to work on your business. Plus, with Gustos help, you can offer benefits like 401k's health insurance, workers' comp, and a lot more. And because you're a smart agency masterclass listener, you're going to get three months free once you run your first payroll. Go to gusto.com/agency. That's gusto.com/agency for three free months. Very cool. So will AI… Will AI replace what agencies are doing for clients? Like I look at it as, and I've been telling agencies like this for a long time. And if you think about kind of the car industry, you know, many, you know, many, a hundred years ago, I guess, you know, the car industry created dealers or the manufacturer created dealers, and they were the middlemen selling to the public because you can't go to the dealer. Um, and forever, it was that way. And then, you know, Tesla came out and you, you don't go through a dealer… You buy it right from the manufacturer. And I kind of see a lot of this starting to happen with agencies that are just doing a particular service where, you know, Facebook and Google would always promote agencies. But I kind of see them starting to kind of pull back from agencies a little bit because now people can go directly to them and not use the middlemen. Anne: [00:09:33] Yeah, for sure. I think, uh, one of the things about technology is that is becoming very quickly democratized. Artificial intelligence just a few years ago, was all about, you know, building training models, you know, putting in a lot of data, huge massive slices of data. Today it costs me $16 and 39 cents to run a learning model. Uh, it takes maybe about an hour to, to train a model. And you know, it, it can be really, really quick and easy, um, with a high level of accuracy to train a, uh, artificial intelligence model. Is, um, the technology strong enough to completely replace a human? I think not at this point. I think that is still a way to go, uh, where, you know, copy is not going to sound like it's artificially written. Uh, so that's, that's something which I think is going to, uh, have to develop a little bit more. But to understand your audience, to predict the audience with a level of, um, certainty, it's starting to become quite democratized. So I think, yes, logic-based artificial intelligence is going to upend the advertising industry. But that being said, artificial intelligence to going to upend almost every industry, if you let it. Jason: [00:11:01] Yeah, yeah. Well, it's, you know… That's what innovation is. It should always challenge the status quo and make us better. And you know, the one thing I always tell agencies is use the new technology, the new innovations to your benefit, and to benefit your clients, you know, going forward. Um, this has all been great, Anne. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Anne: [00:11:24] Yeah, I think, you know, the biggest question that we have as marketing organizations is how can we use that wastage? Um, today up to 26% of ad spend… It's wasted on inefficient, uh, positioning and efficient messaging. And I think a lot of us have to try to learn that, you know, data-driven algorithms and rules-based algorithms can… are not the enemy. Our enemy is embracing… um, the, the innovation that is coming. So I think our enemy is truly ourselves. If we get over ourselves, we can definitely grow the business, um, in a massive, in a major way. Jason: [00:12:09] Awesome. What's the website people can go and check you guys out? Anne: [00:12:14] Well, it's superchargedlab.com. Remember as supercharged lab without an S at the end dot com. Jason: [00:12:20] Awesome. Well, thanks so much for coming on the show, Anne. You did great lots of great insights. And if you guys enjoyed this episode, make sure you guys subscribe, make sure you comment. And if you guys want to be around the best agency owners out there and really tap into their heads, because maybe you haven't tapped into the AI yet, um, I want to invite all of you to go to digitalagencyelite.com and apply. And, uh, if we feel that you're right and the group's right for you, we'll have a chat and… So good at digitalagencyelite.com. And until next time, have a Swenk day.

Living Off Rentals
#93 - How to Massively Increase Efficiency in you Vacation Rental Business - Andy McNulty and Tyann Marcink

Living Off Rentals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:19


Our two guests for today have a ton of experience in the short-term rental space, and they are the hosts of The Guest Cast. We have Andy McNulty and Tyann Marcink on the show. Andy is the co-founder and CEO of Touch Stay. Tyann, on the other hand, is an owner/investor/manager and Touch Stay's community ambassador. In this episode, they introduce Touch Stay—what it is and how it works. They weigh in on the absence of clear communication between travelers and rental accommodation hosts, how Touch Stay fills that gap and the opportunities in the vacation rental industry. Tyann also talks about one of her rentals which is considered a unique stay. If you want to know how to maximize your guests' experience at your short-term rental property, this episode is for you! Key Takeaways [02:05] An overview of Tyann's real estate journey and how Andy came up with Touch Stay [07:30] Touch Stay is a progressive web app that creates digital guest welcome books [14:45] On the ROI that Touch Stay users get [18:55] Who Touch Stay is designed for [25:38] How Touch Stay can lead to repeat customers [28:18] On the future of the vacation rental industry [33:08] The responsibilities of owners, hosts, investors, and managers [36:05] About Tyann's bank-turned-vacation rental Links Touch Stay - https://touchstay.com/ Touch Stay on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/touchstay/ Andy's email - andy@touchstay.com Tyann's email - tyann@touchstay.com The Guest Cast - https://touchstay.com/podcast/ Living Off Rentals YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRpWXe2mWqBm5vvbO2R2AdA?sub_confirmation=1 Living Off Rentals Facebook Group - www.facebook.com/groups/livingoffrentals Living Off Rentals Website - www.livingoffrentals.com Living Off Rentals Instagram - www.instagram.com/livingoffrentals  

Not Your Average Investor
154 | JWB's Property Of The Week - Brand New Construction w/ 7%+ Expected Returns On Investment

Not Your Average Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 72:38


JWB Co-Founder, Gregg Cohen will reveal his JWB turnkey property of the week, take questions from the audience, and share insights into the Jacksonville real estate market.This week's featured property...- Is brand new construction- will generate positive monthly cash flow- will earn 7+% est. ROI w/o including home price appreciation!Be the first to know which property Gregg recommends each week as we reveal it live on the show. This is your chance to pick the brain of an investor with 15 years of experience, that oversees $450M worth of assets, and genuinely wants to help you out.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Daily Sales Tips
1040: How To Take Care Of Your Sales Team In 2022 And Beyond - Maria Pardee

Daily Sales Tips

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 5:12


"Taking care of your team members always provides a great ROI and prioritizing the team member experience can go a long way to retaining top talent, driving engagement, and ultimately driving sales." - Maria Pardee in today's Tip 1040 How do you take care of your sales team? Join the conversation at DailySales.Tips/1040 and learn more about Maria! Have feedback? Want to share a sales tip? Call or text the Sales Success Hotline: 512-777-1442 or Email: scott@top1.fm

The Practice of the Practice Podcast | Innovative Ideas to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice
Ask Joe: Paid advertising, should I use it? How to calculate ROI? Do Facebook ads work? POP 638

The Practice of the Practice Podcast | Innovative Ideas to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 15:16


Does paid advertising work and should you use it? What are some important numbers to know when considering any sort of advertising? How can... The post Ask Joe: Paid advertising, should I use it? How to calculate ROI? Do Facebook ads work? POP 638 appeared first on How to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice| Practice of the Practice.

Social Minds - Social Media Marketing Answered
Ep. 163 - Answered: Is ROI the best way to measure success?

Social Minds - Social Media Marketing Answered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 7:35


ROI is most likely your main campaign metric, but ROI goes down the more you grow. That's why you have to consider smarter ways to measure your performance and learn how to avoid relying on ROI, which we answer in this episode. Got a question or suggestion for the Social Minds podcast? Get in touch at social.minds@socialchain.com

Style Diaries Decoded Podcastâ„¢
Hot Pocket Closets or Picasso Wardrobes

Style Diaries Decoded Podcastâ„¢

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 58:53


A wise man once said, " I just want a Picasso in my casa.." JAY-ZDo you want a meaningless wardrobe or a timeless one?  Right on time for the 2021 Holiday Shopping Rush, we've lined out some serious Style Alignment dilemmas that rear their anxious head  this time of year. In Episode 6, we're talking straight to your face, no cut cards, because well, we love you Decoded Squad!  To celebrate the spirit of giving thanks, we're showing you our appreciation by giving you legit Style Cheat Codes to save that $$$$, & helping you add value to your closet.Black Friday & Cyber Monday can feel like a whole scam, BUT not with what we've packed in a nice gift box for you. Pull up a chair to Intentional Shopping 101. Learn how to avoid buying microwave clothing via (some)Fast Fashion brands, decipher what is & what isn't considered an investment piece, & feel fancy with your friends when you quote acronyms like ROI & CPW in your Style Group Chat. Get ready to drop the mic! P.S. - We shared cringeworthy Wardrobe Pet Peeves & there's homework. We'd love to give you an A++ by hearing from you directly HERE. Your answers could be reviewed on the show! Stay connected with Adrienne and Fabienne:Instagram - @stylediariesdecoded, @curatedstylesbyadrienne, @iamfabiamiWeb - Style Diaries Decoded Send your Listener questions to: contact@stylediariesdecoded.comJoin the Decoded Squad, stay tapped in!Want to join the conversation?  Be a Guest on the Podcast *Remember to Share, Subscribe, Rate, and Review!*

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S28E11 - Throwback Tuesday - The ROI of Gratitude, Active Gratitude, and the Gratitude Lifestyle, with Kristin Petrucci

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 33:38


In this "Throwback Tuesday" HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Westover talks with Kristin Petrucci about the importance of gratitude, a gratitude lifestyle, and the ROI of gratitude (Originally Aired June 15, 2020). See the video here: https://youtu.be/2EkzbZcNp6Y. Kristin Petrucci (https://www.linkedin.com/in/kpspeaks/) received her post graduate positive psychology training from the University of Utah. It helped save her life after suffering from brain trauma and damage in March of 2016. Known as the Mindset Architect, She is a Mother of 5 kids, Transformational Speaker, Corporate Mindfulness Consultant and Executive Coach. Her main focus is to Build a Victory mindset incorporating micro-practices: gratitude, wonder and connection--helping others thrive not just surviive. She practices a Gratitude Lifestyle and is the author of: Daily Reflections: Therapeutic Gratitude Practice Journal, Host of Gratitude Stories, Founder of KP Speaks, Buonaforchettaut, & Co-founder of Women Soul Summit www.kpspeaks.com Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

Wellness Force Radio
423 Ryan Duey | Ice Baths: Cold Therapy For Weight Loss, Immunity, Metabolism & Mental/Emotional Health

Wellness Force Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 92:35


Cold plunging for me - it's the energy. I just get in there for 2-3 minutes and my morning is accelerated. I'm clear and I'm concise. It's a fast-track in meditation. I could go and sit for 10-20 minutes, which I encourage people to do as well, but 2-3 minutes in the Plunge gives me almost that same feeling in my mind as the mental apps get turned off. - Ryan Duey   Are You Stressed Out Lately? Take a deep breath with the M21™ wellness guide: a simple yet powerful 21 minute morning system that melts stress and gives you more energy through 6 science-backed practices and breathwork. Click HERE to download for free. Is Your Energy Low? Get more superfoods to improve your energy, digestion, gut health plus also reduce inflammation and blood sugar. Click HERE to try Paleovalley's Apple Cider Vinegar Complex + Save 15% with the code 'JOSH' *Review The WF Podcast & WIN $150 in wellness prizes! *Join The Facebook Group   Wellness Force Radio Episode 423 Founder of Plunge and Capitol Floats, Ryan Duey, explores the power of conscious breathing with cold therapy, how to cultivate both physical and emotional resilience with a daily cold therapy practice plus what brown fat is and how it accelerates your metabolism. Did you know that pairing cold therapy with breathwork can give you supreme longevity and wellness benefits? Join us as we take a deep dive look at the benefits of cold therapy for weight loss, immunity, and mental health.   Biohack Your Mind & Body with Plunge Ice Baths!   Get $150 off your Plunge order with the code 'WELLNESSFORCE'   Plunge's revolutionary Cold Plunge uses powerful cooling, filtration, and sanitation to give you cold, clean water whenever you want it, making it far superior to an ice bath or chest freezer. The Plunge is safe for indoor or outdoor use and we've made installation truly plug-and-plunge. Fill your Plunge up with a hose, turn it on, set your temp (down to 39F) and you're all set. Plunge was born out of optimistic vision during a challenging time. In March 2020, COVID-19 shut down Michael's float spas and with his newly found free time, he looked at the cold plunges on the market and found them shockingly expensive. Enlisting the help of his dad, they were determined to create a more affordable option. After countless iterations and improvements, the Plunge was born. A friendship turned into a powerful partnership when Ryan Duey came on board. Michael and Ryan have a common passion for cold plunging, floating, and building win-win relationships. After building the first 20 Plunges out of Michael's garage, they have since opened a factory in Sacramento and are sending Plunges all over the world!   Listen To Episode 423 As Ryan Duey Uncovers: [1:30] Float Tanks, Plant Medicine & Ice Baths Ryan Duey Get $150 off your Plunge order with the code 'WELLNESSFORCE' Capitol Floats The changes Josh is going through as a new parent and how doing cold plunges have really been helping him. How Ryan's motorcycle accident in Thailand launched him into the world of wellness. His first experiences with plant medicine after the accident and why he felt called. Temple of the Way of Light Why he became interested in float tanks as a way to help him prepare for his plant medicine experience. What messages he received from his plant medicine journey and the work he continued to do afterward to heal. How Ryan listened to his intuition when he wasn't ready to begin a float tank business but he could relax because he knew that day would come in the future. The power of cultivating patience and resilience in our lives. Opportunities he was presented with early on in his entrepreneur journey and the obstacles he faced.   [15:30] How Wim Hof Inspired Ryan Why our drive to do something can sometimes come from an unhealthy place. MAPS, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies 210 Brad Burge The moment when things finally started happening and his business could finally launch. What lights him up the most about float tanks and ice baths. The fact that entrepreneurship has really been glamorized and there is a price to be paid if you follow that path. Why the best form of therapy for you will be one that is challenging because that experience will truly help you grow. 410 Mark Divine Wim Hof Why Ryan believes he was getting sick after sick for 6 months straight. How Wim Hof's breathwork method was added to Ryan's morning routine to help him combat getting constant colds for so long. Why the more we push and serve, the more we have to recalibrate ourselves to heal and be in integrity with ourselves. What areas of health Josh is focusing on the most while raising a newborn baby: sleep, CBD, cold plunge, sauna, magnesium, and breathwork. Dr. Andrew Weil How you can invest in your health and it costs less in 1 month compared to going out and drinking and partying over 1 weekend.   [24:00] The Benefits of Cold Plunges Exploring the benefits of cold plunge and how it can help your wellness journey. How ice baths can help your body get into a natural state like CBD but it will work differently for everyone. Why all you need is 2-3 minutes in a cold plunge as a fast track to starting your day. Josh's own cold plunge practice of 3 minutes at 39 F but some people like Ryan will do it at 46 F. Why Ryan believes a cold plunge is the best workout for your nervous system compared to a physical workout. What thoughts and emotions may bubble up during a cold plunge so you know what to expect. Why doing an ice bath can be so empowering as you go from a sympathetic state to being in control of the experience. The power of doing really hard things to combat how our modern world has made us soft physically and emotionally. Why weight loss, metabolism, and immunity are the biggest benefits for Josh with his cold plunge practice. Dr. Andrew Huberman The science behind what can happen for each unique person when they get their core body temperature down during a cold plunge. Why some people may only need 60 seconds to bring their core body temperature down. How to find out which cold plunge temperature will give you the results you want. Why shivering means your body's metabolism is improving.   [36:30] How Ice Baths Help Heal CV19 & Build Brown Fat Dr. Andrew Huberman Dr. Rhonda Patrick Breaking down what brown fat is and how it helps burn energy for you in cold environments. Benefits Ryan has seen with brown fat and who he suggests going to for more information. Dr. Rhonda Patrick on her cold plunge experience Scientific Evidence-Based Effects of Hydrotherapy on Various Systems of the Body How cold water therapy can be used to boost your immune system. Benefits CV-19 long haulers have experienced from doing cold plunges. A testimonial from a Cold Plunge user about how their product and cold water therapy helped improve his symptoms. What Josh is currently doing including the Kaufmann Protocol and cold plunges to help him heal his sinuses. The Kaufmann Protocol The power of tuning in and really listening to what our bodies need. How putting your body through the stress of a cold plunge is a great barometer to gather data about your health. Vipassana Meditation – A Spartan Race For The Mind What Josh's Vipassana experience taught him as all of this pain started coming up in his body.   [45:30] The Magic of Cold Plunges & Floating Exploring the spirituality component of both float tanks and cold plunges. What spirituality means to Ryan including peace, joy, and acceptance of what is in life. How the sensation of a cold plunge or a float tank brings out the magic in life such as rapid awareness and perception shifts. John C. Lilly: The pioneer of floating Floating in Quiet Darkness by Glenn Perry and Lee Perry How he was first introduced to floating and why he loves it so much. MAPS 2022 Global Diving into the need we have in the western world to quantify how something like floating and cold water therapy can help. The deep rabbit hole Josh went into in 2017 to quantify his health until he realized there was no need to record everything to prove his wellness practice worked. 310 Ariel Garten Paul Chek | All is God 376 Mike Salemi 252 Oura | Harpreet Rai How science has practically become a religion in our modern-day society. 416 Ben Stewart   [55:30] The Path of Least Resistance Why it was difficult for Ryan to take time off from cold plunging to work on other areas of his life. Ryan's personal health practices and why he sometimes struggles from time to time to want to do them. Why the path of least resistance isn't always the way especially when it comes to physical health. Exploring when resistance can be a healthy thing in our lives especially for a heart-based issue. The tipping point we might experience when the weight of not changing becomes so great that the weight of change is the path of least resistance. Unpacking the self-awareness game of being a human and how our soul protects us. What healthy resistance is and why it's okay to say 'no' to what you don't feel called to do something like psychedelics.   [1:00:30] Healing Depression with Ice Baths 386 Mark Groves Adapted cold shower as a potential treatment for depression How adapted cold therapy can be a treatment for depression and anxiety. Why the opposite of depression is expression and how cold therapy allows us to explore that. The small commitment you can make when you do cold therapy and the incredible ROI it will give you as it improves your mental health. Why you won't be able to heal your depression if you're just constantly fighting it; you have to heal with powerful habits of self-love. How depression can be a momentum game and if you set yourself up for small wins, those negative feelings will gradually go away. The power of a cold plunge to reset your mind and stop those racing thoughts that are bombarding your day. One of the biggest revelations he received during a float tank session that helped him with a difficult decision. Why a float tank is an opportunity for Ryan to reflect on life and a cold plunge removes what cluttering his mind.   [1:09:00] Different Mediums of Cold Therapy: Unleash Your Inner Peace & Creativity How Josh's breathwork.io program has helped people with their daily stress and turns down the default mode network that keeps us on high alert. breathwork.io  Michael Pollan How breathwork, floating, and cold plunging allow us to unleash our creativity, mindfulness and have a greater sense of peace. How Ryan's Cold Plunge product differs from other products and is so much easier to use. Why other mediums of cold therapy are not as sustainable as Plunge for consistent use but they're great if you're interested in trying it a couple of times. Ryan's experience being on Shark Tank to promote Plunge and when you can watch the episode. Why we're in so much more control of our health than we believe. How their payment plans are set up to help you pay a monthly fee rather than the full price at once. Ryan's hope for how your cold plunge experience will help your healing journey. His definition of wellness after all he's been through over the years as a wellpreneur.   Power Quotes From The Show   The Benefits of Ice Baths "From an inflammation standpoint, there are so many benefits of cold plunging after a workout. Also, it gives me so much energy, clears my mind, and makes me feel incredible." - Ryan Duey   The Best Workout for the Nervous System "A cold plunge is the best workout for the nervous system. We work out to tear our muscles down and they build back stronger. By getting in the plunge, you're getting outside of your comfort zone, the adrenaline is increasing, and your mind begins to stress but you have the opportunity to completely override and go from a sympathetic state of fight or flight into being in full control of your breath. By doing that cold plunge, you have literally changed your whole body system in 2-3 minutes. Think about what that could mean in everything we do in life; that you are actually in control."  - Ryan Duey   How Cold Plunging Helps Heal Depression "On a time front, cold plunging is such a short commitment and when you're in a very depressed state, big things seem so unfathomable. If you have this in your house or a river right near you or you take a cold shower, there's a moment where spending time in cold water gives you a window to make a positive shift moving forward. Just spend 2 minutes or even take 10 breaths to help you open up out of your depression and start making the actionable steps when you feel stuck." - Ryan Duey   Links From Today's Show  Get $150 off your Plunge order with the code 'WELLNESSFORCE' Capitol Floats Temple of the Way of Light MAPS, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies 210 Brad Burge 410 Mark Divine Wim Hof Dr. Andrew Weil Dr. Rhonda Patrick Dr. Andrew Huberman Dr. Rhonda Patrick on her cold plunge experience Scientific Evidence-Based Effects of Hydrotherapy on Various Systems of the Body The Kaufmann Protocol Vipassana Meditation – A Spartan Race For The Mind John C. Lilly: The pioneer of floating Floating in Quiet Darkness by Glenn Perry and Lee Perry MAPS 2022 Global 310 Ariel Garten Paul Chek | All is God 376 Mike Salemi 252 Oura | Harpreet Rai 416 Ben Stewart 386 Mark Groves Adapted cold shower as a potential treatment for depression Michael Pollan Leave Wellness Force a review on iTunes Cured Nutrition – Get 15% off of your order when you visit wellnessforce.com/cured + use the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' Organifi – Special 20% off to our listeners with the code ‘WELLNESSFORCE' Paleovalley – Save 15% on your ACV Complex with the code ‘JOSH' Drink LMNT – Zero Sugar Hydration: Get your free LMNT Sample Pack, you only cover the cost of shipping Botanic Tonics – Save 20% when you use the code ‘WELLNESS20' Seeking Health - Save 10% with the code 'JOSH' breathwork.io M21 Wellness Guide Wellness Force Community Ryan Duey Twitter Plunge Facebook YouTube Plunge   About Ryan Duey Ryan Duey was born and raised in Northern California. He attended Cal Poly University where he spent a semester abroad in Barcelona. The experience was so impactful that after graduation, Ryan returned to Spain and spent the next two years living and working in Madrid. After Madrid, Ryan returned to the states and began working in the front office of the San Jose Earthquakes. Soon after, Ryan had what he calls his “greatest gift”: a head-on motorcycle accident in Thailand. This near death experience catapulted Ryan into a journey of self-inquiry, leading him to the jungles of the Amazon, the inside of a float tank, and a commitment to entrepreneurship in the Health and Wellness industry. While building Capitol Floats, Sacramento's Premier Float Center, Ryan traveled to Reboot Float Spa in the Bay Area with the hopes of meeting the owner, Mike Garrett. The two quickly became friends and business confidants. Now, six years later, Ryan and Mike are taking the next step together and have joined forces to create Plunge. Their mission is to make cold plunging as common as coffee. Ryan couldn't be more grateful and excited to be working alongside such an impressive human and building the team at Plunge.    

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz
"I Don't Have Time to Start a Podcast" & 10+ Reasons How Podcasting Will Save You Time

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:19


Dr. Jeremy Weisz is the Co-founder of Rise25. He has been involved in podcasting for 11 years and was a Senior Producer for one of the early business podcasts; he assisted in putting all of their systems in place and helped them add volume, feature, and edify various business leaders. Dr. Weisz has also been running his podcast, Inspired Insider, since 2011. He has featured top entrepreneurs, founders, and CEOs of P90X, Atari, Einstein Bagels, Mattel, the Orlando Magic, and many more. In addition to running Rise25, Dr. Weisz owns a nutritional supplement business and runs his chiropractic and massage facility, Chiropractical Solutions & Massage. John Corcoran is a recovering attorney, an author, and was a former White House writer and speechwriter to the Governor of California. Throughout his career, John has worked in Hollywood, the heart of Silicon Valley, and has run his boutique law firm in the San Francisco Bay Area catering to small business owners and entrepreneurs. John has been the Host of the Smart Business Revolution Podcast since 2012. He has interviewed hundreds of CEOs, founders, authors, and entrepreneurs, from Peter Diamandis and Adam Grant to Gary Vaynerchuk and Marie Forleo. John is also the Co-founder of Rise25 Media, a company that connects B2B businesses with their ideal clients, referral partners, and strategic partners and generates ROI through their done-for-you podcast service. In this episode… If you already have meetings with your referral partners, potential clients, and other people you admire on your schedule, then that's all the time you need for a podcast. But if you don't have these people on your schedule already, a podcast is a great method to do so and get value from it. You gain and give value by having a podcast — from saving travel time, networking on a deeper level, fast-tracking your sales process, giving to your best relationships, and more. Having a podcast is the smart way to create value if you've been trying to achieve all this. So how do you begin?  Listen to this episode of the Inspired Insider Podcast with Dr. Jeremy Weisz, featuring Co-founder of Rise25 and the Host of the Smart Business Revolution Podcast, John Corcoran. Together they talk about saving networking and referral marketing time through podcasting, uncommon ways to give and get value from a podcast, and much more.

Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast
Episode 207: How Erin Hodges of the Colorado Rockies on Developing Skills, Driving Brand Strategy, and Social Media Insights

Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Listen to episode 207 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Erin Hodges, Digital Communications Manager, Colorado Rockies. Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher. 91 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher. Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

The Conversion Show
La maldición del conocimiento

The Conversion Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 13:55


Somos una agencia de inbound marketing enfocada en el lead nurturing para aumentar el ROI de tus clientes… Uf, qué pereza. En sectores con “lenguajes propios” como el marketing, programación, ingeniería o abogacía, sufrimos una maldición milenaria que no somos capaces de eliminar: la maldición del conocimiento. ¿Qué es? ¿Cómo nos libramos de la maldición y qué embrujo podemos invocar? Te lo cuento en este episodio.

Mastery & Message with Lisa Princic
#142: What happens when we stop fighting our nature & focus on the path of least resistance

Mastery & Message with Lisa Princic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 19:45


After a brisk cross-country ski - my first one of the year - I relate my exercise choices to my business. Most of us get much better results focusing on doing what we do naturally and actually enjoy. This is the same in life & business. Do we need to be in a constant state of challenging ourselves to enjoy something, day-after-day when it doesn't become any more fun? Or can we build a life and business without feeling we have to do what everyone else is doing?  Today I share my feelings about social and how I'm taking a stand about not being on the platforms regularly because I simply don't love it. And because I don't love it I'll probably never get great results unless I can do it in a way that's totally supportive and that would be at another level investment, which the ROI hasn't shown me to make sense yet.  I also share more about my SOI/ultimate guide blog post which is now ready at http://scalingdeep.com/membership-site/ the interest in my upcoming workshop https://scalingdeep.com/workshop/.   

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience
Is Your Tech Stack Helping or Hurting? w/ Asa Hochhauser

The B2B Revenue Executive Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 15:41


You've been speaking to a salesperson about a new piece of software that's going to revolutionize your tech stack. It's AI-powered. It's shiny. It has an all-leather interior and chrome trim. It helps grandmas cross the street and carries their shopping bags. You're daydreaming about all the things you can do with it… and somewhere along the way, you've forgotten what you're trying to do in the first place. Today I'm joined by Asa Hochhauser, VP of Sales for McGaw.io, to discuss the almighty tech stack and how to avoid the pitfalls — like the one above — many companies find themselves falling into when trying to optimize theirs. In this episode, we discuss: Why you need to understand the product before you buy Why companies often fail to get the ROI they want from their tech The evolving role of data in marketing If you want to easily visualize and find new ways to optimize your tech stack, all in one place, be sure to check out the McGaw.io stack builder.  Now that you know how to optimize your tech stack, are you ready to dive into how Google's new rules impact your SEO or learn the secrets to establishing credibility? Check out the full list of episodes: The B2B Revenue Executive Experience. 

The Story of a Brand
Realea Skincare - Skincare is Healthcare

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 33:30


**This episode is brought to you by MuteSix, Gorgias, and Attentive**   “It's the right thing to do.” Realea believes that upcycling and being sustainable is the right thing to do since recycling is an intense process with a heavy carbon footprint. In part 2, Crispin Clarke, Co-Founder and CEO of Realea Skincare, mentions that the brand brings three kingdoms - plant, mineral, and animal kingdoms together with their products. According to Crispin, consciousness is an ingredient that affects products. They use specific ceramic labels, glass, and lids in their containers to make the products sustainable. The brand also has a return program for customers, which gives them $50 store credits for purchases and even membership. He further mentioned the company's official launch scheduled on cyber Monday, November 29. He discusses: * Handcrafted nature of products * Alchemy and consciousness * The Brand and sustainability * Return program and upcycling * Upcoming launch Join Ramon Vela and Crispin Clarke as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand. For more on Realea , visit: https://realea.com/  Subscribe and Listen to the podcast on all major apps. Listeners can also search for The Story of a Brand. Click here to listen on Apple Podcast or Spotify. * This episode was brought to you by MuteSix. MuteSix is the leading agency in performance marketing. They have been in this space for nearly eight years, growing and scaling the world's most recognizable e-commerce brands with breakthrough creative, targeted media buying, and data-driven results in every step of the funnel. They're currently offering listeners a FREE omnichannel marketing audit. Their team of auditors will perform a deep dive analysis into your current marketing efforts and identify which strategies might be budget wasters and which strategies will improve performance. The audit covers all digital marketing channels, including Facebook, Google, Email, Amazon, Snapchat, TikTok, Pinterest, Influencer, Programmatic, and Website CRO. For your free digital marketing consultation, visit: https://mutesix.com/storyofabrand  * This episode was brought to you by Attentive. How do the most innovative companies reach mobile consumers? Meet Attentive, the text messaging solution trusted by innovative retail & e-commerce brands like CB2, Coach, and thousands of Shopify brands. On average, Attentive customers see 25x ROI and 18.5% of online revenue driven by SMS. Ready for SMS to become one of your top three revenue channels? Learn how to get started with your free trial by requesting a demo at https://www.attentivemobile.com/ * This episode is also brought to you by Gorgias. Did you know that loyal customers are 9x more likely to convert compared to a first-time shoppers? That's why exceptional customer service is so important for your retention & growth. I recommend using Gorgias. Gorgias combines all your communication channels, including email, SMS, social media, live chat, and phone, into one platform and gives you an organized view of all tickets. This saves your support team hours per day and makes managing customer orders a breeze. Go to https://www.gorgias.com/ to book a demo and mention the Story of a Brand podcast for two months free.

The Story of a Brand
Realea Skincare - Everyone Has a Royal Soul

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 35:07


**This episode is brought to you by MuteSix, Gorgias, and Attentive**   “Beauty and healing” that's Realea. In part 1, we have Crispin Clarke, Co-Founder and CEO of Realea Skincare, a hundred percent natural skincare brand. Crispin worked to promote nonviolence as a strength before Co-Founding a digital health and pet program. After meeting his co-founder, Nick, he formed Realea as a value-driven public benefit corporation. Relea is an acronym derived in part from their company Rare Earth Alchemy. They loved the use of the word alchemy since it is considered by many to be a “royal art.” Crispin and his co-founder also believe that everybody has a royal soul. The brand has natural, effective, handcrafted, and sustainable products. It is bringing the knowledge and secrets of nature to people. According to him, beauty and healing are inextricably connected. We all have beauty, but it glows only through health and wellness. He talked about: * Gratefulness * Overview of the brand * His background * The philosophy behind the Brand & Name * The idea of beauty and healing Join Ramon Vela and Crispin Clarke as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand. For more on Realea, visit: https://realea.com/  Subscribe and Listen to the podcast on all major apps. Listeners can also search for The Story of a Brand. Click here to listen on Apple Podcast or Spotify. * This episode was brought to you by MuteSix. MuteSix is the leading agency in performance marketing. They have been in this space for nearly eight years, growing and scaling the world's most recognizable e-commerce brands with breakthrough creative, targeted media buying, and data-driven results in every step of the funnel. They're currently offering listeners a FREE omnichannel marketing audit. Their team of auditors will perform a deep dive analysis into your current marketing efforts and identify which strategies might be budget wasters and which strategies will improve performance. The audit covers all digital marketing channels, including Facebook, Google, Email, Amazon, Snapchat, TikTok, Pinterest, Influencer, Programmatic, and Website CRO. For your free digital marketing consultation, visit: https://mutesix.com/storyofabrand * This episode was brought to you by Attentive. How do the most innovative companies reach mobile consumers? Meet Attentive, the text messaging solution trusted by innovative retail & e-commerce brands like CB2, Coach, and thousands of Shopify brands. On average, Attentive customers see 25x ROI and 18.5% of online revenue driven by SMS. Ready for SMS to become one of your top three revenue channels? Learn how to get started with your free trial by requesting a demo at https://www.attentivemobile.com/  * This episode is also brought to you by Gorgias. Did you know that loyal customers are 9x more likely to convert compared to a first-time shoppers? That's why exceptional customer service is so important for your retention & growth. I recommend using Gorgias. Gorgias combines all your communication channels, including email, SMS, social media, live chat, and phone, into one platform and gives you an organized view of all tickets. This saves your support team hours per day and makes managing customer orders a breeze. Go to https://www.gorgias.com/ to book a demo and mention the Story of a Brand podcast for two months free.

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists
Episode 212 - Automate your Patient AR collection...(aka stop licking stamps) with Abella AR

The Nifty Thrifty Dentists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:16


SHOW NOTES:  You might know Steve, but Kimberlee Mulkay is new to the group. Although she's no stranger to Abella AR—she's been their Customer Success & Sales Manager since 2019.Abella AR enables practice owners to automate their collections and upgrade your billing experience for your team members and patients.Abella is tailored to each practice, enabling you to text and email patients directly (once integrated with your current setup).Abella will walk them through the process and prompt patients along the way to make everything “seamless.”Through Abella, you can count on a 100% chance of getting an ROI—saving more than $300 a month—and saving your team their valuable time and energy.If you're struggling to get new team members or make the job easier for your current team members, this is the software for you. To add to that, software is always an affordable alternative because it won't call in sick, leave after a few months, and so on.Abella AR works for any dental practice—small or large. Dr. Glenn Vo and Kimberlee discussed how the service can be best utilized in the solo office in a multi-practice group.Glenn Vo uses Abella in his practice. He's grateful that he doesn't have to depend on paper statements or phone callsAbella AR paves way for a 30-40% boost in efficiency; it pays for itself pretty quickly.No nickel-and-diming! You'll pay a monthly fee—but it's “friendly” software.Many team members and dentists alike might be hesitant to change—integrating any new software can be a hassle. But Dr. Glenn Vo uses Abella himself, and he knows it's as easy as a “click of the button.”Abella AR will set off “alarms” if there are patients who miss Here, the software does all the hard work; your team member just has to click on which patient they'd like the software to evaluate.Abella is an easier and faster way to pay. Everyone's on their phones these days—throw that filing cabinet out the door!The more statements you send out, the more cost-effective Abella is. But it's a good idea for a start-up—Abella helps you to ensure none of your team members get swamped as you build your practice up and put in elbow grease to get it on the right track.Learn about:What practice management software does Abella integrate with? (Hint: about 95% of them!)What sorts of practices might particularly benefit from Abella's services?What kind of payment plans does Abella offer? Which ones will work best for various practices (startup, DSO, DPO, etc.)?What approaches does Abella offer to make the process easier for the patient? And what can that do for your business?How much does Abella cost?How much $$ can Abella save you via AR? (Hint: a LOT)And more!   NIFTY DEAL: Waving the enrollment fee—$1,000 back in your pocket—and a 30-day free trial. Your team will be trained, the software will be integrated, and you'll start collecting money without obligation—the risk factor is gone; you'll have nothing else to lose. Get the Deal: Visit: https://info.abellaar.com/ntd

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1768: Investor Case Study $554 per hour, Robert Kiyosaki, Rich Dad & Equity Stripping

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:53


Today we have a case study investor, Winston Templet. He is a member of both the Empowered Investor Inner Circle and The Collective Mastermind. He is a real estate investor with an amazing and very inspiring "rags to riches" story. He also has a unique way of calculating his ROI on his portfolio which he shares with us today. As Jason has taught before, income property is a multi-dimensional asset class which can make you money in so many ways such as rent, depreciation tax benefits, leverage, equity build up through mortgage pay down, inflation induced debt destruction. But today Winston shares how much he's making through just one metric- appreciation. But not only does Winston share how he calculates his ROI but he also shares a part of his life story and the hard lessons he's learned to hopefully inspire, motivate and encourage you in your real estate journey.  You can also check out Jason's YouTube channel to watch the video! Key Takeaways: Jason's editorial: [1:28] Introduction [3:27] He didn't have a head start [3:52] Earning $550 per hour from just one metric- appreciation [4:32] A little secret [4:58] Jason's sample calculation [6:16] A bogus metric- Return on Equity [7:58] An amazing year in real estate [10:05] Don't underestimate what you can do in 5 years [12:01] Protect your assets IN ADVANCE, visit JasonHartman.com/Protect for a FREE Web Class [13:00] Reach out to us JasonHartman.com or 1-800-Hartman Winston Templet Interview: [14:00] Meet Winston [16:10] The rags before the riches [17:54] Building a business with sacrifice [20:25] My first trailer park  [22:02] Investing in yourself [23:27] Learning to read the Bible at age 30 [24:24] Great lessons learned [26:57] Joining Rich Dad and engaging in the Empowered Investor Inner Circle & The Collective Mastermind [28:56] Buying an entire neighborhood [29:29] ROI Spreadsheet from one metric alone- appreciation [33:45] Making $1,100 after dinner [34:21] Put that TV remote down! [37:28] Forecast appreciation of 17%- 15¢ per second [39:43] A personal message [41:54] Giving back to our community   Mentions: JasonHartman.com/Protect 1-800-Hartman JasonHartman.com   Tweetables: If people invest in themselves, it will pay back tenfold easy- Winston Templet  The most expensive education we will ever get, is from the real world- Jason Hartman Learn from the mistakes of others- Jason Hartman A big key to success is the willingness to delay gratification- Jason Hartman The most dangerous moment comes with victory- Napoleon Bonaparte     The WEALTH TRANSFER is happening FAST! Protect your financial future now! Did you know that 25% to 40% of all dollars ever created were dumped into the economy last year???  This will be devastating to some and an opportunity to others, be sure you're on the right side of this massive wealth transfer. Learn from our experiences, maximize your ROI and avoid regrets. Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com Jason's TV Clips: https://vimeo.com/549444172  Asset Protection, Tax Savings & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect What do Jason's clients say? http://JasonHartmanTestimonials.com Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else  http://JasonHartman.com/Fund  Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit www.JasonHartman.com Guided Visualization for Investors: http://jasonhartman.com/visualization    

RotoUnderworld Radio - Fantasy Football Show

First Mover - Season 1, Episode 12 Josh Larky (@jlarkytweets), PlayerProfiler's Head of Analytics, launched a new podcast this season, and he's now looking at the Week 12 DFS slate to pinpoint the best values and upside players before anyone can catch their breath. Improve your player prop ROI, as Josh walks you through the archetypes of RBs and WRs to target for Underdog Fantasy player props. Leveraging 1,000s of data points to help YOU spend less time picking players and more time using math to help you win. Josh only has eyes for high-end TEs this week. The QB who survived an absolute gauntlet of pass defenses and lived to tell the story. Tom Brady double stacks are back on the menu after a Week 11 hiatus. Josh is going back to the well on Jeff Wilson. 4 budget defenses to target on DraftKings. A $4,300 RB who plays for a bad enough team that he just might not be chalk this week. Cooper Kupp's salary is entirely out of hand for Week 12! General players Josh is targeting on DraftKings/FanDuel for Week 12. All the Week 12 game environments Josh will be targeting. Play the Over/Under Pick 'Em games on the Underdog Fantasy app NOW: https://play.underdogfantasy.com/p-rotounderwold, Code UNDERWORLD gets new users a $100 (!!!) deposit match Interested in learning to code in R, the exact coding language Josh uses for his analytics work? Go to ThatRCodingSite.com to learn R from Josh, and he'll teach you using football datasets to make it fun and engaging. He's used R in previous non-football jobs too, working for the San Diego Padres' business analytics department, the Detroit Tigers' baseball analytics department, and a multi-month HR analysis project for Southwest Airlines. R is a free and open source stats coding language, and you can easily learn it in 2-3 months. ThatRCodingSite.com if you're interested, promo code: firstmover to get 10% off

Ready. Set. Go. Real Estate Investing Podcast
“Section 8 Owning 400+ Properties” with Investor Tom Cruz (EP198)

Ready. Set. Go. Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:12


Host: Brandon Elliott @BrandonElliottInvestments | Guest Today: Investor Tom Cruz ----------------------------

Wholesaling Inc
WIP 824: Marketing Perspective - Which Marketing Channel Makes the Most Sense for You and Your Business

Wholesaling Inc

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:58


Wholesaling can get you involved in a business that is sure to make you some money. The key, though, is to get the most return possible for your efforts. To get the most from your wholesaling efforts in any marketing channel, you need to know how well each channel works in terms of return on your investment so you can allocate your time and money accordingly. Real estate wholesaling is a very lucrative business if done right. But the question is, which marketing channel works best for your situation? I'll explain marketing channels and give you an overview on each to help you make the right decision. In this episode, join our hosts, Lauren Hardy and Tag Thompson, as they interview our guest, Chris Arnold, to share how he utilized radio to grow his wholesaling business. He also discusses how effective radio ads are and how it has helped them reach massive ROI. RESOURCES: REI Radio Program Multipliers Brotherhood The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks Multipliers by Liz Weismann The Road Less Stupid by Keith J. Cunningham

Work Less, Earn More
EP 96: Which Business Model is Right For You with Pat Flynn

Work Less, Earn More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 65:28


You can watch a video or read a blog post about how to make money online and think, well, that looks easy.But you're almost never getting the whole picture.What you see in those videos and blog posts is a snapshot, usually of all the things that went right, not everything that went wrong before it started to get better.You won't see all of the potential hazards and challenges that come with those business models because you're not being given the full breadth of the real-world experience of running that business and what it took to make it a success.So today, I'm talking to online business's self-labeled Crash Test Dummy, Pat Flynn.Pat has tested out so many different ways to make money online, and he's going to let me pick his brain and do a deep dive about what worked, what flopped, and how profitable they really were.Pat Flynn is a father, husband, and entrepreneur who lives and works in San Diego, CA. He owns several successful online businesses and is a professional blogger, keynote speaker, Wall Street Journal bestselling author, and host of the Smart Passive Income and AskPat podcasts, which have earned a combined total of over 65 million downloads, multiple awards, and features in publications such as The New York Times and Forbes. He is also an advisor to ConvertKit, LeadPages, Teachable, and other companies in the digital marketing arena.Listen to the full episode to hear:Why asking what model you should start with is the wrong question, and the questions you should be asking insteadHow his audience informed Pat's initial venture into online businessWhy you should think of affiliate marketing and sponsorships as providing a service to your audienceHow books and speaking can support your brand and create incomeThe business models that have the highest ROI and profit margins for PatLearn more about Pat:Smart Passive IncomeSmart Passive Income PodcastAsk Pat PodcastInstagram: @PatFlynnTwitter: @PatFlynnWill It Fly? How to test your next business idea so you don't waste your time and moneyLearn more about Gillian:Startup SocietyGet on the waitlist for VALIDATEProfit Planning ChallengeGet in touch!

BiggerPockets Money Podcast
251: Is College Worth the Cost? This 30,000 Variable Study Says "Sometimes..."

BiggerPockets Money Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 78:23


Is college worth it? For the first time in history, we may have a definitive answer to whether or not your specific degree and school choice provides a positive ROI. We know that ROI isn't the only thing that matters when choosing a degree, but when looking at higher education through a financial independence lens, it's definitely the highest value.Looking through census, employment, and Department of Education data is number crunching crusader, Preston Cooper. Preston and his team over at The Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity put together the most extensive research on college degree ROI ever created. Preston's findings allow you to parse through over 30,000 degrees and school choices so you (or your child) can make the best decision on where to get a bachelor's degree.Preston discusses the discrepancies between nonprofit and for-profit university degrees, whether or not high-cost schools equal a higher payday through life, and why even going to Harvard doesn't secure a high ROI. Want to know the true value of your degree? Tune in and check out Preston's full study!In This Episode We CoverHow much you could benefit, in general, from getting an undergraduate degreeThe degrees that have the highest lifetime ROIDegrees that offer little-to-no or negative financial benefitWhether investing in real estate or a college degree is more worth it The biggest criticisms of Preston's study and how he combats them Dave, Mindy, and Scott's ROI on their respective degrees And So Much More!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Entrepreneurs on Fire
How to Dominate Your Local Market on Google with John Vuong

Entrepreneurs on Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 22:04


John Vuong is the owner and founder of Local SEO Search. He works with small and medium sized businesses to help them rank on Google and grow their business. Top 3 Value Bombs: 1. You got to put in that daily grind to become successful. 2. Speak to your costumers and ask what are they looking for and challenges so you can provide answers and help them. 3. SEO is a long term game. But earning your way on the first page of Google will give you unlimited clicks on your website, more traffic, and best ROI for your investment. Sign up now and get 1 month FREE with an annual campaign connecting your business with ready-to-buy customers online - Gift for Fire Nation Sponsors: HubSpot: Connection across every channel is critical for the success of your business. Learn more about how a HubSpot CRM platform can help connect your business at HubSpot.com! Thinkific: If you've ever thought about creating an online course to reach a wider audience and make passive income, then Thinkific is the perfect partner! Learn how you can take advantage of Thinkific's biggest deal of the year at Thinkific.com/firefriday!