Podcast appearances and mentions of Smokey Robinson

American R&B singer-songwriter and record producer

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Latest podcast episodes about Smokey Robinson

Siempre Pa'lante! Always Forward
2 - King of Latin Soul feat. Joe Bataan

Siempre Pa'lante! Always Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 54:17


Bienvenido mi gente! to Season 2 of Siempre Pa'lante! Always Forward. I'm your host, Giraldo Luis Alvaré. Gracias for listening. In this episode, our guest has dedicated his life to music for more than 50 years. He is a self-taught musician who has earned every accolade that has come his way. From El Barrio in Nueva York to entertaining millions of fans around the world, Please welcome, the King of Latin Soul, Joe Bataan. Gracias for listening. Don't forget to rate, review, follow, subscribe, like and share. Check out my Linktree for more info. Aguacate! https://linktr.ee/sp.alwaysforward SPECIAL GUEST Joe Bataan Musician, Band Leader, Singer & Songwriter Joe Bataan site | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Youtube Joe Bataan site - https://www.joebataanmusic.com/ FB - https://www.facebook.com/joe.bataan IG - https://www.instagram.com/therealjoebataan/?hl=en Twitter - https://twitter.com/JOE_BATAAN YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3hEeXdGmXCK19HNso5epoA/featured NOTABLE MENTIONS El Barrio, New York, Nueva York, Streetology, Afro-Filipino, Puerto Ricans, Portoros, Spofford, Bridges Detention Center, Spirit, Health, Knowledge, Three notches above the rest, The Godfather, Machiavelli Theory, Latin Soul, Cinderella Story, Peace, Joe Cuba, Shaft, Isaac Hayes, La Lupe, Tito Puente, Triad, C Major, D Minor, E Minor, Ralfi Pagan, Saint Cecilia's Church, Saint Cecilia, Patron Saint of Music, Our Father, Lord's Prayer, Shanghai, Australia, Japan, France, Germany, Mother's Day, Marshall & Wendell Piano, West Coast, La Raza, Ballads, Uptempo, Davinci Code, James Brown, Smokey Robinson, Frankie Lymon, George Gershwin, Cole Porter, Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, Perry Como, Nat King Cole, Sammy Davis Jr., George Washington, Roosevelt, Pedro Albizu Campus, Cha-Cha-Cha, Mary Wells, Hector Rivera, Johnny Colon, Boogaloo, Ordinary Guy, Ricardo Ray, Chicago, R&B, Ghetto Records, Drug Story, Gypsy Women, Cotique Records, Morris Levy, Jerry Masucci, Boricua Theatre, Dick (Ricardo) Sugar, Johnny Pacheco, Red Garter, Marvin Gaye, Our Latin Thing, Fania, Sweet Soul, St. Latin's Day Massacre, Shea Stadium, Yankee Stadium, SalSoul, Rap-O-Clap-O, RCA Records, Larry Levan, Paradise Garage, El Avion, The Riot, Grace, Mercy, Peace --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/spalwaysforward/support

Action and Ambition
B. Taylor, The Talented Hip Hop Artist, Basketball Player, and Decorated Sailor in The U.S. Navy

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 51:33


In this episode, we are joined by B. Taylor, a multi-award-winning artist, producer, author, speaker, and a global ambassador of entertainment for The U.S. Military, Veterans, First Responders, and their families. Discovered by Smokey Robinson and The Miracle's, Pete Moore, B. Taylor has been endorsed by The Miracles, The Supremes, The Temptations, The Marvelettes, The Vandellas, The Four Tops, The Gordy Family, and the iconic Cash Family of country music for his unique talents as a Hip-Hop artist, producer and songwriter with consummate musicality. He was a basketball student-athlete at the University of Missouri football and later became a decorated sailor in the U.S. Navy, as well as a standout player of the All Navy and Military Team USA basketball team. Don't miss a thing on this. Tune in to learn more!

Food, News & Views with Linda Gassenheimer
Food, News & Views, Ep. 134

Food, News & Views with Linda Gassenheimer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 44:23


Hosted by Linda Gassenheimer Featuring Tara Bench on why she calls herself "Tara Teaspoon" and how her culinary career led her to write her book "Delicious Gatherings". Jacqueline Coleman and Erik Segelbaum with his involvement as an ambassador Isreali wine. Sara Liss with restaurant news The legendary Smokey Robinson and his very own line of Smokey Robinson wines! Dinner in Minutes to close the show!

De Sandwich
Uitzending van 11 september 2022

De Sandwich

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 110:21


Uur 1 1.         All alone – Pat Boone 2.         Cachaca mecanica – Erasmo Carlos 3.         Waar ik vandaan kom – Esther Groenenberg 4.         Vocalise/The end of the line – Lizz Wright 5.         Walkin' my baby back home – George Benson 6.         That's how I got to Memphis – The Brother Brothers 7.         Alle seizoenen – Joost Spijkers 8.         So alive – Judy Collins 9.         Parce-que je t'aime mon enfant – Claude Francois 10.       A mi manera – Joan Baez & Gipsy Kings 11.       Swan lake – Someone 12.       Yesterday was here (A lament for Morse) – Pat Treacy 13.       Kom weer naar huis – Eddy Christiani 14.       Tears of a clown – Smokey Robinson & the Miracles 15.       Rigodon - MANdolinMAN   Uur 2 1.         Just a song before I go – Crosby Stills & Nash 2.         Blue moon – Billie Holiday 3.         Animaux fragiles – Ycare & Zaz 4.         Sammy – Maarten Heijmans & Band 5.         Riddle beside another riddle – Kari Bremnes 6.         Zonlicht op je schouders – Claudia de Breij 7.         Cuando sali de Cuba – Guillermo Portabales 8.         Horsepower for the streets – Jonathan Jeremiah 9.         Shattered  - Linda Ronstadt 10.       The highwayman – The Highwaymen 11.       Zwemmen in het donker – Lenny & De Wespen 12.       Rosie – Joan Armatrading 13.       Stick to the recipe – Kris Berry 14.       Goosebumps vibes – Barbra & Megitza

The Jay Jay French Connection: Beyond the Music
Steve Binder Part I Rerelease

The Jay Jay French Connection: Beyond the Music

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 70:09 Very Popular


In light of the recent 'ELVIS' film being released, we are re-airing a past favorite episode, Jay Jay's conversation with Steve Binder. In the movie, Steve is portrayed by the actor Dacre Montgomery. This week's guest is the legendary producer and director Steve Binder. Steve found success behind the camera on television shows showcasing music, when he was only in his early 20s. He was also influential in creating music programs that featured a wide range of musical styles. He's well known as being the director & producer of the remarkable rock documentary known as the T.A.M.I. Show, which greatly influenced Jay Jay immediately upon seeing it growing up - showcasing artists such as James Brown, Marvin Gaye, Chuck Berry, The Supremes, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, Gerry and The Pacemakers, Jan and Dean, Smokey Robinson, Leon Russell, Lesley Gore & many more. Tune in to hear why Jay Jay calls James Brown's performance on the T.A.M.I Show the "single greatest performance done by a human being, on the planet." Hear all about Steve's life story, and why he believes that when talent, timing & luck all hit at the same time, this is the combination that can accelerate your life & your career. Be sure to keep an eye out for part II of their conversation, in which Steve & Jay Jay will further discuss the Elvis Presley: 68' comeback special, which Steve also directed and produced. Produced & edited by Matthew Mallinger

THE QUEENS NEW YORKER
THE LEGACY OF QUEENS EPISODE 52: DICK CLARK(American radio and television personality, television producer and film actor, as well as a cultural icon)

THE QUEENS NEW YORKER

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 35:33


Richard Wagstaff Clark[1][2] (November 30, 1929 – April 18, 2012) was an American radio and television personality, television producer and film actor, as well as a cultural icon who remains best known for hosting American Bandstand from 1956 to 1989. He also hosted five incarnations of the Pyramid game show from 1973 to 1988 and Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve, which transmitted New Year's Eve celebrations in New York City's Times Square. As host of American Bandstand, Clark introduced rock & roll to many Americans. The show gave many new music artists their first exposure to national audiences, including Ike & Tina Turner, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, Stevie Wonder, Simon & Garfunkel, Iggy Pop, Prince, Talking Heads, and Madonna. Episodes he hosted were among the first in which black people and white people performed on the same stage, and they were among the first in which the live studio audience sat down together without racial segregation. Singer Paul Anka claimed that Bandstand was responsible for creating a "youth culture". Due to his perennially youthful appearance and his largely teenaged audience of American Bandstand, Clark was often referred to as "America's oldest teenager" or "the world's oldest teenager".[3] In his off-stage roles, Clark served as chief executive officer of Dick Clark Productions company (though he sold off his financial interest in his later years). He also founded the American Bandstand Diner, a restaurant chain modeled after the Hard Rock Cafe.[vague] In 1973, he created and produced the annual American Music Awards show, similar to the Grammy Awards.[3] PICTURE: By ABC Television - eBay itemphoto frontphoto back, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=103866599 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thequeensnewyorker/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thequeensnewyorker/support

You Just Have To Laugh
285. Maybe the funniest comedian working today - Brad Upton - and he is clean!

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 32:57


Brad Upton taught 4th grade and and then decided to be a comedian. Dry Bar Comedy posted a video on Facebook and it had 36 million views in 10 days. They quickly followed with another and they combined for 47 million views in 11 days! His CD shot to Number 1 on the iTunes Comedy chart. Brad's Dry Bar Comedy videos currently have a combined 170 million views! He has opened for the best in the entertainment business including Johnny Mathis, Dolly Parton, Smokey Robinson and Glen Campell. You will love genuinely funny and good man. 

Fresh Air
Smokey Robinson / Isaac Hayes

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 45:53 Very Popular


Our week of archival music interviews continues with Smokey Robinson, one of the greatest soul singers ever, and one of the most important figures in the development of Motown Records. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2006. The movie Shaft helped launch the blaxploitation genre of the '70s. The academy award-winning theme was composed and performed by Isaac Hayes. In the '60s, Hayes helped shape the sound of Memphis soul music, as a songwriter, arranger, producer and singer for Stax records. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1994.Also, David Bianculli reviews the new Lord of the Rings prequel, The Rings of Power.

Fresh Air
Smokey Robinson / Isaac Hayes

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 45:53


Our week of archival music interviews continues with Smokey Robinson, one of the greatest soul singers ever, and one of the most important figures in the development of Motown Records. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2006. The movie Shaft helped launch the blaxploitation genre of the '70s. The academy award-winning theme was composed and performed by Isaac Hayes. In the '60s, Hayes helped shape the sound of Memphis soul music, as a songwriter, arranger, producer and singer for Stax records. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1994.Also, David Bianculli reviews the new Lord of the Rings prequel, The Rings of Power.

The Sound of Success with Nic Harcourt
Patti Smith joins Nic to discuss returning to live performance after lockdown, and the soundtrack of her life. From Little Richard, Marvin Gaye, Dylan and Hendrix to Television, Bronski Beat, Rhianna, Adele, Ariana Grande and Harry Styles.

The Sound of Success with Nic Harcourt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 56:26


Patti Smith is a singer songwriter, poet, author, and visual artist who was at the forefront of the New York city punk movement. Her 1975 debut album 'Horses' announced her arrival, and since then she has carved out a career that allows her to speak truth to power in and outside of her work, and is cited by many artists including Michael Stipe, Johnny Marr and Shirley Manson as an important influence on their own work. In this wide ranging conversation with Nic, Patti talks about getting back out on the road and connecting with audiences after the seclusion of pandemic lockdown, why climate change is the issue of our time, and her upcoming "Evidence" exhibition with 'Soundwalk Collective' at Center Pompidou in Paris. Patti also shares her first live music experience, attending the Motown Revue bus tour with Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye and "Little" Stevie Wonder in Philadelphia in 1963, her stairwell conversation with Jimi Hendrix at the opening of his Electric Lady Studios just three weeks before his tragic death and her love of Opera, orchestral movie soundtracks, and many different styles of popular music.

Red Robinson's Legends
Jerry Allison 1939-2022

Red Robinson's Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 16:11


We're celebrating the life of Jerry Allison, drummer for Buddy Holly and The Crickets, who died this week (8/22). This extended interview was recorded at Vancouver's Legends of Rock'n'Roll show at EXPO 86. One of my favourite lines in the interview is when Jerry says, “I think we were the first ugly band... and then The Rolling Stones just took it and went all the way with it!” Jerry and Buddy met in high school in 1956 and the two began playing as a duo — Allison on drums, Holly on guitar and vocals. One year later, they linked up with bassist Joe B. Mauldin and guitarists Niki Sullivan and Sonny Curtis to become The Crickets. Jerry also co-wrote a couple of their biggest hits: “That'll Be the Day” and “Peggy Sue”. After Buddy left The Crickets in 1958, the group continued to tour and record into the Sixties and beyond, with Jerry Naylor replacing Holly after his death in 1959. Jerry Allison's career flourished as a studio musician at The Crickets' label, Liberty Records in Los Angeles, working with artists like Eddie Cochran, Bobby Vee and Johnny Rivers. Along with fellow original Crickets Mauldin, Sullivan and Curtis, Jerry Allison was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by Smokey Robinson at a special ceremony in 2012. Smokey said, “Buddy Holly wasn't just Buddy Holly. He was a Cricket. One day they gave us ‘That'll Be the Day,' on another ‘Maybe Baby'. They were indeed the original rock'n'roll band.” Jerry Allison's drums are the best part of some of my favourites: “Peggy Sue,” “Everyday” and especially “Not Fade Away”. “That'll Be The Day” was Jerry's favourite. It was the first song he and Buddy recorded together.

Detox Mans!on
Detox Mans!on with Gaz - The Classic Soul And R 'n B Special

Detox Mans!on

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 55:23


1. Smokey Robinson & The Miracles 2. Aretha Franklin 3. The Four Tops 4. The Supremes 5. Martha Reeves & The Vandells 6. Marvin Gaye 7. Dobie Gray 8. The Temptations 9. Otis Redding 10. The Marvalettes 11. Mary Wells 12. Sam And Dave 13. Sly & The Family Stone 14. R Dean Taylor 15. The O'Jays 16. The Spinners 17. Jnr Walker 18. Percy Sledge 19. James Brown

The City's Backyard
The City's Backyard S2 Ep 53 Michael Mugrage(Orleans:Still The One/Dance with Me fame) and Diane Scanlon drop their brand new release and we play a few tracks off the new album!

The City's Backyard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 41:16


Michael Mugrage, songwriter / producer / multi-instrumentalist, began his career in 1974 with is band "Blessings". He inked a deal with ABC records in Hollywood and worked with the legendary producer Gary Katz of Steely Dan.Michael was invited to join Orleans of “Still the One” and “Dance with Me” fame as lead guitarist during their 1982's recording of “One of A Kind”.  Michael toured with them nationally and performed with Orleans on Solid Gold's #1 Classics.James Brown, "the Godfather of Soul", Robben Ford and Bruce Hornsby are among the many other renowned artists that Michael has lent his diverse musical talents to. ABC's Good Morning America's recent, “Good to Go” song and campaign was written and produced by Michael Mugrage and Edd Kalehoff of Monday Night Football.  Michael, also an accomplished musical director, toured with Ronnie Spector, of “Be My Baby” fame for her Madison Square Garden and Radio City Music Hall performances.  He also collaborated with the incomparable Felix Cavaliere of “The Rascals” on the major motion picture “Hiding Out” and “Speed Zone”, as well as being his musical director. Michael's 'first love' of songwriting, has credits that span over his 30 year career.  His songwriting highlights include VH1's first song aired; Smokey Robinson's  R&B hit “Sleepless Nights”.  Chaka Khan's “Naughty” and AWB's Alan Gorrie “Diary of a Fool”.  Michael's many TV and film credits include All My Children, HBO, Showtime, MSG Network and ESPN. Diane Dwyer Scanlon is a Grammy Award winning producer and composer.  Her songs have been recorded by platinum-selling artist Eva Cassidy as well as Vince Gill, Tramaine Hawkins, Darlene Love, Laura Branigan, and Antigone Rising to name a few.  She has been a writer for Peermusic and has songs administered by Kobolt Music.  Currently her extensive song catalog is with Dwyer Hills Music.As an artist she is known for her impassioned, blues-flavored guitar and soul-searching lyrics.  She has toured in the United States and Europe, playing such venues as the Montreux Festival in Switzerland, the Spoleto Festival in South Carolina, Madison Square Garden and the New Haven Coliseum.Currently she is spending her time in her Connecticut studio writing and producing.  During Covid she teamed up with longtime friend and musician Michael Mugrage forming White Feather Music Productions where they are developing young talent as well as writing songs performed by established singers and musicians. https://happyaccidentsband.com/michael-mugragehttps://www.dianescanlon.com/

Halftime Chat R&B Podcast
Halftime Chat with Legendary Broadcaster & DJ Donnie Simpson

Halftime Chat R&B Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 116:53


Donnie Simpson (born January 30, 1954) is a longtime American radio DJ as well as a television and movie personality. He hosted The Donnie Simpson Morning Show on Washington, D.C. radio station WPGC-FM from March 1993 to January 29, 2010. Currently, he hosts The Donnie Simpson Show on D.C.-based radio station WMMJ-FM (Majic 102.3 FM), which began airing on August 17, 2015. Simpson is the first urban-format radio personality to have an annual salary over $1 million without being syndicated.   In 1983, Simpson was recruited by Robert L. Johnson, founder of Black Entertainment Television BET, to host the network's primetime music video show, Video Soul.  Simpson remained with the show until its cancellation in 1997. Over several decades, Simpson has hosted many network specials and tributes. He has interviewed well-known stars, including Stevie Wonder, Prince, Elton John, Aretha Franklin, David Bowie, Janet Jackson, James Brown, Usher, Jay-Z, Notorious BIG, Whitney Houston, Tupac, Madonna, Mariah Carey, Smokey Robinson, and many others. In 2004, Simpson was inducted into the BET Walk of Fame.  In 2015, he was inducted into the Rhythm and Blues Music Hall of Fame, the only non-musician so honored at that point. On October 29, 2020, Donnie, along with six other honorees, was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in a live two-hour ceremony broadcast live on radio stations across the country.   #DonnieSimpson #VideoSoul #HalftimeChat #NewJackSwing #RnBMusic #RnB #SoulMusic #Music #RnBPodcast #NewJackSwingPodcast #MusicIndustry #MusicBusiness Halftime Chat is your home for RnB, New Jack Swing and Old School Hip Hop. Dropping  Interviews with your favourite R&B artists & Music videos from the 80s, 90s and 2000s  We Love the 80s, 90s & 00s! Intro Music Music: Secret Sauce Musician: Jeff Kaale End Credits Music Music: You Know Musician: Jeff Kaale Want to Donate or support the production of Halftime Chat?

The Age Old Question
What Is The Greatest Record Label? (Part 1)

The Age Old Question

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 41:59


• Intro — Framing today's question on the greatest record labels.• Motown• Sub Pop• Let's Go To The Comments• Closer

SCFB 319: SAVE MONEY WHILE GOING TO CONCERTS! 30 TIPS THAT WILL GET YOU IN THE SEAT...WITH SAVINGS. THIS PODCAST IS FREE! SUBSCRIBE TO SOMETHING came from BALTIMORE! FREE! FREE! FREE!

"SOMETHING...came from Baltimore"

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 54:31


02:27 - Beyonce 03:27 - Mann Music Center, Philadelphia, PA (Nancy Wilson) 04:10 - Freedom Theater, Philadelphia, PA (Black Nativity) 04:30 - Prince Theater, Philadelphia, PA (Me and Mrs. Jones/Lou Rawls) 04:54 - WXPN-FM, Live@the World Cafe, Philadelphia, PA (David Dye) 05:13 - King Sunny Ade, Bobby Caldwell, Bell Biv DeVoe, Karla Bonoff, Boney James 07:03 - Weezer/Pixies 07:20 - The Soundstage - Baltimore, MD 08:30 - Facebook Events 09:22 - Groupon (Todrick Hall/Prince Tribute Band/Heart/Weezer/Pixies) 10:01 - City Winery, Philadelphia, PA (Bokante/Roosevelt Collier) 10:35 - The Peabody, Baltimore, MD 10:40 - John Hopkins, Baltimore, MD 10:43 - Ram Head Inn, Annapolis, MD 10:56 - The Power Plant, Baltimore, MD 11L44 - Genesis (without Peter Gabriel) 11:54 - Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia, MD (Genesis) 12:41 - Janet Jackson 12:50 - KRS-1, Taylor Swift 13:32 - Insta-charge 13:44 - Rams Head Inn, Annapolis, MD 14:16 - Royal Farms Civic Center, Baltimore, MD 14:54 - Paul McCartney 17:17 - Steven Tyler 18:05 - Baltimore Blues Society 18:20 - Ultra Nate' - Deep Sugar Parties 19:29 - Genesis (without Peter Gabriel) 24:29 - The Hamilton, Washington DC 25:13 - Downtown Silver Springs, MD 24:43 - The 9:30 Club, Washington DC (Agnes Obel) 25:59 - Merriweather Post Pavilion, Columbia, MD (Capital Jazz Festival/Isaac Hayes) 29:05 - Kimmel Center, Philadelphia, PA (Sonny Rollins) 29:08 - The Dell East, Philadelphia, PA (The Dells) 29:14 - Live @ the World Cafe', Philadelphia, PA (Angelic Kidjo) 29:34 - Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA (Hall & Oates) 29:57 - Kimmel Center, Philadelphia, PA (Ornette Coleman) 34:06 - Meet Up 35:15 - Steely Dan 35:30 - Ryan Adams 35:35 - Paul McCartney 36:53 - The Cars 37:16 - The Hamilton, Washington DC (Shemekia Copeland) 39:20 - The Counting Crows 40:06 - The Philadelphia Phillies 40:12 - War 40:56 - The Dell East, Philadelphia, PA (The Dells) 42:36 - Prince/The Time/Vanity 6 45:46 - Caesar's Casino and Hotel, Atlantic City, New Jersey (Natalie Cole) 45:57 - The Tower Theater, Philadelphia, PA (Natalie Cole) 46:50 - Set List.com (Jeff Warehime/Paul McCartney/Hershey Park, Hershey, PA) 48:21 - John Legend/Sade/My Friend Al 49:30 - The 9:30 Club, Washington, DC (Living Colour) 50:29 - Poi Dog Pondering, Los Lobos, Kathleen Edwards, Todrick Hall 51:00 - Paul McCartney, Paul Simon, Ray Charles, James Brown, George Clinton, Mick Jagger, Elton John 51:42 - Smokey Robinson, Candi Staten, Ben E King, Gladys Knight 52:37 - The Gettysburg Movie Theater, Gettysburg, PA (Beverly Hills Cop 2) --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/somethingcame-from-baltim/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/somethingcame-from-baltim/support

Hey, Remember the 80's?
Ebony and Ivory: Volume 2

Hey, Remember the 80's?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 46:05


Episode 170: Of course, Joe and Kari have to pay tribute to Olivia Newton-John. Kari said it best in one of the first episodes of HRT80's: ONJ is our superstar, forever and always. Ebony And Ivory: More long piano solos from the 80's; including songs from Peter Cetera, Smokey Robinson, and Fine Young Cannibals. Kari is a huge fan of piano and keyboards in popular music, but does she enjoy all of the songs covered in this segment? Before you answer, we forgot to mention that Manhattan Transfer is also on the list. Obscure Soundtrack Songs: Kari teased an upcoming segment, did you guess that we would be discussing The Boy Who Could Fly? Because Joe was stumped! And don't forget there's more music in Flashdance than just Irene Cara and Michael Sembello!

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show
#1610 What Else Might You Be Wrong About?

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 45:43 Very Popular


Adam and Dr. Drew open the show discussing 60 second life in review videos of older actors and what they accomplished in their careers. They also discuss vaudeville and Pagliacci leading to a conversation about music pitting Smokey Robinson's 'Tears of a Clown' against Prince's 'Erotic City' with a very animated Adam giving his thoughts. Drew later circles back to his studies of performers and points out his astonishment that many, if not most of those who succeeded came from affluent backgrounds. They also discuss how that phenomenon translates to very little today with the notable exception of Formula 1 racing. The discussion of racing leads Adam to harken back to his childhood and experiences of going to Malibu Grand Prix with friend's fathers. Please Support Our Sponsors: Con-Cret.com/Podcast GetRoman.com/ADS Babbel.com/ADS

A Mick A Mook and A Mic
The Pump Bros. College Basketball Power Brokers - Dana Pump - Ep. #106

A Mick A Mook and A Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 56:38


Basketball is their passion. Identical twins with with the bright red hair, Dana and David Pump, started their first basketball camp for neighborhood kids at the age of 16 in Northridge, CA. Soon thereafter, you could find them sitting in the bleachers of high school gyms throughout Southern California, logging thousands of hours watching games. They quickly established themselves as the go-to resource for college coaches. If a kid was from the West Coast, chances are the Pumps had seen him play.When they were 20 years old, they capitalized on their passion and formed Double Pump, Inc. providing scouting information on the top players in the Western United States. They also organized high school camps, coaches' clinics, exhibition games, tournaments and the Pump-N-Run AAU teams.Today, the Double Pump brand is a staple in the basketball world at every level of the game.But more important than their impact on basketball is the Pump Bros impact on the fight against cancer. The Harold & Carole Pump Foundation (H&CPF) honors a beloved father who lost his battle to cancer in 2000 and a loving mother who passed away in 2012.Using their unique relationship-building talents and skills, Dana and David Pump have raised more than $10 million for the Carole Pump Women's Center, Harold and Carole Pump Department of Radiation Oncology, and the Leavey Cancer Center at Northridge Medical Center and other non-profit community charities.Annually the Pump Brothers bring together the biggest names in sports and entertainment for their annual foundation dinner, held this year in LA on Aug 16.  From John Wooden, to Jim Brown, Mike Tyson, Sandy Koufax, Magic Johnson, Shaquille O'Neal, Artis Gilmore, Pete Rose, Joe Montana, Reggie Jackson, Lionel Richie, Jamie Foxx, Holly Robinson Peete, Smokey Robinson, Jerry West.  If there is a name your can think of the Pumps have them on speed dial.The mission of the Foundation is to raise funds and create awareness for the treatment and cure of cancer. By engaging the community, sports leaders and those touched by this disease, financial support is given to the development of cancer treatments, programs and services, as well as the procurement of advanced medical technology.

CHOONS
Carrie McDowell Says "Uh Uh, No No Casual Sex"

CHOONS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 40:55


In June of 1987, 24 year-old Carrie McDowell—the second white female artist signed to Motown Records—walked the stage of the legendary music show "Soul Train," and rocked the house with a performance of her first and only single, the controversial "Uh Uh No No Casual Sex." For McDowell, it was no daunting task, as she was already a seasoned entertainer by then.Born and raised in Des Moines, Iowa, Carrie was a musical child prodigy destined to sing. At age 3, she could carry a note and embody the feelings of classic melodies from Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell. By the time she was 10, Carrie went from showcasing her talent at local venues to dazzling the Vegas crowds alongside Liberace, George Burns, and comedy duo Rowan & Martin, and drawing standing ovations at the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.After her parents' divorce and poor management curtailed her early career, Carrie got her second wind by experimenting with musical styles, and embracing new opportunities with legendary Motown producer Willie Hutch, who introduced her to a song that, despite its lyrics, was part of a serious conversation society was having in the late 80s.Show TracklistingStella by Starlight - From the movie "The Uninvited" (Liberace)Over The Rainbow (Carrie McDowell)Top of The World - Carpenters Cover Live at the Tonight Show (Carrie McDowell)I'll Be There (Jackson 5)Uh Uh, No No Casual Sex (Carrie McDowell)Let's Wait Awhile (Janet Jackson)Can't Love You Tonight (Gwen Guthrie)Carrie McDowell on Social Media:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carriemcdowellmusic/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CarrieMcDowellMusicTwitter: https://twitter.com/carriemcmusicHost and Producer: Diego MartinezExecutive Producer: Nicholas "NickFresh" PuzoAudio Engineer: Adam Fogel Follow us on social media: @choonspodSubscribe to our PATREON: patreon.com/choonspod

Comes A Time
Ted Alexandro

Comes A Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 61:06 Very Popular


This week on Comes A Time, Mike and Oteil are joined by comedian Ted Alexandro. Ted tells the guys about his current tour with Jim Gaffigan, why he enjoys meeting different people from different worlds through his standup career, and the rewarding challenge of closing for Roger Waters and Cornel West at a gig. The guys also discuss Ted's progressive religious background, similarities between musical improvisation and standup, how Ted created his last special from combining clips from several different shows, and a story of encouragement that Ted received from Dave Attell during the beginning of his career.Ted Alexandro is a stand-up comedian from New York City. He has appeared on Late Night with David Letterman, Conan, and has hosted his own specials on Comedy Central. Time Out NY listed Ted as one of 21 New York Comedy Scene Linchpins, calling him "a New York fixture as firm as bedrock." Ted's career has spanned over twenty years, and during that time he has opened for legendary acts including Chuck Berry, Smokey Robinson, Craig Ferguson, Dennis Miller, and Joan Rivers. Ted's work, including his recent release titled Cut/Up, is available on YouTube, as well as all music and podcast streaming platforms.-----------*DISCLAIMER: This podcast does NOT provide medical advice. The information contained in this podcast is for informational and entertainment purposes only. No material in this podcast is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen*-----------This podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating or review on iTunes!Comes A Time is brought to you by Osiris Media. Hosted and Produced by Oteil Burbridge and Mike Finoia. Executive Producers are Christina Collins and RJ Bee. Production, Editing and Mixing by Eric Limarenko and Matt Dwyer. Theme music by Oteil Burbridge. Production assistance by Matt Bavuso. To discover more podcasts that connect you more deeply to the music you love, check out osirispod.com-------Visit SunsetlakeCBD.com and use the promo code TIME for 20% off premium CBD products See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

El celobert
Les nostres veus d'espinguet preferides

El celobert

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 62:07


Hi ha alguna cosa enganxosa i encomanadissa en les veus agudes. Potser ens transporten a la infantesa. Avui, els nostres falsettos preferits de la hist

Música
Les nostres veus d'espinguet preferides

Música

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 62:07


Hi ha alguna cosa enganxosa i encomanadissa en les veus agudes. Potser ens transporten a la infantesa. Avui, els nostres falsettos preferits de la hist

Big Time Talker with Burke Allen — by SpeakerMatch
Celebrating the history of Motown with Tony-Nominated Broadway actor Charl Brown

Big Time Talker with Burke Allen — by SpeakerMatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 51:00


This week Burke speaks with Charl Brown, a Broadway singer who was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance as Smokey Robinson in Broadway's Motown: The Musical. Charl has spent years as a young Broadway actor and international touring musician. Charl talks about how he worked to make it on Broadway as a young actor, with no backup plan Charl has devoted his entire life to performing. Charl is part of the Doo Wop Project, a touring Jukebox musical that salutes the history of Doo Wop music with modern "DooWopified" versions of modern-day hits.  Charl also stars in a solo show titled "Smokey and Me," where Charl tells the story of Smokey Robinson and honors his legacy by perfectly singing some of his greatest hits. The Doo Wop Project is now touring across the country, with performances planned throughout the next two years. For tickets and more information visit the Doo Wop Project's website. Smokey and Me is coming to the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, Massachusetts Saturday, July 30th. The Big Time Talker is sponsored by Speakermatch.com

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Let It Roll: Smokey Robinson Was Berry Gordy's Right-Hand Man at Motown

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 55:12


Hosts Nate Wilcox and Brooks Long discuss the life story of Motown's top singer-songwriter-producer.Buy the book and support the podcast.Download this episode.Have a question or a suggestion for a topic or person for Nate to interview? Email letitrollpodcast@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter.Follow us on Facebook.Let It Roll is proud to be part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Let It Roll
Smokey Robinson Was Berry Gordy's Right-Hand Man at Motown

Let It Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 55:11 Very Popular


Hosts Nate Wilcox and Brooks Long discuss the life story of Motown's top singer-songwriter-producer.Buy the book and support the podcast.Download this episode.Have a question or a suggestion for a topic or person for Nate to interview? Email letitrollpodcast@gmail.comFollow us on Twitter.Follow us on Facebook.Let It Roll is proud to be part of Pantheon Podcasts.

Gospel For The Glory Of Jesus
Melvin Slade Presents R&B Gospel

Gospel For The Glory Of Jesus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 60:00


Aretha Franklin, Smokey Robinson, The Temptations, Peabo Bryson and more of your favorite R & B Artists Worship the Lord with your favorite gospel tracks Melvin Slade Host, Producer, Minister of the Soulful Witness of Christ Kraj 100.9 FM Sunday 7AM to 9AM  Listen live on Sunday Mornings Click to hear This Weeks New Soulful […]

The Sync Report
S2 Ep13: The Sync Report | Des Shaw

The Sync Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 69:35


Des Shaw is currently working with Tony Defries on a podcast series that explores the history of Main Man and the groundbreaking work Defries did with Bowie, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, Marianne Faithful and dozens of others in the '70s. Des's audio production work includes projects with Johnny Depp, Bono, Annie Lennox, Susan Sarandon, Antonio Banderas, Cameron Crowe, Tony Visconti, Deborah Harry, Laura Marling, Smokey Robinson and Sir Tim Rice. Des has won international radio awards for music based projects that include The Sgt Pepper's 40th Anniversary, The Guitar That Changed the World, The History of Rolling Stone Magazine, Bruce Springsteen: Long Walk Home, The Beatles Final Concert among others. His film credits include authorized profiles on John Lennon, David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Queen, Mick Ronson, Bruce Springsteen, Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash and Live Aid. Listen to Des talking about how learning to play the clarinet and to read music in his early years helped him gain an understanding of music production. Find out how Des went from working in commercial radio to producing TV specials and tour documentaries and how he met Sir Bob Geldof, with whom he co-founded Ten Alps - now called Zinc Media. Plus we have an exclusive play of Mick Ronson's guitar recording from the original studio recording of "Moonage Daydream" by David Bowie. Hear from Milfredo about his early music life as part of the huge 90's band EMF and how "Unbelievable" became such a huge hit. Then stay tuned as we listen to Director Kevin Sharpley's final three song choices for his indie movie Deadly Night Out. Plus we hear Christmas & Holiday sync submissions for The Sync Report 2022 Christmas special. Dee Shaw Website Facebook Twitter Linkedin Music Music is the difference between a good film and a great one. Songs included in this episode are: "Iggy Pop & The Stooges" by I'm A Man  "New York Telephone Conversation" by Lou Reed "Moonage Daydream" by David Bowie (Mick Ronson guitar split only, studio version)    "Great Song of Indifference" by Bob Geldof  "California Soul" by Marlena Shaw "Unbelievable" by EMF SYNC SESSIONS Featuring: "Use Me" by Nomae "Shattered by Secrets" by Dunn Wilder "The Journey" by Midas Royal 2 Sense  Music presents The Sync Report, where you will meet industry experts and top level songwriters as we pull the curtain back on music placement and scores, build vital relationships and provide real opportunities to our listeners. Listen to indie filmmakers present their latest productions and describe specific scenes as they consider music submitted by our audience. Please tell your friends about us, and remember to rate, comment, & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts and across all platforms.  And find us at The Sync Report here  Linktr.ee TSR Website  Facebook  Instagram Twitter Youtube Linkedin Tik Tok  The Sync Report podcast is:  Hosted By: Jason P. Rothberg Featuring: Milfredo Seven - Kevin Sharpley - Paula Flack and Willow Produced By: JASON P ROTHBERG - KEVIN SHARPLEY - PAULA FLACK - ROBERT CAPPADONA Executive Producers: COLIN O'DONOGHUE - ROSE GANGUZZA - JASON P ROTHBERG - KEVIN SHARPLEY - GIANFRANCO BIANCHI - DEAN LYON  Writers: JASON P ROTHBERG - KEVIN SHARPLEY - LISA DUNN - PAULA FLACK Editors: JASON P ROTHBERG - MILFREDO SEVEN - PAULA FLACK EDGAR “EDGE” CAMEY - ADAM MCNAMARA Marketing Director: PAULA FLACK Music Supervisors: PHILL MASON Music Department: HEATHER RAGNARS - PHILL MASON - LISA DUNN Foley: PHILL MASON Research: LISA DUNN Art Director: GIANFRANCO BIANCHI Graphic Design: JODYLYNN TALEVI College Programs: DR STACY MONTGOMERY College interns: ANGELA NICASTRO - ASHLEY KABOUS - BLAKE LINDER

Late Night Playset
TOM DREESEN: Late Night Playset - Cars & Comedy 476

Late Night Playset

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 93:22


Tuesday July 12, 2022 - Guest: Tom Dreesen Tonight Cars and Comedy races in with a doozy of a guest! Comedy legend Tom Dreesen joins the Late Night Playset to talk about, well, everything! We are excited to announce our first Cars and Comedy LIVE from the Marconi Automotive Museum and it's on September 3rd! J decides to table everything else to Thursday to get our guest in here immediately, resulting in a cavalcade of conversation. But before all that, Tom and Nicole bond over MS, and Tom speaks about his sister who also had the condition. Tom talks about the fundraisers he held for his her and heart-fully let Nicole know how much she inspires him. A must see moment in the show that will warm the hearts of all who see it. Tom expertly talks about his journey with the Jaycees leading to meeting Tim Reid (WKRP in Cincinnati) and forming the first, and last, black and white comedy duo. Next comes the Comedy Store and the Tonight Show, and how that first appearance with Johnny changed Tom's life forever. J and Tom go deep on the philosophy of comedy and how it relates to personal development, envisioning one's goals and being a service to humanity. Letterman and Sinatra stories are next and they came "Fast and Furious." Then somehow J tells Tom the Letterman microphone story and Tom explains why he thinks Dave would've done the same thing... Watch it to believe it folks! Please don't forget to subscribe, like, share, and leave positive comments for the show. THANK YOU for watching!

One Degree of Scandalous with Kato Kaelin and Tom Zenner
EP. 7: Hugh Hefner's personal barber and famous celebrity hairstylist shares scandalous stories of what happened at the Playboy Mansion and at Hollywood parties during the 1990s and 2000s.

One Degree of Scandalous with Kato Kaelin and Tom Zenner

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 54:17 Transcription Available


The backstory of how Hugh Hefner personally chose Kevin Josephson to be his personal barber and what life was like being a celebrity hairstylist for Nicole Kidman, Johnny Carson, Kirsten Dunst, Benicio del Toro, Mick Jagger, Rob Lowe, Anthony Hopkins, Janice Dickinson, Smokey Robinson, and many others during the glamour days Beverly Hills.

Add to Playlist
Linton Stephens and Dinara Klinton celebrate musical pioneers

Add to Playlist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 42:11


Cerys Matthews and Jeffrey Boakye are joined by bassoonist Linton Stephens and Ukrainian pianist Dinara Klinton as they embark on another musical journey, from Veracruz in Mexico to a pioneering Black female composer and a huge Grime hit as they add five more tracks to the playlist. Presenters Cerys Matthews and Jeffrey Boakye Producer Jerome Weatherald The five tracks in this week's playlist: La Bamba by Los Lobos Symphony No.1 in E Minor III: Juba Dance by Florence Beatrice Price Etude No 5 in G-Flat Major; Op 10, ‘Black Keys' by Chopin, played by Dinara Nadzhafova (Klinton) Shut Up by Stormzy She's a Lady by Tom Jones Other music in this episode: E Ye Ye by Quantic & Nidia Góngora Desfado by Ana Moura La Bamba by Ritchie Valens Tears of a Clown by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles La Bamba by El Jarocho Soul Limbo by Booker T & the MGs Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, B. 178 (the 'New World Symphony') by Antonín Dvořák Functions on the Low by Ruff Sqwad (XTC)

The Best of Coast to Coast AM
Smokey Robinson - Best of Coast to Coast AM - 7/6/22

The Best of Coast to Coast AM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 10:56 Very Popular


George Noory and legendary Motown singer Smokey Robinson discuss his music career, growing up with Aretha Franklin, and how Barry Gordy convinced him to re-record his first song "Shop Around" to make it into a hit. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Reese Waters Show
The Best Falsetto Singers

The Reese Waters Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 9:32


Tippy from Wheaton called the show, dropped a couple of thoughts about singers and everything went off the rails after that. Where does Jacko rank among the greatest singers of this register? 

Dance Careers: Unfiltered
The in's and Out's of Being an Assistant Choreographer -- with Kelly Allen

Dance Careers: Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 33:13


Meet the positive light that is Kelly Allen. With over 16 years in LA and 30+ tv/film credits under her belt, Kelly brings her wisdom and experience to the DCU listeners. I LOVE that she dishes all the goods about being an assistant choreographer and a glimpse into how she got where she is now. She just finished filming Amazon's Marvelous Mrs. Maisel final season assisting Marguerite Derricks! Um, can you say baller?MNTR MGMTWebsite@mntr.mgmt@justinementer KELLY ALLENWebsite@kellallen_KELLY ALLEN is a working professional dancer and assistant choreographer on numerous projects for live shows, television & film.  She has been instrumental to over 30+ TV/film series over the past 15 years.  Kelly grew up & trained on the central coast of California at the prestigious Pat Jacksons American Dance, later known as American Dance of SLO.  After moving to Los Angeles, she began performing for and assisting some of the dance industry's most influential choreographers. Kelly most recently worked on 5 seasons of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (Amazon) as a dancer & assistant choreographer to Marguerite Derricks, and assisted Jennifer Hamilton on both seasons of Physical (Apple TV). Other recent work includes Little America (Apple TV), Roar (Apple TV), and High Desert (Apple TV).A few of Kelly's dance credits include: Katy Perry's "Chained to the Rhythm" Music Video, TV/films:The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (AMAZON), Lucifer (Netflix), Physical (Apple TV), Little America (Apple TV), The Affair (SHOWTIME), Superstore (NBC), Glee (FOX), Bunheads (ABC Family), Behind the Candelabra (HBO), The Disney Channel commercials, Frozen (Disney), Two Broke Girls (CBS), Jimmy Kimmel Live (ABC).  Industrials: NIKE, Amway, Lexus, Samsung, Napa Auto. Live shows: PEARL (Lincoln Center & Int'l tour), Rose Parade, "The Who's Tommy" Musical with Tony Award winner Alice Ripley, artist Natasha Bedingfield, Celebrat10n (Walt Disney Concert Hall), Dance Camera West (Getty Museum) and “OPEN” (Ford Amphitheater & tour) for world renown choreographer Daniel Ezralow.Aside from performing, Kelly has had many wonderful choreography opportunities.  Choreographing for Target's Spring Commercial Campaign & CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. Associate/Assistant Choreography Credits: G.L.O.W. (Netflix), Feature Film POMS (w/ Diane Keaton), Westworld (HBO), Katy Perry (59th Grammy Awards, Wango Tango), Critics Choice Awards, Criminal Minds (CBS), Scorpion (CBS), Heathers the Musical (New World Stages/NYC), film Starving In Suburbia (Lifetime), Barbie Live! Musical (Int'l Tour), The Sing-Off (NBC), So You Think You Can Dance (FOX), Skating with the Stars (ABC), Primetime Emmy Awards, Billie Holiday Hologram Show (Apollo Theater). Dance Assistant for films: Behind the Candelabra, No Strings Attached, The Campaign; And for celebrities such as Sutton Foster, Kate Hudson, Paula Abdul, David Hasselhoff, Smokey Robinson and Nicole Sherzinger. Kelly was also the Asssistant Choreographer to Jennifer Hamilton for NBC's Superbowl Promo, with celebrities such as Kristen Wigg, Amy Poehler, and Tina Fey.Kelly continues to push herself to new heights, and broaden her career as an International artist & performer!

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2276: Charlie Ingui of The Soul Suvivors ~ "Expressway to Your Heart", Philadelphia International's #1 Major Music Hit Breakthru Pt 1

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 43:41


Gamble & Huff, Philadelphia International Rock & Soul Classic  Charlie Ingui,  Original Lead Vocalist still records & tours  go check him out! ~ thesoulsurvivors.comR.I.P. Ritchie Ingui, original vocal half of the Soul Survivors. He transitioned in early 2017.Original group member Kenny Jeremiah Transitioned in December of 2020. Memorable Intro, AWESOME Classic Hit, a Kenny Gamble &Leon Huff hit that Helped launch the Legendary Philadelphia International Record Label. I am a Music Lover of All Styles, Generations. This Week I Flashback....... The Soul Survivors, originally from New York City, grew up listening to the R & B groups of the 1950's. The sounds of groups like the Moonglows, Heartbeats, and Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers had a great influence on brothers Charlie and Rich Ingui. With various street corner groups, they developed their vocal skills. While in high school, Charlie joined the vocal group from Queens, N.Y. the Dedications. When, a year later the group's lead singer decided to leave, brother Rich was recruited. While performing at clubs in the New York area, they found themselves at the mercy of various house bands and decided to find a group of musicians who would become permanent members of the group therefore creating a self contained unit. The group would be renamed THE SOUL SURVIVORS. Shortly thereafter, the group began to build a strong following, playing venues in Atlantic City and Philadelphia. Enjoying great success in Philadelphia, they attracted the attention of record producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff. Into the recording studio they went, emerging with " Expressway To Your Heart " a song that would climb to #3 on Billboard's R&B chart and #4 on it's Top 100 list. The success of " Expressway " became Gamble and Huff's first "crossover" hit when it began to be played on both black and white radio stations. It's success enabled Gamble and Huff to reach the large audiences they sought in order to bring their " Sound Of Philadelphia " to the mass Market. In polls taken by both the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia's City Paper, " Expressway" was voted the number one record ever to come out of Philadelphia. "Expressway " was followed by two other chart records, "Explosion In My Soul" and " Mission Impossible". Their first album, released in 1968, was " When The Whistle Blows ". A second LP, on Atco Records, called "Take Another Look" appeared in 1969. During this time, the group toured extensively throughout the U.S. appearing with many different types of artists...everyone from Jackie Wilson, Smokey Robinson and The Miracles to Janis Joplin, the Beach Boys, Buffalo Springfield, Sly and the Family Stone and countless others. In 1974, the Soul Survivors reunited with Gamble and Huff to record their self titled album "The Soul Survivors" on TSOP Records. It was written and performed in a style that would define the unique sound of The Soul Survivors.The album produced "City Of Brotherly Love" which would show up on Billboard's R&B Top 100 and become the group's fourth charted outing. Through the years, the Soul Survivors have continued to provide audiences with high energy performances and music that is timeless and authentic ,appearing with 60's contemporaries Felix Cavaliere's Rascals. the Turtles,the Association, as well as fellow TSOP artists Harold Melvin's Bluenotes,Billy Paul, the Intruders, Russell Thompkins' Stylistics and others. The group's CD is called " Heart Full of Soul ", produced by Grammy nominated producers Jimmy Bralower and Johnny Gale.The Soul Survivors recorded new music and covers several years ago, most recently working with David Uosikkinen of The Hooters and his project "In the Pocket" which is paying tribute to the vast catalog of music created in Philadelphia.© 2022 All Rights Reserved© 2022 Building Abundant Success!!Join Me on ~ iHeart Radio @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23baAmazon Music ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBAS 

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2275: Everett Hall ~ CNN, Wall Street Journal, E!, GQ, Celebrity Designer, Haberdasher @Everett Hall Boutique

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 28:29


Celebrity Haberdasher ~ CNN, Wall Street Journal, E!.,GQ, NY Times  Tyler Perry, Smokey Robinson are just two of his many clients! He's been featured in CNN, Wall Street Journal, E!.,  New York Times, GQ, USA Today, Black Enterprise.  My Guest is Everett Hall, Celebrity Tailor, Fashion Designer @ Everett Hall Signature Collection, Italian Made Suits at his Boutique & Neman-Marcus. Everett Hall is owner of his Upscale Men's Boutique featuring high-end designer suits, sport coats, pants & accessories. At just 13 years old , he designed 300 garments in a year! Everett started his Exquisite Suit Designs in the 1980's when he was a college student at Howard University. He & his brother are designers in his Everett Hall Signature Line of suits, shirts, ties, etc. for men & women.Over the last thirty years he has designed suits for Smokey Robinson, vocalist Alexander O Neal, broadcasting icon Donnie Simpson, Tyler Perry, NBA stars Dominique Wilkins, Patrick Ewing and Isaiah Thomas, Charles Barkley, Boxing Champion Sugar Ray Leonard, Filmmaker Spike Lee, TV news-show host Maury Povich & the list goes on! He is the first African-American to open a store in Chevy Chase. His Flagship store near the Chevy Chase Pavilion,  near the DC/Bethesda is 25 years old! He goes to the BEST factories in Italy to have his suits made. EverettHallBoutique.com © 2022 All Rights Reserved© 2022 Building Abundant Success!!Join Me on ~ iHeart Radio @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23baAmazon Music ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBAS 

Playlist Wars
The Battle of Motown (w/ Philip Bergman & Ed Cunard)

Playlist Wars

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 71:07


In this episode, we're joined by Patreon Playlister Philip Bergman, and Ed Cunard of the Greatest Song Every Sung (Poorly) Podcast, to make the case for our respective Motown playlists! Vote now for YOUR favorite playlists, hear the results of past episodes & listen to ALL of the playlists at: http://www.playlistwarspodcast.com If you'd like to support Playlist Wars, then consider becoming a Patreon subscriber: http://www.patreon.com/playlistwars. Tiers include: Patreon exclusive content; early access to ad-free episodes; & join the show as a guest for a "Playlist An Album" mini episode or a full-length episode! SONGS DISCUSSED INCLUDE The Contours - Do You Love Me?; Bobby Darrin - Happy; The Four Seasons - The Night; The Four Tops - I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch); The Isley Brothers - This Old Heart Of Mine; Jackson 5 - ABC & I'll Be There; Marvin Gaye & Kim Weston - It Takes Two; Marvin Gaye - I Heard It Through The Grapevine & Inner City Blues / Make Me Wanna Holler; Rare Earth - Get Ready; Martha Reeves & The Vandellas - Dancing In The Street, Heat Wave & Nowhere To Run; Smokey Robinson & The Miracles - The Tears Of A Clown & You Really Got A Hold On Me; Jimmy Ruffin - What Becomes Of The Broken Hearted; The Supremes - Reflections, Stop! In The Name Of Love & Stoned Love; The Temptations - I Wish it Would Rain & My Girl; Stevie Wonder - Place In The Sun, Sir Duke & Superstition; The Undisputed Truth - Smiling Faces Sometimes; & Mary Wells - My Guy CONNECT WITH PLAYLIST WARS Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/playlistwars Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/playlistwars Twitter: http://twitter.com/playlistwars Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/playlistwarspodcast TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@playlistwars FOR MORE ON ROCK HALL MONITORS Website: https://rockhallmonitors.blogspot.com/ FOR MORE ON THE GREATEST SONG EVER SUNG (POORLY) PODCAST Website: https://www.sungpoorly.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sungpoorly/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SungPoorly Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sungpoorly/

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


This week's episode looks at “All You Need is Love”, the Our World TV special, and the career of the Beatles from April 1966 through August 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Rain" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ NB for the first few hours this was up, there was a slight editing glitch. If you downloaded the old version and don't want to redownload the whole thing, just look in the transcript for "Other than fixing John's two flubbed" for the text of the two missing paragraphs. Errata I say "Come Together" was a B-side, but the single was actually a double A-side. Also, I say the Lennon interview by Maureen Cleave appeared in Detroit magazine. That's what my source (Steve Turner's book) says, but someone on Twitter says that rather than Detroit magazine it was the Detroit Free Press. Also at one point I say "the videos for 'Paperback Writer' and 'Penny Lane'". I meant to say "Rain" rather than "Penny Lane" there. Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of songs by the Beatles. I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them. All my Beatles episodes refer to: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology. For this episode, I also referred to Last Interview by David Sheff, a longform interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono from shortly before Lennon's death; Many Years From Now by Barry Miles, an authorised biography of Paul McCartney; and Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles by Geoff Emerick and Howard Massey. Particularly useful this time was Steve Turner's book Beatles '66. I also used Turner's The Beatles: The Stories Behind the Songs 1967-1970. Johnny Rogan's Starmakers and Svengalis had some information on Epstein I hadn't seen anywhere else. Some information about the "Bigger than Jesus" scandal comes from Ward, B. (2012). “The ‘C' is for Christ”: Arthur Unger, Datebook Magazine and the Beatles. Popular Music and Society, 35(4), 541-560. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2011.608978 Information on Robert Stigwood comes from Mr Showbiz by Stephen Dando-Collins. And the quote at the end from Simon Napier-Bell is from You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, which is more entertaining than it is accurate, but is very entertaining. Sadly the only way to get the single mix of "All You Need is Love" is on this ludicrously-expensive out-of-print box set, but the stereo mix is easily available on Magical Mystery Tour. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I start the episode -- this episode deals, in part, with the deaths of three gay men -- one by murder, one by suicide, and one by an accidental overdose, all linked at least in part to societal homophobia. I will try to deal with this as tactfully as I can, but anyone who's upset by those things might want to read the transcript instead of listening to the episode. This is also a very, very, *very* long episode -- this is likely to be the longest episode I *ever* do of this podcast, so settle in. We're going to be here a while. I obviously don't know how long it's going to be while I'm still recording, but based on the word count of my script, probably in the region of three hours. You have been warned. In 1967 the actor Patrick McGoohan was tired. He had been working on the hit series Danger Man for many years -- Danger Man had originally run from 1960 through 1962, then had taken a break, and had come back, retooled, with longer episodes in 1964. That longer series was a big hit, both in the UK and in the US, where it was retitled Secret Agent and had a new theme tune written by PF Sloan and Steve Barri and recorded by Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But McGoohan was tired of playing John Drake, the agent, and announced he was going to quit the series. Instead, with the help of George Markstein, Danger Man's script editor, he created a totally new series, in which McGoohan would star, and which McGoohan would also write and direct key episodes of. This new series, The Prisoner, featured a spy who is only ever given the name Number Six, and who many fans -- though not McGoohan himself -- took to be the same character as John Drake. Number Six resigns from his job as a secret agent, and is kidnapped and taken to a place known only as The Village -- the series was filmed in Portmeirion, an unusual-looking town in Gwynnedd, in North Wales -- which is full of other ex-agents. There he is interrogated to try to find out why he has quit his job. It's never made clear whether the interrogators are his old employers or their enemies, and there's a certain suggestion that maybe there is no real distinction between the two sides, that they're both running the Village together. He spends the entire series trying to escape, but refuses to explain himself -- and there's some debate among viewers as to whether it's implied or not that part of the reason he doesn't explain himself is that he knows his interrogators wouldn't understand why he quit: [Excerpt: The Prisoner intro, from episode Once Upon a Time, ] Certainly that explanation would fit in with McGoohan's own personality. According to McGoohan, the final episode of The Prisoner was, at the time, the most watched TV show ever broadcast in the UK, as people tuned in to find out the identity of Number One, the person behind the Village, and to see if Number Six would break free. I don't think that's actually the case, but it's what McGoohan always claimed, and it was certainly a very popular series. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't watched it -- it's a remarkable series -- but ultimately the series seems to decide that such questions don't matter and that even asking them is missing the point. It's a work that's open to multiple interpretations, and is left deliberately ambiguous, but one of the messages many people have taken away from it is that not only are we trapped by a society that oppresses us, we're also trapped by our own identities. You can run from the trap that society has placed you in, from other people's interpretations of your life, your work, and your motives, but you ultimately can't run from yourself, and any time you try to break out of a prison, you'll find yourself trapped in another prison of your own making. The most horrifying implication of the episode is that possibly even death itself won't be a release, and you will spend all eternity trying to escape from an identity you're trapped in. Viewers became so outraged, according to McGoohan, that he had to go into hiding for an extended period, and while his later claims that he never worked in Britain again are an exaggeration, it is true that for the remainder of his life he concentrated on doing work in the US instead, where he hadn't created such anger. That final episode of The Prisoner was also the only one to use a piece of contemporary pop music, in two crucial scenes: [Excerpt: The Prisoner, "Fall Out", "All You Need is Love"] Back in October 2020, we started what I thought would be a year-long look at the period from late 1962 through early 1967, but which has turned out for reasons beyond my control to take more like twenty months, with a song which was one of the last of the big pre-Beatles pop hits, though we looked at it after their first single, "Telstar" by the Tornadoes: [Excerpt: The Tornadoes, "Telstar"] There were many reasons for choosing that as one of the bookends for this fifty-episode chunk of the podcast -- you'll see many connections between that episode and this one if you listen to them back-to-back -- but among them was that it's a song inspired by the launch of the first ever communications satellite, and a sign of how the world was going to become smaller as the sixties went on. Of course, to start with communications satellites didn't do much in that regard -- they were expensive to use, and had limited bandwidth, and were only available during limited time windows, but symbolically they meant that for the first time ever, people could see and hear events thousands of miles away as they were happening. It's not a coincidence that Britain and France signed the agreement to develop Concorde, the first supersonic airliner, a month after the first Beatles single and four months after the Telstar satellite was launched. The world was becoming ever more interconnected -- people were travelling faster and further, getting news from other countries quicker, and there was more cultural conversation – and misunderstanding – between countries thousands of miles apart. The Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, the man who also coined the phrase “the medium is the message”, thought that this ever-faster connection would fundamentally change basic modes of thought in the Western world. McLuhan thought that technology made possible whole new modes of thought, and that just as the printing press had, in his view, caused Western liberalism and individualism, so these new electronic media would cause the rise of a new collective mode of thought. In 1962, the year of Concorde, Telstar, and “Love Me Do”, McLuhan wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy, in which he said: “Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain, exactly as an infantile piece of science fiction. And as our senses have gone outside us, Big Brother goes inside. So, unless aware of this dynamic, we shall at once move into a phase of panic terrors, exactly befitting a small world of tribal drums, total interdependence, and superimposed co-existence.… Terror is the normal state of any oral society, for in it everything affects everything all the time.…” He coined the term “the Global Village” to describe this new collectivism. The story we've seen over the last fifty episodes is one of a sort of cultural ping-pong between the USA and the UK, with innovations in American music inspiring British musicians, who in turn inspired American ones, whether that being the Beatles covering the Isley Brothers or the Rolling Stones doing a Bobby Womack song, or Paul Simon and Bob Dylan coming over to the UK and learning folk songs and guitar techniques from Martin Carthy. And increasingly we're going to see those influences spread to other countries, and influences coming *from* other countries. We've already seen one Jamaican artist, and the influence of Indian music has become very apparent. While the focus of this series is going to remain principally in the British Isles and North America, rock music was and is a worldwide phenomenon, and that's going to become increasingly a part of the story. And so in this episode we're going to look at a live performance -- well, mostly live -- that was seen by hundreds of millions of people all over the world as it happened, thanks to the magic of satellites: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "All You Need is Love"] When we left the Beatles, they had just finished recording "Tomorrow Never Knows", the most experimental track they had recorded up to that date, and if not the most experimental thing they *ever* recorded certainly in the top handful. But "Tomorrow Never Knows" was only the first track they recorded in the sessions for what would become arguably their greatest album, and certainly the one that currently has the most respect from critics. It's interesting to note that that album could have been very, very, different. When we think of Revolver now, we think of the innovative production of George Martin, and of Geoff Emerick and Ken Townshend's inventive ideas for pushing the sound of the equipment in Abbey Road studios, but until very late in the day the album was going to be recorded in the Stax studios in Memphis, with Steve Cropper producing -- whether George Martin would have been involved or not is something we don't even know. In 1965, the Rolling Stones had, as we've seen, started making records in the US, recording in LA and at the Chess studios in Chicago, and the Yardbirds had also been doing the same thing. Mick Jagger had become a convert to the idea of using American studios and working with American musicians, and he had constantly been telling Paul McCartney that the Beatles should do the same. Indeed, they'd put some feelers out in 1965 about the possibility of the group making an album with Holland, Dozier, and Holland in Detroit. Quite how this would have worked is hard to figure out -- Holland, Dozier, and Holland's skills were as songwriters, and in their work with a particular set of musicians -- so it's unsurprising that came to nothing. But recording at Stax was a different matter.  While Steve Cropper was a great songwriter in his own right, he was also adept at getting great sounds on covers of other people's material -- like on Otis Blue, the album he produced for Otis Redding in late 1965, which doesn't include a single Cropper original: [Excerpt: Otis Redding, "Satisfaction"] And the Beatles were very influenced by the records Stax were putting out, often namechecking Wilson Pickett in particular, and during the Rubber Soul sessions they had recorded a "Green Onions" soundalike track, imaginatively titled "12-Bar Original": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "12-Bar Original"] The idea of the group recording at Stax got far enough that they were actually booked in for two weeks starting the ninth of April, and there was even an offer from Elvis to let them stay at Graceland while they recorded, but then a couple of weeks earlier, the news leaked to the press, and Brian Epstein cancelled the booking. According to Cropper, Epstein talked about recording at the Atlantic studios in New York with him instead, but nothing went any further. It's hard to imagine what a Stax-based Beatles album would have been like, but even though it might have been a great album, it certainly wouldn't have been the Revolver we've come to know. Revolver is an unusual album in many ways, and one of the ways it's most distinct from the earlier Beatles albums is the dominance of keyboards. Both Lennon and McCartney had often written at the piano as well as the guitar -- McCartney more so than Lennon, but both had done so regularly -- but up to this point it had been normal for them to arrange the songs for guitars rather than keyboards, no matter how they'd started out. There had been the odd track where one of them, usually Lennon, would play a simple keyboard part, songs like "I'm Down" or "We Can Work it Out", but even those had been guitar records first and foremost. But on Revolver, that changed dramatically. There seems to have been a complex web of cause and effect here. Paul was becoming increasingly interested in moving his basslines away from simple walking basslines and root notes and the other staples of rock and roll basslines up to this point. As the sixties progressed, rock basslines were becoming ever more complex, and Tyler Mahan Coe has made a good case that this is largely down to innovations in production pioneered by Owen Bradley, and McCartney was certainly aware of Bradley's work -- he was a fan of Brenda Lee, who Bradley produced, for example. But the two influences that McCartney has mentioned most often in this regard are the busy, jazz-influenced, basslines that James Jamerson was playing at Motown: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "It's the Same Old Song"] And the basslines that Brian Wilson was writing for various Wrecking Crew bassists to play for the Beach Boys: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)"] Just to be clear, McCartney didn't hear that particular track until partway through the recording of Revolver, when Bruce Johnston visited the UK and brought with him an advance copy of Pet Sounds, but Pet Sounds influenced the later part of Revolver's recording, and Wilson had already started his experiments in that direction with the group's 1965 work. It's much easier to write a song with this kind of bassline, one that's integral to the composition, on the piano than it is to write it on a guitar, as you can work out the bassline with your left hand while working out the chords and melody with your right, so the habit that McCartney had already developed of writing on the piano made this easier. But also, starting with the recording of "Paperback Writer", McCartney switched his style of working in the studio. Where up to this point it had been normal for him to play bass as part of the recording of the basic track, playing with the other Beatles, he now started to take advantage of multitracking to overdub his bass later, so he could spend extra time getting the bassline exactly right. McCartney lived closer to Abbey Road than the other three Beatles, and so could more easily get there early or stay late and tweak his parts. But if McCartney wasn't playing bass while the guitars and drums were being recorded, that meant he could play something else, and so increasingly he would play piano during the recording of the basic track. And that in turn would mean that there wouldn't always *be* a need for guitars on the track, because the harmonic support they would provide would be provided by the piano instead. This, as much as anything else, is the reason that Revolver sounds so radically different to any other Beatles album. Up to this point, with *very* rare exceptions like "Yesterday", every Beatles record, more or less, featured all four of the Beatles playing instruments. Now John and George weren't playing on "Good Day Sunshine" or "For No One", John wasn't playing on "Here, There, and Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" features no guitars or drums at all, and George's "Love You To" only features himself, plus a little tambourine from Ringo (Paul recorded a part for that one, but it doesn't seem to appear on the finished track). Of the three songwriting Beatles, the only one who at this point was consistently requiring the instrumental contributions of all the other band members was John, and even he did without Paul on "She Said, She Said", which by all accounts features either John or George on bass, after Paul had a rare bout of unprofessionalism and left the studio. Revolver is still an album made by a group -- and most of those tracks that don't feature John or George instrumentally still feature them vocally -- it's still a collaborative work in all the best ways. But it's no longer an album made by four people playing together in the same room at the same time. After starting work on "Tomorrow Never Knows", the next track they started work on was Paul's "Got to Get You Into My Life", but as it would turn out they would work on that song throughout most of the sessions for the album -- in a sign of how the group would increasingly work from this point on, Paul's song was subject to multiple re-recordings and tweakings in the studio, as he tinkered to try to make it perfect. The first recording to be completed for the album, though, was almost as much of a departure in its own way as "Tomorrow Never Knows" had been. George's song "Love You To" shows just how inspired he was by the music of Ravi Shankar, and how devoted he was to Indian music. While a few months earlier he had just about managed to pick out a simple melody on the sitar for "Norwegian Wood", by this point he was comfortable enough with Indian classical music that I've seen many, many sources claim that an outside session player is playing sitar on the track, though Anil Bhagwat, the tabla player on the track, always insisted that it was entirely Harrison's playing: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] There is a *lot* of debate as to whether it's George playing on the track, and I feel a little uncomfortable making a definitive statement in either direction. On the one hand I find it hard to believe that Harrison got that good that quickly on an unfamiliar instrument, when we know he wasn't a naturally facile musician. All the stories we have about his work in the studio suggest that he had to work very hard on his guitar solos, and that he would frequently fluff them. As a technical guitarist, Harrison was only mediocre -- his value lay in his inventiveness, not in technical ability -- and he had been playing guitar for over a decade, but sitar only a few months. There's also some session documentation suggesting that an unknown sitar player was hired. On the other hand there's the testimony of Anil Bhagwat that Harrison played the part himself, and he has been very firm on the subject, saying "If you go on the Internet there are a lot of questions asked about "Love You To". They say 'It's not George playing the sitar'. I can tell you here and now -- 100 percent it was George on sitar throughout. There were no other musicians involved. It was just me and him." And several people who are more knowledgeable than myself about the instrument have suggested that the sitar part on the track is played the way that a rock guitarist would play rather than the way someone with more knowledge of Indian classical music would play -- there's a blues feeling to some of the bends that apparently no genuine Indian classical musician would naturally do. I would suggest that the best explanation is that there's a professional sitar player trying to replicate a part that Harrison had previously demonstrated, while Harrison was in turn trying his best to replicate the sound of Ravi Shankar's work. Certainly the instrumental section sounds far more fluent, and far more stylistically correct, than one would expect: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Where previous attempts at what got called "raga-rock" had taken a couple of surface features of Indian music -- some form of a drone, perhaps a modal scale -- and had generally used a guitar made to sound a little bit like a sitar, or had a sitar playing normal rock riffs, Harrison's song seems to be a genuine attempt to hybridise Indian ragas and rock music, combining the instrumentation, modes, and rhythmic complexity of someone like Ravi Shankar with lyrics that are seemingly inspired by Bob Dylan and a fairly conventional pop song structure (and a tiny bit of fuzz guitar). It's a record that could only be made by someone who properly understood both the Indian music he's emulating and the conventions of the Western pop song, and understood how those conventions could work together. Indeed, one thing I've rarely seen pointed out is how cleverly the album is sequenced, so that "Love You To" is followed by possibly the most conventional song on Revolver, "Here, There, and Everywhere", which was recorded towards the end of the sessions. Both songs share a distinctive feature not shared by the rest of the album, so the two songs can sound more of a pair than they otherwise would, retrospectively making "Love You To" seem more conventional than it is and "Here, There, and Everywhere" more unconventional -- both have as an introduction a separate piece of music that states some of the melodic themes of the rest of the song but isn't repeated later. In the case of "Love You To" it's the free-tempo bit at the beginning, characteristic of a lot of Indian music: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] While in the case of "Here, There, and Everywhere" it's the part that mimics an older style of songwriting, a separate intro of the type that would have been called a verse when written by the Gershwins or Cole Porter, but of course in the intervening decades "verse" had come to mean something else, so we now no longer have a specific term for this kind of intro -- but as you can hear, it's doing very much the same thing as that "Love You To" intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] In the same day as the group completed "Love You To", overdubbing George's vocal and Ringo's tambourine, they also started work on a song that would show off a lot of the new techniques they had been working on in very different ways. Paul's "Paperback Writer" could indeed be seen as part of a loose trilogy with "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows", one song by each of the group's three songwriters exploring the idea of a song that's almost all on one chord. Both "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Love You To" are based on a drone with occasional hints towards moving to one other chord. In the case of "Paperback Writer", the entire song stays on a single chord until the title -- it's on a G7 throughout until the first use of the word "writer", when it quickly goes to a C for two bars. I'm afraid I'm going to have to sing to show you how little the chords actually change, because the riff disguises this lack of movement somewhat, but the melody is also far more horizontal than most of McCartney's, so this shouldn't sound too painful, I hope: [demonstrates] This is essentially the exact same thing that both "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" do, and all three have very similarly structured rising and falling modal melodies. There's also a bit of "Paperback Writer" that seems to tie directly into "Love You To", but also points to a possible very non-Indian inspiration for part of "Love You To". The Beach Boys' single "Sloop John B" was released in the UK a couple of days after the sessions for "Paperback Writer" and "Love You To", but it had been released in the US a month before, and the Beatles all got copies of every record in the American top thirty shipped to them. McCartney and Harrison have specifically pointed to it as an influence on "Paperback Writer". "Sloop John B" has a section where all the instruments drop out and we're left with just the group's vocal harmonies: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B"] And that seems to have been the inspiration behind the similar moment at a similar point in "Paperback Writer", which is used in place of a middle eight and also used for the song's intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Which is very close to what Harrison does at the end of each verse of "Love You To", where the instruments drop out for him to sing a long melismatic syllable before coming back in: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Essentially, other than "Got to Get You Into My Life", which is an outlier and should not be counted, the first three songs attempted during the Revolver sessions are variations on a common theme, and it's a sign that no matter how different the results might  sound, the Beatles really were very much a group at this point, and were sharing ideas among themselves and developing those ideas in similar ways. "Paperback Writer" disguises what it's doing somewhat by having such a strong riff. Lennon referred to "Paperback Writer" as "son of 'Day Tripper'", and in terms of the Beatles' singles it's actually their third iteration of this riff idea, which they originally got from Bobby Parker's "Watch Your Step": [Excerpt: Bobby Parker, "Watch Your Step"] Which became the inspiration for "I Feel Fine": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] Which they varied for "Day Tripper": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Day Tripper"] And which then in turn got varied for "Paperback Writer": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] As well as compositional ideas, there are sonic ideas shared between "Paperback Writer", "Tomorrow Never Knows", and "Love You To", and which would be shared by the rest of the tracks the Beatles recorded in the first half of 1966. Since Geoff Emerick had become the group's principal engineer, they'd started paying more attention to how to get a fuller sound, and so Emerick had miced the tabla on "Love You To" much more closely than anyone would normally mic an instrument from classical music, creating a deep, thudding sound, and similarly he had changed the way they recorded the drums on "Tomorrow Never Knows", again giving a much fuller sound. But the group also wanted the kind of big bass sounds they'd loved on records coming out of America -- sounds that no British studio was getting, largely because it was believed that if you cut too loud a bass sound into a record it would make the needle jump out of the groove. The new engineering team of Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott, though, thought that it was likely you could keep the needle in the groove if you had a smoother frequency response. You could do that if you used a microphone with a larger diaphragm to record the bass, but how could you do that? Inspiration finally struck -- loudspeakers are actually the same thing as microphones wired the other way round, so if you wired up a loudspeaker as if it were a microphone you could get a *really big* speaker, place it in front of the bass amp, and get a much stronger bass sound. The experiment wasn't a total success -- the sound they got had to be processed quite extensively to get rid of room noise, and then compressed in order to further prevent the needle-jumping issue, and so it's a muddier, less defined, tone than they would have liked, but one thing that can't be denied is that "Paperback Writer"'s bass sound is much, much, louder than on any previous Beatles record: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Almost every track the group recorded during the Revolver sessions involved all sorts of studio innovations, though rarely anything as truly revolutionary as the artificial double-tracking they'd used on "Tomorrow Never Knows", and which also appeared on "Paperback Writer" -- indeed, as "Paperback Writer" was released several months before Revolver, it became the first record released to use the technique. I could easily devote a good ten minutes to every track on Revolver, and to "Paperback Writer"s B-side, "Rain", but this is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily long episode and there's a lot of material to get through, so I'll break my usual pattern of devoting a Patreon bonus episode to something relatively obscure, and this week's bonus will be on "Rain" itself. "Paperback Writer", though, deserved the attention here even though it was not one of the group's more successful singles -- it did go to number one, but it didn't hit number one in the UK charts straight away, being kept off the top by "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra for the first week: [Excerpt: Frank Sinatra, "Strangers in the Night"] Coincidentally, "Strangers in the Night" was co-written by Bert Kaempfert, the German musician who had produced the group's very first recording sessions with Tony Sheridan back in 1961. On the group's German tour in 1966 they met up with Kaempfert again, and John greeted him by singing the first couple of lines of the Sinatra record. The single was the lowest-selling Beatles single in the UK since "Love Me Do". In the US it only made number one for two non-consecutive weeks, with "Strangers in the Night" knocking it off for a week in between. Now, by literally any other band's standards, that's still a massive hit, and it was the Beatles' tenth UK number one in a row (or ninth, depending on which chart you use for "Please Please Me"), but it's a sign that the group were moving out of the first phase of total unequivocal dominance of the charts. It was a turning point in a lot of other ways as well. Up to this point, while the group had been experimenting with different lyrical subjects on album tracks, every single had lyrics about romantic relationships -- with the possible exception of "Help!", which was about Lennon's emotional state but written in such a way that it could be heard as a plea to a lover. But in the case of "Paperback Writer", McCartney was inspired by his Aunt Mill asking him "Why do you write songs about love all the time? Can you ever write about a horse or the summit conference or something interesting?" His response was to think "All right, Aunt Mill, I'll show you", and to come up with a lyric that was very much in the style of the social satires that bands like the Kinks were releasing at the time. People often miss the humour in the lyric for "Paperback Writer", but there's a huge amount of comedy in lyrics about someone writing to a publisher saying they'd written a book based on someone else's book, and one can only imagine the feeling of weary recognition in slush-pile readers throughout the world as they heard the enthusiastic "It's a thousand pages, give or take a few, I'll be writing more in a week or two. I can make it longer..." From this point on, the group wouldn't release a single that was unambiguously about a romantic relationship until "The Ballad of John and Yoko",  the last single released while the band were still together. "Paperback Writer" also saw the Beatles for the first time making a promotional film -- what we would now call a rock video -- rather than make personal appearances on TV shows. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who the group would work with again in 1969, and shows Paul with a chipped front tooth -- he'd been in an accident while riding mopeds with his friend Tara Browne a few months earlier, and hadn't yet got round to having the tooth capped. When he did, the change in his teeth was one of the many bits of evidence used by conspiracy theorists to prove that the real Paul McCartney was dead and replaced by a lookalike. It also marks a change in who the most prominent Beatle on the group's A-sides was. Up to this point, Paul had had one solo lead on an A-side -- "Can't Buy Me Love" -- and everything else had been either a song with multiple vocalists like "Day Tripper" or "Love Me Do", or a song with a clear John lead like "Ticket to Ride" or "I Feel Fine". In the rest of their career, counting "Paperback Writer", the group would release nine new singles that hadn't already been included on an album. Of those nine singles, one was a double A-side with one John song and one Paul song, two had John songs on the A-side, and the other six were Paul. Where up to this point John had been "lead Beatle", for the rest of the sixties, Paul would be the group's driving force. Oddly, Paul got rather defensive about the record when asked about it in interviews after it failed to go straight to the top, saying "It's not our best single by any means, but we're very satisfied with it". But especially in its original mono mix it actually packs a powerful punch: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] When the "Paperback Writer" single was released, an unusual image was used in the advertising -- a photo of the Beatles dressed in butchers' smocks, covered in blood, with chunks of meat and the dismembered body parts of baby dolls lying around on them. The image was meant as part of a triptych parodying religious art -- the photo on the left was to be an image showing the four Beatles connected to a woman by an umbilical cord made of sausages, the middle panel was meant to be this image, but with halos added over the Beatles' heads, and the panel on the right was George hammering a nail into John's head, symbolising both crucifixion and that the group were real, physical, people, not just images to be worshipped -- these weren't imaginary nails, and they weren't imaginary people. The photographer Robert Whittaker later said: “I did a photograph of the Beatles covered in raw meat, dolls and false teeth. Putting meat, dolls and false teeth with The Beatles is essentially part of the same thing, the breakdown of what is regarded as normal. The actual conception for what I still call “Somnambulant Adventure” was Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. He comes across people worshipping a golden calf. All over the world I'd watched people worshiping like idols, like gods, four Beatles. To me they were just stock standard normal people. But this emotion that fans poured on them made me wonder where Christianity was heading.” The image wasn't that controversial in the UK, when it was used to advertise "Paperback Writer", but in the US it was initially used for the cover of an album, Yesterday... And Today, which was made up of a few tracks that had been left off the US versions of the Rubber Soul and Help! albums, plus both sides of the "We Can Work It Out"/"Day Tripper" single, and three rough mixes of songs that had been recorded for Revolver -- "Doctor Robert", "And Your Bird Can Sing", and "I'm Only Sleeping", which was the song that sounded most different from the mixes that were finally released: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I'm Only Sleeping (Yesterday... and Today mix)"] Those three songs were all Lennon songs, which had the unfortunate effect that when the US version of Revolver was brought out later in the year, only two of the songs on the album were by Lennon, with six by McCartney and three by Harrison. Some have suggested that this was the motivation for the use of the butcher image on the cover of Yesterday... And Today -- saying it was the Beatles' protest against Capitol "butchering" their albums -- but in truth it was just that Capitol's art director chose the cover because he liked the image. Alan Livingston, the president of Capitol was not so sure, and called Brian Epstein to ask if the group would be OK with them using a different image. Epstein checked with John Lennon, but Lennon liked the image and so Epstein told Livingston the group insisted on them using that cover. Even though for the album cover the bloodstains on the butchers' smocks were airbrushed out, after Capitol had pressed up a million copies of the mono version of the album and two hundred thousand copies of the stereo version, and they'd sent out sixty thousand promo copies, they discovered that no record shops would stock the album with that cover. It cost Capitol more than two hundred thousand dollars to recall the album and replace the cover with a new one -- though while many of the covers were destroyed, others had the new cover, with a more acceptable photo of the group, pasted over them, and people have later carefully steamed off the sticker to reveal the original. This would not be the last time in 1966 that something that was intended as a statement on religion and the way people viewed the Beatles would cause the group trouble in America. In the middle of the recording sessions for Revolver, the group also made what turned out to be their last ever UK live performance in front of a paying audience. The group had played the NME Poll-Winners' Party every year since 1963, and they were always shows that featured all the biggest acts in the country at the time -- the 1966 show featured, as well as the Beatles and a bunch of smaller acts, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Yardbirds, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, the Seekers, the Small Faces, the Walker Brothers, and Dusty Springfield. Unfortunately, while these events were always filmed for TV broadcast, the Beatles' performance on the first of May wasn't filmed. There are various stories about what happened, but the crux appears to be a disagreement between Andrew Oldham and Brian Epstein, sparked by John Lennon. When the Beatles got to the show, they were upset to discover that they had to wait around before going on stage -- normally, the awards would all be presented at the end, after all the performances, but the Rolling Stones had asked that the Beatles not follow them directly, so after the Stones finished their set, there would be a break for the awards to be given out, and then the Beatles would play their set, in front of an audience that had been bored by twenty-five minutes of awards ceremony, rather than one that had been excited by all the bands that came before them. John Lennon was annoyed, and insisted that the Beatles were going to go on straight after the Rolling Stones -- he seems to have taken this as some sort of power play by the Stones and to have got his hackles up about it. He told Epstein to deal with the people from the NME. But the NME people said that they had a contract with Andrew Oldham, and they weren't going to break it. Oldham refused to change the terms of the contract. Lennon said that he wasn't going to go on stage if they didn't directly follow the Stones. Maurice Kinn, the publisher of the NME, told Epstein that he wasn't going to break the contract with Oldham, and that if the Beatles didn't appear on stage, he would get Jimmy Savile, who was compering the show, to go out on stage and tell the ten thousand fans in the audience that the Beatles were backstage refusing to appear. He would then sue NEMS for breach of contract *and* NEMS would be liable for any damage caused by the rioting that was sure to happen. Lennon screamed a lot of abuse at Kinn, and told him the group would never play one of their events again, but the group did go on stage -- but because they hadn't yet signed the agreement to allow their performance to be filmed, they refused to allow it to be recorded. Apparently Andrew Oldham took all this as a sign that Epstein was starting to lose control of the group. Also during May 1966 there were visits from musicians from other countries, continuing the cultural exchange that was increasingly influencing the Beatles' art. Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys came over to promote the group's new LP, Pet Sounds, which had been largely the work of Brian Wilson, who had retired from touring to concentrate on working in the studio. Johnston played the record for John and Paul, who listened to it twice, all the way through, in silence, in Johnston's hotel room: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"] According to Johnston, after they'd listened through the album twice, they went over to a piano and started whispering to each other, picking out chords. Certainly the influence of Pet Sounds is very noticeable on songs like "Here, There, and Everywhere", written and recorded a few weeks after this meeting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] That track, and the last track recorded for the album, "She Said She Said" were unusual in one very important respect -- they were recorded while the Beatles were no longer under contract to EMI Records. Their contract expired on the fifth of June, 1966, and they finished Revolver without it having been renewed -- it would be several months before their new contract was signed, and it's rather lucky for music lovers that Brian Epstein was the kind of manager who considered personal relationships and basic honour and decency more important than the legal niceties, unlike any other managers of the era, otherwise we would not have Revolver in the form we know it today. After the meeting with Johnston, but before the recording of those last couple of Revolver tracks, the Beatles also met up again with Bob Dylan, who was on a UK tour with a new, loud, band he was working with called The Hawks. While the Beatles and Dylan all admired each other, there was by this point a lot of wariness on both sides, especially between Lennon and Dylan, both of them very similar personality types and neither wanting to let their guard down around the other or appear unhip. There's a famous half-hour-long film sequence of Lennon and Dylan sharing a taxi, which is a fascinating, excruciating, example of two insecure but arrogant men both trying desperately to impress the other but also equally desperate not to let the other know that they want to impress them: [Excerpt: Dylan and Lennon taxi ride] The day that was filmed, Lennon and Harrison also went to see Dylan play at the Royal Albert Hall. This tour had been controversial, because Dylan's band were loud and raucous, and Dylan's fans in the UK still thought of him as a folk musician. At one gig, earlier on the tour, an audience member had famously yelled out "Judas!" -- (just on the tiny chance that any of my listeners don't know that, Judas was the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the authorities, leading to his crucifixion) -- and that show was for many years bootlegged as the "Royal Albert Hall" show, though in fact it was recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. One of the *actual* Royal Albert Hall shows was released a few years ago -- the one the night before Lennon and Harrison saw Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone", Royal Albert Hall 1966] The show Lennon and Harrison saw would be Dylan's last for many years. Shortly after returning to the US, Dylan was in a motorbike accident, the details of which are still mysterious, and which some fans claim was faked altogether. The accident caused him to cancel all the concert dates he had booked, and devote himself to working in the studio for several years just like Brian Wilson. And from even further afield than America, Ravi Shankar came over to Britain, to work with his friend the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, on a duet album, West Meets East, that was an example in the classical world of the same kind of international cross-fertilisation that was happening in the pop world: [Excerpt: Yehudi Menuhin and Ravi Shankar, "Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali)"] While he was in the UK, Shankar also performed at the Royal Festival Hall, and George Harrison went to the show. He'd seen Shankar live the year before, but this time he met up with him afterwards, and later said "He was the first person that impressed me in a way that was beyond just being a famous celebrity. Ravi was my link to the Vedic world. Ravi plugged me into the whole of reality. Elvis impressed me when I was a kid, and impressed me when I met him, but you couldn't later on go round to him and say 'Elvis, what's happening with the universe?'" After completing recording and mixing the as-yet-unnamed album, which had been by far the longest recording process of their career, and which still nearly sixty years later regularly tops polls of the best album of all time, the Beatles took a well-earned break. For a whole two days, at which point they flew off to Germany to do a three-day tour, on their way to Japan, where they were booked to play five shows at the Budokan. Unfortunately for the group, while they had no idea of this when they were booked to do the shows, many in Japan saw the Budokan as sacred ground, and they were the first ever Western group to play there. This led to numerous death threats and loud protests from far-right activists offended at the Beatles defiling their religious and nationalistic sensibilities. As a result, the police were on high alert -- so high that there were three thousand police in the audience for the shows, in a venue which only held ten thousand audience members. That's according to Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, though I have to say that the rather blurry footage of the audience in the video of those shows doesn't seem to show anything like those numbers. But frankly I'll take Lewisohn's word over that footage, as he's not someone to put out incorrect information. The threats to the group also meant that they had to be kept in their hotel rooms at all times except when actually performing, though they did make attempts to get out. At the press conference for the Tokyo shows, the group were also asked publicly for the first time their views on the war in Vietnam, and John replied "Well, we think about it every day, and we don't agree with it and we think that it's wrong. That's how much interest we take. That's all we can do about it... and say that we don't like it". I say they were asked publicly for the first time, because George had been asked about it for a series of interviews Maureen Cleave had done with the group a couple of months earlier, as we'll see in a bit, but nobody was paying attention to those interviews. Brian Epstein was upset that the question had gone to John. He had hoped that the inevitable Vietnam question would go to Paul, who he thought might be a bit more tactful. The last thing he needed was John Lennon saying something that would upset the Americans before their tour there a few weeks later. Luckily, people in America seemed to have better things to do than pay attention to John Lennon's opinions. The support acts for the Japanese shows included  several of the biggest names in Japanese rock music -- or "group sounds" as the genre was called there, Japanese people having realised that trying to say the phrase "rock and roll" would open them up to ridicule given that it had both "r" and "l" sounds in the phrase. The man who had coined the term "group sounds", Jackey Yoshikawa, was there with his group the Blue Comets, as was Isao Bito, who did a rather good cover version of Cliff Richard's "Dynamite": [Excerpt: Isao Bito, "Dynamite"] Bito, the Blue Comets, and the other two support acts, Yuya Uchida and the Blue Jeans, all got together to perform a specially written song, "Welcome Beatles": [Excerpt: "Welcome Beatles" ] But while the Japanese audience were enthusiastic, they were much less vocal about their enthusiasm than the audiences the Beatles were used to playing for. The group were used, of course, to playing in front of hordes of screaming teenagers who could not hear a single note, but because of the fear that a far-right terrorist would assassinate one of the group members, the police had imposed very, very, strict rules on the audience. Nobody in the audience was allowed to get out of their seat for any reason, and the police would clamp down very firmly on anyone who was too demonstrative. Because of that, the group could actually hear themselves, and they sounded sloppy as hell, especially on the newer material. Not that there was much of that. The only song they did from the Revolver sessions was "Paperback Writer", the new single, and while they did do a couple of tracks from Rubber Soul, those were under-rehearsed. As John said at the start of this tour, "I can't play any of Rubber Soul, it's so unrehearsed. The only time I played any of the numbers on it was when I recorded it. I forget about songs. They're only valid for a certain time." That's certainly borne out by the sound of their performances of Rubber Soul material at the Budokan: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "If I Needed Someone (live at the Budokan)"] It was while they were in Japan as well that they finally came up with the title for their new album. They'd been thinking of all sorts of ideas, like Abracadabra and Magic Circle, and tossing names around with increasing desperation for several days -- at one point they seem to have just started riffing on other groups' albums, and seem to have apparently seriously thought about naming the record in parodic tribute to their favourite artists -- suggestions included The Beatles On Safari, after the Beach Boys' Surfin' Safari (and possibly with a nod to their recent Pet Sounds album cover with animals, too), The Freewheelin' Beatles, after Dylan's second album, and my favourite, Ringo's suggestion After Geography, for the Rolling Stones' Aftermath. But eventually Paul came up with Revolver -- like Rubber Soul, a pun, in this case because the record itself revolves when on a turntable. Then it was off to the Philippines, and if the group thought Japan had been stressful, they had no idea what was coming. The trouble started in the Philippines from the moment they stepped off the plane, when they were bundled into a car without Neil Aspinall or Brian Epstein, and without their luggage, which was sent to customs. This was a problem in itself -- the group had got used to essentially being treated like diplomats, and to having their baggage let through customs without being searched, and so they'd started freely carrying various illicit substances with them. This would obviously be a problem -- but as it turned out, this was just to get a "customs charge" paid by Brian Epstein. But during their initial press conference the group were worried, given the hostility they'd faced from officialdom, that they were going to be arrested during the conference itself. They were asked what they would tell the Rolling Stones, who were going to be visiting the Philippines shortly after, and Lennon just said "We'll warn them". They also asked "is there a war on in the Philippines? Why is everybody armed?" At this time, the Philippines had a new leader, Ferdinand Marcos -- who is not to be confused with his son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, also known as Bongbong Marcos, who just became President-Elect there last month. Marcos Sr was a dictatorial kleptocrat, one of the worst leaders of the latter half of the twentieth century, but that wasn't evident yet. He'd been elected only a few months earlier, and had presented himself as a Kennedy-like figure -- a young man who was also a war hero. He'd recently switched parties from the Liberal party to the right-wing Nacionalista Party, but wasn't yet being thought of as the monstrous dictator he later became. The person organising the Philippines shows had been ordered to get the Beatles to visit Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at 11AM on the day of the show, but for some reason had instead put on their itinerary just the *suggestion* that the group should meet the Marcoses, and had put the time down as 3PM, and the Beatles chose to ignore that suggestion -- they'd refused to do that kind of government-official meet-and-greet ever since an incident in 1964 at the British Embassy in Washington where someone had cut off a bit of Ringo's hair. A military escort turned up at the group's hotel in the morning, to take them for their meeting. The group were all still in their rooms, and Brian Epstein was still eating breakfast and refused to disturb them, saying "Go back and tell the generals we're not coming." The group gave their performances as scheduled, but meanwhile there was outrage at the way the Beatles had refused to meet the Marcos family, who had brought hundreds of children -- friends of their own children, and relatives of top officials -- to a party to meet the group. Brian Epstein went on TV and tried to smooth things over, but the broadcast was interrupted by static and his message didn't get through to anyone. The next day, the group's security was taken away, as were the cars to take them to the airport. When they got to the airport, the escalators were turned off and the group were beaten up at the arrangement of the airport manager, who said in 1984 "I beat up the Beatles. I really thumped them. First I socked Epstein and he went down... then I socked Lennon and Ringo in the face. I was kicking them. They were pleading like frightened chickens. That's what happens when you insult the First Lady." Even on the plane there were further problems -- Brian Epstein and the group's road manager Mal Evans were both made to get off the plane to sort out supposed financial discrepancies, which led to them worrying that they were going to be arrested or worse -- Evans told the group to tell his wife he loved her as he left the plane. But eventually, they were able to leave, and after a brief layover in India -- which Ringo later said was the first time he felt he'd been somewhere truly foreign, as opposed to places like Germany or the USA which felt basically like home -- they got back to England: [Excerpt: "Ordinary passenger!"] When asked what they were going to do next, George replied “We're going to have a couple of weeks to recuperate before we go and get beaten up by the Americans,” The story of the "we're bigger than Jesus" controversy is one of the most widely misreported events in the lives of the Beatles, which is saying a great deal. One book that I've encountered, and one book only, Steve Turner's Beatles '66, tells the story of what actually happened, and even that book seems to miss some emphases. I've pieced what follows together from Turner's book and from an academic journal article I found which has some more detail. As far as I can tell, every single other book on the Beatles released up to this point bases their account of the story on an inaccurate press statement put out by Brian Epstein, not on the truth. Here's the story as it's generally told. John Lennon gave an interview to his friend, Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, during which he made some comments about how it was depressing that Christianity was losing relevance in the eyes of the public, and that the Beatles are more popular than Jesus, speaking casually because he was talking to a friend. That story was run in the Evening Standard more-or-less unnoticed, but then an American teen magazine picked up on the line about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus, reprinted chunks of the interview out of context and without the Beatles' knowledge or permission, as a way to stir up controversy, and there was an outcry, with people burning Beatles records and death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. That's... not exactly what happened. The first thing that you need to understand to know what happened is that Datebook wasn't a typical teen magazine. It *looked* just like a typical teen magazine, certainly, and much of its content was the kind of thing that you would get in Tiger Beat or any of the other magazines aimed at teenage girls -- the September 1966 issue was full of articles like "Life with the Walker Brothers... by their Road Manager", and interviews with the Dave Clark Five -- but it also had a long history of publishing material that was intended to make its readers think about social issues of the time, particularly Civil Rights. Arthur Unger, the magazine's editor and publisher, was a gay man in an interracial relationship, and while the subject of homosexuality was too taboo in the late fifties and sixties for him to have his magazine cover that, he did regularly include articles decrying segregation and calling for the girls reading the magazine to do their part on a personal level to stamp out racism. Datebook had regularly contained articles like one from 1963 talking about how segregation wasn't just a problem in the South, saying "If we are so ‘integrated' why must men in my own city of Philadelphia, the city of Brotherly Love, picket city hall because they are discriminated against when it comes to getting a job? And how come I am still unable to take my dark- complexioned friends to the same roller skating rink or swimming pool that I attend?” One of the writers for the magazine later said “We were much more than an entertainment magazine . . . . We tried to get kids involved in social issues . . . . It was a well-received magazine, recommended by libraries and schools, but during the Civil Rights period we did get pulled off a lot of stands in the South because of our views on integration” Art Unger, the editor and publisher, wasn't the only one pushing this liberal, integrationist, agenda. The managing editor at the time, Danny Fields, was another gay man who wanted to push the magazine even further than Unger, and who would later go on to manage the Stooges and the Ramones, being credited by some as being the single most important figure in punk rock's development, and being immortalised by the Ramones in their song "Danny Says": [Excerpt: The Ramones, "Danny Says"] So this was not a normal teen magazine, and that's certainly shown by the cover of the September 1966 issue, which as well as talking about the interviews with John Lennon and Paul McCartney inside, also advertised articles on Timothy Leary advising people to turn on, tune in, and drop out; an editorial about how interracial dating must be the next step after desegregation of schools, and a piece on "the ten adults you dig/hate the most" -- apparently the adult most teens dug in 1966 was Jackie Kennedy, the most hated was Barry Goldwater, and President Johnson, Billy Graham, and Martin Luther King appeared in the top ten on both lists. Now, in the early part of the year Maureen Cleave had done a whole series of articles on the Beatles -- double-page spreads on each band member, plus Brian Epstein, visiting them in their own homes (apart from Paul, who she met at a restaurant) and discussing their daily lives, their thoughts, and portraying them as rounded individuals. These articles are actually fascinating, because of something that everyone who met the Beatles in this period pointed out. When interviewed separately, all of them came across as thoughtful individuals, with their own opinions about all sorts of subjects, and their own tastes and senses of humour. But when two or more of them were together -- especially when John and Paul were interviewed together, but even in social situations, they would immediately revert to flip in-jokes and riffing on each other's statements, never revealing anything about themselves as individuals, but just going into Beatle mode -- simultaneously preserving the band's image, closing off outsiders, *and* making sure they didn't do or say anything that would get them mocked by the others. Cleave, as someone who actually took them all seriously, managed to get some very revealing information about all of them. In the article on Ringo, which is the most superficial -- one gets the impression that Cleave found him rather difficult to talk to when compared to the other, more verbally facile, band members -- she talked about how he had a lot of Wild West and military memorabilia, how he was a devoted family man and also devoted to his friends -- he had moved to the suburbs to be close to John and George, who already lived there. The most revealing quote about Ringo's personality was him saying "Of course that's the great thing about being married -- you have a house to sit in and company all the time. And you can still go to clubs, a bonus for being married. I love being a family man." While she looked at the other Beatles' tastes in literature in detail, she'd noted that the only books Ringo owned that weren't just for show were a few science fiction paperbacks, but that as he said "I'm not thick, it's just that I'm not educated. People can use words and I won't know what they mean. I say 'me' instead of 'my'." Ringo also didn't have a drum kit at home, saying he only played when he was on stage or in the studio, and that you couldn't practice on your own, you needed to play with other people. In the article on George, she talked about how he was learning the sitar,  and how he was thinking that it might be a good idea to go to India to study the sitar with Ravi Shankar for six months. She also talks about how during the interview, he played the guitar pretty much constantly, playing everything from songs from "Hello Dolly" to pieces by Bach to "the Trumpet Voluntary", by which she presumably means Clarke's "Prince of Denmark's March": [Excerpt: Jeremiah Clarke, "Prince of Denmark's March"] George was also the most outspoken on the subjects of politics, religion, and society, linking the ongoing war in Vietnam with the UK's reverence for the Second World War, saying "I think about it every day and it's wrong. Anything to do with war is wrong. They're all wrapped up in their Nelsons and their Churchills and their Montys -- always talking about war heroes. Look at All Our Yesterdays [a show on ITV that showed twenty-five-year-old newsreels] -- how we killed a few more Huns here and there. Makes me sick. They're the sort who are leaning on their walking sticks and telling us a few years in the army would do us good." He also had very strong words to say about religion, saying "I think religion falls flat on its face. All this 'love thy neighbour' but none of them are doing it. How can anybody get into the position of being Pope and accept all the glory and the money and the Mercedes-Benz and that? I could never be Pope until I'd sold my rich gates and my posh hat. I couldn't sit there with all that money on me and believe I was religious. Why can't we bring all this out in the open? Why is there all this stuff about blasphemy? If Christianity's as good as they say it is, it should stand up to a bit of discussion." Harrison also comes across as a very private person, saying "People keep saying, ‘We made you what you are,' well, I made Mr. Hovis what he is and I don't go round crawling over his gates and smashing up the wall round his house." (Hovis is a British company that makes bread and wholegrain flour). But more than anything else he comes across as an instinctive anti-authoritarian, being angry at bullying teachers, Popes, and Prime Ministers. McCartney's profile has him as the most self-consciously arty -- he talks about the plays of Alfred Jarry and the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio: [Excerpt: Luciano Berio, "Momenti (for magnetic tape)"] Though he was very worried that he might be sounding a little too pretentious, saying “I don't want to sound like Jonathan Miller going on" --