Podcasts about East Coast

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  • 5,214PODCASTS
  • 9,064EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
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  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about East Coast

Show all podcasts related to east coast

Latest podcast episodes about East Coast

Tom and Doug Show
Tom and Doug Show Episode 841

Tom and Doug Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 29:00


Tom and Doug are back in the car, driving around America. This week they are near the East Coast.

political and spiritual
East Coast Eddie...Great Black Latino Superstars of music #5

political and spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 116:00


10/15/21 CELEBRATES HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH Hosted by East Coast Eddie Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15) recognizing  the achievements and contributions of Hispanic American champions who have inspired others to achieve success. The observation began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988. Black Artists in Latin Music  Great talent never celebrated or recognized by US Latin Radio or Mainstream Media Black Latin Americans and Latinxs are often left out of the music conversation due to the whitewashing of their history (read: reggaeton) or the lack of representation in both mainstream and underground spaces, from pop charts to independent music festivals, so we need to be in charge of writing and preserving our own history.  There is really no point in celebrating Latinx Heritage Month without acknowledging the contribution of Black Latinxs to the rich culture of the continent, especially when it comes to music.   Duzzy Gillespie with Chano Pozo a Black Hispano percussionist, composer, songwriter from Cuba with no formal education who changed the world of Jazz creating the Afro Latino movement now called Latin Jazz   Celebrating Black Artists In Latin Music/Educate&Entertain.  

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
former New York Times food critic Byan J. Miller on his new book Dining in the Dark

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:57


(10/15/21) From the early 1980s to the mid-1990s, Bryan Miller was a household name among East Coast foodies as the restaurant critic for the New York Times. Over the course of his decade as a columnist, he dined out more than 5,000 times in eateries around the world. Wine Spectator once called him “the most powerful restaurant critic in America.” And for much of that time, he wanted to die. Bryan's new book Dining in the Dark: A Famed Restaurant Critic's Struggle with and Triumph over Depression chronicles his battle with the mental illness Bipolar II that changed his life forever. Join us for an honest look at the often-invisible suffering people with debilitating depression face in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.

Overheard in the Pantry
East Coast Adventures and Crispy Chicken Dinner

Overheard in the Pantry

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:58


Welcome to another episode of OITP! This week, Phylesha tells us about seeing Harry Styles in MSG (more than ONCE!), Courtney does the quality time thing and then our chatty heroes meet UP for the wrap party on the east coast for The Circle Season 3! If you're ready to hear about all of these adventurous snacks, crack open the pantry door and let's get into it! Phylesha's playlist - https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5ae7rMYfIHH0I4OoxBLvts?si=71DwNJ7FT1OQvl4_bG6Wpw Courtney's *NEW* Spotify playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1iI1vlLwXwJE8Y8rSvlg4c?si=c0148fd323a54a72 Shoot us an email: OverheardPantry@gmail.com Follow OITP on Twitter: @PantryOverheard Phylesha: @hi_phylesha @reality_phyl is my big brother account! Courtney: @CourtRevolution Don't forget to rate us and subscribe for more weekly episodes!

WAMU: Local News
A Blight Wiped Out This Bountiful Tree. Will The American Chestnut Be Back?

WAMU: Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:03


Chestnut trees once dominated forests throughout the East Coast (including the D.C. region). Now they're gone, except for small saplings.

In The Loop
ITL Hour 1: A Tyrod Taylor Disagreement

In The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:36


Landry Locker and Wade Smith disagree on if Tyrod should get his gig back, Adam Spolane reacts to the ALCS roster and a trip to the East Coast as the Sox come to town. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Breath of Fresh Earth
The Earthshot Prize

A Breath of Fresh Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 25:18


15 finalists compete for a one-million pound prize. 5 winners grab the prestige and funding for their projects. Protect and restore nature 03:19-06:23 Clean our air 06:24-09:58 Revive our oceans 09:58-14:47 Build a waste-free world 14:48-18:48 Fix our climate 18:50-24:17 You can reach me at rf@richardfriedman.net You can find my books here with the links to find your favorite retailer. Climate Fiction novels: Escape to Canamith https://books2read.com/u/bWP9y1 The Two Worlds of Billy Callahan https://books2read.com/u/mvnvLX Cli/Fi short stories- A Climate Carol and Other Cli-Fi Short Stories. Available in print or audiobook. https://books2read.com/u/38roQL Danny Bloom created the phrase “cli-fi” and founder of cli-fi.net. Here's his review. Climate-themed anti-Trump short story 'A Climate Carol' will be read 100 years from now ''We must build arks,'' the Notre Dame University philosopher Roy Scranton urges, ''not just biological arks, to carry forward endangered genetic data, but also cultural arks, to carry forward endangered wisdom.'' One such cultural ark has already been built and it's a 14-page Christmas story from the pen of Richard Friedman in Cleveland, Ohio. In the title story, "A Climate Carol," based very closely on U.S. President Donald Trump's stubborn and selfish personality and his public denial of climate change, a narcissistic East Coast businessman and billionaire receives a visit on Christmas Eve from three Charles Dickens-like ghosts in a contemporary spin of that timeless classic from the 1840s "A Christmas Carol." Charles Dickens first published his now famous novella “A Christmas Carol” more than 170 years ago -- in 1843 — and that story has reverberated and resonated worldwide ever since. With the annual holiday season upon us all every November and December worldwide (Thanksgiving, Chanukah, Christmas), a new kind of holiday story titled “A Climate Carol” has been published in 2019 and stands to remain in print for the next 100 years, if not longer. It's that good, and that important. In fact, I would say that this short story is the best and most important climate-themed short story to appear so far in the 21st century and is likely to remain popular over the next 100 Christmases for sure. When I read it online a few days ago, I was blown away by both the author's storytelling skills and the environmental eco-theme of the 14-page piece. Let me tell you a few things about this modern Dickensian-style story and how it fits into the world we live in today, where runaway global warming threatens to push human civilization into a dark corner we may never get out from. However, before I go on, please know that “A Climate Carol” ends on an optimistic note, where ecumenical goodness triumphs over ''Trumpian greed'' and all ends well. In the story you will meet characters with names like Wilson Drummond (the proverbial '' Trumpian bad guy'' who later turns over a new leaf and becomes a champion of human kindness), his mother Gurtie Drummond, his limousine driver Sammie Johnson, and his employee Jericho Reese. And the star of the show, his grand-daughter Lily. You will also meet several important ghost-like characters, one who calls himself the Ghost of Climate Past, another who says they are the Ghost of the Current Climate in the world, and a third ghost who speaks in a chilling voice reminiscent of the horror movie actor Vincent Price and declares that he is the Ghost of Climate Future. In the end, we learn that the Scrooge-like Trump-like Drummond has mended his insensitive ways and become a better human being. He even later becomes President of the United States and turns out to represent all that is good about America. And grand-daughter Lily lives to the ripe old age of 93 and looks back with fondness at the strange but redemptive life of her grandfather for the things he later did to... Support this podcast

Sugar Shack Radio Podcast
Lyra and JustinCredible East Coast Vibes October 14th 2021 JustinCredibles Bday Extravaganzaaaa [SugarShackRadio]

Sugar Shack Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


The JV Club with Janet Varney

It's Maximum Fun's Block Party Week, y'all! Listen in as JV continues her quest to complete her "Crimewriters On Collection” with the delightful Lara Bricker, who in addition to co-hosting one of JV's favorite podcasts, is also celebrating the release of her first cozy mystery novel, “Dead on Deadline!” So crank up the generator and put the horses back in the stable to give your full attention to this East Coast deep dive! 

Inside The Greenroom With PV3
113. Curating Deeper Experiential Connection with Christina Weber

Inside The Greenroom With PV3

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:38


Every entrepreneur knows that to create a successful business you need to find a need or desire within your market and solve it. But there's something extra exciting about the entrepreneur who built a business to solve their own need.  Welcome back to Inside The Greenroom! Christina Weber is a social entrepreneur, relationship activist, connection coach, podcast host, and founder and CEO of WeDeepen. A company devoted to creating deeper connections and better communication through transformational events and experiences. Christina gives us a look into how WeDeepen started and how it moved from the dating circuit to curating events that would bring better communication and deeper connection with yourself and others around you.  Listen in as Christina talks about the moment she realized she needed to inject energy into her desires and how that journey lead to the trials and errors of creating the best event possible. You'll learn about how Christina has brought in tantra to help with the web of connections within different events, her best tips to create an unforgettable experience, and even how you can open up a community and have thoughtful conversations on difficult subjects.  For more resources or to connect with Christina, check out the links below!  More Of What's Inside: Creating a platform that builds you How authentic leadership helps events Tips to design an event that supports deep connections The web of connection that is tantra Using the feedback from surveys Partnering with experiences from all over the country Bringing deep connections online during the pandemic Building momentum with recurring events Thoughtful discourse and healthy dialogue The antidote to judgment And much more!   LINKS: Connect with Christina: Website: wedeepen.com Social: @wedeepen & @christinaweber Instagram: @wedeepen & @christinaweber YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh93E8Kx0oiAa--pPIXvHLg/featured LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christinalweber Connect with Blair: blair@advanceyourreach.com  Connect with us: Facebook: www.facebook.com/advanceyourreach Website: advanceyourreach.com stageagency@advanceyourreach.com Email​: info@insidethegreenroompodcast.com Book Speakers for your next event! We are the only agency where you can book free and paid speakers, no bureau commissions!  Learn More https://elitespeakersagency.com/ Episode Minute By Minute: 0:28 - Introducing Christina Weber 5:22 - Injecting energy into your desires 10:09 - Christina's process of creating an event 15:52 - Learning through trials and error 19:25 - Tantra in professional environments 23:18 - Improving on experiences  27:56 - Finding the right experience for you 33:30 - Creating new experiences online 38:04 - How Christina grew her brand  42:24 - The importance of consistency 46:52 - Where you can connect with Christina 48:27 - Closing thoughts More About Christina: Christina Weber is a social entrepreneur, relationship activist, connection coach, podcast host, and advocate for children of abuse, extreme poverty and human trafficking. She is the founder and CEO of WeDeepen (wedeepen.com), a network of transformational guides and social experiences intended to create more meaningful relationships, now and for future generations. Her work is inspired by Esther Perel's teachings. Christina has received nicknames such as the "Human Linkedin," "Your Love Accomplice" and also "Feminine Weapon," which has helped her raise over $65K for orphans to receive education and transformational workshops. Her podcast “Deepen with Christina,” launched last month, and has received rave reviews since she was featured on Andy Cohen's new show, Ex-Rated, which gives viewers a peek into Christina's love life. Raised in Annapolis, MD, Christina has lived in Los Angeles, New York City and Bali. Currently she's roaming the East Coast in RV with her father who retired from his career last month.

2 Ales and Hockey Tales with Wally
Episode 83 Bryce Reddick

2 Ales and Hockey Tales with Wally

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 86:18


-2021's version of Reg Dunlop or Andrew Lord -Duggan, Mosey, Cardiff and the life changing Devils -Swamp Rabbit camp & the East Coast 2021 -The hockey web and things working out for a reason -Getting the best out of people & learning from Lordo

Ridge RUNers
RRL #68 | Paul Jacobs – Canal Corridor 100

Ridge RUNers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:48


Come check out our 68th episode of Ridge RUNers Live with Paul Jacobs! Paul took home the win this past weekend at the Canal Corridor 100 Mile Endurance Run finishing in 13 hours 44 minutes! He is one of the top runners on the East Coast who has had himself a phenomenal year. Join us … Continue reading "RRL #68 | Paul Jacobs – Canal Corridor 100"

Rams Showcase
Rams Showcase - Rams @ Giants

Rams Showcase

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 75:28


The Los Angeles Rams (4-1) travel to the East Coast to take on the New York Giants (1-4) at 10:00 am PST on FOX. The LA Rams are coming off a 9 point win over the Seattle Seahawks on Thursday Night Football in week 5 while the Giants are coming off a big loss in Dallas. Sheriff Joe Bags previews the game, talks NFC West, and answers the question "Do the Rams need more out of QB Matthew Stafford?"SOCIAL MEDIA: (IG, Twitter, FB, TikTok)@RamsShowcase@SheriffJoeBagsBetUS: (promo code: RAMSSHOWCASE)https://bit.ly/RamsShowcaseBetUSThriveFantasy: (promo code: RAMSSHOWCASE)https://www.thrivefantasy.com/?promo=RamsShowcase Shaw's Customs:https://www.etsy.com/shop/shawscustomsMarcus Maye to LA Rams?:https://heavy.com/sports/new-york-jets/maye-super-bowl-spot/?fbclid=IwAR2NfJsisvDb7Tt4V1UNXYWQ85LPIWc6iLdT6NPrzMs_BIPyOGB5tv-gmWA

CrossYaas: The Crossdress and Gender Appreciation Podcast
Curi - YAAS Conversation with Arris Part One

CrossYaas: The Crossdress and Gender Appreciation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 73:02


In episode 137, Giselle talks to Arris, a 41-year-old, non-binary, genderfluid person from the East Coast of the United States, who comes on the podcast to tell their truly unique story. Support this podcast

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2133: Building Your Routine by Danae Smith of This Wondrous Life on Loving and Creating New Habits

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 11:19


Danae Smith of This Wondrous Life teaches you how to build a routine with habits you love Episode 2133: Building Your Routine by Danae Smith of This Wondrous Life on Loving and Creating New Habits Danae Smith is East Coast born and raised, but a West Coast girl at heart, She is the founder of This Wondrous Life, a lifestyle blog, rooted in pursuing a life lived simply, slowly, and with community. Over the years, Danae has found her heart pulled so strongly towards living a slower, more simple life. In a time where we are inundated with the message of instant gratification; where success is defined by numbers and accolades, and social media has begun to define how we live our lives, She desires to build a space and create a culture that shows another way---a more simple and slow approach to life. The original post is located here: https://thiswondrouslife.com/twl/building-your-routine  Policygenius makes it easy to compare home & auto insurance in one place, and they've saved customers an average of $1,250 per year. Head to Policygenius.com to get started right now Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2133: Building Your Routine by Danae Smith of This Wondrous Life on Loving and Creating New Habits

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 10:50


Danae Smith of This Wondrous Life teaches you how to build a routine with habits you love Episode 2133: Building Your Routine by Danae Smith of This Wondrous Life on Loving and Creating New Habits Danae Smith is East Coast born and raised, but a West Coast girl at heart, She is the founder of This Wondrous Life, a lifestyle blog, rooted in pursuing a life lived simply, slowly, and with community. Over the years, Danae has found her heart pulled so strongly towards living a slower, more simple life. In a time where we are inundated with the message of instant gratification; where success is defined by numbers and accolades, and social media has begun to define how we live our lives, She desires to build a space and create a culture that shows another way---a more simple and slow approach to life. The original post is located here:   Policygenius makes it easy to compare home & auto insurance in one place, and they've saved customers an average of $1,250 per year. Head to to get started right now   Interested in advertising on the show? Visit 

TV CONFIDENTIAL: A radio talk show about television

TVC 555.6: Alexis Hunter, author of Joi Lansing: A Body to Die For, discusses the dangers of silicon enhancements, especially today. For our listeners on the East Coast, Alexis will sign copies of Joi Lansing: A Body to Die For at the historic Stonewall Inn in New York City, the birthplace of the contemporary LGBTQ movement, on Monday Oct. 18 from 6pm to 8pm. Alexis will also read a passage from the book that night, while Vincent DeSalvo, and Joseph Dougherty—the producer and screenwriter, respectively, of the forthcoming miniseries adaptation of Joi Lansing: A Body to Die For—will join her for a Q & A session afterward. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Want to advertise/sponsor our show? TV Confidential has partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle advertising/sponsorship requests for the podcast edition of our program. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started: https://www.advertisecast.com/TVConfidentialAradiotalkshowabout Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Cannabis Talk 101
Marc welcomes Leo Bridgewater to discuss cannabis on the East Coast.

Cannabis Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:29


Retired VET and cannabis activist Leo Bridgewater brings his unique style of education back to CT 101. We discuss Jersey, its political problems and they debate Federal Legalization as Marc is adamant that it will NEVER happen. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Honest Wargamer
New Stormcasts are taking out events! | Age of Sigmar Stats Centre

The Honest Wargamer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 115:44


Rob & Owen go through the week's competitive Age of Sigmar results. Michigan GT - 78 players WLD Lansing, Michigan, Detroit Area, USA https://web.bestcoastpairings.com/event-placings.php?eventId=AacIlumwfM 5-0 Donnie Goerlitz - Ironjawz: Bloodtoofs http://thehonestwargamer.com/aos-list-rundowns/michigan-gt-2021-bloodtoofs-donnie-goerlitz/ Brad College - Bonesplitterz: Drakfoot http://thehonestwargamer.com/aos-list-rundowns/michigan-gt-2021-drakfoot-brad-college/ Jake L'ecuyer - Deepkin: Fuethan http://thehonestwargamer.com/aos-list-rundowns/michigan-gt-2021-fuethan-jake-lecuyer/ Fantasia Fanatic XL - 40 players - 20 - 0 system Umea, East Coast of Gulf of Bothnia, Sweden https://web.bestcoastpairings.com/event-placings.php?eventId=ZQMPpDsdXm 4.5 Joel Kornfield - Soulblight, Vyrkos Dynasty https://web.bestcoastpairings.com/list.php?armyListId=T9YP1JNMCR 4-1 Winner - Alexis Herbeck - Stormcast: Knights Excelsior https://web.bestcoastpairings.com/list.php?armyListId=9QL9E3R5A7 Mancunian Carnage: Resurgence - 74 players Stockport, Manchester, UK https://tabletop.to/mancunian-carnage-resurgence/ladder 5-0 Tom Mawdsley - Stormcast Eternals, Celestial Warbringers (Stormkeep) https://tabletop.to/mancunian-carnage-resurgence/list/tom-mawdsley James Tinsdale - Soulblight, Kastelai Dynasty Nagash https://tabletop.to/mancunian-carnage-resurgence/list/james-tinsdale2 Bobo - 30 players Nottingham, UK https://twitter.com/ageofhobby/status/1447278974057472001/photo/1 Email your results to be included in the stats: ageofsigmarstatscentre@gmail.com Score Sheet Link (v1.1): https://drive.google.com/file/d/18De-E0M-ao8NO0K2XGiyraeu5Wpm1-6y/view?usp=sharing Reference Sheet Link: http://weirdnobz.com/2021/06/21/update-plus-an-age-of-sigmar-reference-sheet/ The Honest Wargamer is an independent show, run by gamers, for gamers and supported by gamers. We don't accept sponsorship, so that you only get the best and most honest answers and opinions from us. If you would like to support us which we would be amazing then you can here -- https://www.patreon.com/TheHonestWargamer Available as a podcast on soundcloud/itunes/all podcast apps -- https://soundcloud.com/the-honest-wargamer Broadcasted live on Twitch -- Watch live at https://www.twitch.tv/thehonestwargamer We have spent a lot of time producing what we think is a fantastic website as a resource for gamers with lists and guides. We would love you to check it out -- https://thehonestwargamer.com/ We have our merchandise: https://thehonestwargamer.bigcartel.com/ #ageofsigmar, #howto, #faction, #scoresheet, #battletome, #competitive, #wargaming, #warhammer, #tournament, #grandstrategy, #ironjawz, #orrukwarclans,

Along Those Lines
How Can Electric Co-ops Avoid Becoming Victims of Ransomware?

Along Those Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:30


First in a two-part series for Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Ransomware became a household word earlier this year when the Colonial Pipeline, a major fuel delivery source on the East Coast, was shut down for several days after hackers attacked the company's billing system. These highly disruptive and costly network intrusions are on the rise in the United States and globally, and businesses across the spectrum are being targeted. How can electric cooperatives avoid becoming victims of this sophisticated malware? And what should they do if they are attacked? To answer those and other questions, we're joined by Ryan Newlon, NRECA's principal for cybersecurity solutions, and Dave Eisenreich, a special agent with the FBI in the Cyber Division and that group's liaison to the energy sector. Stay tuned next week for more on cybersecurity from Along Those Lines.

Greg & The Morning Buzz
ASK THE BUZZ - EAST COAST LUMBER. 10/11

Greg & The Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 14:46


Todays letter comes from a women who just met her bestfriends new man, and knows he's married and is expecting a new baby with his wife any day know (she works in the medical field). How should she handle this remember she does work in the medical field.

Flights, Football & Anything Else
Ep 95 "Your Spouses Sibling or WHAT?!?"

Flights, Football & Anything Else

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 98:07


Mike and Dave have 2 IPAs (one West Coast and one East Coast) and a Marzen for the tastings tonight. They start off with updates on the best shows out there and have a mixed review about Mike's previous shout-out about Midnight Mass from local clergy. The second segment quickly covers the highlights and opinions about the MLB playoffs, NCAA football, then the NFL. The 3rd segment starts off with the FU and "almost" ends with an international Random Question, but Mike and Dave go off on a tangent about the Cancel Culture issues from this past week.

Nebraska Athletics Podcast
No. 10 Nebraska Visits Rutgers for Sunday Matinee

Nebraska Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


The No. 10 Nebraska volleyball team completes its East Coast swing this Sunday, Oct. 10, visiting Rutgers.

Ray Taylor Show
Night of the Living Dead (1968) - Movie Review - Ray Taylor Show

Ray Taylor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 22:51


Night of the Living Dead (1968) - Movie Review - Ray Taylor Show Subscribe: InspiredDisorder.com/rts Binge Ad Free: InspiredDisorder.com/Patreon Show topic: A ragtag group of Pennsylvanians barricade themselves in an old farmhouse to remain safe from a horde of flesh-eating ghouls that are ravaging the East Coast of the United States.Director: George A. Romero Writers: John A. Russo(screenplay), George A. Romero(screenplay) Sponsored By:Patreon.com/InspiredDisorder $3 membership.*Binge full week of Ray Taylor Show (audio+Video)*Massive discount code for The Many Faces*Download raw photoshop filesInspiredDisorder.com/tmf The Many Faces - Original abstract ink portraits by Ray Taylor. Code: RTS for 25% OFF. StationHouseCoffee.com and @StationHouseCoffee on Instagram for premium small batch, single source coffee.InspiredDisorder.com/Ting $25 CREDIT! The best carrier. The best coverage.Same low rates, now with three coast-to-coast networks.Daily Podcast: Ray Taylor Show - InspiredDisorder.com/rts Daily Painting: The Many Faces - InspiredDisorder.com/tmf SUPPORT ON PATREON: Patreon.com/InspiredDisorder More links: InspiredDisorder.com/links

This Date in Weather History
The 1804 "Snow Hurricane"

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 3:45


The 1804 Snow hurricane was the first tropical cyclone in recorded history known to produce snowfall. An unusual late-season storm in 1804 it produced vast amounts of snow, rain, and powerful winds across the northeastern United States. Prior to its approach to the East Coast of the US, it passed through the Caribbean on October 4th, and later tracked just off the South Carolina coast. By early on October 9th, the storm turned up the coast and toward New England as it did so its tropical moisture was pushed across New England just as very cold air came plunging southward from Canada. While located off the Massachusetts coast, it reached its peak intensity wind of 110 . Due to its unusual nature, both heavy snowfall and strong winds caused a swath of devastation stretching from the Mid-Atlantic states to northern New England. In the Middle-Atlantic region, moderate damage occurred at sea coast but little was noted inland. In New England, strong gusts inflicted significant damage to numerous churches. Thousands of trees were knocked over, obstructing roads and damaging the timber industry throughout the region. Cold temperatures, wet snow, and high winds downed numerous branches in fruit orchards and froze crops, flattened dozens of barns, and killed cattle. In general, the agriculture, shipping, timber, and livestock trades suffered most acutely following the passage of the snow hurricane, while structural damage was widespread but generally inconsequential. The storm's most severe effects were concentrated at sea and led to a majority of the hurricane's deaths. Winds swept dozens of watercraft and multiple ships ashore, while high waters capsized many others. Several wharves were destroyed, subsequently harming local shipping businesses as a consequence. Snow and rainfall totals varied widely. Parts of Massachusetts received up to 7 in of rain, in contrast to snow totals upward of 48 in was measured in Vermont. In all, the hurricane caused more than 15 deaths at sea and one inland. The snow hurricane of 1804, generally described as the most severe storm in the United States since the Great Colonial Hurricane of nearly 200 years earlier, set several major precedents which have only infrequently occurred since. It was the first known tropical cyclone to generate significant snowfall, and its early and extensive accumulations throughout New England were unprecedented and unusually heavy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

political and spiritual
EAST COAST EDDIE.. Black Latino Superstars of Music Past and Present #4

political and spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 121:00


10/8/21 CELEBRATES HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH EVERY FRIDAY 9-11 PM EST Hosted by East Coast Eddie Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15) recognizing  the achievements and contributions of Hispanic American champions who have inspired others to achieve success. The observation began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988. Black Artists in Latin Music  Great talent never celebrated or recognized by US Latin Radio or Mainstream Media Black Latin Americans and Latinxs are often left out of the music conversation due to the whitewashing of their history (read: reggaeton) or the lack of representation in both mainstream and underground spaces, from pop charts to independent music festivals, so we need to be in charge of writing and preserving our own history.  There is really no point in celebrating Latinx Heritage Month without acknowledging the contribution of Black Latinxs to the rich culture of the continent, especially when it comes to music.   Duzzy Gillespie with Chano Pozo a Black Hispano percussionist, composer, songwriter from Cuba with no formal education who changed the world of Jazz creating the Afro Latino movement now called Latin Jazz   Celebrating Black Artists In Latin Music/Educate&Entertain.

Insurgency Knitting Circle Podcast
East Coast Freedom and Farmsteading Debrief

Insurgency Knitting Circle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 89:40


We wanted to do a walk through of how the Virginia "Freedom and Farmsteading" event went last week, and we wanted to show people what an event is like with the IKC tribe. We will be hosting more events in the future so if you're interested, come listen to this episode and come see what makes us special. -TX Joe

KOIN PODCAST NETWORK
6 Questions: Jannette Bloom

KOIN PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 41:30


From the East Coast to Southern California and now Portland, filmmaker Jannette Bloom has been chasing her dream to make art across the country. Now, she stops by to talk to Emily about her new movie, Sing to me Sylvie and the role Portland played in getting it made.

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for October 8, 2021 is: scion • SYE-un • noun A scion is an heir or descendant of a wealthy or influential family. // As scions of the celebrity family, the siblings have options when choosing their career paths. See the entry > Examples: "Walker was the beloved, indulged scion of a wealthy East Coast family, the son of the first curator of the National Gallery and a descendant of Thomas More, the author of the 15th-century satire 'Utopia.'" — Parul Sehgal, The New York Times, 1 Aug. 2021 Did you know? Scion comes from Anglo-French cioun, meaning "offspring" or "new growth of a plant." When it first sprouted in English, it referred to a plant's shoot; the word was then applied to portions of a plant that have been grafted. The figurative meaning, "descendant," blossomed later, with particular reference to those who were descendants of notable families.

Sugar Shack Radio Podcast
Lyra East Coast Vibes October 7th 2021 Deep In My House Cushions [SugarShackRadio]

Sugar Shack Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


Screaming in the Cloud
What GitHub Can Give to Microsoft with Jason Warner

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 37:47


About JasonJason is now the Managing Director at Redpoint Ventures.Links: GitHub: https://github.com/ @jasoncwarner: https://twitter.com/jasoncwarner GitHub: https://github.com/jasoncwarner Jasoncwarner/ama: https://github.com/jasoncwarner/ama TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm joined this week by Jason Warner, the Chief Technology Officer at GifHub, although he pronounces it differently. Jason, welcome to the show.Jason: Thanks, Corey. Good to be here.Corey: So, GitHub—as you insist on pronouncing it—is one of those companies that's been around for a long time. In fact, I went to a training conducted by one of your early folks, Scott Chacon, who taught how Git works over the course of a couple of days, and honestly, I left more confused than I did when I entered. It's like, “Oh, this is super awful. Good thing I'll never need to know this because I'm not really a developer.” And I'm still not really a developer and I still don't really know how Git works, but here we are.And it's now over a decade later; you folks have been acquired by Microsoft, and you are sort of the one-stop-shop, from the de facto perspective of, “I'm going to go share some code with people on the internet. I'll use GitHub to do it.” Because, you know, copying and pasting and emailing Microsoft Word documents around isn't ideal.Jason: That is right. And I think that a bunch of things that you mentioned there, played into, you know, GitHub's early and sustained success. But my God, do you remember the old days when people had to email tar files around or drop them in weird spots?Corey: What the hell do you mean, by, “Old days?” It still blows my mind that the Linux kernel is managed by—they use Git, obviously. Linus Torvalds did write Git once upon a time—and it has the user interface you would expect for that. And the way that they collaborate is not through GitHub or anything like that. No, they use Git to generate patches, which they then email to the mailing list. Which sounds like I'm making it up, like, “Oh, well, yeah, tell another one, but maybe involve a fax machine this time.” But no, that is actually what they do.Jason: It blew my mind when I saw that, too, by the way. And you realize, too, that workflows are workflows, and people will build interesting workflows to solve their use case. Now, obviously, anyone that you would be talking to in 2021, if you walked in and said, “Yeah, install Git. Let's set up an email server and start mailing patches to each other and we're going to do it this way.” They would just kind of politely—or maybe impolitely—show you out of the room, and rightfully [laugh] so. But it works for one of the most important software projects in history: Linux.Corey: Yeah, and it works almost in spite of itself to some extent. You've come a long way as a company because initially, it was, “Oh, there's this amazing, decentralized version control system. How do we make it better? I know, we're going to take off the decentralized part of it and give it a central point that everything can go through.” And collaboratively, it works well, but I think that viewing GitHub as a system that is used to sell free Git repositories to people is rather dramatically missing the point. It feels like it's grown significantly beyond just code repository hosting. Tell me more about that.Jason: Absolutely. I remember talking to a bunch of folks right around when I was joining GitHub, and you know, there was still talk about GitHub as, you know, GitHub for lawyers, or GitHub for doctors, or what could you do in a different way? And you know, social coding as an aspect, and maybe turning into a social network with a resume. And all those things are true to a percentage standpoint. But what GitHub should be in the world is the world's most important software development platform, end-to-end software development platform.We obviously have grown a bunch since me joining in that way which we launched dependency management packages, Actions with built-in CI, we've got some deployment mechanisms, we got advanced security underneath it, we've Codespaces in beta and alpha on top of it now. But if you think about GitHub as, join, share, and see other people's code, that's evolution one. If you see it as world's largest, maybe most developed software development platform, that's evolution two, and in my mind, its natural place where it should be, given what it has done already in the world, is become the world's most important software company. I don't mean the most profitable. I just mean the most important.Corey: I would agree. I had a blog post that went up somewhat recently about the future of cloud being Microsoft's to lose. And it's not because Azure is the best cloud platform out there, with respect, and I don't need you to argue the point. It is very clearly not. It is not like other clouds, but I can see a path to where it could become far better than it is.But if I'm out there and I'm just learning how to write code—because I make terrible life choices—and I go to a boot camp or I follow a tutorial online or I take a course somewhere, I'm going to be writing code probably using VS Code, the open-source editor that you folks launched after the acquisition. And it was pretty clear that Atom wasn't quite where the world was going. Great. Then I'm going to host it on GitHub, which is a natural evolution. Then you take a look at things like GitHub Actions that build in CI/CD pipelines natively.All that's missing is a ‘Deploy to Azure' button that is the next logical step, and you're mostly there for an awful lot of use cases. But you can't add that button until Azure itself gets better. Done right, this has the potential to leave, effectively, every other cloud provider in the dust because no one can touch this.Jason: One hundred percent. I mean, the obvious thing that any other cloud should be looking at with us—or should have been before the acquisition, looking at us was, “Oh, no, they could jump over us. They could stop our funnel.” And I used internal metrics when I was talking to them about partnership that led to the sale, which was I showed them more about their running business than they knew about themselves. I can tell them where they were stacked-ranked against each other, based on the ingress and egress of all the data on GitHub, you know, and various reactions to that in those meetings was pretty astounding.And just with that data alone, it should tell you what GitHub would be capable of and what Azure would be capable of in the combination of those two things. I mean, you did mention the ‘Deploy to Azure' button; this has been a topic, obviously, pre and post-acquisition, which is, “When is that coming?” And it was the one hard rule I set during the acquisition was, there will be no ‘Deploy to Azure' button. Azure has to earn the right to get things deployed to, in my opinion. And I think that goes to what you're saying is, if we put a ‘Deploy to Azure' button on top of this and Azure is not ready for that, or is going to fail, ultimately, that looks bad for all of us. But if it earned the right and it gets better, and it becomes one of those, then, you know, people will choose it, and that is, to me, what we're after.Corey: You have to choose the moment because if you do it too soon, you'll set the entire initiative back five years. Do it too late, and you get leapfrogged. There's a golden window somewhere and finding it is going to be hard. And I think it's pretty clear that the other hyperscalers in this space are learning, or have learned, that the next 10 years of cloud or 15 years of cloud or whatever they want to call it, and the new customers that are going to come are not the same as the customers that have built the first half of the business. And they're trying to wrap their heads around that because a lot of where the growth is going to come from is established blue chips that are used to thinking in very enterprise terms.And people think I'm making fun of them when I say this, but Microsoft has 40 years' experience apologizing to enterprises for computer failures. And that is fundamentally what cloud is. It's about talking computers to business executives because as much as we talk about builders, that is not the person at an established company with an existing IT estate, who gets to determine where $50 million a year in cloud-spend is going to go.Jason: It's [laugh] very, [laugh] very true. I mean, we've entered a different spot with cloud computing in the bell curve of adoption, and if you think that they will choose the best technology every time, well, history of computing is littered with better technologies that have failed because the distribution was better on one side. As you mentioned, Microsoft has 40 years, and I wager that Microsoft has the best sales organizations and the best enterprise accounts and, you know, all that sort of stuff, blah, blah, blah, on that side of the world than anyone in the industry. They can sell to enterprises better than almost anyone in the industry. And the other hyperscalers—there's a reason why [TK 00:08:34] is running Google Cloud right now. And Amazon, classically, has been very, very bad assigned to the enterprises. They just happened to be the first mover.Corey: In the early days, it was easy. You'd have an Amazon salesperson roll up to a company, and the exec would say, “Great, why should we consider running things on AWS?” And the answer was, “Oh, I'm sorry, wrong conversation. Right now you have 80 different accounts scattered throughout your org. I'm just here to help you unify them, get some visibility into it, and possibly give you a discount along the way.” And it was a different conversation. Shadow IT was the sole driver of cloud adoption for a long time. That is no longer true. It has to go in the front door, and that is a fundamental shift in how you go to market.Jason: One hundred percent true, and it's why I think that Microsoft has been so successful with Azure, in the last, let's call it five years in that, is that the early adopters in the second wave are doing that; they're all enterprise IT, enterprise dev shops who are buying from the top down. Now, there is still the bottoms-up adoption that going to be happening, and obviously, bottom-up adoption will happen still going forward, but we've entered the phase where that's not the primary or sole mechanism I should say. The sole mechanism of buying in. We have tops-down selling still—or now.Corey: When Microsoft announced it was acquiring GitHub, there was a universal reaction of, “Oh, shit.” Because it's Microsoft; of course they're going to ruin GitHub. Is there a second option? No, unless they find a way to ruin it twice. And none of it came to pass.It is uniformly excellent, and there's a strong argument that could be made by folks who are unaware of what happened—I'm one of them, so maybe I'm right, maybe I'm wrong—that GitHub had a positive effect on Microsoft more than Microsoft had an effect on GitHub. I don't know if that's true or not, but I could believe it based upon what I've seen.Jason: Obviously, the skepticism was well deserved at the time of acquisition, let's just be honest with it, particularly given what Microsoft's history had been for about 15—well, 20 years before, previous to Satya joining. And I was one of those people in the late '90s who would write ‘M$' in various forums. I was 18 or 19 years old, and just got into—Corey: Oh, hating Microsoft was my entire personality.Jason: [laugh]. And it was, honestly, well-deserved, right? Like, they had anti-competitive practices and they did some nefarious things. And you know, I talked about Bill Gates as an example. Bill Gates is, I mean, I don't actually know how old he is, but I'm going to guess he's late '50s, early '60s, but he's basically in the redemption phase of his life for his early years.And Microsoft is making up for Ballmer years, and later Gates years, and things of that nature. So, it was well-deserved skepticism, and particularly for a mid-career to older-career crowd who have really grown to hate Microsoft over that time. But what I would say is, obviously, it's different under Satya, and Scott, and Amy Hood, and people like that. And all we really telling people is give us a chance on this one. And I mean, all of us. The people who were running GitHub at the time, including myself and, you know, let Scott and Satya prove that they are who they say they are.Corey: It's one of those things where there's nothing you could have said that would have changed the opinion of the world. It was, just wait and see. And I think we have. It's now, I daresay, gotten to a point where Microsoft announces that they're acquiring some other beloved company, then people, I think, would extend a lot more credit than they did back then.Jason: I have to give Microsoft a ton of credit, too, on this one for the way in which they handled acquisitions, like us and others. And the reason why I think it's been so successful is also the reason why I think so many others die post-acquisition, which is that Microsoft has basically—I'll say this, and I know I won't get fired because it feels like it's true. Microsoft is essentially a PE holding company at this point. It is acquired a whole bunch of companies and lets them run independent. You know, we got LinkedIn, you got Minecraft, Xbox is its own division, but it's effectively its own company inside of it.Azure is run that way. GitHub's got a CEO still. I call it the archipelago model. Microsoft's the landmass underneath the water that binds them all, and finance, and HR, and a couple of other things, but for the most part, we manifest our own product roadmap still. We're not told what to go do. And I think that's why it's successful. If we're going to functionally integrate GitHub into Microsoft, it would have died very quickly.Corey: You clearly don't mix the streams. I mean, your gaming division writes a lot of interesting games and a lot of interesting gaming platforms. And, like, one of the most popularly played puzzle games in the world is a Microsoft property, and that is, of course, logging into a Microsoft account correctly. And I keep waiting for that to bleed into GitHub, but it doesn't. GitHub is a terrific SAML provider, it is stupidly easy to log in, it's great.And at some level, I wish that would bleed into other aspects, but you can't have everything. Tell me what it's like to go through an acquisition from a C-level position. Because having been through an acquisition before, the process looks a lot like a surprise all-hands meeting one day after the markets close and, “Listen up, idiots.” And [laugh] there we go. I have to imagine with someone in your position, it's a slightly different experience.Jason: It's definitely very different for all C-levels. And then myself in particular, as the primary driver of the acquisition, obviously, I had very privy inside knowledge. And so, from my position, I knew what was happening the entire time as the primary driver from the inside. But even so, it's still disconcerting to a degree because, in many ways, you don't think you're going to be able to pull it off. Like, you know, I remember the months, and the nights, and the weekends, and the weekend nights, and all the weeks I spent on the road trying to get all the puzzle pieces lined up for the Googles, or the Microsofts, or the eventually AWSs, the VMwares, the IBMs of the world to take seriously, just from a product perspective, which I knew would lead to, obviously, acquisition conversations.And then, once you get the call from the board that says, “It's done. We signed the letter of intent,” you basically are like, “Oh. Oh, crap. Okay, hang on a second. I actually didn't—I don't actually believe in my heart of hearts that I was going to actually be able to pull that off.” And so now, you probably didn't plan out—or at least I didn't. I was like, “Shit if we actually pulled this off what comes next?” And I didn't have that what comes next, which is odd for me. I usually have some sort of a loose plan in place. I just didn't. I wasn't really ready for that.Corey: It's got to be a weird discussion, too, when you start looking at shopping a company around to be sold, especially one at the scale of GitHub because you're at such a high level of visibility in the entire environment, where—it's the idea of would anyone even want to buy us? And then, duh, of course they would. And you look the hyperscalers, for example. You have, well, you could sell it to Amazon and they could pull another Cloud9, where they shove it behind the IAM login process, fail to update the thing meaningfully over a period of years, to a point where even now, a significant portion of the audience listening to this is going to wonder if it's a service I just made up; it sounds like something they might have done, but Cloud9 sounds way too inspired for an AWS service name, so maybe not. And—which it is real. You could go sell to Google, which is going to be awesome until some executive changes roles, and then it's going to be deprecated in short order.Or then there's Microsoft, which is the wild card. It's, well, it's Microsoft. I mean, people aren't really excited about it, but okay. And I don't think that's true anymore at all. And maybe I'm not being fair to all the hyperscalers there. I mean, I'm basically insulting everyone, which is kind of my shtick, but it really does seem that Microsoft was far and away the best acquirer possible because it has been transformative. My question—if you can answer it—is, how the hell did you see that beforehand? It's only obvious—even knowing what I know now—in hindsight.Jason: So, Microsoft was a target for me going into it, and the reason why was I thought that they were in the best overall position. There was enough humility on one side, enough hubris on another, enough market awareness, probably, organizational awareness to, kind of, pull it off. There's too much hubris on one side of the fence with some of the other acquirers, and they would try to hug us too deeply, or integrate us too quickly, or things of that nature. And I think it just takes a deep understanding of who the players are and who the egos involved are. And I think egos has actually played more into acquisitions than people will ever admit.What I saw was, based on the initial partnership conversations, we were developing something that we never launched before GitHub Actions called GitHub Launch. The primary reason we were building that was GitHub launches a five, six-year journey, and it's got many, many different phases, which will keep launching over the next couple of years. The first one we never brought to market was a partnership between all of the clouds. And it served a specific purpose. One, it allowed me to get into the room with the highest level executive at every one of those companies.Two allow me to have a deep economic conversation with them at a partnership level. And three, it allowed me to show those executives that we knew what GitHub's value was in the world, and really flip the tables around and say, “We know what we're worth. We know what our value is in the world. We know where we sit from a product influence perspective. If you want to be part of this, we'll allow it.” Not, “Please come work with us.” It was more of a, “We'll allow you to be part of this conversation.”And I wanted to see how people reacted to that. You know how Amazon reacted that told me a lot about how they view the world, and how Google reacted to that showed me exactly where they viewed it. And I remember walking out of the Google conversation, feeling a very specific way based upon the reaction. And you know, when I talked to Microsoft, got a very different feel and it, kind of, confirmed a couple of things. And then when I had my very first conversation with Nat, who have known for a while before that, I realized, like, yep, okay, this is the one. Drive hard at this.Corey: If you could do it all again, would you change anything meaningful about how you approached it?Jason: You know, I think I got very lucky doing a couple of things. I was very intentional aspects of—you know, I tried to serendipitously show up, where Diane Greene was at one point, or a serendipitously show up where Satya or Scott Guthrie was, and obviously, that was all intentional. But I never sold a company like this before. The partnership and the product that we were building was obviously very intentional. I think if I were to go through the sale, again, I would probably have tried to orchestrate at least one more year independent.And it's not—for no other reason alone than what we were building was very special. And the world sees it now, but I wish that the people who built it inside GitHub got full credit for it. And I think that part of that credit gets diffused to saying, “Microsoft fixed GitHub,” and I want the people inside GitHub to have gotten a lot more of that credit. Microsoft obviously made us much better, but that was not specific to Microsoft because we're run independent; it was bringing Nat in and helping us that got a lot of that stuff done. Nat did a great job at those things. But a lot of that was already in play with some incredible engineers, product people, and in particular our sales team and finance team inside of GitHub already.Corey: When you take a look across the landscape of the fact that GitHub has become for a certain subset of relatively sad types of which I'm definitely one a household name, what do you think the biggest misconception about the company is?Jason: I still think the biggest misconception of us is that we're a code host. Every time I talk to the RedMonk folks, they get what we're building and what we're trying to be in the world, but people still think of us as SourceForge-plus-plus in many ways. And obviously, that may have been our past, but that's definitely not where we are now and, for certain, obviously, not our future. So, I think that's one. I do think that people still, to this day, think of GitLab as one of our main competitors, and I never have ever saw GitLab as a competitor.I think it just has an unfortunate naming convention, as well as, you know, PRs, and MRs, and Git and all that sort of stuff. But we take very different views of the world in how we're approaching things. And then maybe the last thing would be that what we're doing at the scale that we're doing it as is kind of easy. When I think that—you know, when you're serving almost every developer in the world at this point at the scale at which we're doing it, we've got some scale issues that people just probably will never thankfully encounter for themselves.Corey: Well, everyone on Hacker News believes that they will, as soon as they put up their hello world blog, so Kubernetes is the only way to do anything now. So, I'm told.Jason: It's quite interesting because I think that everything breaks at scale, as we all know about from the [hyperclouds 00:20:54]. As we've learned, things are breaking every day. And I think that when you get advice, either operational, technical, or managerial advice from people who are running 10 person, 50 person companies, or X-size sophisticated systems, it doesn't apply. But for whatever reason, I don't know why, but people feel inclined to give that feedback to engineers at GitHub directly, saying, “If you just…” and in many [laugh] ways, you're just like, “Well, I think that we'll have that conversation at some point, you know, but we got a 100-plus-million repos and 65 million developers using us on a daily basis.” It's a very different world.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: One of the things that I really appreciate personally because, you know, when you see something that company does, it's nice to just thank people from time to time, so I'm inviting the entire company on the podcast one by one, at some point, to wind up thanking them all individually for it, but Codespaces is one of those things that I think is transformative for me. Back in the before times, and ideally the after times, whenever I travel the only computer I brought with me for a few years now has been an iPad or an iPad Pro. And trying to get an editor on that thing that works reasonably well has been like pulling teeth, my default answer has just been to remote into an EC2 instance and use vim like I have for the last 20 years. But Code is really winning me over. Having to play with code-server and other things like that for a while was obnoxious, fraught, and difficult.And finally, we got to a point where Codespaces was launched, and oh, it works on an iPad. This is actually really slick. I like this. And it was the thing that I was looking for but was trying to have to monkey patch together myself from components. And that's transformative.It feels like we're going back in many ways—at least in my model—to the days of thin clients where all the heavy lifting was done centrally on big computers, and the things that sat on people's desks were mostly just, effectively, relatively simple keyboard, mouse, screen. Things go back and forth and I'm sure we'll have super powerful things in our pockets again soon, but I like the interaction model; it solves for an awful lot of problems and that's one of the things that, at least from my perspective, that the world may not have fully wrapped it head around yet.Jason: Great observation. Before the acquisition, we were experimenting with a couple of different editors, that we wanted to do online editors. And same thing; we were experimenting with some Action CI stuff, and it just didn't make sense for us to build it; it would have been too hard, there have been too many moving parts, and then post-acquisition, we really love what the VS Code team was building over there, and you could see it; it was just going to work. And we had this one person, well, not one person. There was a bunch of people inside of GitHub that do this, but this one person at the highest level who's just obsessed with make this work on my iPad.He's the head of product design, his name's Max, he's an ex-Heroku person as well, and he was just obsessed with it. And he said, “If it works on my iPad, it's got a chance to succeed. If it doesn't work on my iPad, I'm never going to use this thing.” And the first time we booted up Codespaces—or he booted it up on the weekend, working on it. Came back and just, “Yep. This is going to be the one. Now, we got to work on those, the sanding the stones and those fine edges and stuff.”But it really does unlock a lot for us because, you know, again, we want to become the software developer platform for everyone in the world, you got to go end-to-end, and you got to have an opinion on certain things, and you got to enable certain functionality. You mentioned Cloud9 before with Amazon. It was one of the most confounding acquisitions I've ever seen. When they bought it I was at Heroku and I thought, I thought at that moment that Amazon was going to own the next 50 years of development because I thought they saw the same thing a lot of us at Heroku saw, and with the Cloud9 acquisition, what they were going to do was just going to stomp on all of us in the space. And then when it didn't happen, we just thought maybe, you know, okay, maybe something else changed. Maybe we were wrong about that assumption, too. But I think that we're on to it still. I think that it just has to do with the way you approach it and, you know, how you design it.Corey: Sorry, you just said something that took me aback for a second. Wait, you mean software can be designed? It's not this emergent property of people building thing on top of thing? There's actually a grand plan behind all these things? I've only half kidding, on some level, where if you take a look at any modern software product that is deployed into the world, it seems impossible for even small aspects of it to have been part of the initial founding design. But as a counterargument, it would almost have to be for a lot of these things. How do you square that circle?Jason: I think you have to, just like anything on spectrums and timelines, you have to flex at various times for various things. So, if you think about it from a very, very simple construct of time, you just have to think of time horizons. So, I have an opinion about what GitHub should look like in 10 years—vaguely—in five years much more firmly, and then very, very concretely, for the next year, as an example. So, a lot of the features you might see might be more emergent, but a lot of long-term work togetherness has to be loosely tied together with some string. Now, that string will be tightened over time, but it loosely has to see its way through.And the way I describe this to folks is that you don't wake up one day and say, “I'm going on vacation,” and literally just throw a finger on the map. You have to have some sort of vague idea, like, “Hey, I want to have a beach vacation,” or, “I want to have an adventure vacation.” And then you can kind of pick a destination and say, “I'm going to Hawaii,” or, “I'm going to San Diego.” And if you're standing on the East Coast knowing you're going to San Diego, you basically know that you have to just start marching west, or driving west, or whatever. And now, you don't have to have the route mapped out just yet, but you know that hey, if I'm going due southeast, I'm off course, so how do I reorient to make sure I'm still going in the right direction?That's basically what I think about as high-level, as scale design. And it's not unfair to say that a lot of the stuff is not designed today. Amazon is very famous for not designing anything; they design a singular service. But there's no cohesiveness to what Amazon—or AWS specifically, I should say, in this case—has put out there. And maybe that's not what their strategy is. I don't know the internal workings of them, but it's very clear.Corey: Well, oh, yeah. When I first started working in the AWS space and looking through the console, it like, “What is this? It feels like every service's interface was designed by a different team, but that would—oh…” and then the light bulb went on. Yeah. You ship your culture.Jason: It's exactly it. It works for them, but I think if you're going to try to do something very, very, very different, you know, it's going to look a certain way. So, intentional design, I think, is part of what makes GitHub and other products like it special. And if you think about it, you have to have an end-to-end view, and then you can build verticals up and down inside of that. But it has to work on the horizontal, still.And then if you hire really smart people to build the verticals, you get those done. So, a good example of this is that I have a very strong opinion about the horizontal workflow nature of GitHub should look like in five years. I have a very loose opinion about what the matrix build system of Actions looks like. Because we have very, very smart people who are working on that specific problem, so long as that maps back and snaps into the horizontal workflows. And that's how it can work together.Corey: So, when you look at someone who is, I don't know, the CTO of a wildly renowned company that is basically still catering primarily to developers slash engineers, but let's be honest, geeks, it's natural to think that, oh, they must be the alpha geek. That doesn't really apply to you from everything I've been able to uncover. Am I just not digging deeply enough, or are you in fact, a terrible nerd?Jason: [laugh]. I am. I'm a terrible nerd. I am a very terrible nerd. I feel very lucky, obviously, to be in the position I'm in right now, in many ways, and people call me up and exactly that.It's like, “Hey, you must be king of the geeks.” And I'm like, “[laugh], ah, funny story here.” But um, you know, I joke that I'm not actually supposed to be in tech in first place, the way I grew up, and where I did, and how, I wasn't supposed to be here. And so, it's serendipitous that I am in tech. And then turns out I had an aptitude for distributed systems, and complex, you know, human systems as well. But when people dig in and they start talking about topics, I'm confounded. I never liked Star Wars, I never like Star Trek. Never got an anime, board games, I don't play video games—Corey: You are going to get letters.Jason: [laugh]. When I was at Canonical, oh, my goodness, the stuff I tried to hide about myself, and, like, learn, like, so who's this Boba Fett dude. And, you know, at some point, obviously, you don't have to pretend anymore, but you know, people still assume a bunch stuff because, quote, “Nerd” quote, “Geek” culture type of stuff. But you know, some interesting facts that people end up being surprised by with me is that, you know, I was very short in high school and I grew in college, so I decided that I wanted to take advantage of my newfound height and athleticism as you grow into your body. So, I started playing basketball, but I obsessed over it.I love getting good at something. So, I'd wake up at four o'clock in the morning, and go shoot baskets, and do drills for hours. Well, I got really good at it one point, and I end up playing in a Pro-Am basketball game with ex-NBA Harlem Globetrotter legends. And that's just not something you hear about in most engineering circles. You might expect that out of a salesperson or a marketing person who played pro ball—or amateur ball somewhere, or college ball or something like that. But not someone who ends up running the most important software company—from a technical perspective—in the world.Corey: It's weird. People counterintuitively think that, on some level, that code is the answer to all things. And that, oh, all this human interaction stuff, all the discussions, all the systems thinking, you have to fit a certain profile to do that, and anyone outside of that is, eh, they're not as valuable. They can get ignored. And we see that manifesting itself in different ways.And even if we take a look at people whose profess otherwise, we take a look at folks who are fresh out of a boot camp and don't understand much about the business world yet; they have transformed their lives—maybe they're fresh out of college, maybe didn't even go to college—and 18 weeks later, they are signing up for six-figure jobs. Meanwhile, you take a look at virtually any other business function, in order to have a relatively comparable degree of earning potential, it takes years of experience and being very focused on a whole bunch of other things. There's a massive distortion around technical roles, and that's a strange and difficult thing to wrap my head around. But as you're talking about it, it goes both ways, too. It's the idea of, “Oh, I'll become technical than branch into other things.” It sounded like you started off instead with a non-technical direction and then sort of adopted that from other sides. Is that right, or am I misremembering exactly how the story unfolds?Jason: No, that's about right. People say, “Hey, when did I start programming?” And it's very in vogue, I think, for a lot of people to say, “I started programming at three years old,” or five years old, or whatever, and got my first computer. I literally didn't get my first computer until I was 18-years-old. And I started programming when I got to a high school co-op with IBM at 17.It was Lotus Notes programming at the time. Had no exposure to it before. What I did, though, in college was IBM told me at the time, they said, “If you get a computer science degree will guarantee you a job.” Which for a kid who grew up the way I grew up, that is manna from heaven type of deal. Like, “You'll guarantee me a job inside where don't have to dig ditches all day or lay asphalt? Oh, my goodness. What's computer science? I'll go figure it out.”And when I got to school, what I realized was I was really far behind. Everyone was that ubergeek type of thing. So, what I did is I tried to hack the system, and what I said was, “What is a topic that nobody else has an advantage on from me?” And so I basically picked the internet because the internet was so new in the mid-'90s that most people were still not fully up to speed on it. And then the underpinnings in the internet, which basically become distributed systems, that's where I started to focus.And because no one had a real advantage, I just, you know, could catch up pretty quickly. But once I got into computers, it turned out that I was probably a very average developer, maybe even below average, but it was the system's thinking that I stood out on. And you know, large-scale distributed systems or architectures were very good for me. And then, you know, that applies not, like, directly, but it applies decently well to human systems. It's just, you know, different types of inputs and outputs. But if you think about organizations at scale, they're barely just really, really, really complex and kind of irrational distributed systems.Corey: Jason, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you're up to, how you think about the world, where can they find you?Jason: Twitter's probably the best place at this point. Just @jasoncwarner on Twitter. I'm very unimaginative. My name is my GitHub handle. It's my Twitter username. And that's the best place that I, kind of, interact with folks these days. I do an AMA on GitHub. So, if you ever want to ask me anything, just kind of go to jasoncwarner/ama on GitHub and drop a question in one of the issues and I'll get to answering that. Yeah, those are the best spots.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to those things in the [show notes 00:33:52]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Jason: Thanks, Corey. It's been fun.Corey: Jason Warner, Chief Technology Officer at GitHub. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review in your podcast platform of choice anyway, along with a comment that includes a patch.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Everyday Sniper
The Everyday Sniper Podcast: 60 Yards w/ Marc & Frank

The Everyday Sniper

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 62:17


The Everyday Sniper Podcast: 60 Yards w/ Marc & Frank  Hey we're back, dropping a podcast for everyone. Thanks for standing by while we travel the country.   Marc and Frank are on the road and we stopped in Louisville, Kentucky so we decided to talk about it. In this episode we breakdown the classes in PA and OH.  We had a great group of students in both locations and had a good time during our East Coast swing.  Topics include:  Weaponized Math  Suppressors from Abel and KGM  Joel Russo and Terminus Actions  Walker Rifleman Magazines for Tikka's  From there I give a short retelling of my Alaska Trip with Karin Hendrickson.  Karin took me on a 70 mile trip in the back country of Alaska.  Something to listen to while we regroup on Whisky Row.  The new episodes will be coming very soon, but in the meantime hopefully this holds you over. Cheers,  Frank 

Last Born In The Wilderness
Sophie Strand: In Our Bones, We Knew This Was Going To Happen

Last Born In The Wilderness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 20:58


This is a segment of episode 305 of Last Born In The Wilderness “Storytelling Is An Emergency: In Our Bones, We Knew This Was Going To Happen w/ Sophie Strand.” Listen to the full episode: https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com/episodes/sophie-strand Learn more about Sophie and her work: http://sophiestrand.com Writer, poet, and essayist Sophie Strand joins me to discuss the "emergency of storytelling" in our climate disrupted present and future, and the subjects she explores in her upcoming book releases, 'The Madonna Secret,' and 'The Flowering Wand: Lunar Kings, Lichenized Lovers, Transpecies Magicians, and Rhizomatic Harpists Heal the Masculine.' Sophie and I entered this conversation a bit fuzzy, a little stunned. We acknowledge this from the get go. We were processing devastating news that morning: Hurricane Ida crashed and dragged itself from south to north across the East Coast, overwhelming the infrastructure, shutting down the grid and flooding cities. We discuss how climatologically, ecologically, we can feel how things have shifted tremendously — in the Northwest where I live, and in Hudson Valley where Sophie lives. While, personally, I tend to explore this broad subject on this podcast, Sophie writes about it. In her essay 'Storytelling is an Emergency: An Ecological Reading of Scheherazade,' she writes: “We are entering into an ecological A Thousand and One Nights of climate change. We are entering into a series of stories that are desperately trying to save their teller: the earth, Gaia, the biosphere, whatever word, for you, encompasses the sum total of spherical, gravity-bound life. Will we like King Shahryar, halt our violence, and begin to listen to a new, non-human kind of story? Will we let these stories change us and reform us? Ultimately, it matters not whether we do or do not. This series of stories will not depend on a human scribe. It will be written into the stone mantle of the Earth itself.” (https://bit.ly/3B4CJ6A) Sophie Strand is a writer based in the Hudson Valley who focuses on the intersection of spirituality, storytelling, and ecology. But it would probably be more authentic to call her a neo-troubadour animist with a propensity to spin yarns that inevitably turn into love stories. Give her a salamander and a stone and she'll write you a love story. Sophie was raised by house cats, puff balls, possums, raccoons, and an opinionated, crippled goose. In every neighborhood she's ever lived in she has been known as “the walker”. She believes strongly that all thinking happens interstitially – between beings, ideas, differences, mythical gradients. WEBSITE: https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/lastborninthewilderness DONATE: https://www.paypal.me/lastbornpodcast / https://venmo.com/LastBornPodcast BOOK LIST: https://bookshop.org/shop/lastbornpodcast EPISODE 300: https://lastborninthewilderness.bandcamp.com BOOK: http://bit.ly/ORBITgr ATTACK & DETHRONE: https://anchor.fm/adgodcast DROP ME A LINE: Call (208) 918-2837 or http://bit.ly/LBWfiledrop EVERYTHING ELSE: https://linktr.ee/patterns.of.behavior

Mastery & Message with Lisa Princic
#135: The BIG little podcast comeback - thriving with an MVP approach to everything

Mastery & Message with Lisa Princic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 21:15


Sometimes what's in front of us isn't clear until we take a step back from it for a while. I've been super busy since I put the podcast on pause. A healthy East Coast vacation, a hectic Summit and a fairly mellow launch, all things considered.  Despite all that, I recognized that I still have a lot to say, to teach and share and the podcast is my medium.  But it's not going to be the same as before. It's low tech, low time and just me. I'm sharing my new "chill" approach to business growth and scaling to a one to many model.  You'll get plenty of behind-the-scenes talk as I open the kimono and share what I'm learning and applying in real time to make a great business and life. I hope you stick around. And check out the Profitable Membership Club here: scalingdeep.com/club/  

Vacation Mavens
199 Fall Travel

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 31:38


Is the weather starting to change where you live? Autumn has arrived in the Northern Hemisphere and this week Kim and Tamara talk about where they have visited recently for fall travel and some other fall favorites. Full Episode Transcript [00:00:00.000] - Kim Tate It's time to fall into fall travel.   [00:00:14.670] - Announcer Welcome to Vacation Mavens, a family travel podcast with ideas for your next vacation and tips to get you out the door. Here are your hosts, Kim from Stuffed Suitcase and Tamara from We3Travel.   [00:00:29.180] - Tamara Gruber So Kim, by the time this comes out, it's going to be less than a month from Halloween. Do your girls still do stuff for Halloween, or do they dress up or do they go on any haunted hay rides or any of those kind of things they have done?   [00:00:42.560] - Kim Tate We have haunted corn mazes and stuff down here, and they normally get together with friends. And there's some kind of youth event that happens at some of the local farms and pumpkin patches and stuff. And we've been known to go to the pumpkin patches and do some of the kiddish activities. But with Mia being 14 now, she's kind of at the cusp of that, and she's got a sweet heart, so she still likes it. But she's not quite into all the activities as much anymore.   [00:01:10.100] - Tamara Gruber No more trick or treating?   [00:01:11.930] - Kim Tate She actually mentioned because they didn't go last year, and she said, I think I'm going to go this year. It'll be with her best friend. She's like, it'll be our last year, and we're going to go for it. And I said, go do it. That's awesome.   [00:01:23.240] - Tamara Gruber So yeah, I'm waiting to see what Hannah will do. I know her friends have really been trying to convince her to do some kind of haunted house hayride kind of thing. To me, the whole idea of a haunted corn maze sounds absolutely terrifying. Something could just jump out of you. I don't like jump scares either. As a teen, I did do a haunted hayride, but at least then you know, the direction they're coming from. They only come outside, and I can kind of sit in the middle in a little safer, but right down the street for me, they have some kind of I don't even know I've never gone, but it's this whole horror thing in one of the parks that you kind of walk through.   [00:02:00.240] - Tamara Gruber So it's a little bit more of a walk through type of thing, but they've not convinced her. So I don't know about trick or treating, though, because last year obviously no trick or treating. The year before she was going to go with one friend, but then it ended up raining. So I think they decided just to stay home and hand out candy instead. I'm not sure if there'll be one last or she'll just stay home, and we usually try to do Apple picking or some kind of visit to a farm this year.   [00:02:27.240] - Tamara Gruber I've already gone and picked up Apple cider Donuts for her. I think she's just so busy she can't really see about it this year. I'm trying to still give all the fall treats. Here's some Apple cider and Apple cider Donuts. And I made pumpkin pie dip when we had some people over recently in our backyard. And so as she's getting the fall stuff without the scary stuff, that's cool.   [00:02:52.230] - Kim Tate I grew up in Kansas City, and when I was a teenager, there's this area. And I can't even think because I know it's something like all the Kansas City listeners are going to be laughing that I can't think of this. I want to say it's something like the flats or the bottoms, or I can't remember. But there's this area in Kansas City, and it's like, known for having some of the creepiest most amazing haunted houses. And because it's this old warehouse district, right. And they would dress them all up and everything.   [00:03:19.730] - Kim Tate And that was the thing that we always did as teens. And I'm kind of glad that my girls haven't gotten into that. I do know there's one up north, that's kind of a haunted house type thing in a warehouse. But other than the corn maze, there's not as much around here, but I remember as a kid those things that freak me out so mad.   [00:03:38.260] - Tamara Gruber I'm starting to wonder if it like, haunted or not haunted, but it's just general, like, really creepy lawn decorations are like the new holiday lights. You know, how people know, there's the houses that do a really good holiday lights, and they drive around and look at them. The other day, I was driving and a home from practice, and there's a house that is absolutely terrifying. I don't know what's wrong with the people that live there, but there's basically a 15 foot skeleton. Then there's a whole line of super creepy zombie dudes.   [00:04:09.280] - Tamara Gruber And then out of the corner of my eye, I see it's got to be like, ten foot tall pig with a giant knife and an apron on. And I'm like, Where do you even find this bizarre stuff? I really need to go buy the house and take a picture of it. But I'm scared that if I do, I don't know somebody who's a little disturbed in there.   [00:04:31.390] - Kim Tate Yeah, I think I saw something a while back that spending for spending for decorations and all that stuff on Halloween is second only to Christmas.   [00:04:42.320] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it's so easy. And I were talking about all the houses that we used to never be able to go to when she was little. There was the house with the giant Spider. No, we had to skip that one. There was the one that had the little smoke tunnel you went through. We had to skip that one because she was scared of everything when she was little. So we were laughing about that. But not everything has changed because, yeah, I know, literally, we couldn't even go down certain aisles and target because if something started to move and make noise, she'd have a little breakdown.   [00:05:10.370] - Tamara Gruber Oh, man, she's not the haunted house type. That's for sure.   [00:05:14.760] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:05:15.470] - Tamara Gruber Well, there's lots of other fun things to do, though. You just went and did some haunted kind of stuff. I know I saw your picture when you're in Disneyland, and I'm like, Whoa, that looks kind of crazy for Disneyland. But tell me what you did when you were just down in California.   [00:05:29.370] - Kim Tate Yeah. So for those of you who know Disneyland, they actually do a lot of seasonal parties. And starting in September, they do a Halloween time at Disneyland Resort, and they go out. They kind of decorate the parks with beautiful Orange swags, and they have some hand carved pumpkins decorating Main Street. And then they do a few other things this year, they have quite a cool area back in one of the regions for Coco and Dia des Muertes. And then some celebrations around that as well. And then the bigger thing that you saw my picture of was they have parties called Oogie Boogie Bash, and it's kind of crazy how expensive it can be, especially for a family, because they sell these bash party tickets in addition to your park ticket.   [00:06:19.400] - Kim Tate But you don't have to have a park ticket for this party, which is kind of nice. So you can theoretically go to the parks with normal park ticket and then buy one of these. And you can get in 3 hours before your park before the party starts. You can get in at 03:00 p.m. When the party starts at six. And so some people choose to do that, but they are sold out. So if anyone's hearing this, you need to be looking ahead to 2022 if you're thinking of doing kind of a Disneyland and fall.   [00:06:45.290] - Kim Tate But you can still go to Disneyland and celebrate stuff during the Halloween time celebrations. They do a ride overlay for Haunted Mansion, which is called Haunted Mansion Holiday. And it's got Jack Skellington, and he kind of takes over the ride. And sorry for Disney people. I should say the attraction. But anyways, so he takes that over and that lasts all for Christmas because it's kind of like him like that spooky mixed with Christmas season. So it's kind of fun thing. And then they also do cars Land also gets a big makeover and becomes radiator screams, which is kind of funny. And they do a lot of fun, like car part themed, like spiders made out of engines. And, you know, Crow bar stuff. And then they've got these fun cones and tire eyes. And each of the two rides that are not the main radio racers. Each of the two rides get a makeover with fun music and theming around Halloween. So they do that. And then the last one is Guardians of the Galaxy, which used to be Tower of Terror.   [00:07:45.380] - Kim Tate It gets a makeover at night. So kind of later afternoon evenings, it becomes Guardians of the Galaxy, Monsters after dark. And so the theming of the ride, like the story that you see on the screens and the music changes, and it can be pretty intense and scary, I think, for some people. So anyway, that's kind of the thing at Disneyland, but the OG Boogie bash party is something different. And that's what I showed your picture of. Yeah.   [00:08:10.200] - Tamara Gruber Well, I mean, Tower of Terror or Guardians of the Galaxy. The attraction itself is scary to me with that one.   [00:08:18.930] - Kim Tate I know. I see that one I can't handle. My stomach can't handle it.   [00:08:23.210] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So how long do they keep that theming before they switch over to Christmas stuff?   [00:08:28.900] - Kim Tate so this actually is ending October 31 for the season. Sometimes it goes to the first day or two of November. I think it depends on how the week falls, but there's a chance you'll see some stuff. Still, if you're there on November 1 as they take it down. But they're pretty good about getting those holiday things up. And then right back down and then the Halloween decorations will be gone. And then you'll have until about the second week of November. I think this year it's November 12 is when the holiday overlay starts happening and kind of comes alive.   [00:09:02.960] - Kim Tate And then they'll have some festival, the holidays, events that celebrate not just Christmas. So they tried to bring in like Hannukkah and Kwanza and Three Kings Day, so they're trying to make it a little more open to everyone. And then they also just launched this brand new party thing. It's just kind of like the Oogie Boogie bash party called Merriest Nights, which is a ticketed event. There's still a couple of tickets for two days open for that one. So if you did want to do holidays in Disneyland, you could look into that.   [00:09:31.820] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:09:32.510] - Kim Tate So there's a little about ten to 14 days that you get the parks without anything. And then it goes from Halloween time to Christmas time. Or I guess I should say holiday time, out of time, festive season, winter festivities. Yeah.   [00:09:50.540] - Tamara Gruber And they do some similar things, but different at Walt Disney World, right?   [00:09:54.870] - Kim Tate Yeah. So the big news with Walt Disney World right now, they are doing like a boo bash thing. That's an after hour ticketed event. I haven't heard as much about it. I don't know how big of a hit it was. And then they normally do some kind of Christmas thing. They've announced a few things down there. But the big news for Disney World right now is that October 1 is the start of their 50th anniversary celebration, and they've kind of gone all in on decor and merchandise and special things around that.   [00:10:23.730] - Kim Tate So if you are headed to Florida and Walt Disney World this fall and winter, you'll be kind of looking at that 50th anniversary. Definitely. Check out the two Halloween and winter holiday activities that they have and parties.   [00:10:39.310] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. It's good to know, too, that you need to plan in advance for some of these, or at least you might get lucky with some tickets, but it makes sense to try to think ahead.   [00:10:48.730] - Kim Tate Yeah, especially since you have to make reservations for all the park. Still. So you still have to be making you buy your tickets and make your park day reservations and stuff. And park hopping is very limited. So you pick the park, you're going to start it, and then you can't go to another park until 01:00 p.m.. I'm not quite sure on the timing at Walt Disney World.   [00:11:08.590] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it's even more complicated.   [00:11:11.280] - Kim Tate More exactly, even more planning than it already has been. But, yeah, that's just a little bit of fall holidays. But what about in your neck of the Woods, about fall seasonal stuff? What kind of things are you for? Travel wise? What do you know about what do you hear about?   [00:11:30.200] - Tamara Gruber Well, we're kind of in that time where everybody wants to go all type of fall here in New England, but I just got back from a trip to the Finger Lakes in New York, and that's definitely a great destination. We were there for the grape harvest. You know, it always varies a little bit on timing when that's going to be, but definitely a fun time. And we have a beautiful weekend. It was low 70s or high 60s, but sunny, and it was just such a perfect we I went with two of my College friends, and we had a blast because I've talked about the Finger Lakes before.   [00:12:06.840] - Tamara Gruber This time I stayed in Ithaca. I was actually hosted at Hotel Ithaca in downtown Ithaca, which is home to Cornell and Ithaca College. It has that College town vibe. In the past, I've stayed at on a different Lake. I've stayed Ithaca right near Cayuga Lake, and in the past I've stayed at Watkins Glen, which is on Seneca Lake. And then one time, I took Hannah to the Finger Lakes, and we stayed in Hammondsport or Corning, which is on Keuka Lake. So there's actually eleven Lakes in the Finger Lakes region, and there's over 100 wineries.   [00:12:39.510] - Tamara Gruber And there's also a ton of craft breweries. There's distilleries, there's tons of cideries, there's tons of farms. So we did a really nice mix of, like, some wine tasting. And we also went to a cider place. But we also did agritourism types of things because it's beautiful up there. It's kind of like a little bit hilly between the Lakes. So there's so many farms or wineries where you're looking down a gentle slope to the Lake in the distance. It just gives such a pretty backdrop. And the leaves there are just starting to change.   [00:13:12.610] - Tamara Gruber So I think in the next couple of weeks, it's going to be really nice. We started with a boat tour with Discover Cayuga Lake, and that was like a little sunset cruise. They do a whole bunch of different Eco cruises. And then the next day, we went to their farmers market in Ithaca, which is like amazing tons of food and beautiful produce. Wineries, cideries, honey, there's local apiaries, so many nice things. We picked up some breakfast there and sat at a picnic table by the Lake and just enjoyed that.   [00:13:45.400] - Tamara Gruber And then we did a couple of tastings at wineries like a pairing with everyone had a charcuterie board, too. And it was just like a really nicely paced, like, really good, relaxing, enjoyable pairing. And then we did a blind tasting somewhere, which is a lot of fun. And then we visited a goat farm. And then yesterday we went to an alpaca farm. I don't know if you got a chance to see my Instagram stories on that, but they're so cute.   [00:14:13.240] - Kim Tate Sweet. Did you buy some alpaca socks or Wolf?   [00:14:17.760] - Tamara Gruber I bought plenty. I had held back at the farmers market and all these other places, but then I was like, okay, I'm supporting the economy right here, which is nice because it's a family on farm. We had signed up to do a farm tour and to take the alpacas for a walk. And I can just say from a wellness perspective, getting to see and interact with really cute, adorable animals is just really nice. It gives such a good feeling, right? Yeah. But yes, I bought a hat, which maybe I'll bring with me to Portugal.   [00:14:51.940] - Tamara Gruber Maybe you'll get to see it. I bought a little scarf. I bought this adorable little fluff ball thing that looks like an alpaca for Hannah, because that was the one thing I always say these days. She's not very jealous of when I go away and do things like she still enjoys when we get to do things together. But she's so busy and stuff going on with her own life that she's not like, oh, I wish I could come with the one. I told her I was going to an Alpaca farm.   [00:15:16.990] - Tamara Gruber She's like, Can you send me pictures?   [00:15:20.020] - Kim Tate Well, I'm jealous. Definitely. I can't wait to see your hat. I hope you do bring it because is it like a felted wool hat?   [00:15:26.650] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it's kind of. I don't know what kind of like a news boy hat.   [00:15:31.760] - Kim Tate Oh, yes. I don't know what that's called. The sweeper.   [00:15:37.760] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:15:38.430] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:15:39.450] - Tamara Gruber I'm not a fashion person, as you know, I'm not a fashion person.   [00:15:42.030] - Kim Tate But I know I should know what that's called, but I can't think of it right now. Okay, cool.   [00:15:46.230] - Tamara Gruber So that's definitely one great destination. And I can see just from the traffic on my website. Like, what the other popular things to do are. I think even back to last year, last year, we did some family glamping, and I did some glamping on my own, and I think that that's a really nice time to do it before it gets too cold. The nights are crisp and the days are nice. You're not, like sweating in the tent. It's kind of perfect camping or glamping.   [00:16:15.590] - Kim Tate Kind of want the fires at night and stuff.   [00:16:18.550] - Tamara Gruber Exactly. So I think that's a really fun thing to do now. And there's so many places to do that now. I have a whole post on my website about places to go glamping in New England and new ones keep cropping up, which is great. But I know Vermont and New Hampshire are super popular. I think some people come a little bit too late, so just keep track of every state puts out a fall foliage kind of tracker. I have a blog post on my website about following road trips in New England, and I have links to each of those state trackers, so you can see when they expect it to be peak and stuff like that.   [00:16:56.060] - Tamara Gruber But basically the further north you go, the early it's going to be. So things are starting to really pop right now in New Hampshire, in Vermont and Maine, and that's going to continue to kind of work its way south. So one of the things that we like to do is in New Hampshire, there's a scenic drive called the Kancamagus Highway, and I have a post about all the scenic spots to stop along there.   [00:17:23.560] Nice.   [00:17:24.040] - Tamara Gruber And that is now kind of doing really well on the website. And I have a post about New York road trips to take in the fall and Vermont. I know I've been getting a lot of messages from people like, what should I do in Vermont? All of how many people are open to and yeah, exactly. The thing to think about, though, is that it's total leaf peeping season, and it is hard to find hotels on certain weekends, especially the three day weekend in October can be really tough.   [00:17:55.110] - Tamara Gruber So you might need to, you know, try to search early. It's a little bit late for that, but try to look for maybe Airbnb or VRBO or the Glamping and things like that to try to find some alternatives cool or just plan for 220 and 22. What about by you? Do you have other I mean, I'm sure between, like, Apple season and wine harvest, you must have so many great places to go for fall by you as well.   [00:18:19.280] - Kim Tate I was going to say I think Washington State is definitely a big gem for October trips or fall seasonal trips, especially people think about New England, but if you look, it's latitude, right? Not longitude. Yeah. Latitudes. We're kind of similar. And even though we are like the evergreen state, there's a lot of aspens and poplars and Maple trees out here, and we get some beautiful fall colors mixed in with the green trees. So I definitely think that in Washington State, October is also just a really nice temperature.   [00:18:53.680] - Kim Tate If you want to do hiking or drives, you definitely do have to prepare for dreary weather. I'll call it because it's not necessarily always rainy. But dreary is definitely the right word. And fall is when we do get most of our wind storms. We don't have, like, thunderstorms like I grew up with in the Midwest. But we have these massive wind storms, and that normally is in the fall when that can be a problem. So that is something to keep in mind. But otherwise, it's just so nice here.   [00:19:24.150] - Kim Tate The temperatures are so mild, and it's like you said, with glamping and things. It's cool in the evenings, but can kind of get a little warm in the in the daytime, but not too much. It depends how much of the cloud cover Burns off. But I think kind of like with the Finger Lakes. The big thing out here is the fact that it's harvest season. And there are a lot of fall festivals and wine crushing events. And I know that Chelan, which is a very popular vacation destination for Seattle people.   [00:19:52.630] - Kim Tate It's kind of a Lake community destination out here. And they have a massive fall festival that lasts from October through Thanksgiving. And so you can find stuff happening all the time there with different vendors and activities and things like that. And they have, like, an evening. They have family events during the day, and then they have these evening haunted things as well. So it's kind of a big destination. So if you're in Washington state, Chelan is kind of a big thing. And then, of course, some people may have heard of the little town of Leavenworth, which is a Bavarian village out here in Washington.   [00:20:26.820] - Kim Tate It's about, I'd say, about 2 hours from Seattle, probably it depends what traffic's like. And when you're going. And it is known for first, it's October Fest because of the fact that it's a Bavarian town. So it's very German inspired. And they do a big October festival. But then they also do a big holiday lights festival and that's very popular local. So those are kind of the main things I'm thinking about here, of course, like you said, with apples, there's a lot of cider events happening.   [00:20:56.800] - Kim Tate So if you like to drink cider, Washington State is a great place for that as well. And I think Oregon is pretty big in breweries and cideries and stuff as well. And of course, they have their whole Willamette Valley for wine. So they're pretty big as well in the fall embibing travel. Maybe that should be a term. But yeah. So those are kind of the big things that I can think of. I've heard also that I am not a fan of mushrooms, but supposedly Washington has a big mushroom festival as well.   [00:21:28.850] - Kim Tate I guess October is a good mushroom season. So if you know.   [00:21:32.620] - Tamara Gruber A and the Finger Lakes, there is a mushroom spirits distillery. Okay. I don't know much about distilleries. You know, obviously, they're they're made from many different things from vodkas.   [00:21:43.720] - Kim Tate Potatoes, but you never know exactly like.   [00:21:46.770] - Tamara Gruber I don't know what that would be like.   [00:21:49.050] - Kim Tate No idea.   [00:21:49.570] - Tamara Gruber I also saw that they were having an Apple Fest in Ithaca, like next weekend. Definitely. The Apple Fest is huge. Yeah.   [00:21:58.330] - Kim Tate We also have Washington state and even in Oregon and stuff. It's really, really big. I know you have this on the East Coast too, but pumpkin patches and corn mazes. It's just huge. Like I mentioned with when I was talking about what the kids do with the haunted corn maze and all that stuff. It's insane. In our little area. We have probably seven pumpkin patches and corn maze and stuff we could choose to go to. So, I mean, some are definitely bigger than others, but it's a huge thing out here in Washington are the at least at Western Washington is the pumpkin patches and all that stuff.   [00:22:31.820] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it's definitely big here, too. We have were small state, but we have quite a few in Rhode Island, and then in Massachusetts, there's some super massive ones. I remember taking Hannah to one in Rhode Island, one where the parents didn't go in. We kind of stood outside and chatted, and then we're like, it's been a really long time. Are they ever going to make their way out? But that wasn't haunted. It was just during the day, regular regular comes. But yeah, there's so many fun things to do.   [00:23:01.620] - Tamara Gruber It's outside and a lot of the farms by us. They'll bring in food trucks and live music and sometimes like, little kiddie rides. You definitely do the wagon rides into the pumpkin patch.   [00:23:14.380] - Kim Tate Hay rides, and there's normally some animal.   [00:23:18.700] - Tamara Gruber Some cows, petting Zoo kind of thing. And then there's all kinds of great baked goods. And I love this time of year. I will still always love summer more, and I try to really get out and appreciate fall when I can, because it's just so short for us. September through mid to late. October is beautiful. You still see blue skies. The weather is great. This year has been fantastic, but by November it's Brown and Gray, so it's over. It's done. So I try to take it in as much as I can.   [00:23:57.470] - Tamara Gruber Now, even I'm sitting here looking at my window, like, Why didn't I go for a walk out?   [00:24:02.190] - Kim Tate You can still go.   [00:24:03.970] - Tamara Gruber I know. I have to get work.   [00:24:06.440] - Kim Tate I can still go. I'm with you. I definitely prefer summer. And being in Seattle, we don't have that nice blue sky. Fall day in Seattle is celebrated as if it's the best thing in the world because it's when the cloud cover definitely moves in. So that is one kind of bummer, but we definitely keep our green. I mean, I love the fact that we have green trees all year round, so there's a payoff to it.   [00:24:35.080] - Tamara Gruber Well, I think for people that are looking for some fall color and stuff a little bit later in the season because I've had people reach out to me like, we're coming to Boston in November and where can we see the best? I'm like over one, but you think about a Great Smoky Mountain National Park and so many parts of Tennessee, North Carolina, the Northern Georgia mountains that gets it in Yosemite and stuff as well. That too.   [00:25:02.710] - Kim Tate It's absolutely gorgeous in the fall.   [00:25:04.880] - Tamara Gruber And I know you mentioned Aspens. I definitely see, like in Colorado, they are really popping right now.   [00:25:09.560] - Kim Tate Like, Vail is gorgeous right now.   [00:25:11.510] - Tamara Gruber Not everything is on our time schedule since we're up here further to the north.   [00:25:18.480] - Kim Tate Well, and then we headed in November will be heading down to Arizona. And so for those people who are looking to start escaping that dreary winter, moving in the south, especially Arizona in the fall can be amazing. I'm looking forward to spending a few hours by the pool with you.   [00:25:38.460] - Tamara Gruber I'm kind of hoping that this year we can go back to previous years where I can escape my drink Gray dreary winter with some Sunshine if you the winter. So, knock wood, because Arizona. And then we're supposed to, as I mentioned, go to Aruba, and then we'll see how it all goes. But I really look forward to those little bits of Sunshine in the middle of the cold is that we have well.   [00:26:05.800] - Kim Tate And for those people that are looking for that are into cruising. I know Thanksgiving cruises are very popular. I do feel like they're doing limited capacity on ships because it seems like prices are not really moving on cruises. You're not going to be getting a steal of a deal. And I think getting to choose your cabin, it's going to be limited as well. But I don't know how long that's going to be kept up, but cruising is always kind of a fun fall getaway because you normally head somewhere warm.   [00:26:34.980] - Kim Tate I know the fall is really popular for a lot of Seattle people. They go down to Cabo and that area of Mexico in the fall.   [00:26:41.980] - Tamara Gruber So here's to a good fall. I feel like I need to go pour myself some Apple cider right now.   [00:26:47.830] - Kim Tate I'm jealous of the Apple cider Donuts. Do you know that I've never had Apple cider?   [00:26:51.550] - Tamara Gruber Donuts?   [00:26:51.940] - Kim Tate I don't think I ever have, and I would love them. They sound amazing. I've had pumpkin spice Donuts and I've had lots of fresh Apple cider, but Apple cider Donuts. I don't think I've ever had one.   [00:27:01.480] - Tamara Gruber See, now I'm going to see you soon, and I would happily bring you some Apple cider Donuts. But I will say there are nothing like getting a hot, fresh, fresh one cider donut. So can you just come visit me next fall? Yes, I will have to.   [00:27:16.960] - Kim Tate That's a plan. Let's make it happen. 2022 New England or Bust. Yeah.   [00:27:22.400] - Tamara Gruber New England. You should see New England in the fall for sure.   [00:27:26.030] - Kim Tate Yeah, definitely.   [00:27:26.990] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:27:27.530] - Kim Tate Well, you'll be my tour guide, so I think we can make that happen. It's always so busy. Like I just got back from a trip. And why is the fall always so busy with work?   [00:27:37.210] - Tamara Gruber Stuff. I know as excited as I am about Portugal. And I know that we're going to get a little taste of all there, too, because we're going to be there during their wine harvest. And we're going to get to in some of those wine events. And for those of you that are listening, pop over to Instagram and check out our Instagram accounts because we're going to be doing some really cool things, like hot air balloon and some very special wine events. And so staying at some really interesting, amazing hotels sounds like it's going to be awesome.   [00:28:09.740] - Kim Tate We're staying at some amazing places we are staying at. Now. This will give you guys a little idea, like work is work, and it's not always vacation. But we are staying at a new hotel almost every day. I think there's two times that we stay at a hotel two nights. Yeah. And we're there for 17 days. So just so you guys know, we are going to be sharing a lot. And we're not just in Lisbon, we're going to Porto and the sorts and Lisbon and and we're going to see a lot of the country.   [00:28:40.580] - Tamara Gruber And I think people are kind of used to seeing certain pictures from Lisbon in particular. And I no Porto is very popular as well. But we're going to get out into the countryside and show you and be able to help figure out what are the great itineraries to do. How can you organize it? So you're not visit our not a new hotel every night?   [00:29:01.640] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:29:02.180] - Tamara Gruber Exactly.   [00:29:02.740] - Kim Tate Well. And also knowing it to be a situation where it's like, what's worth? What are these gems that you're not realizing so that you're not just the standard tourists going to the Portugal is an amazing country. And so I'm so excited to get a feel for more of this country that I've already fallen in love with. And so I'm really excited about that and being able to share kind of the other because I think you and I have always said that there needs to be this balance with doing the standard touristy stuff.   [00:29:29.280] - Kim Tate It's a touristy thing for a reason. Most of the time it's worthwhile. And some you don't want to not see it. But you need to balance that with some more, not even off the beaten path, but more things that you wouldn't necessarily know about or think about. And that's why I'm so glad that we're working with the epic travel people because they're on the ground there, and they have all those little gems that they can help put us on that you and I I don't think we wouldn't necessarily have known to look for I'm really excited.   [00:29:56.480] - Tamara Gruber So of the regions we're on top of mind. Right. And then we're doing something like one of the big products in Portugal is cork. And so we're going to do a cork trekking hike. I can't wait where we're going to go and look and see how they would harvest it.   [00:30:16.380] - Tamara Gruber So there's so many interesting things, like digging deeper, traveling in a way that really gets to know the culture and totally up our alley. I'm super excited. So I know we were talking all about fall, and my whole point was as excited as I am about Portugal. I'm missing out on some of the best part of here in New England, but I'll take it. I agreed.   [00:30:39.170] - Kim Tate I mean, everything I'm looking at, it sounds like Portugal is going to be an amazing October destination. So if any of you are listening and thinking about October trips, definitely be following along Tamara again is @we3travel and I'm @stuffedsuitcase, and we will be sharing because from the research I'm doing, it seems seems like a great time to go.   [00:30:58.230] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Definitely follow along when we come back. Our next episode is going to be all about our Portugal trip. So hopefully you'll follow along and then you'll want to hear even more about it. So you'll tune in next time.   [00:31:13.160] - Kim Tate Well, thanks for joining us, as always, and we hope that you have some wonderful fall travels or local adventures planned ahead. Tchau.  

Killed by Desk
52 Jim ‘Murf' Murphy - Stained Glass Conservator ( Wounded Knee Skateboards / Stronghold Society / Juice Magazine )

Killed by Desk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 75:45


Jim Murphy, or ‘Murf' as he is more commonly known, is one of the most accomplished vert skaters of the 1980s, skating for Alva Skateboards and representing the East Coast. But, as we learned in our conversation, Murf has a LOT more going on in his life. From his founding of Stronghold Society, a non-profit organization that advocates for skateboarding with a focus on creating and sustaining skateparks in Native American communities, and the formation of Wounded Knee Skateboards, Murf has remained involved in skateboarding with a higher, humanitarian purpose. Add to this his other day job as a stained glass conservator, restoring Tiffany (and other antique) glass art to its former glory AND his work with JUICE Magazine, and you've got a very busy punk rocker! We dive into all of it (and more) in an in-depth and totally fascinating conversation, so don't miss it! For Full Length Episodes And Merchandise Go To https://www.patreon.com/killedbydesk Follow: Killed By Desk Insta: @killedbydeskpodcast Twitter: @killedbydesk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/killedbydesk LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/killedbydesk Links: Jim Murphy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Murphy_(skateboarder) https://venturellastudio.com/about/jim-murphy/ Wounded Knee Skateboards https://www.woundedkneeskateboards.net/ https://time.com/4163592/native-american-skateboarding-lakota/ Juice Mag https://juicemagazine.com/home/ Levi's Promo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DN98eObkFCQ Live Life Call to Action http://strongholdsociety.org/?p=946 Emily Earring https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49E5uW5mVx4 Bobby Pourier https://lakotachildren.org/2015/05/bobby-pourier-a-scholar-and-leader/

The Prophecy Club - All Broadcasts
Tsunami, Car Tracking & Global Currency 10/04/2021 - Video

The Prophecy Club - All Broadcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:28


Today Pastor Stan talks more about a dream concerning a Tsunami hitting the East Coast, how the Government plan to soon track your vehicle and how close we are to the new Quantum Financial System.

The Prophecy Club - All Broadcasts
Tsunami, Car Tracking & Global Currency 10/04/2021 - Audio

The Prophecy Club - All Broadcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:28


Today Pastor Stan talks more about a dream concerning a Tsunami hitting the East Coast, how the Government plan to soon track your vehicle and how close we are to the new Quantum Financial System.

VSiN Best Bets
Lombardi Line | October 4, 2021, Hour 1

VSiN Best Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 52:49


In the opening hour of Lombardi Line, hosts Michael Lombardi and Patrick Meagher discuss all the action that went down in the NFL Week 4 action including the much-awaited reunion in Foxboro. Thomas Gable of Borgata joins with an East Coast betting handle recap, and Point Spread Weekly Contributor Will Hill closes out the hour with his pick for the Raider's Monday Nighy Football matchup! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Greg & The Morning Buzz
ASK THE BUZZ- EAST COAST LUMBER. 10/4

Greg & The Morning Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 17:12


So this dudes buddy just got engaged to his sister and he knows the dude had a crazy past, does he say anything to his sis, or just mind his own business?

Roads Taken
Lesson Plans: Kate Shanahan on focusing on the first step and keeping at it

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 26:50


Guest Kate Shanahan, Dartmouth '96, had grown up in Hanover in her elementary years and searched for colleges elsewhere. But nothing compared to the College on the Hill and so returned to rediscover the campus she knew so well. It took her time to find her groove but English literature lit a spark for her. Later, she found the Education department and the encounters she had there with professors and the material was life-changing. Upon graduation, she spent six more months in Hanover in the teacher preparation program, student teaching in a classroom that she'd been in as a nine-year-old.While she loved teaching and knew she was good at it, she did wonder whether she wanted to make it her life-long profession. A wise adviser suggested that her focus should be not so long term but rather about what to do right now. That laid her on the expected path to teaching. But in taking spending time on the west coast during the six months before taking on her first full-time classroom, she took a by-road would set an unexpected course for a geographic switch.In this episode, find out from Kate how focusing on the first step can take the pressure of off forever, but lead you there anyway…on ROADS TAKEN...with Leslie Jennings Rowley. About This Episode's GuestKate Shanahan taught at several private schools on the East Coast before moving to California and joining the Harker faculty of the Harker School in San Jose, California, in 1998. During her long tenure at Harker, she has led the English department and has taught both upper elementary grades, chiefly grade 5 English and writing. She lives with her husband and two sons in sunny San Jose. Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.comEmail the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com

Called By God Podcast
056. Come See A Man Part 2

Called By God Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 52:36


What does having a call on your life look like? The simple answer to this question is to follow our discussion with Pam Hampstead. Pam took us from the Midwest, West Coast and all the way to the East Coast, what a journey.What do you do when opportunity presents itselfPam fought the urge to make the call by reading scripturesShe called single sisters and her minister's wifeShe said yes to the Lord and no to her bodyPam was able to tell her minister's wife she said yes to the LordShe wrote her first book (Single with Purpose: A Single Sister's Tool to Living Single, Celibate and Loving ItPam began walking in her purpose by getting the word out to other single womenShe teaches single women how to stay single and celibateBreast Cancer is the next journeyPam was invited to lunch and was told a dear sister and friend has breast cancerShe confessed to the sister that she has not had a mammogramThe sister would send her text messages regarding getting a mammogram Cancer diagnosis was on her journey and God's planShe had cancer in her milk ductNine years no mammogram and she was stage zeroPam loses her brotherPam had a conversation with her brother and then he was gonePam can be reached on:Facebook: Pamela HempsteadIG: Pamela HempsteadEmail: phempstead0406@gmail.comThe way to salvation:Hear: Romans 10:17Believe: Hebrews 11:6Repent: Acts 17:30-31Confess: Matthew 10:32Be Baptized: Mark 16:15-16Be faithful unto death: Revelation 2:10Chivas Davis-President and Teara Davis-Vice PresidentPaint with Faith "Motivational Painting Classhttps://paintwithfaith.com A Call to SalvationSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/CalledbyGod)

RA Podcast
RA.800 UNiiQU3 - 2021.10.03

RA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 59:15


On our 800th RA Podcast, New Jersey's club queen spreads the East Coast club gospel.

127 Fit Podcast
Episode 31: Behind the Muscle Podcast w/ NPC Super Heavyweight Nate Spear

127 Fit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 87:19


Episdoe 31 of "Behind the Muscle" features NPC bodybuilder, Nate Spear!   On this episode of the podcast, Nate and I have a thorough conversation digging into all things bodybuilding! We specifically discuss: Nate's struggle with drug addiction, his coach Nate Berry, best gyms on the East Coast, 2021 Olympia predictions, and more!     Please, if you have not done so already, hit the subscribe button on you preferred listening platform for "Behind the Muscle!" Also, share this episode on all of your social media platforms! Thank you!     Connect with "Behind the Muscle": https://www.instagram.com/behindthemusclepodcast1/     Connect with Nate: https://www.instagram.com/nastynatespear/     "Remember, behind the muscle, there's always a story!"

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi
Rockshow Episode 138 Anthrax

Getting lumped up with Rob Rossi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 52:01


RockerMike and Rob discuss Anthrax Anthrax is an American heavy metal band from New York City, formed in 1981 by rhythm guitarist Scott Ian and bassist Dan Lilker. The group is considered one of the leaders of the thrash metal scene from the 1980s and is part of the "Big Four" of the genre, along with Metallica, Megadeth and Slayer. They were also one of the first thrash metal bands (along with Overkill and Nuclear Assault) to emerge from the East Coast.[1] The band has released 11 studio albums, several other albums, and 26 singles, including collaborating on a single with American hip hop group Public Enemy. According to Nielsen SoundScan, Anthrax sold 2.5 million records in the United States from 1991 to 2004, with worldwide sales of 10 million. Four of the band's studio albums have also achieved gold certifications by the RIAA, including their third full-length record Among the Living (1987), which cemented Anthrax's reputation as one of the most successful thrash metal bands. https://www.anthrax.com/ https://m.facebook.com/anthrax/ https://loudwire.com/tags/anthrax/ https://open.spotify.com/artist/3JysSUOyfVs1UQ0UaESheP https://www.instagram.com/anthrax/ https://music.apple.com/us/artist/anthrax/80417 https://mobile.twitter.com/anthrax?lang=en Please follow us on Youtube,Facebook,Instagram,Twitter,Patreon and at www.gettinglumpedup.com https://linktr.ee/RobRossi Get your T-shirt at https://www.prowrestlingtees.com/gettinglumpedup And https://www.bonfire.com/store/getting-lumped-up/ https://app.hashtag.expert/?fpr=roberto-rossi80 https://dc2bfnt-peyeewd4slt50d2x1b.hop.clickbank.net https://8bcded2xph1jdsb8mqp8th3y0n.hop.clickbank.net/?cbpage=nb Subscribe to the channel and hit the like button --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/getting-lumped-up-with-rob-rossi/id1448899708 https://open.spotify.com/show/00ZWLZaYqQlJji1QSoEz7a https://www.patreon.com/Gettinglumpedup #heavymetalmusic #heavy #heavymetal #heavyrock #heavymusic #musician #musicproduction #musiclife #musicislife #musicvideo #musicproducer #musically #musicfestival #musicstudio #musicians #musiclover #musicindustry #music --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rob-rossi/support

5 Things
New antiviral pill is highly effective against COVID-19

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 12:29


The drug appears to significantly diminish serious illness. Plus, Women's March Day is here amid renewed abortion fights around the country, the House again can't come to infrastructure agreements, Hurricane Sam causes dangerous surf conditions on the East Coast and Tom Brady makes his return to New England.(Audio: Associated Press)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Last Born In The Wilderness
#305 | Storytelling Is An Emergency: In Our Bones, We Knew This Was Going To Happen w/ Sophie Strand

Last Born In The Wilderness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 88:02


[Intro: 11:43] Writer, poet, and essayist Sophie Strand joins me to discuss the "emergency of storytelling" in our climate disrupted present and future, and the subjects she explores in her upcoming book releases, 'The Madonna Secret,' and 'The Flowering Wand: Lunar Kings, Lichenized Lovers, Transpecies Magicians, and Rhizomatic Harpists Heal the Masculine.' Sophie and I entered this conversation a bit fuzzy, a little stunned. We acknowledge this from the get go. We were processing devastating news that morning: Hurricane Ida crashed and dragged itself from south to north across the East Coast, overwhelming the infrastructure, shutting down the grid and flooding cities. We discuss how climatologically, ecologically, we can feel how things have shifted tremendously — in the Northwest where I live, and in Hudson Valley where Sophie lives. While, personally, I tend to explore this broad subject on this podcast, Sophie writes about it. In her essay 'Storytelling is an Emergency: An Ecological Reading of Scheherazade,' she writes: “We are entering into an ecological A Thousand and One Nights of climate change. We are entering into a series of stories that are desperately trying to save their teller: the earth, Gaia, the biosphere, whatever word, for you, encompasses the sum total of spherical, gravity-bound life. Will we like King Shahryar, halt our violence, and begin to listen to a new, non-human kind of story? Will we let these stories change us and reform us? Ultimately, it matters not whether we do or do not. This series of stories will not depend on a human scribe. It will be written into the stone mantle of the Earth itself.” (https://bit.ly/3B4CJ6A) Sophie Strand is a writer based in the Hudson Valley who focuses on the intersection of spirituality, storytelling, and ecology. But it would probably be more authentic to call her a neo-troubadour animist with a propensity to spin yarns that inevitably turn into love stories. Give her a salamander and a stone and she'll write you a love story. Sophie was raised by house cats, puff balls, possums, raccoons, and an opinionated, crippled goose. In every neighborhood she's ever lived in she has been known as “the walker”. She believes strongly that all thinking happens interstitially – between beings, ideas, differences, mythical gradients. Episode Notes: - Learn more about Sophie and her work: http://sophiestrand.com - Follow her on Facebook and Instagram: https://www.facebook.com/sophie.strand1 / https://www.instagram.com/cosmogyny - Sounds by Abel Takan WEBSITE: https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/lastborninthewilderness DONATE: https://www.paypal.me/lastbornpodcast / https://venmo.com/LastBornPodcast BOOK LIST: https://bookshop.org/shop/lastbornpodcast EPISODE 300: https://lastborninthewilderness.bandcamp.com BOOK: http://bit.ly/ORBITgr ATTACK & DETHRONE: https://anchor.fm/adgodcast DROP ME A LINE: Call (208) 918-2837 or http://bit.ly/LBWfiledrop EVERYTHING ELSE: https://linktr.ee/patterns.of.behavior

political and spiritual
East Coast Eddie..Black Latino Superstars, Past & Present

political and spiritual

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 124:00


10/1/2021 Recently departed Latino Talent: Johnny Pacheco, Johnny Ventura, Roberto Roena, Chocolate Armenteros

The Remote Real Estate Investor
This is how Alex Jarbo gets massive returns with short term rentals

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 30:16


Alex Jarbo is a real estate agent and investor that specializes in custom-built short-term rentals. He also runs the YouTube channel, Alex Builds which details his process. In this episode, he tells us how he got started, what his strategy and returns are, and important things to consider if you are interested in getting started in the short-term rental game. Alex's channel and contact: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCN0sdWw5T6zP7-NG4p8Ry6g Email: alexbuildschannel@gmail.com --- Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals. Hey, everybody,   Michael: Welcome to another episode of remote real estate investor. I'm Michael Albaum. And today with me, I have a guest, Alex Jarbo. And Alex is actually doing ground up development for short term rentals out on East Coast market. So he's going to be talking to us about what that process looks like, and all the lessons he's learned along the way. So let's get into it.   Alex Jarbo, welcome to the podcast. Man. Thanks so much for taking the time to hang out with me.   Alex: Oh, thanks for having me on, Michael.   Michael: Now. No, I appreciate you. So give everybody a little bit of background on who you are, where you come from, and what is it that you're doing in the real estate space, because I know that it's very interesting. Let's bring everybody up to speed.   Alex: Yeah, so I'm originally born and raised in Detroit, Michigan. My parents grew up in Detroit and then my parents moved to like 20-25 minutes north of Detroit. During the Marine Corps when I was like 18 years old did that for like five years, I was stationed in Washington DC, that time it was like time to leave the Marine Corps. I decided that I want to be in real estate got my real estate license in North Carolina, moved to Asheville, North Carolina, right out of the military, and then I sort of dabbled around in real estate flipping properties.   Didn't really like that too much did the real estate agent thing for a little bit made some good money but I was I was helping investors sort of find Vacation Rentals instead of, and I realized like okay, let me let me try like purchasing some. So we had some money saved up and I went out and started like looking for vacation rentals in this area. Or like properties that would do well as like short term rentals and stuff didn't really find anything that wasn't like crazy overpriced. This is like even before like the COVID lockdown and then so we just decided to build we just decided to build our first cabin which ended up being an a-frame took took about a year to get that done just because we were like my first build and just learning everything and then from there like we started renting it out and started doing really well and then like one turn into four and then four turned into not like next year so we're breaking ground on four this year and then we have 24 plan for next year.   Michael: Holy smokes it sounds like these cabins are just having like little cabin babies.   Alex: Yeah. We just took took the class cashflow and just rolled it into the next board took our like I took on investment money for the first time with with the like to have the cabins and then all the all the properties we're doing next year with investment money. So like with other people's money, oh,   Michael: Man, that's frickin awesome. I love how you just said, Oh, this thing isn't working over here. So let me just go build my own. Most people say oh, it's not working like Screw it. Real Estate sucks. It's I can't do it.   Alex: No, no, absolutely not. And I mean that the model that we're following now really has been I mean, like solidified with like with COVID, because we had a lot of like out of town, people moved to this area that are working remote. And that sort of drove real estate and that's driving real estate prices up everywhere. But that drove real estate prices up here now. And it's like, if I try to go out and find a vacation route right now like I'm competing with people who also want to live in the home, we build all of our homes a stick built permanent foundation. And the reason we do that is just so like it's just as a built in exit strategy there so we we build them as normal, like single family house for the most part, like they're still built as unique cabins, like a-frames log cabins, something something unique about the architecture. But if like for some reason, like 5-10 years down the road or the city, like decides to one like the county one day decides randomly to not allow short term rentals in the city or the county. Then like we do have an exit strategy there.   Michael: So yeah, that's awesome. And so that first one that you built and rented out, was that a short term rental? Was that your traditional long term?   Alex: Yeah, no, it was a short term right out of the gate. We had designed it as a short term rental and then we saw how good those numbers were that were just like I was I never really underwrote the property myself. I just figured that we underwrote it as a long term rental like okay if it doesn't work out, we can put a renter in there and just cover the mortgage and maybe cash flow a couple $100 but I mean the cash flow like for October's like five grand for the small cabin. That's like that's net in our pocket.   So yeah, I was I was curious to see like, I was You know, I've never done my numbers on this before because it's been renting out for like a year and a half a little over a year and a half now, I was like, let me let me do like annual numbers and see like, what actually would have like if like, let me do the cap rate, let me do the ROI. And like, just with, like, I didn't have an investor with that property. So like, my cap rate was like 26%. My, yeah, my ROI was like 80 something percent, like for the whole year, I'm like, oh, okay, I think we are working here.   Yeah, so that's what I put together, I started putting together like a YouTube channel and sort of talking to some people. Like just some, like close friends and stuff, who had some money saved up and they wanted to do something. And then I just just pitched him the idea of like doing like, right now what we do is like, we sort of pivoted from doing like one or two cabins at a time to like doing six at a time. So we do like these small vacation rental complexes, but there's still like stick build permanent foundation owns, like we purchase six to 10 acres. And then we subdivided into three plots. And then we put three primary homes on it. And then three accessory dwelling units are like mother in law suites that are detached, like in the back, like up maybe like 100 or 200 meters away. That way we get away with doing six at the same time, but it's three separate parcels. So safely, something comes up and we need to sell one of the properties are safe, like an investor wants to back out or something. We can also like give them back their money.   But yeah, it's like we the 24 that we're doing next year, we have like 455 investors lined up for those for those 24 cabins and it's four separate communities. So…   Michael: Man, this is incredible. So I'm curious on that very first one, did you finance the build with a construction loan? Did you go all cash then he didn't have investors walk us through how you got that done?   Alex: Yeah, and I sort of briefly talked about this on my YouTube channel. But we we started with like a second home loan, essentially I had my license technically was still in Michigan, like where I'm from, and then my wife, we'd live separate for a little bit until just like until her job allowed her to work remotely full time. So we were allowed to get away with doing a second home loan second home loan construction loan. Just because I had an established residency here in North Carolina, I didn't know if I was going to be here long term either. So technically, like my address was still in Michigan.   But a lot of people a lot of posts that I talked to now sort of that's how they get into this space, whether it be building or with with just purchasing an already built home for vacation while purposes they do it as a second home loan, and other lenders are fine with it. Like if it's a second home loan, it's rented out as an Airbnb that's what everyone's doing. It's like they'll stay in it two, three weeks a year and then for the rest of the time they'll just rent it out just to cover their mortgage.   So yeah, that's that's how we started we did a two time close loan, which there are negatives and positives to that so it's essentially a construction loan for a year and then you refinance into a permanent like 30 year fixed which is what we ended up doing.   Michael: That's awesome. And so can you walk us through some of the numbers on what did it cost to build because I think a lot of people just assume that building ground up is more expensive than buying existing which is why more people maybe don't do ground up.   Michael: Right. Like you're a little bit of the head like headache comes with it if you're just like starting with it, but but it felt like it fell on us we're just like okay, we're either gonna overpay for a property that's not 100% perfect and it's gonna need some work anyways, so we're like instead of renovating a home for three to six months, why don't we just build one like from scratch and we'll take like 12 to 14 months. So what are our numbers these numbers again, these are numbers that were prior to COVID so like with like materials and everything going up but our first Kevin the first Kevin we built for 202 and that the 202 means it was also like furnish the land cost about 50,000 and then it cost around like 135 130,000 a build it's only an eight it's like an 830 square foot cabin, which sounds small but if you actually like if you actually see it like it's an open floor concept pocket doors everywhere so no doors are opening in and out we just really tried to optimize the space like.   It's funny like we just the furniture sort of decided what when you're building these cabins like these smaller cabins, the furniture like decides what the house sort of looks like so it's like you have to like have your furniture planned out before you start designing the home but yeah, we that that cost It costs around like 202 to three to build and furnish.   And then yeah, we started we just started renting it out. We've been we've been 100% occupied for the last a year and a half. I mean besides maybe like, one or two days that we've taken for like maintenance days or like to just do some like extra work on the cabin. Like I already mentioned my cap rate was like 25% for that first year without an investor. And then my ROI was about like 80%   So like the nice thing about our market which If I do decide to invest in a different market and this market is year round I'm here like people like to be in the mountains year round we have the I'm in Asheville, North Carolina so we have like the breweries here but we also have like the Biltmore Estate, which people actually come for like in the winter and stuff people like to hike in the winter too so with Yeah, it's like I accidentally stumbled upon like a year round market now we do have like busier seasons and stuff so like October November in my opinion are our busiest seasons because it leaves season like with all the leaves, changing colors, it just like turns like yellow orange reds and stuff. So   Michael: That's incredible. So while you were talking, I just pulled out my calculator and ran the numbers on your dollar cost per square foot, which is about 160 bucks a square foot   Alex: Yeah, and I would say right now I'm pricing out these other properties that we did it's closer to 200 a square foot Okay, which is a pretty big jump but it's nothing it's nothing like compared to like if you're building in like California, like our lender that we're using now for the bigger projects next year. They're based out of California and it's like my entire 660 unit project is about like a $2 million bill compared to like something in California which like a single family house could cost that.   Yeah, So yeah, we're around like 200 square foot or and so like this the first six that we're doing next year, it's anywhere between 400 square foot all the way to 2600 square foot so it's like there's a big range there. Like some cabins can only sleep like two people but the biggest cabin can sleep like eight to nine people.     Michael: Oh my gosh that's awesome. So you take on investors you do the build and then do you turn around and sell them for the investors and then you manage them talk to us a little bit about the whole business model.   Alex: Yeah, so that we self manage and that's that's part of the business model is we take we we take on the investor money and then we don't take a development fee, we're a full partner throughout the whole thing it's a it's a long term play we don't we don't we're not selling them so that the hold is about 10 years I just that's a pretty round number. If I can refinance say like at the five year mark, I will just to give the investors back their money but I think my projections I've done for my last the last three projects were like two and a half years to get your money back from when your initial investment from when when they're fully built so about it takes about a year to fully build the project three and a half years to get your initial investment back and that's not including the refinance to pull out money say like they want to another initial investment back essentially or we can take that money and go do other projects with it. And also that doesn't include principal pay down that doesn't include if if we do want to sell like in 10 years like so. Yeah, they're getting their money back four or five times over six times over I would say so.   Michael: That's amazing. That's absolutely amazing. So what do you tell people that are trying to get into the short term rental business? Do you tell them hey, you know go start go do ground up development because it works really really well.   Alex: It's all dependent on your risk and what type of headache you want. Like so   Michael: You're getting headaches it just depends what kind   Alex: Yeah so like that was a that was the biggest reason why I started the YouTube channel was like to detail every single part of the ground up is is not as stressful as people find it I would say the hardest part is just making sure that you have a builder like a competent builder that's also comfortable and take it on   Michael: Competent being the main key   Alex: Yeah, absolutely. And another another thing is like when you're approaching a builder like and you're you're looking to do maybe if you're just on the like if you're just trying to do like what we first did which is like an 800 square foot cabin make sure the builder knows that upfront like you're they might not want to take on a project that small um so yeah, I would say getting into it just making sure that you have a competent builder but also an agent like when you go start to look at land.   And stuff to make sure that you have an agent that deals specifically in buying and selling land, which we have in this area. So like I went to Google and just type in like land agent Asheville and there are there are agents everywhere that only specifically deal in land save like you're in the rural parts of like the city that you live in. So that that's huge. It's just like you can you can leverage all their knowledge all their context when it comes to finding the right piece of land.   Access is the biggest thing for us. So making sure that our guest isn't driving like 20 minutes down a gravel road, especially if they're arriving at night. So like we look at we look for like properties that are like parcels of land that are attached to like state maintained like double lane roads and stuff, especially if we're building six cabins. So like the six cabins we're building, the first six we're building next year that All if all those cabins are fully like maxed out on, like the amount of guests that can sleep in, they're all rented out. It can sleep up to 34 people a night, like all six cabins together, so you got to think of like 34 people going up and down that road, it can't be a single lane, gravel road.   Michael: Right.   Alex: So that even even if you're building only one cabin, you got to think of like the guest experience, like do like do you really want your guests who maybe is arriving at night to be like going up, like 20 minutes up a gravel road, and they've never been to this cabin, and they lose reception like, like, so it's like, that's the biggest thing when we first look at even building the access to the lands important, which means before like part of the due diligence before we even go under contract is driving out to the land, because it might look cool on on the MLS and might look cool when we're looking at it with the agent like on the computer, when we're looking like at the GIS maps, like the satellite images, but you might not know like, maybe it's just that, like, it's an absolute terrible commute to even get to the land. So it's very important to drive up there, too.   Michael: That makes so much sense. And so are you using the same agent and the same builder like the same team for all of your builds? Or do you find Do you bid out all your projects?   Alex: So different subs, same builder, I wouldn't say we have an agreement with the builder that we have is just like we're sort of like, we've become his exclusive client. Because we we I went to him, I'm like, hey, like 24 projects next year, like I'd like to be a priority here. Which makes sense. So yeah, we use the same builder, same agent, for the last two that we did was the same agent, I'm licensed in this area as well. But it does help to have someone that only deals in land. And like the land agent that we use has like experience with like buying and selling for their clients like up to like, under 200 acres. So like our 10 acre parcel isn't really a big deal compared to like, some of the larger projects they build. So yeah, same team, for the most part, it's just the subs are going to be different because we bid everything out after that.   Michael: So Alex, can you speak to now that the building is built, you've got your short term rental built, or maybe you go and buy one, what's what are some things that you're doing to kind of set yourself apart without giving away the secret sauce, but that, you know, investors should be thinking about or be aware of, of things they could do in their own short term rental.   Alex: Yeah, and playing off the title of this podcast, you got to decide if you're, if you're going to be worse, if you're going to be doing it remotely like out of state or if you're if you're living in the city, you also got to decide if you're going to self manage compared to if you're going to hand it off to a manager, you're going to hand it off to a manager, that's easy, you just give it to them they handle everything. Um, there are more and more tools that are coming out now that allow remote real estate investors to be able to handle this themselves.   A good example of that is like when I when my wife and I recently went to Tulum, Mexico, I almost everything was handled from my phone like nothing crazy it happened there. So I would say the if you're going to self manage, which I'd honestly recommend because like right now managers is a good manager will take about like 25 to 30% of gross, which is a lot. I would recommend like trying to do it on your own. Start with the cleaning crew find a cleaning crew that specifically deals in short term rentals. If you're just starting out, I wouldn't like go out and try to hire a cleaning crew like find find a company that already handles short, short term rentals, they're going to be sort of like where the gravel meets the road there.   The cleaning crew helped helps with like save something's broken, like my cleaning crew will like take a picture and send it to me and I sent it directly to Airbnb or wherever I'm renting from they, my calendar directly links to my cleaning crews calendar. So like if there's an update on a booking or like if, if a new booking comes through, they automatically see it. So I would say cleaning crew number one.   Have some contacts. I like a plumber and electrician, like just like three or four contacts there just in case something does come up at the cabin. The nice cool The cool thing about new construction is for about the first year you don't really have to worry about too much maintenance, because they are brand new homes. And then on top of that it's just leverage leveraging the technology like we use. We use a service called Smart B&B that automates all of the messaging. So I'd say 80% of my messaging is automated, where like sending, sending and checking instructions, checking up on the guest sending out checkout instructions, and then everything like the last 15 to 20%. Like if I do like something some days will pass where I don't I don't look at we'll look at the Airbnb app, but it's like some days will pass where I don't even touch my like, contact the guests at all because they're having a good stay without me having to do anything. So messaging is important, Smart B&B.   And then right now we recently started implementing stay fi which is like an online marketing platform where it's like an email capture. So like say if you like go to an airport, you go to, like a mall, you have to put in like your email address before you have access to the internet. And that sort of protects us. Like if they're doing anything like sketchy on our internet, that that will protect us. But it also captures their email, it captures everyone's email in the cabinet as well. So it's like one listing, if five people are staying in the cabin, that's five emails there. So you're building an email list there. And then we just re we're gonna start remarketing, to these guests who have already stayed with us. And the goal is to be able to take them off of the Airbnb platform and sort of run them through our platform. That way, we sort of have more control over the guests, like the the guests, and also, they're going to be paying less in service fees, because I believe right now, like the service fee on the guests adds like 15% for Airbnb, which it's getting higher and higher.   And it's like, they take 3% from the host, which is not too much, but 15% from the guest, and it recently went up like like a year and a half ago. And like now I like there isn't really a week that passes by, and that we don't get at least like a potential guests or to complain about the price prior to booking. Like they're like them asking for a deal. So that didn't happen for the first year where you're renting it out. And it recently started to happen in the last six months, where like a lot of people are complaining about the price where we don't really have too much control over it, like of the service fee. So that sort of really opened my eyes to like, Hey, I think we there there has to be a way to sort of start getting, like controlling, controlling the guest experience essentially.   Michael: Totally. Well, I mean, I feel like it's very similar to a rental car, you say, Oh, it's 25 bucks a day. And then I'm renting for three days, and then you get your bill and it's $700. Like, wait, what, how did that happen. Sur charge   Alex: Yeah, why is my security deposit more than my rental. Yeah, yeah.   Michael: It's crazy. That makes a ton of sense. I think that's frickin genius. I think that is genius.   Alex: We were thinking about it like last, the service that we use Stayfi recently came out like in the last six months, but we're I was trying to figure out how to do that, like I want because like with any business online or offline, like real estate to offline, for the most part, you have to build a list in some in some type of way. Even if you do long term rentals, like building a list, building a waitlist is super important. So that's our way of end like we're essentially getting paid to build our email list here. Where it's like the guest is paying us to stay at the cabin, and we get their email. And we're also helping them out. Because if they do decide to book through us compared to Airbnb, they are saving money on the service we sell.   Michael: So yeah, so did you set up a direct website for us specifically, or is third party,   Alex: We're building a website right now to help bring those like people in so like we're building the list right now. But for all of our future cabins, all of that is built into like the budgeting and everything. So..     Michael: That is incredible, man. But Alex, anything else that folks who are getting into the short term space should be aware of things you know where that you've seen things go south or sideways for short term rentals.   Alex: Oh, when it comes to utilities, make sure that you have like, when you're purchasing the land, I would say the land is probably the most important part is making sure that you have access to utilities, when it comes to like, you get like, here we're a little bit we invest in more rural areas about like 15 to 20 minutes away from downtown. So let's like the first cabin that we built, we needed like an electricity easement from the neighbors to be able to run electricity to our property. And it took about like six months to build that. Or to get that we built that entire first cabin with a generator, which is crazy to think about now.   Thinking about utilities, electricity Internet's a big one, making sure that you have like, even if you're doing Satellite Internet to like make sure that like you, you take down the right trees, or you know where the internet is going to be at. So when you start building. Yeah, making sure just making sure on the management side making sure that you are able to the right people are in place. So like before you if you're looking to get into like a specific market, making sure that the builder like you can find the right builder, you can find the right cleaning crew that that's going to be super, super important and just you building unique properties. If you're going the building route.   What I'm seeing is and I started this way, like I started with the master leasing thing where it's like you you rent out a property from a lot like an owner and then put it on Airbnb and sort of split the profits there or at least pay that rent. That's how I started. That's how a lot of people started. That's how I saved money to sort of do the my first build. But what I'm seeing is investors like I already mentioned are coming into these markets and sort of really bidding up the properties which is driving down returns, and they're just they're purchasing normal properties and just putting them on the market. There isn't any really draw to them or any type of appeal, they're not really unique in any way. So I would say for the listeners, though, if you're going to go the building route to like really focus on building a unique property where the property itself is an experience outside of the city, like that the guest is visiting. So that's sort of like my company thesis, for the most part is building unique properties that will, like draw guests to these properties and sort of set you apart from the 1000s of listings in your market.   Michael: Yeah, that makes a ton of sense. I have a couple Airbnbs over in Portugal, and we're getting it furnished right now. Beautiful. Yeah, it's awesome. But I was chatting with a property manager about furnishing it. And he goes, Michael, I swear to God, if you put a single trolley car picture in your house, it is not going to work with you, because that's what everybody does. Everyone. Portuguese is very famous. So you have to set yourself apart. I think that makes tons of sense.   Alex: Absolutely.     Michael: That makes sense.   Alex: Yeah. And I mean, you can't like, like thinking of that, like, before you even like when you're designing the property is super important. Because like, yeah, change the structure once it's fully right. So.   Michael: Right, right, right. Yeah. Cool. And Alex, my last question for you is how do you think about or how do you go about getting ahead of political changes or county ordinance changes? What's the best way to get informed about that if someone is trying to buy a short term rental?   Alex: Yeah, I would say number one, look up your your county city's zoning laws before you go in there. So in the city of Asheville, currently, you can't have vacation rentals, but in the county you can, in the city you can't so we invest in the county that sort of helps us a little bit to Asheville is a drive in city where a lot of our guests were coming in are driving in they're not flying here. Um, so they don't mind the 15 20 minute drive. Getting Ahead getting ahead of it, it's just like call up your planning department and just ask them what the zoning laws are.   What we do to on top of that, to protect us is we like Like I said, we keep the property separate. Where we subdivide, we're all say like, all six of our properties aren't on the same parcel say if we do need to sell, but we also underwrite our properties as long term rentals, like when it comes to like, we make sure that if we put a long term rental in our property that it will be able to cover the mortgage payment or at least break even if not cashflow a couple $100 a month. And that's like, that's like Plan C when it comes to the vacation rental stuff is underwriting them as a long term rental, which some coasts might not agree with. But that's just been with me taking on investor money, I need to be like 100 like very, very conservative when it comes to like, Plan B Plan C plan D So   Michael: Yeah, I think that makes sense. That's that's what I've said for years too because you know, I don't know how somebody could disagree with that methodology because you seeing this this Airbnb going away in numerous cities like Monterey, California, you can't have short term rentals. So what are you going to do if you just bought a property there so I don't think saying it could never happen here is a realistic adage   Alex: Yeah, no, I had spoken to a host that had like I think 2020 listings in Detroit where I'm originally from and the the mayor of Detroit at the time had done an Airbnb ad like he had he had been on an Airbnb ad like like telling people like hosts and stuff to like essentially come to Detroit like Airbnb is welcome. And then like a year later, it'll leave a year later, like Detroit just decides to get rid of Airbnb. So it's like like you like you? Yeah, and he had he had worked with the city and I forgot what he had done to sort of grandfather himself in but um yeah no you're completely right there is is like plan for the worst when it comes to this stuff because like, again, like the the mayor of the city was on an Airbnb commercial. Like and they still they still change their laws. So.   Michael: Wow, yeah, I can't really happen anywhere. Alex might my truly last question for you is how can people find out more about you? Where can they get in touch with you? Where can they come invest with you if that's something you're open to?   Alex: Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, we're, we're we're building out we're growing pretty rapidly right now. So if they want to, if they want to check out my YouTube channel, it's called Alex Builds. The little icon to find it is like a little treehouse or blue treehouse. Or they can email me directly at Alexbuildschannel@gmail.com so it's alexbuildschannelchanel@gmail.com. I'll be I'll answer any questions that anyone has some   Michael: Fantastic man This was absolutely awesome. Thank you so much for coming on and taking the time really appreciate it and curious see how this next build turns out.   Alex: Yeah, absolutely. Thanks, Michael.   Michael: Alrighty, everybody, that was our episode a big big, big thank you to Alex. I hope I wasn't being too too much of a fanboy the whole time. I was like, what this guy is doing is unbelievable. So definitely go back. Give this episode another listen to if you're at all considering getting into short term rentals. If you liked the episode, feel free to leave us a rating or review wherever it is, listen, your podcasts We look forward to seeing the next one. As always, happy investing      

Childish
Episode 113 - Owen's Boogie Bubble

Childish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 65:43


Greg's on the East Coast tending to his mom while Alison is being woken up in the middle of the night by Owen's boogie bubble. And some news stories about parental consent for vaccines, a twin surrogate, a dangerous product recall and more. Plus an amazing voicemail which asks a question for the ages: Is it a persimmon? Is it a foot? And Greg's gambling win! Follow Childish: twitter.com/childishpod instagram.com/childishpod Follow Greg: twitter.com/GregFitzShow instagram.com/gregfitzsimmons Follow Alison: twitter.com/AlisonRosen instagram.com/alisonrosen Our Lovely Sponsors! Dame Get 15% off by going to dameproducts.com/childish PolicyGenius Shop the market & save on insurance at policygenius.com Chime Banking that has your back: chime.com/childish StoryWorth Go to storyworth.com/childish for $10 off your first purchase