Podcasts about devastating

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,405PODCASTS
  • 1,793EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 25, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about devastating

Show all podcasts related to devastating

Latest podcast episodes about devastating

Broken Harts
Introducing: Dynasty

Broken Harts

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 11:34


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY https://listen.vanityfair.com/dynasty-podcast examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty: https://listen.vanityfair.com/dynasty-podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
DEVASTATING TRUTH Behind The TERRA CRASH!!

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 13:41


We've never seen a fall from grace quite like LUNA, whose price now sits below a fraction of a penny. In this video, I take a look at the Terra LUNA crash and TerraUSD's downfall. I'll break down what led to the Terra crash and who could be behind it. I'll explain the rise of Terra founder Do Kwon and how Terra and its UST stablecoin were built. Then I'll get into the gritty details of the collapse of everything in Terra's ecosystem. Stay tuned for the latest Terra LUNA theories and the hard evidence.

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: Epstein and The Powerful People Who Protected Him

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 46:21


In this episode Brad Edwards confirms what we have all believed: Epstein was being protected by very powerful people within our government in the United States and overseas.Edwards leaves no stone unturned as he lays it all out all the dirty laundry for the public to see.(Commercial at 31:05)To contact me:Bobbycapucci@protonmail.comSource:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8138477/Devastating-book-exposes-government-hid-appalling-scale-child-abuse-Epstein.html

Beyond The Horizon
A Look Back: Epstein and The Powerful People Who Protected Him

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 46:21


In this episode Brad Edwards confirms what we have all believed: Epstein was being protected by very powerful people within our government in the United States and overseas.Edwards leaves no stone unturned as he lays it all out all the dirty laundry for the public to see.(Commercial at 31:05)To contact me:Bobbycapucci@protonmail.comSource:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8138477/Devastating-book-exposes-government-hid-appalling-scale-child-abuse-Epstein.html

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Retiring in 2 years Through “Aggressive” Rental Property Investing

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 19:06


Do you want to work only because you want to and not because you have to?   Rachel Richards has built a real estate portfolio of 38 units by the age of 26 and is now passively earning $20,000 per month. In this episode, she tells us how she stopped trading time for money by investing and opening up passive income streams other than real estate. She also shares why she continues to work and find ways to challenge herself even after “retiring” and achieving financial independence.   Rachel Richards is the best-selling author of “Money Honey” and “Passive Income, Aggressive Retirement.” Listen in to know more about her journey!   [00:01 - 07:54] Living off of $20,000 in Passive Income Monthly Rachel on being a finance nerd and on her experience in the industry Why people should look for off-market deals This is how she found their first duplex From self-managing to hiring property managers to self-managing again The biggest mistake they made so far Don't be cheap! Owning real estate out of state   [07:55 - 14:15] Passive Income Strategies You don't have to own a rental property to generate passive income Self-publishing and making $4,000-$10,000 a month  Rachel's goal to make income more and more passive Being a limited partner Setting boundaries and being more intentional  Looking at opportunities in mobile home parks and self-storage Screening syndications and doing due diligence   [14:16 - 17:55] Creating Impact Through Her Work Living freely and having time for things that fulfill them Writing to inspire others, especially women Doing what serves them and the people around them   [17:56 - 19:06] Closing Segment Reach out to Rachel!  Step into the path of financial freedom with Rachel's FREE Passive Income Starter Kit! Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “Being cheap can cost you a lot more money in the long run. This is not the place to cut corners when you hire people like contractors and property managers.” - Rachel Richards “Don't be afraid to invest out of state. It really forces you to be an efficient property manager and owner of real estate.” - Rachel Richards “I want to make a big impact and help as many people as I can. That's what I'm passionate about, especially helping women.” - Rachel Richards -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Rachel! Follow her on Instagram and visit her website, Money Honey Rachel. Get her FREE Passive Income Starter Kit, and check out her books, Money Honey and Passive Retirement, Aggressive Income, to know more about money management, personal finance, and investing!   Resources Mentioned: Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki HOLD by Steve Chader The Hands-off Investor by Brian Burke Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   Rachel Richards  00:00 The great thing about moving away is that we've been forced to streamline, and systematize all of our processes and doing that has made self-managing so much easier. I was so afraid to move away. But owning real estate in another state is so freeing and it's a lot easier than I thought. So if that's anyone's hang-ups if you're listening, to don't be afraid to invest out of state, it really forces you to be an efficient property manager and owner of real estate.   Intro  00:27 Welcome to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Show. Whether you are an active or passive investor, we'll teach you how to scale your real estate investing business into something big.    Sam Wilson  00:39 Rachel is the best-selling author of Money Honey and Passive Income, Aggressive Retirement. She built a real estate portfolio of 38 units by the age of 26. Rachel, welcome to the show.   Rachel Richards  00:50 Hey, Sam. Thanks for having me.   Sam Wilson  00:52 Hey, pleasure's mine. Three questions I ask every guest that comes on the show: 90 seconds or less, where did you start? Where are you now? How'd you get there?   Rachel Richards  00:58 I started my real estate investing journey in 2017. My husband and I purchased our first duplex that year. And within two years, we scaled our real estate portfolio from zero to 38 units. When people hear that they make some assumptions. So I'll get those out of the way. I'm not a trust fund baby. And I never made six figures from a job or career. So let's see, where am I? Now I am now investing in syndications. I've invested in eight syndications as LP as a passive investor, and I'm now financially independent and living off $20,000 per month in passive income.   Sam Wilson  01:35 Wow, that is really cool. Congratulations and a job well done. Zero to 38 units in over how many months was that?    Rachel Richards  01:43 24.   Sam Wilson  01:44 24 months. Okay, so you're buying a property? We're actually more than one and a half properties a month.   Rachel Richards  01:50 It was six buildings. 38 doors.   Sam Wilson  01:53 Six buildings. 38 doors. That helps. So you're not, one and a half transactions every single month. Got it? Six buildings. 38 doors. That's cool. Absolutely. Love it. Is this tell me? Is this all you're based in Denver, Colorado? Is this all in Denver?    Rachel Richards  02:06 This was all in Kentucky where I lived for 20 years.   Sam Wilson  02:10 Okay, cool. So you had some experience, obviously, in the local market there? What did you do? I mean, to identify that many assets and that short of a time, what were you doing to do that?   Rachel Richards  02:21 So I've always been a finance nerd. And my whole life proud of it. And I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad in high school. I, after college, I was a financial advisor. I also took a couple of jobs, working with a real estate investor and learning from him, and then working under a realtor. So I did have some experience in the industry. And I read every book I could get my hands on. One of my favorite ones is this book called Hold by Steve Chader. That one was really helpful in learning how to analyze properties. One of the important things I think, for people to do right now is look for off-market deals because the market is so intense. The MLS is saturated and competitive. And it's really difficult to find good deals if all you're doing is looking at the MLS. One of the ways we found our first duplex was pretty much an off-market deal. So we looked at the withdrawn and cancelled and expired listings on the MLS. And I was reaching out to those list agents to find out what happened. You know, why did the seller take it off the market? Did they change their mind? Are they is it going to come back up? And I remember feeling like I was pestering this one list agent about this duplex for months. But really, I was just trying to be polite and stay top of mind. And when the seller was going to relist it, she reached out to me first and she said, Hey, this is about to come back on the market. Would you like to make an offer, which was really beneficial because I could make my offer before anyone else did. And that is how we got that first duplex.   Sam Wilson  03:45 Wow, that's cool. Now, did you self-manage these? Or do you self-manage these? Are these be plugged in the property management company? How do you handle that?   Rachel Richards  03:54 We self-managed until we got to about 26 units, I think. And here's the thing, my husband and I were working full time. So we were working 40 to 50 hours a week, I was writing my book in the evening. And we were acquiring and managing our rental properties on our own on the weekends and everything. So once we got to 26 units, we were like we definitely need a property manager. And we've made our share of mistakes, hiring property managers as well. But now to this day, we're back to self-managing.   Sam Wilson  04:20 Okay, that's really Yeah, that's interesting, because you at some point, you're right. You need that outside help. But it sounds like there were some mistakes made along the way where that help wasn't so very helpful.   Rachel Richards  04:30 Absolutely. This is our biggest mistake to date. So my mistake is that I tend to be too cheap and being cheap can cost you a lot more money in the long run. This is not the place to cut corners. When you hire people like contractors and property managers. You don't cut corners here. So what we did is we were looking for a property management company and we you know, they charge you anywhere from 10 to 12%. And we had this couple that was working for us doing things like maintenance lawn care, they were so hard working, some of the hardest working people we've met, and they always went above and beyond. So we figured let's make them employees of our company, and they can be our property managers. We can save some money and be a little more hands-on in the way that we are training them and managing them to manage our properties, felt like a win-win, right? It was not, it was not a win-win. It was a win-lose. So everything started off great. And then about six months in my husband went to pick up rent from the onsite lockbox is one weekend, and he noticed a lot of rent was missing. And it was not just the normal tenant or to paying late, it was a significant amount. So come to find out this couple had stolen $6,000 in rent that weekend. And we found out they had been squatting in vacant rooms and units in our properties for almost a year. Devastating. Yeah, it was one of those occurrences where I was like, we should quit. This is not meant for us. This is awful. And that lasted for a few days. And I got over it, but it was devastating and such a violation of trust. And the moral of the story is that, again, this is not the place to be cheap. You need to hire a licensed, insured, properly-permitted, you know, everything reputable property management company, because if we had done that, and one of their employees had stolen rent from us, they would have been liable for the damages, not us. So it's embarrassing to share. Because in retrospect, it seems so obvious. It's so naive of us to have done that, but I share it in the hopes that others will learn from my mistake.   Sam Wilson  06:24 Yeah, no, thank you for taking the time to share that that is painful. I mean, I'm curious, you said your husband had gone to pick up rent from the on-site lock boxes. Now you live in Denver, and these properties are in Kentucky. So were you flying back to go pick up rent monthly?   Rachel Richards  06:39 No, we were still living there at the time. So we only moved to Denver a couple years ago.   Sam Wilson  06:43 Got it. Okay, cool. Wow, that's really intense.   Rachel Richards  06:46 Yeah. Now, we're not quite that dedicated. But the great thing about moving away is that we've been forced to streamline, and systematize all of our processes. And doing that has made self-managing so much easier. I was so afraid to move away. But owning real estate in another state is so freeing, and it's a lot easier than I thought. So if that's anyone's hang-ups if you're listening, that don't be afraid to invest out of state, it really forces you to be an efficient property manager and owner of real estate.   Sam Wilson  07:16 You know, I've heard that and I, let's see, do I own anything? I own stuff that's four hours away. So it's, you know, I guess that's, I mean, obviously involved as a general partner on deals that are much further away than that. So I get it. Yes, I'm trying to remember what that state where you're mentioning, we're allowed to and maybe hearing this and going, Gosh, I can't quite wrap my head around it. But you does all the things you just mentioned, where it's like, oh, you know what, I've got to find a way to solve this without going to the property. Got a way, to find a way to solve this, we're now taking all electronic payments, there's no checks, there's no cash being dropped off, like this is the way we do business. That's, in fact, a very freeing, freeing thing to get in place. I think once you've done that, tell me about your self-publishing journey. I know you've written the book. And I know I read the title out here and we kick this off, and I can't remember what it was now. But tell me about the title of that book. And then tell me about what's in the book and why you wrote it.   Rachel Richards  08:08 Yeah, so one of the great things about passive income is that you don't have to own rental property to create passive income. And so a lot of the things that I hear from people is like, well, I don't want to be a landlord, Rachel, I want to create passive income, but I don't want to be a landlord. And the great thing is, you don't have to be a landlord to generate passive income. There's a lot of other ways to do it besides investing in real estate. I have found self-publishing to be an amazing way to generate passive income. So in 2017, I self-published my first book Money Honey and it was the thing I did because I used to be a financial advisor. All my family friends came to me for financial advice, which I loved. At the same time, I thought, Well, why aren't they learning on their own? You know, why aren't they reading books, listening to podcasts? And I had this aha moment where I realized, oh, yeah, personal finance is boring, right? It's overwhelming. It's complicated. It's intimidatin for most people. No wonder people don't like to learn about it. So I thought to myself, How can I make this topic sassy and fun and simple? And that's where the idea for Money Honey came from. So I wrote it. I was really excited. Something I felt very compelled to do. I didn't really think I was gonna make money to be honest. I was so hesitant to invest in it. So I spent like $560 on the book launch thinking I would never make that money back. It was just a passion project. But I published it in September 2017. And to my surprise, to this day, it just took off. It resonated with female millennials, it started selling, spread by word of mouth. I was making $1,000 a month in profit for the first year. And I launched another book. And last year, I believe I made about $99,600, or something and profit from my two books. I was like, so close to becoming a six figure author, but it's still really amazing to think you know, these books now bring in anywhere from four to $10,000 a month in passive profit and it's just an example of you know, you don't have to invest in real estate to create passive income streams.   Sam Wilson  10:05 Right. No, that's absolutely true. I mean, it can be books, it can be other businesses. It can be, you know, a variety of things that you do. Tell me on, since we're talking about the money side of things. I know you said you're making about 20,000 bucks a month off your rental property off a 38 units. That's over 500 bucks per month profit per unit.   Rachel Richards  10:26 Yeah, and it's not that's including all my passive income streams. Okay. Yeah. So at one point, when we had 38 units, we were making 10 grand a month from those 38 units. It was about $260 per door.    Sam Wilson  10:26 Got it. Okay. Yeah, I was gonna say that's, it sounds pretty incredible. 500 bucks a door in profit every single month. So that's really, really awesome. Now, you're a limited partner in eight syndications, why are you going this direction, and not buying more active real estate?   Rachel Richards  10:55 So great question, real estate investing for my husband and I was always a means to an end, we never wanted to build this huge empire. And our goal was to get to 10k a month in profit from our rentals. And once we did that we wanted to stop, that was sort of our fat fire number. We could become financially independent and not have to work anymore once we got that number. So in 2018, we achieved that, and we stopped acquiring real estate and it shocked some people, you know, they were like, Well, why not build an empire of 200 doors or 250 doors? And we were like, well, that's not what we want to do. So we stopped. And I'm proud that we were able to do that, because you can really get caught up in you know, enough is never enough. And sort of always moving that goalposts further, but we were able to stop and be intentional about what we wanted to do with real estate. So that was why we stopped acquiring. Now why we've transitioned things is because the goal is to always make the income streams more and more passive. And back then when we were building up this empire, we had a lot more time than money. We started off pretty broke, in my opinion. Again, we didn't have, like I wasn't a trust fund baby. I wasn't making six figures, we were just scraping the money together to get 20% down payments, right? We did have time and we were willing to hustle to make cash flow. Now that we have a lot more money, we would rather invest in syndications, which are a lot more passive. So last year, we sold three of our big multifamily buildings. And we've transitioned that money into syndications. And it's a much more passive way to directly own and invest in real estate. So that's why we sort of change strategies.   Sam Wilson  12:31 Gotcha. Let's talk about what you are investing in right now. Are there certain asset classes you're favoring? Where do you see opportunity as a passive investor?   Rachel Richards  12:42 So I favor multifamily, just because I'm so familiar with it. And I can easily analyze those syndications. So that's my comfort. However, I really want to invest more in self-storage and mobile home parks. Because I think there's a supply-demand thing with self-storage right now. And definitely with mobile home parks, because it's a scarcity thing. It's a limited resource. And there's only so many and you're not allowed to build any more mobile home parks. So I'm really wanting to invest in more mobile home parks.   Sam Wilson  13:07 Right, you obviously talk about mobile home parks, you know, commonly on this show, and you've hit a lot of the highlights that kind of go into why that's still a great asset class, a great asset class to be involved in how have you gone about picking the sponsors that you are working with?   Rachel Richards  13:24 Great question, because picking the sponsor is almost more important than picking which syndication you're investing in. Because really, when you're deciding to invest in a syndication, you're placing your money with the person, you're trusting the person, and you need to find somebody that has enough knowledge, who's done this before successfully, who has the experience, and who's trustworthy. I've heard horror stories of syndicators running off with you know, 50k of somebody's money. And yeah, they'll eventually get caught and get thrown in jail, but someone's not gonna get their money back. So I definitely want to find good trustworthy people. I was making the mistake at first to try to go on Facebook groups and LinkedIn and reaching out to people. But the problem with cold contacting somebody is that no one can speak for them. No one can vouch for them for me. So the best way in my opinion, to find good sponsors or syndicators is to be connected to them through a mutual contact or friend who knows them and trust them and has already invested with them. So that is what I now do. I have a good network. And a book that I really recommend is the Hands-off Investor by Brian Burke. It is so good. It's very dry. It's very technical, even for me, and I'm a finance nerd. But it's something if you read it, like have everything you need to know to screen syndicators and to do due diligence on a syndication.   Sam Wilson  14:43 Righ. Yeah, I think I've read that book before. It's been a while, but I'll put that back on the list. And we'll certainly make sure we reference that. And also the whole book by Steve Chader. Yeah, we'll reference both of those there in the show notes. Questions for you. You said earlier when you guys had hit you or number that you said, Hey, we had units, X number of dollars in passive income. And we don't want to grow any bigger. That's not what we want to do is go bigger. What did you want to do?    Rachel Richards  15:11 We wanted to just live a free lifestyle, we wanted to work when where and if we want, a lot of people get bothered by my use of the word retire, because I still work. I still work on my business, I teach women how to invest in real estate, I have books, I have courses, I have programs. But the thing is, I work now because I want to not because I have to. And we now spend a lot of our time hiking and traveling. And we have free time. And we work again, because we have the choice to work. And that's because we want to do so it's about having the time to do what is fulfilling to us and not have to trade our time for money anymore.   Sam Wilson  15:52 Right. Absolutely. So what does the next five to 10 years look like for you? Because let's presume I mean, at some point, forgive me for my projects, you might be like, I hate this guy. You know, at some point, you know, the book sales may drop off that income stream may dissipate. And then if you're doing courses or some other stuff along the way, do you just keep building some other things that are generating passive income along the way? Is that really the plan? Or is there something there that you guys are shooting big for?   Rachel Richards  16:18 There's I have a lot of ideas, I have a lot of ideas and not enough time to implement them all. But one thing I know about myself is if I'm not building and creating something, I'm bored, so I don't see myself ever stopping or slowing down from that regard, I want to make an impact. And I want to make a big impact and help as many people as I can. That's what I'm passionate about, especially helping women. So I want to write more books, that's for sure. One of my dreams is to write a fiction book, actually, I've thought about becoming a general partner and being a syndicator myself or helping to raise capital. So that's a thought that I have, I definitely want to continue finding ways to invest in real estate, maybe as a silent partner, hard money lender, just continue to find ways to just do more things and challenge myself.   Sam Wilson  17:02 Got it. I love that. I think that's the fun part about it. And I really appreciate how you guys have defined what it is that you want. I think a lot of people, you know, they keep doing like you said they keep adding on to keep moving the goalposts because they see, well, that guy has a billion dollars in assets under management, why shouldn't I? Like, you know, why should I go out and do this or do that. But in the end, it was not what it is that it serves you or the people around you, it's probably not that fulfilling. So you got to do what it is that's in your heart and in your goal list of things to do. So I really admire you and your husband's ability to set limits on it and say, This is what we're building. And then we're done. At least with the real estate, you know, portfolio part. Yeah, obviously, like you said, you're either building or you're bored. You're always gonna be building something.   Rachel Richards  17:47 I think that's my new tagline. I like that I'm either building or I'm bored...   Sam Wilson  17:52 Guys, that's me. I wrote, building or be bored. So yeah. So that's really, really cool. Rachel, I've certainly enjoyed this. Thank you for taking the time, really to come on today and share with us your story of what you have done, are doing in real estate, publishing and everything else. I think it's a really cool story. It's certainly inspiring to the rest of us. If our listeners want to get in touch with you, or learn more about you what is the best way to do that?   Rachel Richards  18:15 Yeah, thank you, Sam, you all can follow me on Instagram @moneyhoneyrachel. And what I'd love to do for your listeners is if anyone wants to download my passive income starter kit, I will give that for free so they can go to moneyhoneyrachel.com/passiveincome to download that.   Sam Wilson  18:33 Awesome. And we'll make sure of course that we put that also in the show notes. Rachel, thank you again. Appreciate it.    Rachel Richards  18:40 Thank you.    Sam Wilson  18:41 Hey, thanks for listening to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Podcast. If you can do me a favor and subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, whatever platform it is you use to listen, if you can do that for us, that would be a fantastic help to the show. It helps us both attract new listeners as well as rank higher on those directories so appreciate you listening. Thanks so much and hope to catch you on the next episode.  

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Farm Talk: Producers helping other producers in need after devastating storms rip through the Northern Plains

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 3:43


This Farm Talk segment is brought to you by the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council. Some producers from North Dakota are lending a helping hand after livestock facilities were destroyed and damaged during last week's storm events in South Dakota. We visit with Amber Boeshans, Executive Director of the ND Livestock Alliance. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, More primaries this week as the GOP gets ready to deliver what could be a devastating blow to the Democrat party for decades

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   ONE— Elon's mom Maye Musk has just shocked the world—by appearing on the cover of Sports Illustrated's 2022 swimsuit edition and the ripe young age of 74—think about that!   TWO— The War mongers in Congress got a little gift from Joe Biden yesterday—because the President—or whoever controls him—says its time to re-deploy troops into Somalia—yeah Somalia—   THREE— More primaries this week as the GOP gets ready to deliver what could be a devastating blow to the Democrat party for decades—or maybe send them the way of the Whigs—   In New York—a devastating new Congressional map—could mean that instead of picking up seats—the Democrats could lose several seats to the Republicans because Hispanic and Black voters are fleeing the Party—   And why you ask? Well for a whole host or reasons—  

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Campbell Barry: It's a devastating blow for the Hutt Valley

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 3:48


It's a doubtful future for hospital care in the Wellington region.  Hutt Hospital's main building has been deemed earthquake-prone – meaning patients and services will have to move out.  The building houses the outpatient unit, maternity and post-natal services, the children's ward, general surgery, gynaecology and the medical ward. 80 per cent of the hospital's beds are in the building. Campbell Barry is Hutt City's mayor, he joined Heather du Plessis-Allan. LISTEN ABOVE 

The Bert Show
Trigger Warning: Britney Spears Shares Some Devastating News About Her Pregnancy

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 5:26


Trigger Warning: Britney Spears Shares Some Devastating News About Her Pregnancy See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter
Kourtney Kardashian and Travis Barker marry in Santa Barbara ceremony. One of the Queen's closest friends just moved Into Windsor Castle. Britney Spears shares she had a miscarriage: ‘A devastating time for any parent'

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 21:42


Kourtney Kardashian and Travis tied the knot in Santa Barbara, Calif., Sunday. Queen Elizabeth is keeping her friends close by her side after the death of her beloved husband. Britney Spears shared that she and fiancé Sam Asghari have lost their “miracle baby,” weeks after announcing she was expecting her third child. Rob is joined by his dear pal Garrett Vogel from Elvis Duran and the Morning Show with all the scoop. Don't forget to vote in today's poll on Twitter at @naughtynicerob or in our Facebook group. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)
Day 134: Devastating Effects of Sin (2022)

The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 18:22


Fr. Mike talks about the horrible things that can happen when we turn away from God and stop asking him "what's the next step?" In today's readings we see David humbled and humiliated, Absalom revealing how devastating sin is, and the evil that comes from war. Today's readings are 2 Samuel 16, 1 Chronicles 21, and Psalm 15. For the complete reading plan, visit ascensionpress.com/bibleinayear. Please note: The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children - parental discretion is advised.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Facebook Has No Idea Where Your Data Is and What They Do With It?!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 82:20


Facebook Has No Idea Where Your Data Is and What They Do With It?! Facebook's about 18 years old coming on 20 Facebook has a lot of data. How much stuff have you given Facebook? Did you fall victim for that? Hey, upload your contacts. We'll find your friends. They don't know where your data is. [Following is an automated transcript] [00:00:15] This whole thing with Facebook has exploded here lately. [00:00:20] There is an article that had appeared on a line from our friends over at, I think it was, yeah. Let me see here. Yeah. Yeah. Motherboard. I was right. And motherboards reporting that Facebook doesn't know what it does with your data or. It goes, no, there's always a lot of rumors about different companies and particularly when they're big company and the news headlines are grabbing your attention and certainly Facebook can be one of those companies. [00:00:57] So where did motherboard get this opinion about Facebook? Just being completely clueless about your personal. It tamed from a leaked document. Yeah, exactly. So we find out a lot of stuff like that. I used to follow a website about companies that were going to go under and they posted internal memos. [00:01:23] It basically got sued out of existence, but there's no way that Facebook is going to be able to Sue this one out of existence because they are describing this as. Internally as a tsunami of privacy regulations all over the world. So Gores, if you're older, we used to call those tidal waves, but think of what the implication there is of a tsunami coming in and just overwhelming everything. [00:01:53] So Facebook, internally, their engineers are trying to figure out, okay. So how do we deal with. People's personal data. It's not categorized in ways that regulators want to control it. Now there's a huge problem right there. You've got third party data. You've got first party data. You've got sensitive categories, data. [00:02:16] They might know what religion you are, what your persuasions are in various different ways. There's a lot of things they might know about you. How were they all cat categorize now we've got the European union. With their general data protection regulation. The GDPR we talked about when it came into effect back in 2018, and I've helped a few companies to comply with that. [00:02:41] That's not my specialty. My specialty is the cybersecurity. But in article five this year, peon law mandates that personal data must be collected for specified explicit and legitimate purposes and not further processed in a manner that is incompatible with those purposes. So what that means is that every piece of data, like where you are using Facebook or your religious orientation, Can only be collected in use for a specific purpose and not reused for another purpose. [00:03:19] As an example here, that vice has given in past Facebook, took the phone number that users provided to protect their accounts with two factor authentication and fed it to its people, feature as well as. Advertisers. Yeah. Interesting. Hey, so Gizmodo with the help of academic researchers caught Facebook doing this, and eventually the company had to stop the practice because, and this goes back to the earlier days where Facebook would say, Hey, find out if your friends are on Facebook, upload your contacts right now. [00:03:54] And most people. What did you know back then about trying to keep your data private, to try and stop the proliferation of information about you online then nothing. I think I probably even uploaded it back then thinking it'd be nice to see if I got friends here. We can start chatting, et cetera. [00:04:12] According to legal experts that were interviewed by motherboard who wrote this article and has a copy of the internal memo this year, PN regulation specifically prohibits that kind of repurposing of your phone number of trying to put together the social graph and the leaked document shows that Facebook may not even have the ability to live. [00:04:37] How it handles user's data. Now I was on a number of radio stations this week, talking about this. And the example I gave is just look at an average business from the time it start, Facebook started how right? Wildly scraping pictures of young women off of Harvard university. Main catalog, contact page, and then asking people what do you think of this? This person, that person. And off they go, trying to rate them. Yeah. Yeah. All that matters to a woman, at least to Courtney, to mark Zuckerberg girl, all the matters about a woman is how she looks. Do I think she's pretty or not? [00:05:15] It's ridiculous. What he was doing. It just, oh, that's zackerburg who he is not a great guy anyways. So you go from stealing pictures of young ladies asking people to rate them, putting together some class information and stuff there at Harvard, and then moving on to other universities and then open it up even wider and wider. [00:05:42] And of course, that also created demand because you can't get on. If you're not at one of the universities that we have set it up for. And then you continue to grow. You're adding these universities, certainly starting to collect data and you are making more money than God. So what do you do? You don't have to worry about any efficiencies. [00:06:02] I'll tell you that. Right? One thing you don't have to do is worry about gee. We've got a lot of redundant work going on here. We've got a lot of teams working on basically the same thing. No, you've got more money than you can possibly shake a stick at. So now you go ahead and send that money to this group or that group. [00:06:24] And they put together all of the basic information, that they want. Pulling it out of this database and that database in there doing some correlation, writing some really cool CQL queries with mem credible joins and everything else. And now that becomes part of the main code for Facebook. [00:06:45] And then Facebook goes on to the next little project and they do the same thing. Then the next project, then the next project. And then someone comes along and says, Hey, we. This feature, that feature for advertisers and then in that goes, and then along comes candidate Obama. And they, one of the groups inside Facebook says, yeah here we go. [00:07:09] Here's all of the information we have about everybody and it's free. Don't worry about it. And then when Trump actually bought it and hired a company to try and process some of that information he got in trouble. No but the. The whole campaign could get access to anything they wanted to, again, because the data wasn't controlled, they had no idea who was doing what with the data. [00:07:34] And according to this internal memo, they still don't know. They don't even know if they can possibly comply with these regulations, not just in Europe, but we have regulations in pretty much all of the 50 states in the U S Canada of course, has their own Australia and New Zealand think about all the places. [00:07:57] Facebook makes a lot of. So here's a quote from that we build systems with open borders. The result of these open systems and open culture is well-described with an analogy. Imagine you hold a bottle of ink in your hand, the bottle of ink is a mixture of all kinds of user data. You pour that ink into a lake of water and K and it flows every year. [00:08:22] The document read. So how do you put that ink back in the bottle? I, in the right bottle, how do you organize it again? So that it only flows to the allowed places in the lake? They're totally right about that. Where did they collect it from? Apparently they don't even know where they got some of this information. [00:08:43] This data from reminds me of the no fly list. You don't know you're on it and you can't get yourself off of it. It's crazy. So this document that we're talking about, it was written last year by. Privacy engineers on the ad and business product team, whose mission is to make meaningful connections between people and businesses and which quote sits at the center of our monetization strategy. [00:09:06] And is the engine that powers Facebook's growth. Interesting. Interesting problems. And I see this being a problem well into the future for more and more of these companies, look at Twitter as an example that we've all heard about a lot lately. And then I've talked about as well along comes Elon Musk and he says wait a minute. [00:09:29] I can make Twitter way more profitable. We're going to get rid of however many people over a thousand, and then we are going to hire more people. We're going to start charging. We're going to be more efficient. You can bet all of these redundancies that are in Facebook are also there. And Twitter also has to comply with all of these regulations that Facebook is freaking out about it for a really a very good reason. [00:10:00] So this document is available to anybody who wants to look at it. I'm looking at it right now, talking about regulatory landscape and the fundamental problems Facebook's data lake. And this is a problem that most companies have not. As bad as Facebook does the button. Most companies you write, you grow. I have yet to walk into a business that needs help with cybersecurity and find everything in place as it should be because it grew organically. [00:10:32] Do you started out with a little consumer firewall router, wifi, and then you added to it and you put a switch here and you added another switch behind that and move things around. This is normal. This is not total incompetence on the part of the management, but my gosh, I don't know. Maybe they need an Elon Musk. [00:10:52] Just straighten them out as well. Hey, stick around. I'll be right back and sign up online@craigpeterson.com. [00:11:02] Apparently looting is one of the benefits of being a Russian soldier. And according to the reports coming out of Ukraine, they've been doing it a lot, but there's a tech angle on here that is really turning the tables on these Russian Looters. [00:11:19] We know in wars, there are people that loot and typically the various militaries try and make sure, at least recently that looting is kept to an absolute minimum. [00:11:32] Certainly the Americans, the British, even the Nazis during world war II the the socialists they're in. Germany they tried to stop some of the looting that was going on. I think that's probably a very good thing, because what you end up with is just all of these locals that are just totally upset with you. [00:11:57] I found a great article on the guardian and there's a village. I hadn't been occupied for about a month by Russian troops and the people came back. They are just shocked to see what happened in there. Giving a few examples of different towns. They found that the alcohol was stolen and they left empty bottles behind food wrappers, cigarette butts, thrown all over the place in apartments in the home. [00:12:26] Piles of feces blocking the toilets, family photographs torn, thrown around the house. They took away all of the closes as a code from one of the people, literally everything, male and female coats, boots, shirts, jackets, even my dresses and laundry. This is really something. The Sylvia's didn't do this, but now Russia. [00:12:49] The military apparently does. So over the past couple of weeks, there have been reporting from numerous places where Russian troops had occupied Ukrainian territory and the guardian, which is this UK newspaper collected evidence to suggest looting by Russian forces was not merely a case of a few way, word soldiers, but a systematic part of Russian military behavior across multiple towns. [00:13:17] And villages. That's absolutely amazing. Another quote here, people saw the Russian soldiers loading everything onto your old trucks. Everything they could get their hands on a dozen houses on the villages. Main street had been looted as well as the shops. Other villagers reported losing washing machines, food laptops, even as sofa, air conditioner. [00:13:41] Being shipped back, just you might use ups here or they have their equivalent over there. A lady here who was the head teacher in the school, she came back in, of course, found her home looted and in the head teacher's office. She found an open pair of scissors that had been jammed into a plasma screen that was left behind because if they can't steal it, they're going to destroy it. [00:14:07] They don't wanna leave anything behind. They found the Russian to take in most of the computers, the projectors and other electronic equipment. It's incredible. So let's talk about the turnaround here. You might've heard stories about some of these bad guys that have smashed and grabbed their way into apple stores. [00:14:27] So they get into the apple store. They grab laptops on iPads, no longer iPods, because they don't make those anymore. And I phone. And they take them and they run with them. Nowadays there's not a whole lot of use for those. Now what they have been doing, some of these bad guys is they'd take some parts and use them in stolen equipment. [00:14:52] They sell them on the used market, et cetera. But when you're talking about something specific, like an iPhone that needs specific activation. Completely different problem arises for these guys because that iPhone needs to have a SIM card in order to get onto the cell network. And it also has built in serial numbers. [00:15:15] So what happens in those cases while apple goes ahead and disables them. So as soon as they connect to the internet, they didn't say they put them on wifi. They don't get a SIM card. They don't. Service from T-Mobile or Verizon or whoever it might be. So now they just connect to the wifi and it calls home. [00:15:33] Cause it's going to get updates and download stuff from the app store and they find that it's been bricked. Now you can do that with a lot of mobile device managers that are available for. All kinds of equipment nowadays, but certainly apple equipment where if a phone is lost or stolen or a laptop or other pieces of equipment, you can get on the MDM and disable it, have it remotely erase, et cetera. [00:16:00] Now, please have had some interesting problems with that. Because a bad guy might go ahead and erase a smartphone. That's in the evidence locker at the police station. So they're doing things like putting them into Faraday cages or static bags or other things to try and stop that. So I think we've established here that the higher tech equipment is pretty well protected. [00:16:25] You steal it. It's not going to do you much. Good. So one of the things the Russian stole when they were in a it's called a, I think you pronounced. Melad Mellott DePaul which is again, a Ukrainian city is they stole all of the equipment from a farm equipment dealership and shipped it to check. Now that's according to a source in a businessman in the area that CNN is reporting on. [00:16:56] So they shipped this equipment. We're talking about combine harvesters were 300 grand a piece. They shipped it 700 miles. And the thieves were ultimately unable to use the equipment because it had been locked remotely. So think about agriculture equipment that John Deere, in this case, these pieces of equipment, they, they drive themselves. [00:17:23] It's atonomous it goes up and down the field. Goes to any pattern that you want to it'll bring itself within a foot or an inch of your boundaries, of your property being very efficient the whole time, whether it's planting or harvesting, et cetera. And that's just a phenomenal thing because it saves so much time for the farmer makes it easier to do the companies like John Deere. [00:17:49] Want to sell as many pieces of this equipment as they possibly can. And farming is known to be a what not terribly profitable business. And certainly isn't like Facebook. So how can they get this expensive equipment into the hands of a lot of farmers? What they do is they use. So you can lease the equipment through leasing company or maybe directly from the manufacturer and now you're off and running. [00:18:16] But what happens if the lease isn't paid now? It's one thing. If you don't pay your lease on a $2,000 laptop, right? They're probably not going to come hunting for you, but when you're talking about a $300,000 harvester, they're more interested. So the leasing company. Has titled to the equipment and the leasing company can shut it off remotely. [00:18:41] You see where I'm going with this so that they can get their equipment in the hands of more farmers because the farmers can lease it. It costs them less. They don't have to have a big cash payment. You see how this all works. So when the Russian forces stole this equipment, that's valued, total value here is about $5 million. [00:19:02] They were able to shut it all off. And th the, obviously if you can't start the engine, because it's all shut off and it's all run by computers nowadays, and there's pros and cons to that. I think there's a lot of cons, but what are you going to do? How's that going to work for? Isn't going to work for you. [00:19:22] And they were able to track it and had GPS trackers find out exactly where it was. That's how they know it was Tara taken to Chechnya and could be controlled remotely. And in this case, how did they control it? They completely. Shut it off, even if they sell the harvesters for spare parts to learn some money, but they sure aren't gonna be able to sell them for the 300 grand that they were actually worth. [00:19:48] Hey, stick around. We'll be right back and visit me online@craigpeterson.com. If you sign up there, you'll be able to get my insider show notes. And every week I have a quick. Training right there. New emails, Craig Peterson.com. [00:20:05] If you've been worried about ransomware, you are right to worry. It's up. It's costly. And we're going to talk about that right now. What are the stats? What can you do? What happens if you do get hacked? Interesting world! [00:20:20] Ransomware has been a very long running problem. I remember a client of ours, a car dealership who we had gone in. [00:20:31] We had improved all of their systems and their security, and one of them. People who was actually a senior manager, ended up downloading a piece of ransomware, one of these encrypted ones and opened it up and his machine all of a sudden, guess what it had ransomware on it. One of those big. Green's that say, pay up and send us this much Bitcoin, and here's our address. [00:21:00] All of that sort of stuff. And he called us up and said, what's going on here? What happened? First of all, don't bring your own machine into the office. Secondly, don't open up as particularly encrypted files using a password that they gave. And thirdly, we stopped it automatically. It did not spread. [00:21:20] We were able to completely restore his computer. Now let's consider here the consequences of what happened. So he obviously was scared. And within a matter of a couple of hours, we actually had him back to where he was and it didn't spread. So the consequences there, they weren't that bad. But how about if it had gotten worse? [00:21:47] How about if the ransomware. Also before it started holding his computer ransom, went out and found all of the data about their customers. What do you think an auto dealership would love to hear that all of their customer data was stolen and released all of the personal data of all of their customers? [00:22:08] Obviously not. So there's a potential cost there. And then how long do you think it would take a normal company? That thinks they have backups to get back online. All I can tell you it'll take quite a while because the biggest problem is most backups don't work. We have yet to go into a business that was actually doing backups that would work to help restore them. [00:22:35] And if you're interested, I can send you, I've got something I wrote up. Be glad to email it back to you. Obviously as usual, no charge. And you'll be able to go into that and figure out what you should do. Cause I, I break it down into the different types of backups and why you might want to use them or why you might not want to use them, but ransomware. [00:22:58] Is a kind of a pernicious nasty little thing, particularly nowadays, because it's to two factor, first is they've encrypted your data. You can't get to it. And then the second side of that is okay I can't get to my data and now they're threatening to hold my data ransom or they'll release. So they'll put it out there. [00:23:22] And of course, if you're in a regulated industry, which actually car dealers are because they deal with financial transactions, leases, loans, that sort of thing you can lose your license for your business. You can, you lose your ability to go ahead and frankly make loans and work with financial companies and financial instruments. [00:23:45] It could be a very big. So there are a lot of potential things that can happen all the way from losing your reputation as a business or an individual losing all of the money in your operating account. And again, we've got a client that we picked up afterwards. That yes, indeed. That lost all of the money in their operating account. [00:24:09] And then how do you make payroll? How do you do things? There's a new study that came out from checkpoint. Checkpoint is one of the original firewall companies and they had a look at ransomware. What are the costs of ransomware? Now bottom line, I'm looking at some stats here on a couple of different sites. [00:24:29] One is by the way, Conti, which is a big ransomware gang that also got hacked after they said we are going to attack anyone. That doesn't defend Plaid's invasion of Ukraine, and then they got hacked and their information was released, but here's ransomware statistics. This is from cloud words. First of all, the largest ransom demand is $50 million. [00:24:55] And that was in 2021 to Acer big computer company. 37% of businesses were hit by ransomware. In 2021. This is amazing. They're expecting by 2031. So in about a decade, ransomware is going to be costing about $265 billion a year. Now on average. Ransomware costs businesses. 1.8, $5 million to recover from an attack. [00:25:25] Now that's obviously not a one or two person place, but think of the car dealer again, how much money are they going to make over the year or over the life of the business? If you're a car dealer, you have a license to print money, right? You're selling car model or cars from manufacturers. And now you have the right to do that and they can remove that. [00:25:48] How many tens, hundreds of millions of dollars might that end up costing you? Yeah. Big deal. Total cost of ransomware last year, $20 billion. Now these are the interesting statistics here right now. So pay closer attention to this 32% of ransomware victims paid a ransom. So about a third Peter ransom demand. [00:26:12] Lastly. It's actually down because my recollection is it used to be about 50% would pay a ransom. Now on average that one third of victims that paid a ransom only recovered 65% of their data. Now that differs from a number I've been using from the FBI. That's a little bit older that was saying it ends it a little better than 50%, but 65% of pain victims recovered their. [00:26:41] Now isn't that absolutely amazing. Now 57% of companies were able to recover their data, using a cloud backup. Now think about the different types of backup cloud backup is something that can work pretty well if you're a home user, but how long did it take for your system to get back? Probably took weeks, right? [00:27:05] For a regular computer over a regular internet line. Now restoring from backups is going to be faster because your downlink is usually faster than your uplink. That's not true for businesses that have real internet service like ours. It's the same bandwidth up as it is down. But it can take again, days or weeks to try and recover your machine. [00:27:28] So it's very expensive. And I wish I had more time to go into this, but looking at the costs here and the fact that insurance companies are no longer paying out for a lot of these ransomware attacks, it could be credibly expensive for you incredibly. The number one business types by industry for ransomware attacks, retail. [00:27:59] That makes sense. Doesn't it. Real estate. Electrical contractors, law firms and wholesale building materials. Isn't that interesting? And that's probably because none of these people are really aware or conscious of doing what a, of keeping their data secure of having a good it team, a good it department. [00:28:24] So there's your bottom line. Those are the guys that are getting hit. The most, the numbers are increasing dramatically and your costs are not just in the money. You might pay as a ransom. And as it turns out in pretty much every case prevention. Is less expensive and much better than the cure of trying to pay ransom or trying to restore from backups. [00:28:52] Hey, you're listening to Craig Peterson. You can get my weekly show notes by just going to craig peterson.com. [00:29:00] You and I have talked about passwords before the way to generate them and how important they are. We'll go over that again a little bit in just a second, but there's a new standard out there that will eliminate the need for passwords. [00:29:16] Passwords are a necessary evil, at least they have been forever. I remember, I think the only system I've ever really used that did not require passwords was the IBM 360. [00:29:31] Yeah, 360, you punch up the cards, all of the JCL you feed the card deck in and off it goes. And does this little thing that was a different day, a different era. When I started in college in university, we. We had a remote systems, timeshare systems that we could log into. And there weren't much in the line of password requirements. [00:29:58] And, but you had a username, you had a simple password. And I remember one of our instructors, his name was Robert, Andrew Lang, and his password was always some sort of a combination of RA Lang. So it was always easy to guess what his password was. Today. It has gotten a lot worse today. We have devices with us all the time. [00:30:22] You might be wearing a smart watch. That requires a password. You course probably have a smartphone that also maybe requiring a password. Certainly after it boots nowadays they use fingerprints or facial recognition, which is handy, but it has its own drawbacks. But how about the websites? You're going to the systems you're using in you're at work and logging in. [00:30:49] They all require password. And usernames of some sort or another well, apple, Google, and Microsoft have all committed to expanding their support for a standard. That's actually been out there for a few years. It's called the Fido standard. And the idea behind this is that you don't have to have a password in order to. [00:31:15] Now that's really an interesting thing, right? Just looking at it because we're so used to have in this password only authenticate. And of course the thing to do there is to make sure you have for your password, multiple words in the password, it should really be a pass phrase. And between the words put in special characters or numbers, maybe. [00:31:41] Upper lower case a little bit. In those words, those are the best passwords, 20 characters, 30 characters long. And then if you have to have a pin, I typically use a 12 digit pin. And how do I remember all of these? Cause I use a completely different password for every website and right now, Let me pull it up. [00:32:03] I'm using one password dot coms, password manager. And my main password for that is about 25 characters long. And I have thirty one hundred and thirty five. And trees here in my password manager, 3,100, that is a whole lot of passwords, right? As well as software licenses and a few other things in there. [00:32:30] That's how we remember them is using a password manager. One password.com is my favorite. Now, obviously I don't make any money by referring you there. I really do like that. Some others that I've liked in the past include last pass, but they really meant. With some of their cybersecurity last year and I lost my faith in it. [00:32:51] So now what they're trying to do is make these websites that we go to as well as some apps to have a consistent, secure, and passwordless. And they're going to make it available to consumers across all kinds of devices and platforms. That's why you've got apple, Google, and Microsoft all committing to it. [00:33:15] And you can bet everybody else is going to follow along because there's hundreds of other companies that have decided they're going to work with the Fido Alliance and they're going to create this passwordless future. Which I like this idea. So how does this work? Basically you need to have a smartphone. [00:33:33] This is, I'm just going to go with the most standard way that this is going to work here in the future, and you can then have. Passkey, this is like a multi-factor authentication or two factor authentication. So for instance, right now, when I sign into a website online, I'm giving a username, given a password, and then it comes up and it asks me for a code. [00:33:57] So I enter in a six digit code and that code changes every 30 seconds. And again, I use my password manager from one password. In order to generate that code. So that's how I log into Microsoft site and Google sites and all kinds of sites out there. So it's a similar thing here now for the sites for my company, because we do cyber security for businesses, including regulated businesses. [00:34:24] We have biometrics tied in as. So to log into our systems, I have to have a username. I have to have a password. I then am sent to a single sign-on page where I have to have a message sent to my smart device. That then has a special app that uses biometrics either a face ID or a fingerprint to verify who I am. [00:34:49] Yeah, there's a lot there, but I have to protect my customers. Something that very few it's crazy. Actual managed security services providers do, but it's important, right? By the way, if you want my password. Special report, just go to Craig peterson.com. Sign up for my email list. I'll send that to you. [00:35:13] That's what we're sending out right now for anyone who signs up new@craigpeterson.com. And if you'd like a copy of it in you're already on the list, just go ahead and email me. At Craig peterson.com and ask for the password special report where I go through a lot of this sort of thing. So what will happen with this is you go to a website and I might come up with a QR code. [00:35:37] So you then scan that QR code with your phone and verify it, authorize it on your phone. You might again to have it set up so that your phone requires a facial recognition or perhaps it'll require a fingerprint. And now you are. Which is very cool. They fix some security problems in Fido over the last few years, which is great over the coming year. [00:36:02] You're going to see this available on apple devices, Google Microsoft platforms, and it really is simple, stronger authentication. That's sort of Fido calls it. But it is going to make your life a lot easy, easier. It is a standard and the passwordless future makes a whole lot of sense for all of us. Now, I want to talk about another thing here that just bothered me for a long time. [00:36:30] I have a sister. Who is in the medical field and gives prescriptions, doctor thing. And I think she's not quite a doctor. I can't remember what she has. She's an LPN or something. And anyhow, so she. We'll get on a zoom call with someone and they'll go through medical history and what's happening right now and she'll make prescriptions. [00:36:57] And so I warned her about that saying, it is very bad to be using zoom because zoom is not secure. Never has been, probably never will be right. If you want secure. To go and pay for it from one of these providers like WebEx, that's what we use. We have a version of WebEx that is set up to be secure. [00:37:20] So I talked to her about that and said, Hey, listen, you can't do this. You've really got to go another way here. And so she started using one of these mental or. Medical health apps. What I want to talk about right now specifically are some checks that were just performed some audits on mental health apps. [00:37:45] That's why I messed up a second ago, but what they looked at is that things are a serious problem there. And then fact, the threat post, just calling it a. Frankly, just plain old creepy. So they've got some good intentions. They want to help with mental health. You've probably seen these or at least heard them advertise. [00:38:06] So you can get on the horn with a mental health professional, a doctor or otherwise in order to help you here with your psychological or spiritual wellness. And people are sharing their personal and sensitive data with third parties and have 32 mental health and prayer mobile apps that were investigated by the open source organization. [00:38:32] 28, 28 of the 32 were found to be inherently insecure and were given a privacy not included label, including others here. So this is a report. That was released here by the open source organization, tied into Mozilla. Those are the Firefox people. They have what they call their minimum security standards. [00:38:56] So things like requiring strong passwords, managing security, updates, and vulnerabilities, et cetera. 25 of the 32 failed to meet. Even those minimum security standards. So these apps are dealing with some of the most sensitive mental health and wellness issues people can possibly have, right? Depression, anxieties, suicidal fonts, domestic violence, eating disorders. [00:39:23] And they are being just terrible with your security Mozilla researchers spent 255 hours or about eight hours per product pairing under the hood of the security, watching the data that was going back and forth, right between all of these mental health and prayer apps. It was just crazy. So for example, eight of the apps reviewed, allowed weak passwords, that range. [00:39:52] One digit one as the password to 1, 1, 1, 1, while a mental health app called a mood fit only required one letter or digit as a password. Now that is very concerning for an app that collects mood and symptom data. So be very careful. Two of the apps better help a popular app that connects users with therapists and better stop suicide, which is a course of suicide prevention app have vague and messy, according to Mozilla privacy policies that have little or no effect on actual. [00:40:30] User data protection. So be very careful. And if you're a mental health, professional or medical professional, don't just go and use these open video calls, et cetera, et cetera, find something good. And there are some standards out there. Again. Visit me online, get my insider show notes every week. Get my little mini trends. [00:40:56] And they come up most weeks. Just go to Craig peterson.com. And I'll send you my special report on passwords and more. [00:41:06] We know the Russians have been attacking us. I've talked a lot about it on the radio station, all kinds of stations. In fact, here over the last couple of weeks, and I am doing something special, we are going through the things you can do to keep safe. [00:41:23] Last week we started doing something I promise we would continue. [00:41:27] And that is how can you protect yourself when it comes to the Russians, right? When it comes to the bad guys, because the Russians are definitely the bad guys. There's a few things you can do. And there's a few things, frankly, you shouldn't be doing. And that's exactly what we're going to talk about right now. [00:41:45] So last week he went over some steps, some things that you can look at that you should look at that are going to help protect you. And we are going to go into this a whole lot more today. And so I want you to stick around and if you miss anything, you can go online. You can go to Craig peterson.com, make sure you sign up there for my email. [00:42:08] And what I'm going to do for you is. Send you a few different documents now where we can chat back and forth about it, but I can send you this. Now I'm recording this on video as well as on audio. So you can follow along if you're watching either on YouTube or. Over on rumble and you can find it also on my website. [00:42:32] I've been trying to post it up there too, but right now let's talk about what we call passive backend protections. So you've got the front end and the front end of course, is. Stuff coming at you, maybe to the firewall I've mentioned last week about customers of mine. I was just looking at a few customers this week, just so I could have an idea of their firewalls. [00:42:59] And they were getting about 10 attacks per minute. Yeah. And these were customers who have requirements from the department of defense because they are defense sub subcontractors. So again, Potential bad guys. So I looked up their IP addresses and where the attacks were coming from. Now, remember that doesn't mean where they originated because the bad guys can hop through multiple machines and then get onto your machine. [00:43:28] What it means is that all, ultimately they ended up. Coming from one machine, right? So there's an IP address of that machine. That's attacking my clients or are attacking my machines. That just happens all the time. A lot of scans, but some definite attacks where they're trying to log in using SSH. [00:43:48] And what I found is these were coming from Slovakia, Russia, and Iran. Kind of what you were expecting, right? The Iranians, they just haven't given up yet. They keep trying to attack, particularly our military in our industry. One of the things we found out this week from, again, this was an FBI notice is that the Russians have been going after our industrial base. [00:44:15] And that includes, in fact, it's more specifically our automobile manufacturers we've already got problems, right? Try buying a new car, try buying parts. I was with my friend, just this. I helped them because he had his car right. Need to get picked up. So I took him over to pick up his car and we chatted a little bit with this small independent automotive repair shop. [00:44:40] And they were telling us that they're getting sometimes six, eight week delays on getting parts and some parts. They just can't. So they're going to everything from junkyards on out, and the worst parts are the parts, the official parts from the car manufacturers. So what's been happening is Russia apparently has been hacking into these various automobile manufacturers and automobile parts manufacturers. [00:45:10] And once they're inside, they've been putting in. A remote control button net. And those botnets now have the ability to wake up when they want them to wake up. And then once they've woken up, what do they do? Who knows? They've been busy erasing machines causing nothing, but having they've been doing all kinds of stuff in the past today, they're sitting there. [00:45:31] Which makes you think they're waiting, it's accumulate as much as you possibly can. And then once you've got it all accumulated go ahead and attack. So they could control thousands of machines, but they're not just in the U S it's automobile manufacturers in Japan. That we found out about. [00:45:50] So that's what they're doing right now. So you've got the kind of that front end and back end protections. So we're going to talk a little bit about the back end. What does that mean? When a cybersecurity guy talks about the backend and the protections. I got it up on my green right now, but here's the things you can do. [00:46:10] Okay. Remember, small businesses are just getting nailed from these guys, because again, they're fairly easy targets. One change your passwords, right? How many times do we have to say that? And yet about 70% of businesses out there are not using a good password methodology. If you want more information on passwords, two factor authentication, you name it. [00:46:37] Just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. I want to get the information out now. You got to make sure that all of the passwords on your systems are encrypted are stored in some sort of a good password vault as you really should be looking at 256 bit encryption or better. I have a vendor of. That I use. So if you get my emails every week, when them, there's the little training. [00:47:06] And so I'll give you a five minute training. It's written usually it's in bullet point for, I'm just trying to help you understand things. That provider of mine has a big database and there's another provider that I use that is for. So the training guys use the database of my provider. [00:47:27] In using that database, they're storing the passwords and the training providers putting passwords in the clinics. Into the database, which is absolutely crazy. So again, if you're a business, if you're storing any sort of personal information, particularly passwords, make sure that you're using good encryption and your S what's called salting the hash, which means. [00:47:53] You're not really storing the password, just joining assaulted hash. I can send you more on this. If you are a business and you're developing software that's, this is long tail stuff here. Configure all of the security password settings so that if someone's trying to log in and is failing that, and you block it, many of us that let's say you're a small business. [00:48:15] I see this all of the time. Okay. You're not to blame. You, but you have a firewall that came from the cable company. Maybe you bought it at a big box retailer. Maybe you bought it online over at Amazon, as hurricane really great for you. Has it got settings on there that lets you say. There's 20 attempts to log in. [00:48:38] Maybe we should stop them. Now, what we do personally for our customers is typically we'll block them at somewhere around three or four failed attempts and then their passwords block. Now you can configure that sort of thing. If you're using. Email. And that's an important thing to do. Let me tell you, because we've had some huge breaches due to email, like Microsoft email and passwords and people logging in and stealing stuff. [00:49:06] It was just a total nightmare for the entire industry last year, but limit the number of login retries as well as you're in there. These excessive login attempts or whatever you want to define it as needs to lock the account. And what that means is even if they have the right password, they can't get in and you have to use an administrative password in order to get in. [00:49:31] You also want to, what's called throttle, the rate of repeated logins. Now you might've gotten caught on this, right? You went to your bank, you went to E-bay, you went to any of these places and all of a sudden. And denied you write it blocked you. That can happen when your account is on these hackers lists. [00:49:51] You remember last week we talked about password spraying while that's a very big deal and hackers are doing the sprain trick all of the time, and that is causing you to get locked out of your own account. So if you do get locked out, remember it might be because someone's trying to break. Obviously you have to enforce the policies. [00:50:16] The capture is a very good thing. Again, this is more for software developer. We always recommend that you use multifactor or two factor authentication. Okay. Do not use your SMS, your text messages for that, where they'll send you a text message to verify who you are. If you can avoid that, you're much better off. [00:50:36] Cause there's some easy ways to get around that for hackers that are determined. Okay. A multi-factor again, installed an intrusion. system. We put right at the network edge and between workstations and servers, even inside the network, we put detection systems that look for intrusion attempts and block intrusion attempts. [00:51:02] A very important use denied lists to block known attackers. We build them automatically. We use some of the higher end Cisco gates. Cisco is a big network provider. They have some of the best hardware and software out there, and you have to subscribe to a lot of people complain. I ain't going to just go buy a firewall for 200 bucks on Amazon. [00:51:24] Why would I pay that much a month just to to have a Cisco firewall? And it's like praying pain for the brand. I've got by logo chert on here. Oh, I wouldn't pay for that. No, it's because they are automatically providing block lists that are updated by the minute sometimes. And then make sure you've got an incident response plan in place. [00:51:50] What are you going to do when they come for you? What are you going to do?  [00:51:55] Now we're going to talk about prevention. What can you do an order to stop some of these attacks that are coming from Russia and from other countries, it is huge. People. Believe me, this is a very big problem. And I'm here to help. [00:52:12] We've reviewed a number of things that are important when it comes to your cyber security and your protection. [00:52:20] We talked about the front end. We talked about the backend. Now we're going to talk about pure prevention and if you're watching. Online. You'll be able to see my slides as they come up, as we talk about some of this stuff and you'll find me on YouTube and you'll also find me on rumble, a fairly new platform out there platform that doesn't censor you for the things you say. [00:52:44] Okay. So here we go. First of all, enabling your active directory password protection is going to. Four's password protection all the way through your business. Now I've had some discussions with people over the months, over the years about this whole thing and what should be done, what can be done, what cannot be done. [00:53:09] Hey, it's a very big deal when it comes to password protection and actor directory, believe it or not, even though it's a Microsoft product is pretty darn good at a few things. One of them is. Controlling all the machines and the devices. One of the things we do is we use an MDM or what used to be a mobile device manager called mass 360. [00:53:34] It's available from IBM. We have a special version of that allows us as a managed security services provider to be able to control everything on people's machines. Active directory is something you should seriously consider. If you are a Mac based shop. Like I am. In fact, I'm sitting right now in front of two max that I'm using right now, you'll find that active directory is a little bit iffy. [00:54:04] Sometimes for max, there are some work around and it's gotten better mastery. 60 is absolutely the way to go, but make sure you've got really good. Passwords and the types of passwords that are most prone to sprain the attacks are the ones you should be banning specifically. Remember the website? Have I been poned? [00:54:28] Yeah. It's something that you should go to pretty frequently. And again, if you miss anything today, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. Believe me, I am not going to harass you at all. Okay. Now, the next thing that you should be doing is what's called red team blue team. Now the red team is a group of people, usually outside of your organization. [00:54:54] If you're a big company they're probably inside, but the red team is the team that attacks you. They're white hat hackers, who are attacking you, looking for vulnerabilities, looking for things that you should or shouldn't be doing. And then the blue team is the side that's trying to defend. So think of, like war games. [00:55:12] Remember that movie with Matthew Broderick all of those decades ago and how the, he was trying to defend that computer was trying to defend that it moved into an attack mode, right? Red team's attack, blue team is defend. So you want. To conduct simulated attacks. Now w conducting these attacks include saying, oh my let's now put in place and execute our plan here for what are we going to do once we have a. [00:55:44] And you darn well better have a breach plan in place. So that's one of the things that we help as a fractional chief information security officer for companies, right? You've got to get that in place and you have to conduct these simulated attacks and you have to do penetration testing, including password spraying attacks. [00:56:04] There's so many things you can do. The one of the things that we like to do and that you might want to do, whether you're a home user, retiree or a business is go and look online, you can just use Google. I use far more advanced tools, but you can use Google and look for your email address right there. [00:56:23] Look for the names of people inside your organization. And then say wait a minute, does that data actually need to be there? Or am I really exposing the company exposing people's information that shouldn't be out there because you remember the hackers. One of the things they do is they fish you fish as in pH. [00:56:47] So they'll send you an email that looks like. Hey let me see. I know that Mary is the CFO, and I know that Joe's going to be out of town for two weeks in The Bahamas, not a touch. So while he's got. I'm going to send an email to Mary, to get her to do something, to transfer the company's funds to me. [00:57:06] Okay. So that's what that's all about. You've got to make sure, where is our information? And if you go to my company's page, mainstream.net, you'll see on there that I don't list any of the officers or any of the people that are in the company, because that again is a security problem. [00:57:24] We're letting them know. I go to some of these sites, like professional sites lawyers, doctors, countenance, and I find right there all, are there people right there top people or sometimes all of them. And then we'll say, yeah, I went to McGill university, went to Harvard, whatever my B. It's all there. So now they've got great information to fish you, to fish that company, because all they have to do is send an email to say, Hey, you remember me? [00:57:56] We're in Harvard when this class together. And did you have as a professor to see how that works? Okay. You also want to make. That you implement, what's called a passwordless user agent, and this is just so solely effective. If they cannot get into your count, what's going to, what could possibly go wrong, but one of the ways to not allow them into the count is to use. [00:58:24] Biometrics. We use something called duo and we have that tied into the single sign-on and the duo single sign-on works great because what it does now is I put in, I go to a site, I put it into my username and. Pulls up a special splash page that is running on one of our servers. That again asks me for my duo username. [00:58:48] So I've got my username for the site then to my dual username and my duo password single sign on. And then it sends me. To an app on my smart device, a request saying, Hey, are you trying to log into Microsoft? And w whatever it might be at Microsoft, and you can say yes or no, and it uses biometric. [00:59:11] So those biometrics now are great because it says, oh, okay, I need a face ID or I need a thumb print, whatever it might be that allows a generalized, a password, less access. Okay. Password less. Meaning no pass. So those are some of the top things you can do when it comes to prevention. And if you use those, they're never going to be able to get at your data because it's something you have along with something, it works great. [00:59:45] And we like to do this. Some customers. I don't like to go through those hoops of the single sign-on and using duo and making that all work right where we're fine with it. We've got to keep ourselves, at least as secure as the DOD regulations require unlike almost anybody else in industry, I'm not going to brag about it. [01:00:09] But some of our clients don't like to meet the tightest of controls. And so sometimes they don't. I hate to say that, but they just don't and it's a fine line between. Getting your work done and being secure, but I think there's some compromises it can be readily made. We're going to talk next about saving your data from ransomware and the newest ransomware. [01:00:36] We're going to talk about the third generation. That's out there right now. Ransomware, it's getting crazy. Let me tell ya and what it's doing to us and what you can do. What is a good backup that has changed over the last 12 months? It's changed a lot. I used to preach 3, 2, 1. There's a new sheriff in town. [01:00:58] Stick around Craig peterson.com. [01:01:02] 3, 2, 1 that used to be the standard, the gold standard for backing up. It is no longer the case with now the third generation of ransomware. You should be doing something even better. And we'll talk about it now. [01:01:19] We're doing this as a simulcast here. It's on YouTube. It is also on rumble. [01:01:27] It's on my website@craigpeterson.com because we're going through the things that you can do, particularly if you're a business. To stop the Russian invasion because as we've been warned again and again, the Russians are after us and our data. So if you missed part of what we're talking about today, or. [01:01:50] Last week show, make sure you send me an email. me@craigpeterson.com. This is the information you need. If you are responsible in any way for computers, that means in your home, right? Certainly in businesses, because what I'm trying to do is help and save those small businesses that just can't afford to have full-time. [01:02:15] True cyber security personnel on site. So that's what the whole fractional chief information security officer thing is about. Because you just, you can't possibly afford it. And believe me, that guy that comes in to fix your computers is no cyber security expert. These people that are attacking our full time cybersecurity experts in the coming from every country in the world, including the coming from the us. [01:02:44] We just had more arrests last week. So let's talk about ransomware correctly. Ransomware, very big problem. Been around a long time. The first version of ransomware was software got onto your computer through some mechanism, and then you had that red screen. We've all seen that red screen and it says, Hey, pay up buddy. [01:03:07] It says here you need to send so many Bitcoin or a fraction of a Bitcoin or so many dollars worth of Bitcoin. To this Bitcoin wallet. And if you need any help, you can send email here or do a live chat. They're very sophisticated. We should talk about it some more. At some point that was one generation. [01:03:29] One generation two was not everybody was paying the ransoms. So what did they do at that point? They said let me see if they, we can ransom the data by encrypting it and having them pay us to get it back. 50% of the time issue got all your data back. Okay. Not very often. Not often enough that's for sure. [01:03:49] Or what we could do is let's steal some of their intellectual property. Let's steal some of their data, their social security number, their bank, account numbers, et cetera. They're in a, in an Excel spreadsheet on their company. And then we'll, if they don't pay that first ransom, we'll tell them if they don't pay up, we'll release their information. [01:04:10] Sometimes you'll pay that first ransom and then they will hold you ransom a second time, pretending to be a different group of cyber terrorists. Okay. Number three, round three is what we're seeing right now. And this is what's coming from Russia, nears, everything we can tell. And that is. They are erasing our machines. [01:04:31] Totally erasing them are pretty sophisticated ways of erasing it as well, so that it sinks in really, it's impossible to recover. It's sophisticated in that it, it doesn't delete some key registry entries until right at the very end and then reboots and computer. And of course, there's. Computer left to reboot, right? [01:04:55] It's lost everything off of that hard drive or SSD, whatever your boot devices. So let's talk about the best ways here to do some of this backup and saving your data from ransomware. Now you need to use offsite disconnected. Backups, no question about it. So let's talk about what's been happening. [01:05:17] Hospitals, businesses, police departments, schools, they've all been hit, right? And these ransomware attacks are usually started by a person. I'll link in an email. Now this is a poison link. Most of the time, it used to be a little bit more where it was a word document, an Excel document that had something nasty inside Microsoft, as I've said, many times has truly pulled up their socks. [01:05:45] Okay. So it doesn't happen as much as it used to. Plus with malware defender turned on in your windows operating system. You're going to be a little bit safer next step. A program tries to run. Okay. And it effectively denies access to all of that data. Because it's encrypted it. And then usually what it does so that your computer still works. [01:06:09] Is it encrypts all of you, like your word docs, your Excel docs, your databases, right? Oh, the stuff that matters. And once they've got all of that encrypted, you can't really access it. Yeah. The files there, but it looks like trash now. There's new disturbing trends. It has really developed over the last few months. [01:06:31] So in addition to encrypting your PC, it can now encrypt an entire network and all mounted drives, even drives that are marrying cloud services. Remember this, everybody, this is really a big deal because what will happen here is if you have let's say you've got an old driver G drive or some drive mounted off of your network. [01:06:57] You have access to it from your computer, right? Yeah. You click on that drive. And now you're in there and in the windows side Unix and max are a little different, but the same general idea you have access to you have right. Access to it. So what they'll do is any mounted drive, like those network drives is going to get encrypted, but the same thing is true. [01:07:20] If you are attaching a U S B drive to your company, So that USB drive, now that has your backup on it gets encrypted. So if your network is being used to back up, and if you have a thumb drive a USB drive, it's not really a thumb drive, right? There's external drive, but countered by USP hooked up. [01:07:45] And that's where your backup lives. Your. Because you have lost it. And there have been some pieces of software that have done that for awhile. Yeah. When they can encrypt your network drive, it is really going after all whole bunch of people, because everyone that's using that network drive is now effective, and it is absolutely. [01:08:10] Devastating. So the best way to do this is you. Obviously you do a bit of a local backup. We will usually put a server at the client's site that is used as a backup destiny. Okay. So that servers, the destination, all of the stuff gets backed up there. It's encrypted. It's not on the network per se. It's using a special encrypted protocol between each machine and the backup server. And then that backup servers data gets pushed off site. Some of our clients, we even go so far as to push it. To a tape drive, which is really important too, because now you have something physical that is by the way, encrypted that cannot be accessed by the attacker. [01:09:03] It's offsite. So we have our own data center. The, we run the, we manage the no one else has access to it is ours. And we push all of those backups offsite to our data center, which gives us another advantage. If a machine crashes badly, right? The hard disk fails heaven forbid they get ransomware. We've never had that happen to one of our clients. [01:09:29] Just we've had it happen prior to them becoming clients, is that we can now restore. That machine either virtually in the cloud, or we can restore it right onto a piece of hardware and have them up and running in four hours. It can really be that fast, but it's obviously more expensive than in some. [01:09:51] Are looking to pay. All right, stick around. We've got more to talk about when we come back and what are the Russians doing? How can you protect your small business? If you're a one, man, one woman operation, believe it. You've got to do this as well. Or you could lose everything. In fact, I think our small guys have even more to lose Craig peterson.com. [01:10:16] Backups are important. And we're going to talk about the different types of backups right now, what you should be doing, whether you're a one person, little business, or you are a, multi-national obviously a scale matters. [01:10:32] Protecting your data is one of the most important things you can possibly do. [01:10:36] I have clients who had their entire operating account emptied out, completely emptied. It's just amazing. I've had people pay. A lot of money to hackers to try and get data back. And I go back to this one lady over in Eastern Europe who built a company out of $45 million. By herself. And of course you probably heard about the shark tank people, right? [01:11:07] Barbara Cochran, how she almost lost $400,000 to a hacker. In fact, the money was on its way when she noticed what was going on and was able to stop it. So thank goodness she was able to stop it. But she was aware of these problems was looking for the potential and was able to catch it. How many of us are paying that much attention? [01:11:34] And now one of the things you can do that will usually kind of protect you from some of the worst outcomes. And when it comes to ransomware is to backup. And I know everybody says, yeah, I'm backing up. It's really rare. When we go in and we find a company has been backing up properly, it even happens to us sometimes. [01:11:59] We put them back up regimen in place and things seem to be going well, but then when you need the backup, oh my gosh, we just had this happen a couple of weeks ago. Actually this last week, this is what happened. We have. Something called an FMC, which is a controller from Cisco that actually controls firewalls in our customer's locations. [01:12:26] This is a big machine. It monitors stuff. It's tied into this ice server, which is. Looking for nastiness and we're bad guys trying to break in, right? It's intrusion detection and prevention and tying it into this massive network of a billion data points a day that Cisco manages. Okay. It's absolutely huge. [01:12:48] And we're running it in a virtual machine network. So we. Two big blade. Chassies full of blades and blades are each blade is a computer. So it has multiple CPU's and has a whole bunch of memory. It also has in there storage and we're using something that VMware calls visa. So it's a little virtual storage area network. [01:13:15] That's located inside this chassis and there are multiple copies of everything. So if a storage unit fails, you're still, okay. Everything stays up, it keeps running. And we have it set up so that there's redundancy on pond redundancy. One of the redundancies was to back it up to a file server that we have that's running ZFS, which is phenomenal. [01:13:40] Let me tell you, it is the best file system out there I've never ever had a problem with it. It's just crazy. I can send you more information. If you ever interested, just email me@craigpeterson.com. Anytime. Be glad to send you the open source information, whatever you need. But what had happened is. [01:13:57] Somehow the boot disk of that FMC, that, that firewall controller had been corrupted. So we thought, oh, okay, no problem. Let's look at our backups. Yeah, hadn't backed up since October, 2019. Yeah, and we didn't know it had been silently failing. Obviously we're putting stuff in place to stop that from ever happening again. [01:14:27] So we are monitoring the backups, the, that network. Of desks that was making up that storage area network that had the redundancy failed because the machine itself, somehow corrupted its file system, ext four file system right then are supposed to be corruptible, but the journal was messed up and it was man, what a headache. [01:14:51] And so they thought, okay, you're going to have to re-install. And we were sitting there saying, oh, you're kidding me. Reinstalling this FMC controller means we've got to configure our clients, firewalls that are being controlled from this FMC, all of their networks, all of their devices. We had to put it out. [01:15:07] This is going to take a couple of weeks. So because I've been doing this for so long. I was able to boot up an optics desk and Mount the file system and go in manually underneath the whole FMC, this whole firewall controller and make repairs to it. Got it repaired, and then got it back online. So thank goodness for that. [01:15:33] It happens to the best of us, but I have to say I have never had a new client where they had good backups. Ever. Okay. That, and now that should tell you something. So if you are a business, a small business, whatever it might be, check your backups, double check them. Now, when we're running backups, we do a couple of things. [01:15:57] We go ahead and make sure the backup is good. So remember I mentioned that we h

NTD News Today
House Jan. 6 Panel Subpoenas GOP's McCarthy; Biden Hosts Southeast Asian Leaders at the WH

NTD News Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 48:50


NTD News Today—5/13/2022 1. Biden Welcomes Southeast Asian Leaders 2. Jan. 6 Panel Subpoena's GOP's McCarthy 3. Bipartisan Calls Grow for More Police Funding 4. PA GOP Senate Primary a Tight Race Among 3 5. 'Devastating' Wildfire Destroys California Mansions

Allure: The Science of Beauty
Introducing Dynasty

Allure: The Science of Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 11:33


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Checking In
Introducing Dynasty

Checking In

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 11:33


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sore Losers
Devastating News: The End Of An Era

Sore Losers

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 61:36


Not the news any of us wanted to hear but it has been an amazing run. The Sore Losers breakdown how Lunchbox lived with a chick that was married but her husband didn't live in the house. Did Team Snacks get their first win when Lunchbox wasn't there?  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bible Principles Podcast
Sin's Devastating Results

Bible Principles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:00


Principle 3 – Sin's Devastating Results   Romans 1:18-32   In view of the power of sin, we should not be surprised how human beings progressively violate God's moral laws and suffer the consequences.Support the show

Christian Business Insights
One Religious Practice with Devastating Spiritual Consequences

Christian Business Insights

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 21:55


There are certain culturally supported beliefs that are widespread throughout the modern institutional church. It doesn't matter what the particular flavor of the church is, its denominational affiliation, or its position on the charismatic/conservative spectrum. Regardless of these differences, almost every congregation holds these beliefs and adheres to these practices. Not only are these practices pervasive, they're also so deeply held that virtually no one questions them.  The problem is that they have devastating spiritual consequences.

The Strong Mommas Podcast
154. Rediscovering Strength After a Devastating Diagnosis with Marnie Clark

The Strong Mommas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 43:20


What does strength look like when your world gets flipped upside down? When you're staring at a devastating diagnosis and fear threatens to end everything? Giving up on your health journey is tempting, but gritting through while wearing a facade is equally tempting, too. This episode...Wow. It may be one of the most incredible interviews I've had the honor of doing. It's one of those conversations where you have to just sit and think for a while afterward because it impacts you that much. I'm talking with Marnie Clark, a 54 year old mom who's a former blogger and influencer in the sobriety world. But just recently she had to pivot and completely re-examine life and priorities after she was give a very surprising stage IV cancer diagnosis. She's now on a mission to bring awareness to her type of cancer, the importance of good health and fitness, and this whole darn, scary, difficult journey. I ask her some really tough questions, she shares some of the darkest moments of this journey, how she has felt supported the most by those around her, and we talk about what it means to be strong and brave right now. We cried, we laughed, we talked about the goodness of God. Put this one on repeat, friend. You're going to love my friend Marnie. More Resources Read more about Marnie's story on her Caring Bridge blog: https://www.caringbridge.org/visit/marnieclark Follow Marnie on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/marnieraec/ Follow Megan on Instagram

Royally Obsessed
Introducing: Dynasty by Vanity Fair

Royally Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 3:20


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege.The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests.Listen & follow Dynasty now: https://listen.vanityfair.com/dynasty-podcastSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fireside Talk Radio
Devastating Moments, Crisis, and Suffering: When God Lights Up the Sky with Becky Carpenter Her Story

Fireside Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 27:54


Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - Russia's May 9th Victory Parade and SoCal's Devastating Drought

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 28:10


Bill Handel talks about how Russia is celebrating today, May 9th, with a Victory Parade revolving around WWII, but could decide to officially declare war on Ukraine as well. Southern California is facing an extreme drought as it barrels towards what's expected to be a scorching hot Summer - maybe it should take a page or two out of Las Vegas and Israel's book.

Mornings with Neil Mitchell
The devastating cost of delays in Victoria's stretched healthcare system

Mornings with Neil Mitchell

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 12:29


One of Victoria's leading emergency physicians has listed a handful of examples where the state's stressed healthcare system led to poor patient outcomes, in some cases death. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

10/3: Canada Covered
Dozens B.C. communities vulnerable to flood, fire devastation

10/3: Canada Covered

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 20:13


Devastating floods and fires in B.C. last year showed the havoc these disasters can bring to communities. But it also laid bare how vulnerable some communities are to widespread destruction from future emergencies. Vancouver Sun reporters Gordon Hoekstra and Glenda Luymes join Dave Breakenridge to discuss an investigation that reveals just how unprepared some B.C. communities are, what's keeping communities from doing the necessary work, and how disaster-plagued residents feel heading into another flood and fire season. Background reading: Fire & Flood: B.C. is facing two extremes — is your community ready?   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ADOPTION NOW - Telling Your Adoption Story
Holy Moments to New Callings: Tiffany Nardoni Shares How a Devastating Loss Led Their Family into Adoption [S6E11]

ADOPTION NOW - Telling Your Adoption Story

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 31:40


Tiffany and Jeff live in a small Midwest town. They always knew they would adopt but had no idea the journey God would take them on. We often ask ourselves, where is the beauty from these ASHES?? The way that Tiffany speaks on the deep loss and sorrow that propels their family into action is profound. God is in the midst, and those that can see through the confusion and walk into His plan are blessed in ways that are beyond this world. It is not often that a story leaves me absolutely speechless like this one did. When you listen, you will understand how beautiful this adoption story is from the DRC!

KPFA - Flashpoints
Camping Out Against Devastating Budget Cuts at City College of San Francisco

KPFA - Flashpoints

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 59:58


Speak The Truth
Ukrainian Forces Deploy Powerful American Weapon Against Russia - Devastating

Speak The Truth

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 22:45


Another massive thing has happened over there in Ukraine. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/speak-the-truth1/support

WPKN Community Radio
GaiaGram # 101 Environmental Headlines from around a planet in crisis.

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 4:34


-Lake Mead has fallen to an unprecedented low. -California limits watering of outdoor lawns and gardens -Possible extinction of most marine life -Reptiles of the world threatened -Devastating losses for the world's forests -New high for earthquakes in Texas -World's largest urban wildlife crossing opens

EVOQ.BIKE Cycling Podcast
Go Race. Apparently The Last Pod Resonated. Some other fear and thoughts.

EVOQ.BIKE Cycling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 23:01


One athlete reached out with these notes. These are VALID! But let's dig into this a touch. I know this can help some of you. Reason why no racing- 1. Don't feel that I'm strong enough to execute attacks or any sort of strategy other than hang on as long as possible. 2. I feel that having a non distracted training program can benefit me more than adjusting the training because a race is happening. 3. My competitive spirit is strong. Devastating results take a big mental toll on me 4. I feel like executing the training for the rest of this year and hitting it hard really hard next year with full focus on racing is a better path of success

The Silvercore Podcast
Ep. 76: Transmission

The Silvercore Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 67:34


Devastating bacterial transmission, -35 C° with no shelter and one mountain house meal for 5 men  Award winning photographer and videographer and producer    Do you know what bacteria has the potential of wiping out wild sheep populations and how it can be stopped? Would you spend the night in the freezing arctic, with no shelter and almost no food to track a wild bison?   Are you interested in knowing how the pros utilize age old story telling techniques with modern technology to effect positive change?   Jesse Bone is the producer and partner from Filter Studios which, with the help of the Wild Sheep Society of British Columbia, has put together the fantastic documentary “Transmission”.   Hear his story, learn about their project and join in on the tales of adventure that many never get the opportunity to experience.   https://movifree.org   https://filterstudios.ca/project/transmission/ https://www.wildsheepsociety.com    https://www.instagram.com/filterstudios https://www.instagram.com/wildsheepsocietybc ______     Silvercore Club - https://bit.ly/2RiREb4     Online Training - https://bit.ly/3nJKx7U    Other Training & Services - https://bit.ly/3vw6kSU    Merchandise - https://bit.ly/3ecyvk9    Blog Page - https://bit.ly/3nEHs8W     Host Instagram - @Bader.Trav - https://www.instagram.com/bader.trav   Silvercore Instagram - @Silvercoreinc - https://www.instagram.com/silvercoreinc     ____  

DISGRACELAND
Miles Davis Pt. 1: Blasting Bebop, Blasting Racism, and a Devastating Heroin Habit

DISGRACELAND

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 35:14


Miles Davis is jazz's first and only rock star, with the rap sheet to prove it. He did enough cocaine to run down the entirety of 52nd street, and pimped out women when performing wasn't paying the bills. At one point, his heroin habit was so public that clubs who had once welcomed his brilliant bebop instead froze him out completely. When he wasn't vying to keep his rightful spot in jazz's upper echelon, he was doing time at Rikers Island or dodging racist cops on the prowl for any junkie they could find. Miles Davis invented cool, but nearly destroyed himself in the process.This episode contains themes that may be disturbing to some listeners and includes descriptions of domestic violence.This is Part One of a two-part Disgraceland Episode on Miles Davis. To hear all episodes of Disgraceland for free, visit amazon.com/disgraceland. Show notes are available at disgracelandpod.com. Follow us @disgracelandpod on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for music news, bonus episodes, and more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Does Big Government Collaboration With Big Tech Raise the Costs of Everything?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 73:14


How Does Big Government Collaboration With Big Tech Raise the Costs of Everything? We're going to talk about the Senate bill that has big tech scared, really scared. I'll talk about a new job site problem for a number of different industries because of hackers, the cloud, the cost and reliability. [Following is an automated transcript]  This tech bill. It has the Senate really scared. He is frankly, quite a big deal for those of you who are watching over on of course, rumble or YouTube. I'm pulling this up on this screen. This is an article. ARS Technica and they got it originally from wired it's it was out in wired earlier in the month. And it's pointing out a real big problem that this isn't just a problem. This is a problem for both the legislature. In this case, we're going to talk about the Senate and a problem for our friend. In big tech. So let us define the first problem as the big tech problem. [00:01:00] You're Amazon. You are Google. Those are the two big targets here of this particular bill. We're going to talk about, or maybe your Facebook or one of these other Facebook properties, et cetera. If you are a small company that wants to compete with any of these big guys, What can you do? Obviously you can do what everyone's been telling us. Oh, you don't like the censorship, just make your own platform. And there've been a lot of places and people that are put a lot of money into trying to make their own platform. And some of them have had some mild successes. So for instance, I'm on. You can watch my videos there. And there have been some successes that rumble has had and making it into kind of the competition to YouTube. But YouTube is still the 800 pound gorilla. Everybody wants to be where the cool kids are. So for most people. That YouTube. They look at YouTube as being the [00:02:00] popular place. Thus, we should be, we are obviously saw the whole thing with Elon Musk and Twitter, and the goings on there. And Twitter really is the public square, although it's died down a lot because of this censorship on Twitter. Interesting. So as time goes forward, these various big companies are worried about potential competition. So how do they deal with that? This is where the real problems start coming in because we saw Amazon, for instance, in support of an internet sales tax. You remember that whole big deal. The internet had been set aside saying, Hey, no states can tax the internet and that's going to keep the internet open. That's going to help keep it free. And people can start buying online. And that worked out fairly well. A lot of people are out there, why would Amazon support a sales tax on the internet? They are the biggest merchant on the internet, probably the biggest [00:03:00] merchant period when it comes to not just consumer goods, but a lot of goods, like a staples might carry for business. So they'd have to deal with what they're 9,000 different tax jurisdictions in the United States. And then of course all these other countries, we're not going to talk about them right now, but the United States 9,000 tax jurisdictions. So why would Amazon support an internet sales tax when there's 5,000 tax jurisdictions? The reason is it makes life easier for them when it comes to competition. So if you are a little. And do you want to sell your widgets or your service? Whatever it might be online. You now have to deal with 9,000 tax jurisdictions. It's bad enough in the Northeast. If you are in New Hampshire, if you live in New Hampshire and you spend more than, I think [00:04:00] it's 15% of your time south of the border and mass, then mass wants you to pay income tax for that 15% that you are spending your time there. Now they do that with the. Baseball teams with football teams, hockey, you name it, right? So the big football team comes into town. The Patriots are paying the New York jets or whatever it might be. The Patriots have to pay New York state taxes, income tax now because they stepped foot in New York heaven forbid that they try and do business there and help New York state out. And they now have to pay income tax. Now they only have to pay income tax for, or for the amount of time. They're more New York. Various states have various weirdnesses, but if you're only playing 1, 2, 3 dozen games a year, It isn't like your normal work here, which is 2080 hours. We're talking about their plane to New York and they're only spending maybe 10 hours working in New York, but that [00:05:00] represents what percentage, 10, 20, 30% of their income, depending on how many games they play and how they're paying. And so they got to keep track of all that and figure it out. Okay. We played in New York, we played in New Jersey. We're in mass. We were they weren't in New Hampshire, certainly the Patriots plane, but they got to figure it all out. Guess what? Those big pay. Football players, hockey, baseball. They can afford to have a tax accountant, figure it all out and then battle with them. I had a booth one time at a trade show down in Connecticut. Didn't say. Thing it was terrible trade shows, man. They aren't what they used to be. And they haven't been for a long time. This is probably a decade plus ago, maybe even 20 years ago. So I had a little booth, we were selling our services for cybersecurity and of course, nobody wanted to bother pain for cybersecurity who needs it. I haven't been hacked yet. [00:06:00] Although there's an interesting article. We'll talk about next week based on a study that shows. Small businesses are going out of business at a huge rate because of the hacks because of ransomware. And if you're worried about ransomware, I've got a really great little guide that you can get. Just email me, me@craigpeterson.com. I'll send it off to you, right? It's a free thing. Real information, not this cruddy stuff that you get from so many marketers, cause I'm an engineer. They'll go out of business. So they figured I haven't got a business yet, not a big deal. And so no body. There's big trade show. And I was so disappointed with the number of people that even showed up for this silly thing. So what happens next while I get back to the office and about a month to two months later, I get this notice from the state of Connecticut they're tax people saying that I haven't paid my Connecticut taxes yet. [00:07:00] And because I was in connected. I should be paying my income tax for that day that I spent and wasted in Connecticut. Oh. And plus every company in Connecticut that I'm doing business with now, I need to collect their taxes and pay them the taxes that I'm collecting for those Connecticut businesses are resident. I didn't sell a thing. You know what it took almost, I think it was three or maybe four years to get the state of Connecticut to finally stop sending me all of these threatening notices because I didn't get a dime from anybody in Connecticut. So I'd love the internet from that standpoint saying you don't have to collect taxes in certain cases, certain states, et cetera, unless you have a legal nexus or a legal presence there in the state. So back to Amazon, Amazon loves the idea of having everything on the internet packs. They love the fact that there's 9,000 plus [00:08:00] tax jurisdictions. When you get right down to city, state county Lilian, either local taxes, or you look at those poor residents of New York state, or they're poor residents out in Washington state that have to worry about that, right? There's county taxes, state sales tax. City sales tax, and income taxes are much the same, the, all of these crazy cities and states around the country. Yeah. The ones that are in serious trouble right now, they are those same ones. Those particular jurisdictions are hard to deal with. So from Amazon standpoint is just like the Patriots football players. We've got plenty of money. We've got teams of lawyers. We have all kinds of accountant. We can handle this and you know why Amazon really loves it because it provides another obstacle for any competitors who want to enter the business. That's the [00:09:00] real reason, so many big businesses don't go ahead and charge you serious money so that they can use that money against you. Okay. You see where I'm going with this? Because if you want to start a business that competes with Amazon, if you want to have a doilies, you're making doilies. My grandmother used to make them all the time and she had them on the toilet paper in the bathroom, little doily holders. Doilies everywhere. And then of course, the seashells shells on top of the toilet paper holders. If you want to do that and sell it, how are you going to deal online with 9,000 tax jurisdictions? All what you're going to do is you're going to go to Etsy, or you may be going to go to Amazon marketplace and sell your product there. An Amazon marketplace. So Amazon is taking its cut out of it at is taking it's cut off. And you still ultimately have some of that tax liable. [00:10:00] Amazon loves it. It's the same reason you see these groups forums, right? Barbers saying, oh, we've got to be regulated. Really you need to have a regulation in place for barbers. You need to have licensing for barbers. Why do they do that? They do that. Not just barbers, right? It's all of these licensures and various states. They do that really to keep people. To keep their prices high. That's why they do it because someone can't just put up a sign and say, Hey, I am now a barber. Come get a haircut. And if you don't like the barber, if they do a lousy job, you go elsewhere. We don't need all of the bureaucracy on top of this to enforce licensure. Anyways, when we get back, let's talk about that Senate. It's a big deal. And I am coming down in the middle of this thing. Hey, visit me online. Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com and get my special report on passwords.[00:11:00] We just talked about how big business uses its advantages to crush potential competition. Crush them. And it's a shame and it's happened to me and many people I know, and now the Senate's getting involved and making things worse.  This is a huge problem. This happened to me a number of years ago, and I will never forget it. It was a really big lesson for me. I had designed and written a computer system that would take the code that it was written for a much older system. And run it for much less money. So bottom line here, this was a system called Cade computer assisted data entry that was made by Sperry way back in the day. Yeah. I've been in there for that long and they had little programs, so they would not punch cards, but punch right on two tapes, those big [00:12:00] nine track tapes and that information would then be used for processing later on then. People, big businesses grocery stores, you name it. We're using that Sperry system. And I designed a system that would take their COBOL is what it was. It was a form of COBOL code from this cage system. And you could use my code to compile it and run it on a Unix system. So the cost involved here was that it would be cheaper to buy a whole new Unix computer and buy new terminals and do some slight training changes. But the key punch operators would be exactly the same keystrokes as they were already used to. Okay. So you know how fast they were, so it wouldn't slow than none at all. And their cost would be. Then just the maintenance contract on the old Sperry cage. Very [00:13:00] cool stuff. And I worked really well. Then I worked with a couple of sales guys at spirit because Barry had a Unix tower system. It was a mini computer that was Unix space. And I had one, I had saved up my money. We bought this thing. It was a lot of money nowadays. It'd be about a hundred thousand dollars I spent on that system and it was really great. Cool. So some grocery stores started using it. They used it to build the space shuttle to design it and send it into space. RCA, Astro space used it, my system, which is all really cool. So Sperry was interested in it saying, okay let's do this. Now. I had flown myself across the country too, because I was in California at the time to do some of this work for. The for RCA Astro space for the space program and help make sure it was working and get it installed, help them configure it and everything else. So [00:14:00] I had a lot of time, a lot of money, a lot of effort into this. It was a big venture. So Sperry invited me down to their headquarters down in blue bell, Pennsylvania to talk about this. And I was so excited because their sales guys wanted to sell it. They gave me some free space in a booth in Las Vegas. So I was in the Sperry booth with them and, say, yeah, you can buy this. And you're using the Sperry, the new Sperry hardware. And I went down there and talked with them. They never did anything with me, or, here's a huge investment young guy. And all of this stuff just worked and they had proof of concept. They had a couple of customers already using the system and it never materialized. And then about a year and a half later, I found out Sperry had tried to duplicate my system and had messed it up terribly. It [00:15:00] wasn't keystroke compatible. So anyone using the new Sperry system, they had to learn. Okay. So I got to hit this and I got to go over here and I got to click on this. Are you kidding me using a mouse? Aren't you not? These are data entry operators. They just go all day long, just typing and. They had stolen my ideas. They messed it up. They didn't do as good a job as I did, which turns out it's pretty common. And they had stolen it. They stolen years of my life. So I've seen that before with me. I've seen Microsoft do that with friends of mine, and I've seen apple do it with various products that they've decided to release. They all do it. Why do you think these businesses can not spend money on research and development, and yet at the same time, stay in business as technology's continuing to move forward? Why? The reason is. They don't have to do, or why [00:16:00] would we do T wait a minute. Now, all we have to do is either buy the company or steal the product just re-engineer. Oh. And if we want to buy the company, we can do what Microsoft has been accused of doing again and again, which is. We'll just Microsoft. Let's see here. I like that database is pretty darn cool. So here's what we're going to do. So Microsoft announces, Hey, we're going to have a competitor to that in coming out soon. And then they sit there and they wait and they say, okay, how many people are going to ask about, oh wow. A lot of people asking for it. In the meantime, that company that had that great little database soft. Trying to sell it. And people are saying, wait, Microsoft is going to come up with a version of this. I'm just, I'm going to wait. We can wait a few months. Let's see what Microsoft. So that poor company is now seriously struggling because this big company came out and made the announcement that they're going to do something like this. And then that small company gets a [00:17:00] knock on the door. Hey, we're Microsoft or company X. And we like your product. Wow. Okay. So we're going to do a buyout. We're going to we're just, oh, this is going to be fantastic. I might have to sign what a two year contract non-compete and help them manage it. Okay. We can deal with this. And then they find out that company X says Your company is not worth that much anymore. Your sales look at their sales here, man. They've gone way down. Okay. So let me see let's do a nickel on every dollar evaluation you had a year ago. This happens every day, worldwide in America, it should never happen to anyone. And as you can tell, it upsets me. So what are Klobuchar and Grassley doing here? Amy, when she was running for president, she made this big deal. I'm going to pull us up on my screen. Those of you who are watching [00:18:00] on rumble or YouTube. And you can find all of that in my website, Craig peterson.com can see here. So they are trying to protect the American consumer, right? Yeah. Yeah. That's it. They're gonna protect us. And so what they're doing is saying that. Would a rule ruin Google search results because that's what Google says. Is it going to bar apple from offering new features, useful ones on the iPhone? How about Facebook? Will it stop them from moderating content? So the legislation's core idea is we will just. The marketplace take care of things. We're not going to let Amazon put their products in the product listings before third parties, but how are you possibly going to be able to regulate that stuff you can't, you can regulate it [00:19:00] talking about a bureaucracy. You'd probably need one about as big as the federal government is right now. And the federal government needs to be cut back in a major way. There's this two months. How about the 150 million Americans? This article brings that up to that are currently using Amazon prime, even though the price one hump. And they have it free to prime members. It's this is a big deal. The bill doesn't mention prime. Doesn't mention Google by name, Amazon. But this is going to be a nightmare to enforce the bill is not specific enough. It should be voted down. And between you and me, I don't know what can be done about this other than to have additional marketplaces show up online. And you know what the conservative social media sites are starting to win. So maybe there's hope. We've got two things we're going to talk about right now. One of them [00:20:00] is tech jobs. And man, is there a lot of scamming going on there as you might expect in the second is cloud, are you looking at cloud services? Hey, a home or business.  You can see this. I'm going to pull this up on my screen for those watching on rumble or on YouTube, but this is a big problem. And we've seen this again and again right now, they're going after certain workers in the chemical. The sector, but it isn't just the chemical sector. What we've seen is the bad guys going after anyone that's applying for a job. So let me give you a few tips here. First of all, you should not be pain to apply for a job. We see that all of the time when it comes to the head hunting firms, what. Is, they will charge the business who is looking to hire someone [00:21:00] that makes sense to you. They'll hire they'll charge the business. So oftentimes it's a percentage of the annual salary committee where from usually 20% up to a hundred percent or more, depending on the position. And boy can, they make a lot of money, but they don't necessarily place. People, but you know how it is right now, there, there can be quite a few. So people have been applying for jobs to make a lot of money and not realizing that fee that supposedly they have to pay is illegitimate. So remember that. Okay. The second thing has to do with this particular scam, because what they're trying to do is. Into some of these companies. So they will send a thing out saying, Hey, on my head hunter, I'm here for you. We're going to get you this job you need to apply. Are you interested in a new job now? I've seen some stats online saying [00:22:00] that somewhere around 30 plus percent of people are looking or at least open to. Take getting a new job, which means a lot more are looking for jobs. Now I have to add to that, that the people who have jumped ship over the lockdown period really are not happy. The majority of them wish they had stayed where they were at. So keep that in mind too. But what they'll do is they'll say, Hey, listen. Oh, there's this new feature on LinkedIn. By the way, you can say y'all are, I'm interested in looking for a job. I forget exactly what it says, but it goes around your picture and I have it up there because I'm a contractor, I go to businesses and I'm. To harden their cybersecurity. And we usually start slowly, especially with some of these startups we're doing work with right now where they won't, they go from a completely flat network and [00:23:00] it's all engineers and I don't want anything hindering anything. And so you got to work with them and it's just, we had a time sort of a thing. Okay. I just had this one thing this week. And then move on to one thing next week as well. So that's what I do for a living. And a lot of people are looking on LinkedIn and other places to find people who can be a chief information security officer. So I'm what you call a fractional chief information security officer. I do this under contract and I've been doing contracts and contract work for. I don't know if I shouldn't be on the air, but my gosh it's been now I guess it's 40 years right now. So I've been doing this for a long time. So I'm familiar with some of these scams, so they didn't take my word on some of this stuff. So what they do is they say, Hey, we've got a potential job opening. Are you in interested now? When we talk about 30 plus percent of people polled [00:24:00] say that they're looking interested in a new job, the numbers are probably a little higher. Not that everyone's going to jump ship. Some people will, but there are a lot of people that if they get this email, they're going to open it up. And so what'll happen now is this group out of North Korea called the Lazarus group? And we've talked about them before. We'll go ahead and say yeah, the here's, what's going to happen here. Let's just send you this thing. You can open it up. You can look at it and see if it's really a fit for you. I love this graphic that they have. This is from dark reading. I have it up on the screen again. Rumble and YouTube. What should we do now? Should I open this up? Should I not open it up? It turns out that what's happening is that Symantec and Broadcom, both have noticed this and stated in an advisory a couple of weeks ago. Be very careful [00:25:00] because what it's going to do is install a Trojan horse on your computer. So let's think about this. You're talking about the chemicals. You have a lot of people who are very technical. And if a company wants to get some new technology, we talked about this earlier in the show, what did they do? Do they just go and say, oh, okay, let's get some R and D going here. Let me research and development. Let's hire some scientists and do some pure science here, which are almost never happens anymore. No, what they do is they either buy a company, they steal a company's idea. If you are like the communist, you try and steal the technology directly. And that's exactly what these guys are doing. They put a Trojan on your machine because you open that file and that Trojan then gives you. Oh, excuse me, gives them access to your machine. Now this particular Trobe Trojan is a malicious [00:26:00] web file. Disguises. This job offer and your machine gets comparable. They attempt to compromise it, right? It's not always successful. They're not as many zero days out there for these lower level actors like North Korea, but they've been able. Now, they're not just going after chemical sectors, they're going after it service providers. So companies like mine that provide managed security services for businesses, they are being attacked. So that's a problem too, isn't it? Because if you can compromise. A nine company and we've seen this all the time. It's getting reported like crazy. You now have access to all of their customers because the it service company has passwords, et cetera. And they're probably using. Industry is number one or number two products for managing the customer's computers, neither of which are secure. [00:27:00] And that's the biggest problem that we've had. We use some of these things before, I'm not going to name them right now because it wouldn't mean anything to you anyways, but we had to get. We worked with our, it people inside the software companies that make the software that are used by the managed services providers. And we'd talked with their developers and said, Hey, listen, this is a serious problem. That's a serious problem. You've got to change this. You got to change that. And what ended up happening? We left them because they weren't doing what they were supposed to be doing a very big deal. So they're targeting defense, contractors, engineering firms of any sort. They want to steal IP, intellectual property, pharmaceutical companies. Yeah. Very big deal. These third hunting teams, including Cisco's, which are the guys that we use. Tallow sets again, an example of a big company buying a smaller company called telos that does threat intelligence and it looks at stuff. They're all reporting to this. [00:28:00] So high level jobs in an industry or what you have to watch out. It'd be very careful. Now, earlier this year, Lazarus group, again, North Korea went after some of these jobs people 250 that were identified working in the news media, software vendors, internet infrastructure providers, using job offers that appeared to come from. Disney, Google Oracle by the way, that was according to Google who tracked the campaign. They know what their employees are doing, where they're going, what emails coming in. It's crazy. We're looking a lot of stuff. Okay. So I want to move on to the next topic here. Last one, this hour, but I'm gonna pull this up right now on my screen. You can have a look at it there. Of course, if you are at home. You can or you really can't on the road. You can see this on rumble and also see this on the YouTube [00:29:00] site. At least for the time being until I get kicked off right. Kicked off again. That seems to be the word of the hour, but cost reliability are raising concerns in. Again, this is a dark reading article, came out a couple of weeks back here, but the biggest concerns about cloud computing to what is cloud computing. Let's talk about that first for a minute. Cloud computing is going online using something like salesforce.com. People don't think of that as cloud computing. But you have in Salesforce, all the communications with all of your customers, et cetera, that's an example of a platform as a service, basically. So they're providing you with everything and it's up in the cloud, nothing to worry about here, folks, but of course you have the same potential problems. You do outs where people use what's it called now? Microsoft 365. Which Microsoft disclaimed [00:30:00] any liability for any problems they cause for anything customers it's really crazy, but again, what are the problems there? Reliability slash performance, 50% of the people, 50% applaud on the screen. Again here worried about reliability and performance, because if your business is relying on cloud computing, What, how is the security any good? That you could use something, as I mentioned Salesforce, and just picking them out of a hat and not, they haven't been like a terrible provider by any stretch. But how about if you're going to Azure and you're using a workstation news here? How about if you're going to some other place, right? It could be Amazon web services. Google also has data processing services. Security's huge issue. Cost is a huge issue, reliability, performance, all of those. We're issues with more than 50% of the it [00:31:00] professionals. I'm surprised that this next one, which is our staff skillset on dealing with cog computing 26%. The reason I'm surprised by that is hardly anybody knows enough about cloud computing. Do we really confident about it? I'm serious about that. There's some companies right now, we're talking with a company called Wiz and they audit Azure configuration. So be very careful if you're using. Particularly if you're a business, it may not work out well for you. Hey, make sure you go online right now. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Sign up. You'll get my newsletters. You'll get all kinds of great information. Absolutely free Craig peterson.com including my special report on passwords. Now, if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [00:32:00] There is a whole bunch going on when it comes to Russia, of course, invasion of Ukraine. We're going to talk about that. And what is I can, how does this domain system work and why are people calling to have dot R U deleted? This is really a big deal. And if you're watching from home, I'm going to go full screen on this article. This is an article from ARS Technica, and I've been talking about it all week, which is that I can won't revoke Russian in Jeanette domains, says the effect. Devastating. This is frankly pretty darn fascinating to me because I can, as this international organization, it was put together in order to help make the internet international. And I'm not talking about the data international, but control of it. A lot of countries work. Because of [00:33:00] course the internet was created in that states. It was created by us tax payers, money for the DOD. And it was designed to be very resilient, in fact, so resilient that there could be a nuclear blast and that nuclear blast and. Causing problems, but yeah. Yeah, the internet is still going to work. And the whole idea behind it was you could have multiple routers. They're all talking to each other nowadays. They're talking BGP four and they can say, how can I get from here? To there. And so the idea behind BGP is they all share this information once the least cost way. What's the easiest way to post way. If you will, for me to get from point a to point B and it changes all the time. So you might be on a phone conversation. You might be listening to me right now, online streaming or watching the video you might be doing, who knows what [00:34:00] out there with digital communications. But the communications channel that you think you're using, where the data is going from, let's say my microphone, ultimately to your device, your ears, that data path, once it becomes dated. Can be changing multiple times a second. Now it actually changes quite a bit. Initially as these internet backbone routers, send the least cost, routing information back and forth to, and fro a very good thing, frankly, because it helps to speed everything up. And there's other tricks that we're using you. Might've seen. For instance, Akamai and some of the URLs before have sites that you've gone to, and that's called a content delivery network and that helps get the content to be closer to you. So if you're on a website in California and you're in New Hampshire, that website video, that website graphic, et cetera, is going to be coming from [00:35:00] a server local to me here in New Hampshire. All right. That's how that all is supposed to work. So we have names you guys know about that internet, domain names and those domain names. You already know those are turned into internet addresses, and those addresses are then used by the routers to figure out where to go, how to get the data. The problem that we're having right now, of course, is Russia seems to be substantially abusing the intranet Putin, put a kill switch on to the Russian internet sometime ago. And the idea behind the skills, which was, Hey, listen, if we don't want the world to be talking to us, we'll just cut it. Now he's tested it a couple of times, but what he has not done is shut it down and he hasn't shut it down. As part of this Ukraine, more, what they did is they passed laws saying, Hey, if you publish something that [00:36:00] disagrees with what we're saying, you get 15 years. And even these people who've been protesting on the streets, they're getting a bound 60 days, 30 to 60 days in jail, just for protesting what's going on. So a lot of people have been saying why don't we just, we turn off the Russian internet now we're not going to use Putin's kill switch in order to shut it all off. We're not going to do a well, a few things. She decided not to do, denial of service attacks, et cetera. Although there are hackers doing that and we are going to talk about that today, but they're saying what? Let's just go ahead and let's kill their dot R E. The country domain. And I can, the guy who heads it up said, Hey, listen our mission is just to make sure that the internet works. So shutting off the dot R U domain so that no one can go ahead and. We send right. A [00:37:00] request out to the domain name servers and get a resolution to an IP address. So if you try and go to Kremlin dot REU or something, you will get blocked and you will get blocked. Not blocked. No, I like the great firewall of China or of Russia. Now they've got one going pretty good. Yeah. Thank you. You ain't using us technology. It's crazy. What we've. But what it does is it says, oh, I hide dot, are you, I don't know. What are you talking about? So there have been a lot of people who have been pushing for it. And you'll see, on my screen here, that Ukraine is requested to cut Russia off from some of these core parts of the internet. And I can, which is the internet corporation for assigned names and numbers. I couldn't remember what that was earlier said that I can must remain neutral and their mission they say is not to take punitive actions. It's to make sure the internet works. So are they really taking punitive actions [00:38:00] of the cat Russia off? It's really interesting to me because look at what has been going on. You've got companies like Facebook as the great example who has gone ahead and just shut off people. They didn't like what they were saying. My goodness. At one point of you said you should wear a mask during this pandemic. You would be cut off from Facebook. And then of course, if you said, no, you don't, you shouldn't don't need you, you shouldn't wear a mask that at that point you would be cut off, because science right. Sciences, we know exactly what we're doing now. It goes on and on. If you said that it came from a lab in China, you would have your account suspended. Now of course their whole tune has changed and yeah probably came from a lab in China. It's crazy what these people have been doing. So we have arbiters of truth, who are some contractors sitting in their home or wherever it is the contractors for Facebook [00:39:00] that are going through posts that people are flagging as Incorrect as fake news. So what happens is people say fake news and then that goes off to their team that then looks at it and says okay. Yeah, fake news because we disagree with it. It just blows my mind. We have to have free and fair and open discussions. Don't we. You have that line at Facebook and Google does some of the same. A lot of these sites do a lot of the same. You get our major media outlets that are all deciding what they want to report on and what they want to label as fake and fake news. I'm just shaking my head because it's hard. It's hard to believe. What about. Russia is putting out fake news, as I've said many times before the first casualty in war, this isn't my quote. The first casualty in war is what, it's the truth. So if [00:40:00] truth is the first casualty, then that means we've got a lot of propaganda going on. We had propaganda coming out of Ukraine. We've caught some of those, like the, what was it? The. Chat goes, fighter, pilot, whatever it was who had killed, what was it? Five Soviet or Russian jets, Soviet era using silver deer, techno era technology on the part of the Ukrainian turns out well. Okay, that, that was false news. That was fake news. The whole thing about snake island, where you had that Russian military. I know what it was a frigging but anyways boat sitting there saying we are a Russia. Warship, you will surrender or, whatever. Do you remember that snake on just the small place, 13 guys and supposedly they shelled it and they killed all 13 turns out that was probably fake news as well. So that's from the Ukrainian side and on the Russian side they hardly reported I as to how many.[00:41:00] The we're in fact, initially for quite a while, they were saying there are no desks. Then at the same time, the Ukrainians are saying they're 2,500 Russians dead. And that number keeps going up, who knows what it is today. It gets really crazy in the time of war. So if Facebook is going to stop someone from saying don't wear masks or do wear masks, depending on what day of the week it is basically right. Wednesday. It's okay to say that Thursday is not okay to say that we're back. No it's not. Or then why can't that type of censorship? Move on to the next. I that's a big question I have now. Should we be shutting it off? I'll pull this back up on the screen again. And it, this article from ARS, Technica is saying that experts have warned, whoever they are that shutting down the dot R U domain. Is going to cause just incredible problems [00:42:00] for Russians, which man would it ever talking about a major blow to the economy. And it would also cause problems for people who are trying to find out more truth about. Russia cause you couldn't get to their site. Now we've seen some amazing things in Russia. We had the Russian, one of the Russian news agencies T, which is broadcasting and here in the U S that their entire staff just walked out saying, forget about it. We're not going to promote this fake news, but this is a little bit different question. Me personally. I don't think anybody should be censoring any. For almost anything. Yo, there are some limits, but they're pretty extreme in my book. I'd rather know someone is an idiot because they're allowed to say stupid things, and counter, counter it, counter their arguments. You've got to have discussions anyways, stick around. We'll be [00:43:00] right back. Microsoft. Yeah, they've been around a long time. They've been helping us. They've had lots of cybersecurity problems. People use Microsoft software on their desktop. Some people use it for servers, which is crazy, but listen to what they're doing now. This is a little concerning. I'm going to pull this article up on the screen. For those of you who are watching a long, either on rumble or YouTube ARS, Technica article, they have some really great articles. This particular one is about our friends at Microsoft. This is cool. Microsoft announced today? This was like a week or so ago that Microsoft would be suspending all new sales of Microsoft products and services in Russia. Following the countries, unjustified, unprovoked, and unlawful invasion of. Now Microsoft [00:44:00] didn't give any specifics about the products, but it really is likely to be a blanket ban of all of the Microsoft products. This is very cool because Microsoft has taken an approach I've never seen them do before, which is okay. When. Gets hacked. You get our friends at apple, putting together patches and getting them out. They get them up pretty quick. Microsoft had been doing much the same. The problem was some months there were patches every day that you had to apply. That's how bad this software is. And they decided that man, let's be like politicians here. Let's release some very damning news Friday. At about 4:30 PM before a long weekend. So no one will notice. Yeah. Y'all are friends of politicians do that all the time. What Microsoft decided they do is, Hey, wait a minute. We know we're going to have patches. [00:45:00] It's not going to slow down. And because our code is terrible. So what we're going to do, let me see here. How about we just release all of them at once and we'll just call it patch Tuesday, right? Because people were complaining about how much work it was, how much effort was effort. It was to try. They hate them. These machines apply these patches every day. Huge problem for everybody from home users to big companies out there. So Microsoft has said, okay let's do that. Let's burry it. So nobody will notice okay that's what Microsoft does. And now we've gotten used to that. Now we have. We remember two guys, right? Bill gates followed by Steve Ballmer. Steve Bohmer was a nut job. Bill gates was a bad man. I think he's just been trying extra hard to compensate for all of the evil he did over the years. But what we're looking at now is new management and that he's been in [00:46:00] there now for a few years, doing a great job, cleaning up Microsoft, making it a very competitive company. He has done some amazing things. One of the things that he has decided to do, that's been very effective is how about this? How about we go ahead. And we work with various governments to help stop these Russian hackers. And I mentioned this a couple of weeks ago, what was happening and the Microsoft had reached out to the white house and said, Hey, listen. What we have been looking at the hacks that have been coming from the Russian hackers, and we've been preparing fixes for some of those hacks. How about we work directly with some of these other countries? This reminds me a whole lot of the lend lease program in world war two. You might remember this thing, but the [00:47:00] us of course, initially was not involved in the war and they decided, okay we've got to help the United Kingdom. How are we going to help them? The UK doesn't have the money to buy ships, to have us make weapons, bullets know. What they did is they had people donate the rifles, the guns ammo from home. Plus they made them the government, instead of selling them to the UK, they lent them to the UK because the UK could not afford everything that it needed in order to fight a war against the national socialist in Germany. So what did they do? We just shipped the stuff over there and called it a lend slash lease. I think that's a great idea. And what Microsoft is doing is also great idea. They have been decoding, reverse compiling, if you will, and interpreting the code, looking at what some of the ransomware and other malicious code the Russia has [00:48:00] been using against Ukraine, and they have been providing. All kinds of insight information to these other countries. Now, this is a great idea for a few reasons, one of the reasons, and I think maybe the biggest reason is that the ransomware, the viruses, all of this malware that they're producing is. Not particularly discriminating. Do you guys remember maybe I dunno, what was it? Six months ago, I taught, told you how to avoid getting most of this Russian ransomware. And it was as easy as just installing. Yeah, installing a keyboard on your computer windows or Mac, windows. Those are the machines are always getting attacked quite successfully most of the time, but the windows keyboard. Russian language. Now you didn't even have to use it. [00:49:00] You don't have to have a keyboard, right? This isn't a Russian keyboard that I'm holding up here on camera. This is just a regular us keyboard. You can just install a virtual, Russian keyboard. And once that keyboard was installed, you're pretty safe. Why? Because Vladimir poop. Dictator for life of Russia decided he would just go ahead and stop anybody that was trying to hack Russian. Companies businesses, government agencies and what's the best way for the hackers to do that. Cause they didn't want to end up in Siberia for the rest of their lives because of a hack. Now they went ahead and said, okay if there's a Russian Cyrillic keyboard on the machine, we're not going to activate. So if the software, the malware on your computer, all you need to do is have a Russian keyboard. Yeah, that's it pretty simple. I told you that months ago, now what we're seeing is these indiscriminant [00:50:00] types of software that are being used in Ukraine. Why doesn't the keyboard trick work while some of Ukrainians peak Russian, we could go in. To the background on that of the massacre, the starvation purposeful starvation of Ukrainians by the Soviet union over many years ago. And how they then gave their property, their homes to Russians to move into in order to occupy Ukraine. So there's people in Ukraine who are Russian speaking of course. Now we're talking two or three generations, four, maybe down the road from when the Soviet union killed all of those millions of people. But there are some fights that to say, there's Russians, Russian speaking people there. Let me put it that way. Perfectly. In Southeastern Ukraine anyways I'm going on and on I, this is not an education on war or history. This we're talking about [00:51:00] cyber security. So the, they have, they been, Microsoft found many cases of Russians putting destructive. And disruptive or even more than that data wiping malware onto computers, it spreads indiscriminately. So Microsoft looking at what's happening, you crane, trying to get patches together for all of us, letting other countries know about what's going on is going to be. Amazing because this malware, which is wiping computers, primarily, it's not really just straight up ransomware give us money and we'll give you your data back. This is just showing your data, that malware is going to leak outside of Ukraine. Yeah. Cause us all kinds of book tension, probably. When we get back, I want to talk about this here. This is our friend Ilan Musk, and we've been following [00:52:00] along with some of the stuff been going on with his new satellite system in Ukraine. Stick around. The whole concept of these satellites and circling the earth, providing us with internet, just regular guides. It's going to be in our smartphones is changing everything. We're going to talk about Elon Musk and what's happened over in Ukraine.  Our friend Elon Musk has done a lot of things over the years. He has really helped us for frankly, the Tesla and what's been happening there. SpaceX, his main concern being let's get off of a single planet on to multiple planets, right? The movement to Mars, NASA's working on a serious moon base. I reminded him of space 1999. You guys remember that show, but yeah, we're going to have a moon base by then [00:53:00] and it makes a lot of sense. So who's going to go to these well, there's some interesting lotteries people have to apply and everything else, but he's done so much, right? He's got the boring company you'd already know about Tesla and boring company in case you didn't know makes underground tunnels. He has also. A few other things has got a huge battery manufacturing facility. They're working on new battery technologies to make all of our lives a little bit better, particularly if we have an electric house or electric car, because this is what good is it to have electricity that you can't use. And that's really what they're trying to do is make it so that electricity is available 24 7 for you. And. Those space X, which is what I mentioned as well as what we're going to talk about right now. I'm going to pull this up on my screen. For those of you who are watching over on rumble, or of course, YouTube, this is fascinating. He [00:54:00] said there's a high probability of Russian attacks on Starlink in Ukraine. Now that is fascinating because what he's done is he has sent over truckloads. I'm showing a picture of a truck. In fact, with these Starling terminals in it, that's from ARS Technica. Just double-checking it here, but this is very cool. This is posted by the vice prime minister over there in Ukraine. And they are talking about these terminals. Now a terminal in this case is something that allows your devices to talk to the Starlink satellites, or there's going to be a huge constellation. They've got 2000 satellites up and they're putting another 12,000. These types of satellites are much different than what we've been used to over the years. We were typically, we've had these massive things sitting up in space. [00:55:00] I worked with RCA Astro space many years ago and I saw. They're testing facilities, which are just incredible. They had this huge vacuum chamber that they brought me in to see as we were working on space shuttle software. Yeah. I wrote software that they used to put the space shuttle together yeah. Way back in the day. So that was a pretty proud moment. Anyways. It's we're not talking about these huge satellites, like they used to launch, we're talking about very small cell. And they're not just sitting way, way up there. These are in basically in low orbit around the earth and they're geostationary. In other words, they stay in one spot. I believe this is the way they've got these things set up. So these satellites then allow because they're so close to the earth, allow them to use less power. And also the other advantage to that is.[00:56:00] The delay, right? The delay between having to send it all the way up and back down, because electricity takes time, right? Yeah. Travels at the speed of light. But nowadays you might've noticed it can take your quarter second, half a second. When you're talking to someone, when I'm on the radio with some of these radio stations or the delay can be absolutely incredible. Like I half second to a second sometimes. And that's just because they're being cheap. This type of technology where you have these constellations and it isn't just Elon Musk. It isn't just Starling, but constellations with will ultimately we'll have tens of thousands of satellites up there. Not, there's all kinds of other potential problems not getting into that right now. But what it does mean is yes. Can communicate and we've never had this sort of thing before we had the us military, the Navy in fact, put together a communication system that [00:57:00] lives on top of the internet and called nowadays. Generically the dark web. And it was set up to allow our military, our state department to be able to communicate with people in countries that are back in the day under Soviet control, all kinds of potential problems. So whenever those problems existed, they just went ahead and used this onion network, which is a part of the dark web, et cetera, et cetera. So let's say we had before. Now what happens if you're a country like Ukraine, where 100% of your internet comes from Russia, Russia obviously can sit there and listen in. Hopefully your encryptions. Good. A lot of Russians have been using telegram and already get real news about what's happening in their country and other places. And Della Graham is not that secure, frankly. WhatsApp pretty secure signal is the [00:58:00] one you want to pay close. Attention to signal is considered to be the most secure of all of these secure communications apps. But there's a level above all of that, because if they can tell that you're communicating, even that is enough to give them some information. So they might not know what was in that transmission, but if the transmission is all of a sudden, a tons of activity coming over, lots of data, lots of messages going back and forth, they can say maybe there's something about to happen. That came out. You might remember the old orange book for security way back in the eighties, I think is when it came out. But part of what you had to do was cover up your. Actual real communication. So it's one thing to have the communications encrypted, but you wanted to always have about the same amount of communications going back and forth. So people couldn't figure out what you're doing now with these types of devices. That [00:59:00] kind of problem still exists. And this is part of what Elon Musk is warning about here. Pull it up on my screen again, for those people who are watching Elon Musk is urging users of his satellite system to put their Starlink antennas as far as. From people as possible. Now, why would he be doing that? Because frankly, that terminal is transmitting to the satellite as well as receiving from the satellite. And it is entirely possible that there could be some evil software that is listening in for the satellite transmissions and sends a little missile your way. Also, of course the Russians have satellites in space that can look down on the ground. Now it's something as small as a terminal four Starlink, little hard to see, but Elon Musk is saying, Hey, listen guys, [01:00:00] go ahead and camouflage it. You might want to spray paint. It just don't use metallic paint so that they can't see it and place it as far away from where people are as post. So you can still use it and only use it when you need to use it. Don't keep it up and running all the time. But this is the start of something great. Something where you can't easily block people's communication. So Russia has tried to do. And they have been jamming the Starlink satellites. So what did must do? He delivered all of his engineers to working on how can we get around the Russian Jack? And according to Elon Musk, they have gotten around it and they now have their satellite systems completely jammed free from the Russians. I think that's fascinating. They're probably using some good spread spectrum technology that was actually known about it and world war II. And then we can talk [01:01:00] about that for a long time. Heady, you might remember her anyways, skip that for now. Stick her out. We got more when we. A whole bunch of pandemonium out there because of what Russia's been doing in Ukraine and how it's flowing over to us as well. Hey, this is not great news. Pandemonium is the name of the game over there in Russia. And they are being very successful. We're going to talk about what happened in Bella ruse. We'll talk a little bit about what happened in Ukraine with cybersecurity and what's happening right here right now.  I'd also like to invite you guys to listen to me on all kinds of apps out there, including the tune-in app and many others. Let me get my screen set up because now you can also catch me on. And on YouTube, this is almost [01:02:00] a complete, let me pull this up for you. There we go. Complete ARS Technica today. They've got some great articles this week, looking into the Russians. What are they doing? What kind of problems is that causing us? But we are seeing some interesting attacks back on. And back in very big way. Russia has been going after you crane in the cyberspace for a long time, we spoke a few years ago about what Russia had been doing with the tax software for Ukraine. We don't do this in the us or in Canada, but my number of European countries do you, where you have to have. The old official tax preparation software put together by the government for your business or for your person, depending on the country you're living in [01:03:00] France is a great example of this. And Ukraine is another one. So Ukraine says, Hey guys, you got to go ahead and use our software. That means every business in Ukraine is using their software. To manage their tax payments and their accounts, frankly. And that wonderful little piece of software was hijacked by our friends in Russia. So they grabbed a hold of it. They in. Did some code into it that added rent somewhere to the software. So now all of the businesses in Ukraine are pretty much guaranteed to be using this hacked software. We have a client who has offices over in France, and we found a really interesting problem with them because. The French software that was being used for taxes for French businesses had an extra little [01:04:00] problem. And that extra problem was, it was insecure as can be whoever wrote this, must've taken a Microsoft programming course and had no idea DIA about the consequences of what they were. So it was very insecure. The, it was using a version of SSL, which is an encryption that's based on another type of increase. I don't want to get too wonky here, but that was just one of its many problems and bad keys, et cetera, et cetera. And keys by the way, was using keys that had been revoked, which you should never do. Bottom line. Oh my gosh. Hey, if you want more information on this, just drop me a note. me@craigpetersohndotcomandyoucanalsogetmynewsletterwithallkindsofgreatlittletipsmeatcraigpeterson.com. Just let me know. So in this case, we had to help that company in [01:05:00] France. Ignore the security restrictions that were on their systems so they could use the French tax system. So anyways, I told you that, so I could tell you that the same thing happened to Ukraine. In a different way, their software was pre infected. So when they downloaded it, ta-da. They got that piece of ransomware that virus had spread. It was just a nightmare. And of course it robbed. If you will, Ukraine, government of funds, that would have been. So we had now a bit of a shift. I'm going to pull this up on the screen again, this article, because what this shift has shown is that the hackers are now operating on the side of you. Crazy. Which is just fascinating. So the group called anonymous, you might be familiar with them. Of course, they've been doing a lot of hacking for a [01:06:00] lot of years, releasing private information, government and information. All of that sort of stuff. And they have a mast what they're calling a volunteer. It. And this it army has been going and doing what well hacking Russian sites apparently. So this article is just absolutely fascinating and they pulled some of from wired as well, but the Russian space research Institute, their website was hacked, leaked files that were stolen from the Russian space agency, made it all the way on to the. The space agency was hacked in their website said, leave Ukraine alone, Alto anonymous. Will you up even more? They also did. What's called a D O S. Which is a distributed denial of service attack. Those can be [01:07:00] very difficult to protect against unless you're set up in advance to help protect yourself. And that pretty much destroyed Russia's dot are you top level domain? So we've talked about how domain services work, right? So Doug are, you is like.com except dot R U is for running. And so the domain name servers that handled our, you were knocked off the air because no one could really get to them. They used amplifying attacks and stuff without getting into all of the details. So basically they were trying to cut off access and they did for a lot of people to any. That ended in, are you? It's great. These are just some of the latest in this surge of hacktivism. That's been going on one of the ones I mentioned a couple of weeks ago with the Belarusians deciding they were going to hack the Belarus railroad, which was being used. To bring Russian [01:08:00] troops, supplies, tanks, et cetera, all on rail, right on down right to the border of Ukraine. So that was hacked so that they couldn't use it in order to go after. Of course Russia was able to get to Ukraine, but there's also been protests around the world. 48 Russian cities raise millions of dollars through cryptocurrency donations. Now, I'm not a big cryptocurrency guy and I'm not a big crypto currency guy because while. Cryptocurrency is likely to be outlawed by most, if not all governments. And they certainly could shut it down and it is not anonymous. All right. So using cryptocurrency does not mean it does not equate to completely anonymous. They have done a lot of donations. They're big companies including, we [01:09:00] just talked earlier about Microsoft, but also apple shell, BP, a McDonald's Starbucks. And these hacktivists have really joined in. And w we talked about a couple of other things, so this is messy. Because even more than in peace time, these active combat that are really hacking happening right now, rendering, hacktivism, any effectual and largely just distracting because we are now in a hot war right now. Maybe we don't have our. Eric planes bombing Russian movements or other things, but there is a kinetic war going on over there. There are bullets, et cetera, mean exchanged. So the hacktivist efforts have been, visible. There's no question about that. But what have they done? See, [01:10:00] that's an advantage to being a country like Russia, or like the Ukraine, or excuse me, Ukraine, because both of those countries there, their industrial base, the military industrial base is not heavily automated unlike ours. What could you do? What can you shut down? So what you shut down the Russian space agency's website, how far did you get into it? Probably not very far. We also have a couple of groups and we talked about these guys many times the Conti group, which has been. Terrible and hurting us businesses, individuals, government agencies, and stuff, the Cuming project, both of them have declared their allegiance to Russia. You might remember a few weeks ago, we talked here about how we have had some researchers track down most of these Russian hacker groups and their money. And they all ended up in one building in Moscow. [01:11:00] No, that should tell you something, right? In fact, the most expensive real estate right there in downtown Los gal, the tallest building, et cetera. So these groups getting together in order to protect the father land there in Russia. Ah interesting problem. How much of this is really controlled by the Kremlin? It's a very good question. Context. Was dismantling its infrastructure. It, some of their top people were arrested by Putins military. Not military, but police state over there. And that was interesting too. That was again before the invasion, but why would Putin be shutting them down at all? Apparently they said some things. That they shouldn't have said. So now they've come out and have decided they're going to support Russia in its entirety. Now we mentioned Microsoft and how [01:12:00] Microsoft has decided they are going to protect other countries. As well as you crane, at least as far as the Russian malware goes, and they've been very active in that. And there are a number of cybersecurity companies and other organizations that have released free versions of some of their software, these digital defense tools. Free offerings. Our big cranes defend the networks. Google says it's human rights focus de dos protection service project shield is now in use by more than 150 Ukrainian websites. So it's very good. Bottom line propped up by the way, published this massive trove of personal data. Allegedly identifying 120,000 Russian soldiers deploy. In Ukraine that was Ukrainian prov, not the old good old Russian Sophia Pramata man. I [01:13:00] remember I bought one of those on new standing Canada once. And I had a friend who was from Yugoslavia and he said, oh, can I show that to my wife? He showed it to his wife. She tore it up. I said, I want my Pramata, Craig Peterson got calm.

The Todd Herman Show
Life with a government Minister of Truth … who happens to be an unbalanced head-case seeking fame and power. What do we do about her and this? Plus: Border Sheriffs have news about our “border”;  Instead of writing about this dangerous thought-czar

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 59:19


THE THESIS: There can be no compromise on this issue: we are the only ones God has called to fight this Minister of Truth, fame-hungry, ill-balanced, vicious young woman trained in propaganda and convinced of her special place in history.   THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Genesis 1 1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. 2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters. 3 And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day. 6 And God said, “Let there be a vault between the waters to separate water from water.” 7 So God made the vault and separated the water under the vault from the water above it. And it was so. 8 God called the vault “sky.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the second day. 9 And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. 10 God called the dry ground “land,” and the gathered waters he called “seas.” And God saw that it was good. 11 Then God said, “Let the land produce vegetation: seed-bearing plants and trees on the land that bear fruit with seed in it, according to their various kinds.” And it was so. 12 The land produced vegetation: plants bearing seed according to their kinds and trees bearing fruit with seed in it according to their kinds. And God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening, and there was morning—the third day. 14 And God said, “Let there be lights in the vault of the sky to separate the day from the night, and let them serve as signs to mark sacred times, and days and years, 15 and let them be lights in the vault of the sky to give light on the earth.” And it was so. 16 God made two great lights—the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars. 17 God set them in the vault of the sky to give light on the earth, 18 to govern the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 And there was evening, and there was morning—the fourth day. 20 And God said, “Let the water teem with living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the vault of the sky.” 21 So God created the great creatures of the sea and every living thing with which the water teems and that moves about in it, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. 22 God blessed them and said, “Be fruitful and increase in number and fill the water in the seas, and let the birds increase on the earth.” 23 And there was evening, and there was morning—the fifth day. 24 And God said, “Let the land produce living creatures according to their kinds: the livestock, the creatures that move along the ground, and the wild animals, each according to its kind.” And it was so. 25 God made the wild animals according to their kinds, the livestock according to their kinds, and all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. And God saw that it was good. 26 Then God said, “Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so that they may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals,[a] and over all the creatures that move along the ground.” 27 So God created mankind in his own image,     in the image of God he created them;     male and female he created them. 28 God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.” 29 Then God said, “I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food. 30 And to all the beasts of the earth and all the birds in the sky and all the creatures that move along the ground—everything that has the breath of life in it—I give every green plant for food.” And it was so. 31 God saw all that he had made, and it was very good. And there was evening, and there was morning—the sixth day. Matthew 4:3-5 3 The tempter came to him and said, “If you are the Son of God, tell these stones to become bread.” 4 Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.'[a]” 5 Then the devil took him to the holy city and had him stand on the highest point of the temple. THE NEWS & COMMENT: [AUDIO] - Just stop everything and watch this absolutely firey exchange between @chiproytx and @SecMayorkas. Devastating questioning from Roy challenging Mayorkas on his support for Biden's intentional border crisis. On April 19, the National Sheriffs' Association and the Border Sheriffs wrote to Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer, urging them to retain Title 42 authority for Customs and Border officers. The letter, embedded below, is brief but powerful.  [AUDIO] -  Nina Jancowinz, the 33 year old Minister of Truth sings about disinformation  [AUDIO] -   . . . Then, she offers this: the most condescending explanation of Biden firing the Ukrainian prosecutor that I have ever heard, and she tops it off with: “Now you can get back to watching Netflix, Zoom happy hours, and washing your hands” (smirk) But, instead of focusing on this woman's self-clowning narcissism, Jeff Bezo's WA-PO attacks a black man for changing his mind about serving the Democrat plantation.   How a former NBA player and activist became a far-right media darling THE LISTENERS: Hi Todd! I'm writing you from the separate country of Washington state. Recently I was able to rekindle a relationship with my dad.. something that was long past due. Ah, life can get messy and I'm glad we were able to clean it up. The thing I've missed the most are our visits and random phone calls.  Yesterday morning he called me and said “hey hon, what are you doing? Watching the view?” We both had a good laugh. I responded that I was folding laundry and listening to my favorite podcaster, Todd Herman. He was thrilled (and proud). Come to find out he has been a fan of yours for years but hasn't listened since you left KTTH. He doesn't know how to podcast and I promised to hook him up this coming weekend when we get together for Sunday dinner so he doesn't miss another day of the greatest podcast ever! He asked me if you still do the personal note at the end of the show.. it made me smile when he asked that. That was also one of my favorite parts of the show. Always a touching story that made me release and breathe at the end of hashing out all the evil we are living in.  Sadly, my dad is sick and we don't know how much longer he has but we are not wasting another day. Your podcast and the evil in this world has brought me closer to God. I was always a believer but rarely spoke his name. I thank you for bringing me closer to our creator. My life is better because of it. It is comforting to know that even though I've missed many years with my dad on this side, I will get eternity with him one day in heaven. If you can find some time in your day to add more personal notes, my dad and I will BOTH be listening and smiling together. Thank you for all you d Kelli A PERSONAL NOTE: See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Throwback FDNY
Throwback FDNY to the Brooklyn Fire Department aquiring its first fire engine in 1785, a devastating fire ravages Brooklyn in 1848, and the appointment of Thomas Nevins as Chief of the Brooklyn Fire Department in 1870

Throwback FDNY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 13:42


In this episode of Throwback FDNY... we venture back to the days of the Brooklyn Fire Department, starting in 1785 with Brooklyn getting its first fire engine; then a devastating fire ravages one of the Department's districts in 1848, and finally, the appointment of Thomas Nevins as Chief of the Brooklyn Fire Department in 1870.

Kevin Kietzman Has Issues
Draft Day is Here, Mondesi Injury is Devastating

Kevin Kietzman Has Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 41:12


   It's the start of the NFL draft and unless there's a trade, the Chiefs won't be on the clock until late Thursday night.    The bigger news is structural damage to Royals shortstop Adelberto Mondesi's knee as he's set to hit the Injury List.  And it because it's a knee, the Royals fear it could be worse than that.    Ryan Lefebvre joins us to talk about Mondesi's history of injuries, Daniel Lynch coming into his own, a fellow announcers rough home run call and the "unwritten" rules of the game

The Current
South Africa's devastating floods — and the role of climate change and social inequality

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 19:19


Floods in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal have killed more than 400 people and displaced 40,000 others. We hear more from Phindiwe Mashiloane, whose house was flooded; and Tafadzwa Mabhaudhi, a professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal who specializes in climate change adaptation.

They Will Kill
The Devastating Murder of Daisy De La O

They Will Kill

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 61:19


Daisy De La O was murdered in the prime of her life and when authorities and the media failed to get the word out on a suspect in the case, friends and family used social media to track down her killer.  For show notes go to www.theywillkill.com

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Sunday, Apr 24, 2022

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 19:49


Public health officials express concern over rise in COVID-19 cases; President Emmanuel Macron wins French election; Devastating fire breaks out in Philadelphia.

Girl Wonder Podcast: Your Everyday Girl Discussing Your Favorite Webtoons
Lore Olympus Mid - Season Finale RECAP & HIATUS TRIVIA!

Girl Wonder Podcast: Your Everyday Girl Discussing Your Favorite Webtoons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 90:40


Hades said he loves her! Zeus has given Persephone and Demeter their punishments and it's DEVASTATING. Also, how well do you know the world of Lore Olympus? We're discussing episodes 186-190 AND doing a hiatus trivia where we quiz your knowledge of Lore Olympus by Rachel Smythe. LORE OLYMPUS IN PRINT:
 www.loreolympusbooks.com HOT TOPIC LO MERCH:
 www.hottopic.com/search?q=lore+olympus TEAM PERSEPHONE SHIRT:
 loreolympus.threadless.com/designs/team-persephone twitter.com/used_bandaid
 www.instagram.com/usedbandaid MUSIC CREDIT: Isabella LeVan https://www.instagram.com/isabellalevan https://open.spotify.com/artist/3mHmktHG4sbkGsCORnaNT3?si=Nx2DvyOGQyatxudvD3ik9Q Connect with Girl Wonder: 
 MY PATREON:  www.patreon.com/girlwonder
 My YouTube Channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCTk-JbxxAnf5TKyeCchNRHA 
twitter.com/girlwonderpod
instagram.com/girlwonderpodcast 
Email: girlwondersquad (at) gmail (dot) com
 Buy me a coffee: ko-fi.com/girlwonderpodcast

Even More News
SMN: The Devastating Impact of 'Fear of Crime' Politics

Even More News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 74:24


Hi! In today's episode, we honor 4/20, the weed day, by discussing the history of 'fear of crime' politics and its impact on our society. Probably negative impact, if I had to guess! Please sign the petition to stop the April 27th execution of Melissa Lucio - https://innocenceproject.org/petitions/stop-execution-of-innocent-melissa-lucio-texas/ Please fill out our SURVEY: HTTP://kastmedia.com/survey/ We now have a MERCH STORE! Check it out here: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/somemorenews Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/some-more-news/id1364825229 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6ebqegozpFt9hY2WJ7TDiA?si=5keGjCe5SxejFN1XkQlZ3w&dl_branch=1 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/show/even-more-news Right now, Trade Coffee is offering new subscribers a total of $30 off your first order plus free shipping when you go to HTTP://drinktrade.com/morenews. That's more than 40 cups of coffee for free! Athletic Greens will give you an immune-supporting FREE 1-year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase if you visit http://athleticgreens.com/morenews today. Go to HTTP://Brooklinen.com and use promo code [MORENEWS] to get $20 off your purchase of $100 or more/ Listen to American History Tellers: Lewis and Clark on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, or you can listen ad-free by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery app. Source List: https://docs.google.com/document/d/12Z_H-2INBfV_jAap0hjabXoOgJw6YnczacRhGMXZ_vI/edit?usp=sharing Support the show!: http://patreon.com.com/somemorenews See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Little Gold Men
Introducing Dynasty

Little Gold Men

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 11:35


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Phillip Scott Audio Experience
Democrats Says If Black Voters Sit Out The Election, Midterms Will Be Devastating

The Phillip Scott Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 23:56


Black Americans have no reason to show up for the Dems. What have they done for us to be rewarded with our votes? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/psae/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/psae/support

Love is a Crime
Introducing Dynasty

Love is a Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 11:33


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Still Watching: Game of Thrones
Introducing Dynasty

Still Watching: Game of Thrones

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 11:27


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton
Introducing Dynasty

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 11:39


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

In VOGUE: The 1990s
Introducing Dynasty

In VOGUE: The 1990s

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 12:33


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

She Makes Money Moves
Introducing Dynasty

She Makes Money Moves

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 11:33


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Women Who Travel
Introducing Dynasty

Women Who Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 12:18


Unimaginable secrets. Unyielding power. Devastating rifts and shocking allegiances. With surprising new interviews as well as historic sound, Vanity Fair's DYNASTY examines the ties that bind the most influential families in the world today, taking you inside their lives for a glimpse at the inner workings of privilege. The DYNASTY debut season goes deep on the modern Windsors with Vanity Fair's royal correspondent Katie Nicholl and staff writer Erin Vanderhoof, who reexamine the complex, sometimes fiery family dynamics—from the intimate side of the queen's early reign to Harry and Meghan's royal split to Prince Andrew's shameful scandal—with razor-sharp insights, fresh reportage, and exclusive guests. Listen & follow Dynasty here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Comeback Szn
What Is The Most Devastating Loss In College Football History?

Comeback Szn

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 70:09


On episode 191: -Brandon is on his death bed -Brandon went to war with Texas Twitter -Kayce isn't a Texan anymore? -Most devastating CFB losses ever -Oregon the most southern west coast team? -Which coach blew up the toilet at a recruits house? +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ High Noon is our presenting sponsor. The Hard Seltzer is made with real vodka, real juice, and sparkling water. HelloFresh - Go to https://barstool.link/HellofreshWalker and use code walker16 for up to 16 free meals AND 3 free gifts Earnest - Refinance your student debt at https://barstool.link/EarnestUR Bird Dogs- Go to https://barstool.link/BirddogsBSS, enter promo code “WALKER” for a free whiste tip football.