Podcasts about Surgeon general

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  • May 26, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Surgeon general

Latest podcast episodes about Surgeon general

The Gary Bisbee Show
65: What Does Memorial Day Mean for Military Leaders?, with Lt. General R. Scott Dingle, Lt. General Ronald J. Place, Joseph Caravalho, Jr., M.D., MG, U.S. Army, (Ret.), and Elder Granger, M.D., MG, U.S. Army (Ret.)

The Gary Bisbee Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 12:00


Meet The Guests:This episode showcases military leaders. Lieutenant General R. Scott Dingle is the Surgeon General of the U.S. Army and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Medical Command. Lieutenant General Ronald J. Place, M.D. is the Director of the Defense Health Agency (DHA). Joseph Caravalho, Jr., M.D. is a retired Major General of the U.S. Army and currently serves as the President and CEO of the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine. Elder Granger, M.D., is a retired Major General of the U.S. Army and is the Founder and President of The 5P's LLC. Key Insights:Memorial Day is observed on the last Monday of May to mourn U.S. military personnel who died in service. We asked military leaders to share what Memorial Day means to them. Honoring Past Leaders. LTG Dingle shares a quote from General Douglas MacArthur: no one desires peace more than the soldier because it is he, or she, who must pay the greatest price when called upon. (0:40)Honoring the Ultimate Sacrifice. LTG Place shared a personal story of a soldier that died in his medical care, succumbing to injuries from an IED. Following that deployment, LTG Place stopped thinking of himself as a surgeon first, and rather as a soldier first.(2:37)Honoring Selflessness. MG Caravalho points out that there are many patriots; many people that act selflessly for this country. However, Memorial Day is about those who chose to put on a uniform and promised to defend the United States no matter the situation and no matter the sacrifice. (6:54)Honoring History. For MG Granger, Memorial Day reminds him that freedom is not free. We must honor those who paid the ultimate sacrifice from not just modern wars, but also from the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War 1 and 2, and other historical battles that solidified America's freedom. (9:27)

Here & Now
Graham Nash revisits old songs; Surgeon general on nation's health worker shortage

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 41:40


Singer-songwriter Graham Nash of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young fame goes back half a century. His new album revisits his old solo albums from the 1970s. And, the Department of Health and Human Services is ringing the alarm bell over a projected massive worker shortage in medicine. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy discusses the implications.

Audio Arguendo
USCA, Eleventh Circuit Norwegian Cruise Line v. Surgeon General of Florida, Case No. 21-12729

Audio Arguendo

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022


MPR News with Angela Davis
Youth mental health is in a state of emergency. How is Minnesota responding?

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:52


In 2021, leading medical groups and the U.S. Surgeon General declared youth mental health a national emergency, citing increased rates of depression, hopelessness and thoughts of suicide.  The percentage of teens reporting “persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness” jumped from 26 percent to 37 percent between 2009 and 2019. In 2021, it was 44 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  On Tuesday, American Public Media's Call to Mind initiative explored the mental health experiences of young people across the nation. And it took a close look at schools' role on  the frontlines of the youth mental health crisis.  On Wednesday, MPR News host Angela Davis continued the conversation. She talked with three guests about how the mental health crisis is affecting Minnesota youth and schools.  Guests:  Daniel Knewitz is the legislative chair of the Minnesota School Psychologists Association and a licensed school psychologist.  Sandy Lewandowski is the Superintendent of Intermediate District 287. Sierra Grandy is a volunteer with NAMI Minnesota.

Freedom Discourse
Did Pandemic Panic Theater Cause the Buffalo Massacre?

Freedom Discourse

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 17:47


This is going to be hard for some people to hear. I'll likely get accused of politicizing a tragedy shortly after the fact, but it needs to be said. Considering the Buffalo mass murderer claimed in his manifesto that he was basically indoctrinated by 4Chan when he nothing else to do shortly after the lockdowns began, it's a fair question to ask if he would have become violent had he not been forced out of school by destructive pandemic policies.By no means am I suggesting he didn't already have major problems. Those are well documented. But the timing of his transition to becoming a deranged young man of violence coincides perfectly with the psychologically altering time when Americans were tolled to fear everything and stay home. For young people, this often translated into even more online time than they used to have, and that can be a very bad thing for some.On the latest episode of End Medical Tyranny, I didn't dwell on this. I did read parts of the article below by Jeffrey A. Tucker from Brownstone Institute, but the focus needs to be on how we prevent the next round of Pandemic Panic Theater. It's coming. There's very little doubt about that. And with most lockdowns and mandates put on hold, far too many Americans are acting like the fight is over. It's not. It's just getting started. We need to be ready. Here's Jeffrey...Last weekend, an 18-year-old kid slogged a powerful weapon into a Buffalo, New York, grocery store and started shooting people based on race. Thirteen people were slaughtered. His goal was to start a race war, along the lines of the fiction books that inspired his online gurus. He live-streamed the carnage and left a manifesto explaining his motives. His ideology – which has deep roots and has spawned genocides – is the kind of demonic gibberish that unstable kids find on the Internet when they are looking for some mission and meaning in life.Why might this kid have allowed his brain to become poisoned in this way? He was a high school junior when the schools in his town were closed by government, from March 2020 through September at the earliest. That cut him off from peers and normal social life and the civilizing effect that they have. He lived online in isolated loneliness.He admits this in his revolting "manifesto.""Before I begin I will say that I was not born racist nor grew up to be racist. I simply became racist after I learned the truth. I started browsing 4chan in May 2020 after extreme boredom, remember this was during the outbreak of covid…. I never even saw this information until I found these sites, since mostly I would get my news from the front page of Reddit. I didn't care at the time, but as I learned more and more I realized how serious the situation was. Eventually I couldn't take it anymore, I told myself that eventually I was going to kill myself to escape this fate. My race was doomed and there was nothing I could do about it."These words reflect grave pathology. Recent surveys of people in forced covid isolation have found that some 30% develop strong symptoms of PTSD over the course of weeks. In this case, an already imbalanced kid found personal meaning through his own perceived "race" identity. He invented a sense of belongingness through an imagined artificial solidarity with others of his tribe. The next steps are obvious: the demonization of others who are blamed for his plight, the manufacturing of a mission, and the valorization of his own violent longings. The grotesque ideology he adopted was the replacement for what he lost or never had.The disruption of closures and quarantines affected millions of others without the same results but the tendency is there: people are robbed of a moral center and a clarity about life's meaning. In Freudian terms, the last two years provided every pathway for the id (the primitive instinct) to displace the ego, which consists of social norms, social realities, etiquette, and rules when deciding how to behave.This displacement can leave nothing but instinct fueled by resentment and hate. Along with this comes the search for the "other" on which to blame all problems. Whether that is the racial identity, political deviants, the covid non-compliant, the unvaccinated, or make up any other category, we see the same dynamic at work: the attempt to stigmatize, exclude, dehumanize, and eventually eliminate.This kid's behavior is but a sign, a marker, an extreme example of the loss of moral center. It is also a warning. Millions more have been so affected, as we lost two years, not only of education, but also of socialization opportunities. Networks have been shattered. Expectations that life can be stable and good, and always will be, are gone for many among a whole generation. Even the Surgeon General has commented on the crisis for a generation, without of course identifying the most obvious causes.What kinds of things unleash this Freudian id that is always just beneath the surface? What breaks the barrier created by sublimation? Isolation. Despair. Deprivation. This is linked to a shattering of social bonds (via "social distancing") and also material loss. These cause hope to evaporate. A happy future starts to seem unattainable, and so there is a loss of desire to work toward that end. Instead, the psychology of reversion takes place: to behave in a primitive, anomic, and violent way.Freud is a good guide to this tragic process, but to see the other end of the moral spectrum, we can turn to Adam Smith's masterwork The Theory of Moral Sentiments. It is heavy on the analysis of what it means to feel empathy, and not only to feel it, but to rely on it to the point that our own well-being is connected to the belief that others too are experiencing something like a good life.What instills this higher sense in our minds? It is the practical experience of depending on others and finding value in their labor, productivity, contribution to community life, and coming to see our own well-being as bound up with the fate of others. This is what the market and socializing encourages: the gradual recognition that others, and indeed all people, are worthy of being treated with dignity and respect.The universalization of this sense is never complete, but as civilization and prosperity grow, we make progress toward that end. This is what grants us ever better lives. Without it, we can very quickly descend into barbarism in the way The Lord of the Flies describes. This is particularly true in the volatile years of youth, when the search for meaning is active and the mind is malleable in both good and dangerous ways.Take away community and you take away the thing that instills that Smithian sense of empathy that extends from a conscience trained by socialization. All of this is contingent on a functioning market and social order. Without that, a decline in mental health can lead to violent outbursts and even genocide.The World Can Be Broken Like you, I never wanted to live in a society that is devolving ever deeper into moral decay. Along with that is, inevitably, a fall in overall prosperity.Years ago, I was having lunch with one of the great economists who had dedicated his life to studying economic freedom the world over. He developed the metrics to quantify this progress and ranked countries. I asked him the big question, whether there was ever a chance that in the West we could lose what we take for granted, and find ourselves falling back to ever more primitive ways, eventually losing both freedom and prosperity.His answer came quickly: there is almost zero chance of that. Markets are too complex, law is mostly good, and humanity has learned the right path. The foundations of civilization are so strong that it would require a mighty effort to break them. People would never stand for it. I was relieved to hear this and went on with my naive ways.Two years ago, in spring, this confidence in the future was shattered. A friend just now described it to me as a nightmare unfolding in real time, as ruling class elites play willy nilly with sacred rights and liberties, while smashing so much of what it has taken hundreds of years to create.The results of compulsory closures and shutdowns are all around us. It's not only about educational losses, falling optimism, declining health, inflation, weakened financials, empty shelves, and shortened lives. Above all else, it is about the decline of society's moral sense.We saw public officials engaged in the unthinkable – locking people in their homes, closing schools and churches, shutting down venues for fun and therapy, excluding people from public accommodations based on vaccine status – and that sent a message to everyone else.We've been through more than two years of isolating, segregating, dividing, excluding, and dehumanizing. The message: there are no more rules based on equality and rights. Nothing that we thought matters really does matter. The replacement is not rationality but primitivism and the destructive mindset.How Bad Can This Get?Many are now asking the unthinkable: just how bad can this get?Polls say that the number one concern of Americans today is inflation, a direct outgrowth of terrible pandemic policy. We have examples from history of how forces like inflation can prompt rapid devolution. Venezuela is a good example: a prosperous and civilized country falling into the abyss when the money fails, after which civil society collapses too. Germany and Russia too come to mind. One or two things going wrong can cause a crack in civilized life that exposes whole social orders to the unthinkable.What's awesome and terrifying to contemplate is just how many things have gone wrong all at once. The quality of money has taken a huge hit and will likely endure many more years. But we also have a health crisis, a psychological decline, massive learning loss, dependency on government largess, a loss of work ethic, an ideological putsch against basic tenets of traditional liberalism, a revol

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
Customer Engagement with Jeff Dwoskin

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 21:33


Jon talks with Jeff about social media, how to use Twitter, and his new podcast, The Jeff Dwoskin Show. Jeff (@bigmacher) is an Internet marketing pioneer. In 1995 he co-founded an online marketing venture that rapidly established its dominance and was acquired by the world's largest web development firm, USWeb. Jeff is also an award-winning standup comedian and renowned tweeter. His tweets have been featured on Good Morning America, MSNBC, Laughs TV, CNN.com, People.com, and numerous other media outlets. Currently Jeff is the CEO of Hashtag Roundup (@HashtagRoundup), a Twitter-based media group that is the source for the majority of top trends in the United States. Hashtag Roundup has worked with companies such as @TheWalkingDead, @TVLand, @Gillette, @ChakaKhan, and the Surgeon General to help them gain massive reach and exposure on Twitter. Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/ Website: https://jondwoskin.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/ Email: jon@jondwoskin.com Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big!   Connect with Jeff Dwoskin: Website: hashtagroundup.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigmacher

Consider This from NPR
The Children's Mental Health Crisis Didn't Start With The Pandemic

Consider This from NPR

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 11:49


The United States is experiencing an adolescent mental health crisis. Experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the Surgeon General are stressing the urgent need to address the mental health needs of children and teens. The pandemic focused attention on this issue as young people dealt with isolation, the uncertainty of lockdown and grief over the death of loved ones. But while the pandemic exacerbated the problem, it has been building for years. We speak with Judith Warner, a journalist and author, to find out how we got to this point, and what can be done to help kids now. Warner's most recent piece, "We Have Essentially Turned a Blind Eye to Our Own Children for Decades," appears in The Washington Post Magazine.This episode deals with suicide. If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or the Crisis Text Line by texting "HOME" to 741741. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

Children's Hospital of Alabama
How Parents Can Help Their Kids Navigate The Mental Health Crisis

Children's Hospital of Alabama

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


In early December 2021, the U.S. Surgeon General issued an advisory citing an urgent need to address the mental health crisis among the country's youth. Many children and teens were then and still are struggling with mental health issues. Some of the problems stem from the coronavirus pandemic, but many predate that. In this episode, clinical psychologist Dr. Daniel Marullo explains the many reasons for this crisis, and what parents need to know.

Health Connection Radio
A Natural Approach to Depression, Anxiety and Mood Swings in Children & Adults

Health Connection Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 15:03


With the increasing rates of Anxiety & Depression in adolescents and small children, the Surgeon General has called this an Urgent Public Health Crisis. There has been a devastating decline in the mental health of children, starting even before the pandemic. Drug therapy is not usually the solution. Nutritional Biochemist Jay Foster explains the role of diet and blood sugar balance on the mental health of children and adults and the natural approach he has seen work over the past 40 years at Body Chemistry Associates.

Superfeed! from The Incomparable
Pants in the Boot 40: The Candy Man Can't

Superfeed! from The Incomparable

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 29:55


We’re sweet on sugar, but many of our panelists don’t cotton to American candy—including the American participants. We discuss our favorite chocolate bars and confections, Glenn forgets the word for licorice briefly, seaside rock crops up, and we drop into dipping Tim Tams. The Surgeon General warns that this episode might exceed your sugar allocation for the year. This is our membership drive episode—become an Incomparable member! Sign up, support our show, and get access to exclusive podcasts! We’ve scheduled a special members-only live and then archived video session of Pants in the Boot in which we eat candies and sweets of various countries and describe our reactions. We’ll take questions and comments from members during the recording on May 14 at 10 am PDT! Become a member for all the details! Host Glenn Fleishman with Annette Wierstra, Chris Phin, Dan Moren, James Thomson and Sarah Hendrica Bickerton.

Pants in the Boot
40: The Candy Man Can't

Pants in the Boot

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 29:55


We’re sweet on sugar, but many of our panelists don’t cotton to American candy—including the American participants. We discuss our favorite chocolate bars and confections, Glenn forgets the word for licorice briefly, seaside rock crops up, and we drop into dipping Tim Tams. The Surgeon General warns that this episode might exceed your sugar allocation for the year. This is our membership drive episode—become an Incomparable member! Sign up, support our show, and get access to exclusive podcasts! We’ve scheduled a special members-only live and then archived video session of Pants in the Boot in which we eat candies and sweets of various countries and describe our reactions. We’ll take questions and comments from members during the recording on May 14 at 10 am PDT! Become a member for all the details! Glenn Fleishman with Annette Wierstra, Chris Phin, Dan Moren, James Thomson and Sarah Hendrica Bickerton.

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast
Major General (RET) Gale S. Pollock: CRNA, First Female and First Nonphysician Army Surgeon General and 22nd Chief of the Army Nurse Corps

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 57:12


  In this episode you will hear MG(R) Pollock describe her journey into Army Medicine and what led her to pursue a career as an CRNA.  She talks about the role of a CRNA on the battlefield and her experiences at multiple medical treatment facilities including Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany and Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  She explains how advanced degrees such as a Master's degree in National Security and Strategy, a MHA and MBA were valuable in the many strategic roles in which she served such as Hospital Commander at several MTFs including Tripler Army Medical Center.   She shares her experiences when she was the Deputy Surgeon General of the Army and then was appointed as Acting Surgeon General and Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Command (the first woman, non-physician to have this role in any of the military services) during a turbulent time when Walter Reed AMC was on the front pages of the Washington Post which was covering a story on the potential mistreatment of wounded warriors.  She provides a behind the scenes look at what actually going on at that time.    MG(R) Pollock also shares her experiences from additional important leadership roles such as Chief of the Army Nurse Corps and Member of the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services.  MG(R) Pollock shares many insights and lessons learned over a distinguished career and provides some valuable advice for all listeners.  You don't want to miss this episode!                                                       Find out more about MG(R) Pollock at wardocspodcast.com/guest-bios and visit our webpage and become part of Team WarDocs at wardocspodcast.com.   Our Mission is to honor the legacy and preserve the oral history of military medicine to foster patriotism, inspire selfless service, and leverage lessons learned to improve military and civilian healthcare in the future.    Listen to the What We are For Episode 47. https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-rixc8-11e56b3   WarDocs- The Military Medicine Podcast is a Non-Profit, Tax-exempt-501(c)(3) Veteran Run Organization.  All donations are tax-deductible, and 100% go to honoring and preserving the history, experiences, successes, and lessons learned in military medicine.     Please take a moment to follow/subscribe, rate and review WarDocs on your preferred Podcast venue.   Follow Us on Social Media Twitter: @wardocspodcast Facebook: WarDocs Podcast Instagram: @wardocspodcast

Kasich & Klepper
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy

Kasich & Klepper

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 58:39


The Doctor is in! This week, Surgeon General of the United States Dr. Vivek Murthy joins the podcast for a healthy dose of Kasich & Klepper. In this episode, America's Doctor answers questions about the continuing COVID health crisis including the need for continued response funding, COVID best practices, and the future of the pandemic. He also talks about the epidemic of loneliness and isolation among Americans, the youth mental health crisis, and how connection can help serve as an antidote to those problems. Jordan then takes the opportunity for a not-so-routine personal check-up. To learn more about the U.S. Surgeon General's work to help lay the foundation for a healthier country, you can visit surgeongeneral.gov or follow him on Twitter at @surgeon_general. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SA Voices From the Field
On Becoming an International Marriage Equality Activist with Parag Mehta

SA Voices From the Field

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 47:44


This week on SA Voices From the Field we interviewed Parag Mehta, Managing Director and President of the JPMorgan Chase PolicyCenter. He works with a team of experts who leverage the bank's assets, insights, and expertise to develop and advance policy solutions that drive inclusive economic growth in the United States and around the world. Prior to joining JPMC, he served as Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth, the philanthropic hub of the company. Parag previously served as Chief of Staff and Senior Advisor to the 19th Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. Vivek Murthy. Parag also spent more than four years directing communications for a civil rights agency in the U.S. Department of Labor and served on Barack Obama's 2008 presidential transition team as a liaison to the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities and to LGBTQ+ Americans. Parag earned a Master's degree in Public Administration from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a B.A. in Plan II Honors from The University of Texas at Austin. He and his husband Vaibhav Jain are currently petitioning the Delhi High Court in India for recognition of their marriage in a landmark case which could pave the way for marriage equality in the world's largest democracy. Please subscribe to SA Voices from the Field on your favorite podcasting device and share the podcast with other student affairs colleagues!

Hoosier Ag Today Podcast
The Hoosier Ag Today Podcast for 5/3/22

Hoosier Ag Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 14:10


The Hoosier Ag Today Podcast for Tuesday, May 3, 2022: 1.) Better access to health care for Hoosier farmers and Indiana's rural communities.  That's the goal of Dr. Jerome Adams, former U.S. Surgeon General under President Trump.  C.J. Miller spoke with Dr. Adams about that during the Purdue Ag Alumni Fish Fry over the weekend.   2.) Eric Pfeiffer has a planting update from southwestern Indiana – and he chats with an agronomist with Pioneer about concerns farmers may have when dealing with tight windows of time to get planting done. 3.) Chief Meteorologist Ryan Martin says you'll see rain today and for a good chunk of the weekend that may delay planting even further.  4.) AND a bearish day for the grain markets with double-digit losses Monday for soybeans.  John Zanker with Risk Management Commodities in Lafayette talks about the likelihood of a turnaround for Tuesday. That's all next in Tuesday's HAT Podcast!

Fuel the Fight
COL(P) Deydre Teyhen

Fuel the Fight

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 28:25


COL(P) Deydre Teyhen was born in Canton, Ohio and received her Bachelor of Arts in Sports Science at Ohio Wesleyan University. She earned her Master's Degree in Physical Therapy from the U.S. Army-Baylor University, completed her Ph.D. in Biomechanics from the University of Texas, and her Doctoral Degree in Physical Therapy from the Baylor University. COL(P) Teyhen graduated with honors from the U.S. Army War College with a Master's Degree in Strategic Studies.She currently serves as the Deputy Chief of Staff (Support), G-1/4/6, U.S. Army Medical Command and as the 20th Chief, U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps. COL(P) Teyhen most recently served as the Department of Defense Lead of Therapeutics for Operation Warp Speed at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Prior to joining HHS, she served as the Commander for Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the Department of Defense's largest biomedical research facility. COL(P) Teyhen led infectious disease, brain, and behavioral health research efforts; including research to prevent, detect, and treat COVID-19. Her previous assignments include Commander, U.S. Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks; Assistant Chief of Staff, Public Health at the Army's Office of the Surgeon General; Commander, Public Health Command Region-South; Deputy Director, Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center at Fort Detrick, MD; Associate Professor and Director of the center for Physical Therapy Research for the U.S. Army-Baylor University Doctoral Program in Physical Therapy at Fort Sam Houston, TX; Officer-in-Charge of Task Force 10 Delta Med in Al Kut, Iraq; Chief of Musculoskeletal Care Center and Chief of Physical Therapy at Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center, Fort Meade, MD; Chief of Outpatient Physical Therapy at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.; Chief of Physical Therapy, 21st Combat Support Hospital in Tuzla, Bosnia; and Physical Therapist at Darnall Army Community Hospital at Fort Hood, TX.COL(P) Teyhen's personal research portfolio focuses on Soldier health and medical readiness (public health, musculoskeletal medicine, behavioral health, resiliency, imaging, and technology). Her research accomplishments include over 210 peer-reviewed publications, editorials, book chapters, and published abstracts; 120 presentations at conferences; and 150 invited lectures.Her key military awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (3OLC), the Army Medical Department's Order of Military Medical Merit, the Surgeon General's “A” Proficiency Designator, and the U.S. Army War College Commandant's Award for Distinction in Research. Key civilian awards include Dissertation Award from the University of Texas, the American Physical Therapy Association, Margaret L. Moore Award for Outstanding New Academic Faculty Member, and inducted into the Kinesiology and Health Education Distinguished Alumna Hall of Honor, University of Texas.

Southern Tomfoolery Plays
Apollo Protection Agency - Episode 166: Surgeon General Warring

Southern Tomfoolery Plays

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 75:15


As the party treks further into the Shadow Lab, a new type of doctor emerges.Please support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/SouthernTomfoolerySouthern Tomfoolery Playshttps://www.southerntomfoolery.com/https://discord.gg/7KPfMCzhttps://twitter.com/SouthernTomfoolhttps://www.facebook.com/SouthernTomfoolery/https://www.instagram.com/southerntomfoolery/Starfinder - Signal of ScreamsTitle Music:"Signal of Screams Theme" by Adam KellyOther music:Kevin MacCleod - Incompetechincompetech.filmmusic.ioTabletop Audiotabletopaudio.comPurple Planet Musicwww.purple-planet.com/ (edited)

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast
BG (R) Norvell “Van” Coots, MD Military Medicine Impacts in Eastern Europe and the Middle East; a Motivational Story of Perseverance, Ambition, and a Never Quit Attitude

WarDocs - The Military Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 48:55


BG Coots describes his lifelong ambition to become a doctor and the perseverance required to accomplish his goal of becoming a Dermatologist.  This episode describes his career and deployment experiences in his pathway to becoming the Surgeon General for the US Forces in Afghanistan. He describes his general officer role as well as being a dermatologist. He was the Command Surgeon for the US Army Europe and provides an enlightening understanding of military medical care in support of Eastern European issues.  BG(R) Coots served as the final Commander of Walter Reed Army Medical Center and describes the Herculian efforts required to care for Service Members evacuated from the OIF and OEF theatres of war during a very high operational tempo.      Dr. Coots shares many insights and lessons learned over a distinguished career and provides valuable advice for all listeners.  You don't want to miss this episode! WarDocs- The Military Medicine Podcast is a Non-Profit, Tax-exempt-501(c)(3) Veteran Run Organization.  All donations are tax-deductible and go to accomplishing our mission of honoring the legacy and preserving the oral history of military medicine told from the perspective of those who have lived it. Find out more about Dr. Coots at wardocspodcast.com/guest-bios   Support and become part of Team WarDocs at wardocspodcast.com. Listen to the WarDocs Origin Story- WarDocs-What are we for?   https://bit.ly/3r87Afm    Follow Us on Social Media Twitter: @wardocspodcast Facebook: WarDocs Podcast Instagram: @wardocspodcast

Dear Family,
Dr. Jonathan Goldfinger- Nationally Recognized Pediatrician on the Need For and Right To Mental Health Care

Dear Family,

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 55:13


Dr. Jonathan Goldfinger is a nationally recognized pediatrician and an advocate for mental health services for children and families, including in minority and low-income communities. His inclusive approach to health equity and policy has transformed countless lives. He joined Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services, an 80-year organization, as the CEO just months after the pandemic began in June 2020. Didi Hirsch is a national leader offering free mental health, substance use disorder, and suicide prevention services. They're pioneers in specialized therapy and support groups for children, adults, and families while also offering crisis residential facilities. Dr. Goldfinger's personal connection to Didi Hirsch's mission stems from his own intergenerational trauma, including behavioral health challenges in family and friends, experienced from a young age. With the support of nurturing grandparents, parents, and other adults, he developed strength and resilience that gave him hope and a desire to help others by combating structural stigma, poverty, and racism. With a BA in Philosophy from Columbia University, Dr. Goldfinger completed his MD and MPH (Masters in Public Health) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and did his residency and fellowships at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. He brings his expertise in intergenerational trauma, integrated care, and health technologies into a more humane, team-based, digital age. As Chief Medical Officer and Vice President of Innovation at the Center for Youth Wellness, he oversaw national and statewide collaborations and research addressing childhood trauma, including parent mental illness and substance use, child abuse, domestic violence, and discrimination. Before that, as Chief Medical Officer of ZERO TO THREE, he led a National Office to scale HealthySteps integrating behavioral health and primary care for parents and young children through transformative partnerships with health systems, communities, government, and philanthropy. Dr. Goldfinger currently serves on the California Office of the Surgeon General and Department of Health Care Services' Trauma-Informed Primary Care Advisory Committee, has published with the CDC among other publications, and has won numerous awards and honors for his advocacy and public health research. Dr. Goldfinger lives with his accomplished, beloved wife and two adorable boys.     SHOW NOTE LINKS: Didi Hirsch SAMHSA Mental Health Coalition  Suicide Hotline- 800-273-8255 or 988 (starting July 16, 2022)     CONNECT WITH US! *Dear Family, Podcast Page *Write Now Rachel Website *Rachel's Blog @Medium *Rachel's Twitter *Facebook *Instagram     PLEASE JOIN: *Dear Family Members, the Private Facebook Group     WAYS TO HELP THE PODCAST: *PLEASE Leave a 5-Star Review and Subscribe! Thank you! Your support means the world to me. Wishing you love, happiness, and good mental health always.

NC Policy Watch
Documentary producer Cristin Severance discusses WRAL-TV’s latest powerful documentary entitled “Pandemic Generation: Kids in Crisis”

NC Policy Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 12:23


The American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.S. Surgeon General declared a national state of emergency in children's mental health with one in five young people experiencing anxiety or depression. The latest WRAL Doc, Pandemic Generation, shines a light on the real, lasting impacts of remote learning, quarantine, and the uncertainty our kids endured these last two years. Watch the documentary here. The post Documentary producer Cristin Severance discusses WRAL-TV's latest powerful documentary entitled “Pandemic Generation: Kids in Crisis” appeared first on NC Policy Watch.

Fort Worth Roots
Episode 075 "Doctor of Fort Worth Rock" Stephen Troum of the band " The Troumatics"

Fort Worth Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 89:22


A hand surgeon by day and a musician by night. This episode we bring you "Doc Roc" front man for the local group "The Troumatics". DR. Stephen J. Troum, MD, FACS has made a name for himself in the world of Surgery of the Hand. He has been quoted as a medical expert in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and other national publications.  Aside from our guests' accomplishments in the medical field, he has also made a serious name for himself recently as a Fort Worth rock star!!(And listen he has been given a shit ton of titles. The man has done enough to write a series of books about. He was even given the title of Surgeon General of Texas. But we want to talk about his band today.)Keep track of our new friends band  The Troumatics by using the links or by following the Fort Worth Roots Podcast:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.troumhttps://www.facebook.com/troumaticshttps://troumatics.bandcamp.com/https://www.instagram.com/troumatics/ Stephen my friend thank you so much for guesting on our show. It is such a privilege to have you on Fort Worth Roots. Squad STX ! Thanks for being a part of the show. Find information on Squad STX at www.squadstx.com Squad STX is an overnight primitive camping, hiking, orienteering, and laser tag course for boys designed by U.S. Army infantry officers as an alternative to Boy Scouts and traditional summer camp. We develop strong leadership skills through squad competitions, time-tested military training methodologies and situational training exercises (STX). Find more information about the River Oaks Springfest Car Show that's taking place April 30th by going to Facebook and searching @RiverOaksSpringfest . Fort Worth Roots Podcast will be there along with at least 70 vendors and dozens of awesome cars!  Address for the event : 6200 Sand Springs Road Fort Worth, TX 76114.Other things...Find all of Fort Worth Roots content by checking out the website, www.fortworthroots.comand all other social media platforms . Youtube vids to complement the audio that you find on all your podcast players can be found on our youtube page... when i publish the episode. Some times the videos take a while... i work and stuff.  Thank you for listening!!!Intro music provided with permission to use by Matt Novesky. Matt is the front man for the band Icarus Bell (https://icarusbellofficial.com/) ,Owner of Orb Recording Studios in Austin Texas ( www.orbrecordingstudios.com ), and  is the bassist for the band Blue October out of Houston Texas (https://www.blueoctober.com/)  The name of the song the intro was sampled from is: Bones by Icarus Bell. You can check Matt's band out on your favorite streaming service like Amazon music or Spotify. The YouTube version of Bones can be found at this link ( https://youtu.be/d9HLLrvsqi8 )A HUGE thank you to Matt Novesky for the privilege to share some of your newest art on Fort Worth Roots. I am sincerely looking forward to future creations made by you and the Orb Recording Studios family.#icarusbellbones #icarusbell #mattnovesky #orbrecordingstudios  Did I forget to include something? Let me know please! media@fortworthroots.com About the show! This Interview style podcast or variety interview podcast originates out of Fort Worth Texas. We've recorded episodes in the Fort Worth Stockyards, many homes and offices, we've traveled all over the DFW area, and now currently we have set up shop in Austin Texas at the foot of the Hill Country. Its always been the purpose of the show to be a true mobile podcast with a mobile podcast studio. While we grow the show and continue to make friends, we are in the process of what one of our guests calls "bridge building". Simply put, bridge building is the process of working on your dreams while maintaining your day job! Andrew Turner, the host of Fort Worth Roots, is no stranger to the perils of being in business for himself. His first business was a landscape design business that landed him a role on HGTV with Andy and Ashley Williams on the show " Flip or Flop Fort Worth. Andrew and his little company appeared on 6 episodes of the show. This was the first time he had been part of a production this size. Eventually the show was finished filming and two years later Andrew left the world of landscape design. With experience in a dozen or more industries Andrew finds it easy to connect with almost all of his guests. The show continues to evolve and change with each episode. Bringing more interesting content to every recording is the goal and maintaining a feel of authenticity is paramount. We hope you enjoy the show and, we would love to hear from you! This Texas Based Podcast grows best when people tell us what the enjoy or what they cannot stand. Let us know. Email us, media@fortworthroots.com . Do you think you would like to be a guest on a podcast? Send us an email and tell us why you would be the next rock star episode. 

Coronavirus: Everything You Need to Know
Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy Update on COVID Variants, Protocols, Masking

Coronavirus: Everything You Need to Know

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 12:51


21st Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. Vivek Murthy joins Dr. Marc Siegel and discusses what's going on with Omicron and other COVID 19 variants in the US, pandemic protocols, and masking on planes. He also addresses the mental health crisis and opioid epidemic.

16:1
Bully for You!

16:1

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 72:34


Bullying has always been around, but social media has created new ways for students to bully and to be bullied. Join Katie and Chelsea as they take a look at how social media continues to evolve the way that parents, administrators, and peers engage with bullying in schools. In the attention economy, digital literacy and good digital citizenship aren't just good ideas-- they are important tools for managing mental health.Sources:Stop BullyingOhio Department of Education - Anti-Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying (HIB) Policy Guidance for Student Action PBISEdSource - Is crackdown on social media for kids too late? by Carolyn JonesProtecting Youth Mental Health - The U.S. Surgeon General's AdvisoryWashington Post - Facebook paid GOP firm to malign TikTok By Taylor Lorenz and Drew Harwell Esquire - The Life and Death of r/Place, Home to the Internet's Greatest Art War By Cameron SherrillEntrepreneur - Ken Burns: 'Mark Zuckerberg Should Be in Jail' By Dan BovaEleventy

Administrative Static Podcast
Federal Government Forces Social Media Companies to Censor Americans; NCLA Files Preliminary Injunction in Mexican Gulf Charter Boat Lawsuit

Administrative Static Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 25:00


Federal Government Forces Social Media Companies to Censor Americans Mark Changizi, Daniel Kotzin, and Michael Senger each had or have Twitter accounts with tens of thousands of followers or more. Their Twitter platforms provided them with a social network, and an outlet to express their views, to hear the views of others, and to engage with detractors and fans alike. Outrageously, the U.S. Surgeon General and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have directed social media platforms, including Twitter, to censor alleged “misinformation” about Covid-19. The speech ban has included information the government later conceded was true but that conflicted with the government's messaging on Covid-19 at the time. On March 3, the Surgeon General demanded that the tech companies turn over information about individuals who spread such “misinformation,” a clear intimidation tactic. In response to government pressure, Twitter has permanently banned Mr. Senger, and temporarily suspended Mr. Changizi and Mr. Kotzin. NCLA has filed a Complaint and a Motion for a Preliminary Injunction in the lawsuit, Changizi, et al. v. HHS, et al., in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Ohio alleging that Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra, whom NCLA has sued in their official capacities, do not have the statutory authority to issue the request. Mark and Vec discuss this government intimidation of tech companies.  NCLA Files Preliminary Injunction in Mexican Gulf Charter Boat Lawsuit  The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has denied the Motion for Summary Judgment filed by over 1,300 federally permitted charter boat owners in the class-action lawsuit, Mexican Gulf Fishing Company, et al. v. NOAA, et al., and granted the government's motion to allow a Final Rule governing the tracking of boats to go into effect.  NCLA recently filed a Motion for an Injunction Pending Appeal in the class-action lawsuit, to immediately stop the ongoing, unlawful surveillance of charter boats in the Gulf of Mexico. The charter boats will continue to be monitored, their whereabouts relayed at all times to the government without a warrant, unless an injunction is granted. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast
Shark's Pond- A South Park Podcast #213: T.M.I.

Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 31:57


Welcome to a brand new episode of Shark's Pond: A South Park Podcast. Join Bill as this week he reviews the season fifteen episode "T.M.I.". Topics discussed include who the Surgeon General of the United States was at the time of the episode, one of Bill's favorite scenes this season, Cartman not getting phased by a doctor and much more.Theme song courtesy of Joseph McDade https://josephmcdade.com/Follow the show on Twitter https://twitter.com/sharkspond97Join the shows Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/sharkspond/

This Changes Everything
Ep. 2 - The Kids Are Not All Right (Season 3)

This Changes Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 43:15


Rates of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation and behavioral crises have risen during the pandemic. Are schools equipped for the needs they now face? Even before the pandemic, the mental health of young people was a growing concern. By 2018, for instance, suicide had become the second leading cause of death among people age 10 to 24. And in 2019, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three high school students reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness. The pandemic only made things worse. According to a recent U.S. Surgeon General report, depression and anxiety symptoms have doubled among youth across the world. Emergency room visits in the U.S. for suspected suicide attempts among adolescent girls are up more than 50%. And there is a documented spike in suicides among children of color. That mental health strain appears to be manifesting at school in a number of ways. Reports of behavioral issues and violence are rising, student achievement and attendance are flagging and the demand for professional help is overwhelming the systems set up to care for young people. Meanwhile, the adults tasked with providing support to students at school — the guidance counselors and teachers — are struggling, too. For this episode of This Changes Everything, we talk with educators and professionals about what the pandemic is doing to the mental health of our students and teachers, what is being done to address the need and whether it's enough.  --- Mental health resources If you or someone you know needs support for mental health, here's where to find help. Crisis Connections: Covers King County and surrounding areas with five programs focused on serving the emotional and physical needs of people across Washington state. Call 866-427-4747. Washington 211: Free referral and informational help line that connects people to health and human services, available 24/7. Call 211. Washington Recovery Helpline: 24-hour crisis intervention and referral assistance for substance abuse, mental health and gambling. Call 866-789-1511. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: National network of local crisis centers that provide free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Call 800-273-8255. National Alliance on Mental Illness: The nation's largest grassroots mental-health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. --- Credits Host/Producer: Sara Bernard Reporters: Venice Buhain, Claudia Rowe Editorial assistant: Brooklyn Jamerson-Flowers Consulting editor: Donna Blankinship Executive producer/story editor: Mark Baumgarten Audio support: Jonah Cohen

Binah
Binah: U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy on fighting the loneliness epidemic

Binah

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 50:35


Dr. Vivek Murthy, the 19th and 21st Surgeon General of the United States, warns of the dangers of loneliness and the lasting impact it can have on our health.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
Improve Your Relationships For Better Health

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 60:10


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, Athletic Greens, and InsideTracker. Community is medicine, just like food or sleep. Without community, we can become isolated, which has been found to be connected with inflammation and can even negatively impact immune response. Moreover, whom you choose to be in community with also matters. Your immediate social circle—the four-to-five people you surround yourself with the most—has the greatest influence on your health. In today's episode, I talk with Radha Agrawal, Dan Buettner, and Dr. Vivek Murthy about why community matters, what we have learned from cultures that prioritize community in their population, and how to take care of our needs first before giving to others.Radha Agrawal is the Co-founder, CEO, and Chief Community Architect of Daybreaker, the early morning dance and wellness move-ment. Daybreaker currently holds events in 25 cities and more than a dozen college campuses around the world and has a community of almost half a million people. She is also the author of the book, Belong: Find Your People, Create Community, and Live a More Connected Life. Dan Buettner is an explorer, National Geographic Fellow, award-winning journalist and producer, and New York Times bestselling author. He discovered the five places in the world— dubbed Blue Zones hotspots—where people live the longest, healthiest lives. Dr. Vivek H. Murthy served as the 19th Surgeon General of the United States from December 15, 2014 to April 21, 2017 and was confirmed by the United States Senate on March 23, 2021 as the 21st Surgeon General of the United States. In 2017, Dr. Murthy focused his attention on chronic stress and loneliness as prevalent problems that have profound implications for health, productivity, and happiness. He is the author of, Together: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World. This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health, Athletic Greens, and InsideTracker.Rupa Health is a place where Functional Medicine practitioners can access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, and Great Plains. You can check out a free, live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com.AG1 contains 75 high-quality vitamins, minerals, whole-food sourced superfoods, probiotics, and adaptogens to support your entire body. Right now when you purchase AG1 from Athletic Greens, you will receive 10 FREE travel packs with your first purchase by visiting athleticgreens.com/hyman.InsideTracker is a personalized health and wellness platform like no other. Right now they're offering my community 25% off at insidetracker.com/drhyman.Full-length episodes of these interviews can be found here:Radha AgrawalDan BuettnerDr. Vivek Murthy See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Leading Voices in Food
Ultra-processed Foods Have Addiction Impact on our Bodies

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 20:32


Much has been written and said about ultra-processed foods, first in scientific circles and now more broadly in the media. This concept is relatively new, but what is even newer in this discussion is how such foods figure into the issue of food and addiction. Our guest, Dr. Ashley Gearhardt is doing pioneering work on this. So, we eat a lot of these foods. A paper published several months ago, found that as much as 80% of all calories consumed in the US and in Canada come from such foods. Such diets are high in added sugar, in fat and saturated fat and low in fiber and key vitamins and minerals. We've recorded earlier podcasts on ultra-processed foods, most notably with Dr. Carlos Monteiro, who created the term. But now let's talk addiction. Ashley Gearhardt is Associate Professor in the department of psychology at the University of Michigan and as a leading expert on the issue of food and addiction. Interview Summary So, let's start by you telling us what is ultra-processed food?   Well, I'll start with the scientific definition which is foods composed of mostly cheap industrial sources of dietary energy and nutrients plus additives. But in layman's term, I think the easiest way to have a feel for what ultra-processed foods are, they're the sorts of baked goods and sugary treats and salty snacks that are on our shelves. That when you look at the ingredient list, you kind of can't pronounce or understand many of the ingredients in that food substance. That's a big way for me that I tell that something's ultra-processed.   You've made very interesting parallels between these ultra-processed foods and cigarettes. Can you explain that?   Yes, absolutely. So, with cigarettes, one of the things that's really surprised me is that we know nicotine is the addictive agent in cigarettes. But I think something that surprised me recently is we're all probably consuming nicotine every single week. Nicotine is in things like tomatoes and eggplants. But of course, we're not getting hooked on eggplants and tomatoes and consuming them to excess. It was really when Big Tobacco got involved and they were able to take the tobacco leaf which has high levels of nicotine and process and optimize it so that it gave us naturally extreme levels of nicotine that were absorbed really rapidly into the system. And they did that through manipulating the nicotine leaf, but also putting additives in there. Things like bronchodilators that let the smoke to get into the lung more rapidly and to hit the brain. And they added all these different flavors and tastes with sugar and cocoa being the most popular. So, really industry got in and ultra-processed the tobacco leaf that led it to be the perfect delivery device for nicotine in a way that made it addictive.   And I think about the same thing with our foods. When I think of naturally occurring foods that have sugars and fats that we enjoy, we find reinforcing, like berries and nuts, people just don't seem to develop a compulsive relationship with those foods. It's really when industrial processes get involved and it amps up the level of that reinforcing ingredients of the sugar sugars and the fats, but then it also ultra-processes it into these packages that just delivers it so rapidly into our body and into our brain, and adds all these unique flavorants and additives that further amplify the rewarding nature of things like sugar and fat. So, the way the companies are manufacturing the foods then makes them maximally palatable, but then they interact with the brain in interesting ways too.   So, how would you know if these ultra-processed foods are addictive?   I think one of the things that's a misunderstanding at times about addiction is that there's some sort of magical brain signature that if the brain just does this, we know something's addictive. And that is not the case. Scientifically, we haven't figured out what that would be. What we've done to figure out whether something's addictive or not is really to look mostly at the behaviors of the people who are consuming it. And so again, going back to cigarettes. What really led people to consider these substances as not just a bad habit, but truly addictive, was how compulsively people were consuming them. You know, that people wanted to quit desperately and they couldn't, even in the face of some really stark negative consequences like a lung cancer or emphysema. People come out of the hospital wanting to stop smoking and then start smoking right away. And we know as well that these substances impact our mood and our pleasure experiences. They'll often help us feel a little less stressed, help us feel more pleasure. And we'll work hard to get them and we enjoy them. If we know that doing a certain behavior will get us something like an addictive drug, we're willing to do it over and over again.   And that was really, when we looked at cigarettes, the three core criteria that we used to decide that cigarettes were addictive in the Surgeon General's report. They trigger compulsive behavior, they were really pleasurable and reduced negative feelings and they were reinforcing. Meaning they left us coming back for more.   And when I look at these ultra-processed foods, it's clear to me that they meet all of those behavioral signatures. That people want to cut down and they can't. Even in the face of something like having bariatric surgery and having your stomach fully rewired, about 30% of people are regaining the weight within a couple years. And they report that the cravings for these sorts of foods is one of the biggest obstacles. It's these ultra-processed foods. They are impactful in giving us a hit of pleasure and helping us feel a little less bored and a little less stressed. Those are some of our major motivations for using them. And they're very reinforcing. When we look at animal models, ultra-processed foods and the ingredients in those foods are arguably as reinforcing - meaning animals will work for them as much as they would for something like cocaine and definitely more than nicotine.   So, all of those factors together really strike me as fitting the bill for something that is addictive. And then when we bring the brain into it, we're starting to understand from looking at the dopamine system which is kind of the core system that gets activated by addictive drugs, the degree to which fats and sugars - which are elevated in these ultra-processed foods - can cause the dopamine system to release. It's actually a pretty similar magnitude to what alcohol and nicotine can do. So, all of these factors combined really lead us to see some really strong parallels, which to me, makes the case that these unique, novel, highly-processed substances should be considered addictive.   What you're saying is very persuasive and another issue that's come up in the context of drug addiction is tolerance. That people might need more of the drug over time in order to get the same reward. Is there any evidence of that in the context of food?   You know, it's been really hard to study in humans, because unlike other drugs of abuse, we're getting exposed to these sorts of foods from the time we're one or two years old. So, if I try and look at even a teenager, I don't have like that baseline to say, oh, this is how they used to respond to it and now they respond to it differently 18 years later. So, we've really kind of had to look at our animal models to help us get some information about tolerance. And in the animal models, we do see that exposure to the ultra-processed foods and the ingredients that are so heightened in these foods like sugar and fats cause changes in the reward system of the brain that is consistent with tolerance. I mean, look at those animals, they start binging on more and more and more of those foods over time, which also suggests they're becoming tolerant to the effects. To me, I see some parallels in what we see in our society. Just looking at the fact that our portion sizes are getting bigger and bigger and bigger, and the amount of sugar is going up and up and up and salt is going up and up and up, suggests that the same amount of food or the same amount of sugar, just isn't quite doing it for us. So, then we're amping it up and taking something a little sweeter or eating more of it to get the fix that we would've had previously.   Well, it would be interesting, wouldn't it, to take those animal intake curves that show increasing consumption of the rewarding foods and project from that what human weight trends would look like over time and then see how closely those lines parallel each other. I bet they'd be pretty close.   I bet they would as well.   And you know industry says, in defense of things like large portion sizes, that 'we're just giving consumers what they want.' And other critics say, ‘heck no, you're driving that consumers are eating so much by increasing portion sizes.' It's quite possible both are true and both could be being driven by this common effect on the brain of these highly reinforcing foods.   Absolutely. You know, we have a sense that the ultra-processed foods, in addition to being really tempting and rewarding and really activating your drive for wanting more and the industry will say that, they're trying to create foods that have maximum craveability that inspire more-ishness, that you want more and more and more. I mean, these are all code words for addiction without saying it, but then they also seem to not be as effective at triggering our satiety signals. So, the food itself and the way that they're engineered, leads us to want more and more and more and to not have those signals that it's time to stop because we're feeling full.   So, how do these foods make trusting our intuitions about what we're eating more challenging?   The intuitive eating movement, I think has a lot of really wonderful things about it, of kind of connecting with yourself more. However, my one concern about it is that if you're trying to intuitively eat ultra-processed foods, it's not an even playing field. They trick your brain into wanting more. They're not signaling hunger and satiety signals in the way that normal, minimally processed foods do. And we see in my lab that it's really, really hard to distinguish when you're hungry, because you need calories, and when you're hungry, because you're tempted by reward. I have this simulated fast food restaurant lab and we'll bring people in, we'll kind of randomize people. And say, half of them will go into this kind of normal blank lab space and we'll ask them how hungry are you and ‘meh, not that hungry.' And we'll randomize these other group of people to come into our fast food restaurant lab where it smells like French fries and there's all the cues of the restaurant and everything is kind of setting you up. And they'll say, ‘oh, I'm really, really hungry.' And the only thing that changed is that that one group is in that acute environment. So, their reward systems are kind of perked up and it's hard to distinguish that fact that you're now desiring food from I'm actually calorically deprived and I need calories. So, I think we have a hard time as humans, knowing when we're truly hungry and when we're being tempted by ultra-processed foods.   Over the course of human evolution, body weights have been pretty healthy for populations, for the most part. And that's been true for century after century. Then all of a sudden in a very short period of time, body weight in basically all other countries has really skyrocketed. And it's pretty hard to argue that people have changed in some fundamental way or that biology has changed in fundamental ways. What really seems to have changed are the food and physical activity environment, and you're narrowing down exactly how those changes have been made and how ordinary biology that works well under normal circumstances, fails under abnormal circumstances and that's how we're living today.   Absolutely correct. And I think one thing that people sometimes don't understand is that drugs of abuse, addictive drugs, they are hijacking the system that was designed so we would be seeking out food and calories and making sure we were eating enough. And those drugs of abuse are so novel and potent that they can get in and take that system and start to shift the drive towards those drugs rather than things like food and sustenance and things we need for survival. Now, these ultra-processed foods that are novel, chemical substances that really just popped up since the 70s and 80s, really, they are working on that same reward sustenance system and they're on overdrive. So, they don't even have to hijack this system. They just have to amp it up higher than it typically is by normal foods to start to trigger this loss of control, this compulsive seeking, this hard time stopping yourself even when you know it's not good for you.   And what's really interesting to me about the timeline, if we kind of say, it's 70s, 80s, 90s, this is this time where we really feel like the food environment changed so drastically, that's also when big tobacco really got into food. Philip Morris and R.J Reynolds were the biggest producers of the sort of processed foods that we're talking about today, in the 80s. And they really used the same playbook, the same scientific strategies. Their know about how to develop and market and create these addictive substances like cigarettes to make them so optimized and apply that to the development of their food portfolios.    So, when we talk about ultra-processed foods, I think of them in my mind, much more as a similar substance to something like a cigarette, than an apple, or a salmon filet, because the process that creates them and the consequences for our brain and our psyche and our biology is much more similar to that cigarette than it is for those other sorts of foods, even though they all give us calories.   So, what do we know about how these ultra-processed foods affect children and adolescents?   To me, that's one of the most concerning spots about this. And I would say that research is really just beginning. We know that that is the dominant source of calories for adolescents and children, when we are looking at the United States, that ultra-processed foods is where they're getting most of their caloric intake. And our lab, we assess this addictive profile, the like classic signs of addiction with eating and we do that with these ultra-processed foods, and we do that in adults. And the current estimates is that about, anywhere between 15% to 20% of adults in the United States would meet this kind of diagnostic level of addiction to these ultra-processed foods.   What's concerning is that we see about 15% of children and adolescents are showing that same addictive profile. Our research finds that this is a profile that's associated with a harder time maintaining a healthy body weight, failure to respond to typical treatments, to help reduce obesity that it's associated with mental health concerns like depression and difficulties with inhibitory control. Seeing this in kids and teens, in many ways is not surprising, because you're not exposed to things like alcohol and cigarettes from the time you're one to two years old. Whereas in contrast with children, by the time a kid is two years old, a major part of their diet are ultra-processed foods. And we really don't know. We're in the middle of the experiment to understand how does that impact a developing brain that would be more vulnerable to addictive substances and how does that set them up for a lifetime of struggling to maintain a healthy relationship with food?   Again, the animal models are very concerning. The animal models suggest that young, early exposure to those sorts of ingredients in ultra-processed foods and ultra-processed foods is particularly likely to change the brain and adolescent and young rats in a way that makes them vulnerable, not only to show an addictive profile with a those foods, but also to be more sensitized to the addictive properties of things like stimulants and alcohol. So, it is not an issue that might just be in the realm of food, but might also be setting people up to be vulnerable for other addictive substances as they get more exposure to them in adolescence and early adulthood.   Now, what you're talking about is really concerning, especially in light of how much marketing of these ultra-processed foods goes on that's directed at children and adolescents, and almost all of it is for the least healthy foods in the company's portfolios. So, you think about kids getting bombarded by these inducements to eat these things, they're engineered to taste really good and their biology starts getting hijacked at an earlier age such that tolerance may develop and they need more of the foods over time, it's really pretty bad.   Yes. And you know, we've even done some work around withdrawal where I think people often think of withdrawal as really physical, with people like shaking or vomiting or sweating. That actually isn't often how withdrawal from addictive drugs presents. It's often, if you think of cigarettes more psychological. It is irritability and depression and kind of agitation. So, we've been looking at that in adults, what happens when people are trying to get off these foods and eat a healthier diet and people are reporting those same clusters of symptoms that we see with withdrawal from other addictive substances and it follows kind of the same time course, that it often starts in about 24 hours, it peaks in that first week where it's really severe and hard and then slowly starts to taper off. And the more withdrawal people are experiencing, the more likely they are to fail at their weight loss attempt.   Now, when we started to do this work, we thought, well, wait, this wouldn't just be happening with adults, we would expect this with children too if this is playing a role. So, we asked parents who had tried to cut their kids junk food down in the past year and asked them about the signs of withdrawal and they reported that, yes, their children had that experience, it followed the same time course as typical withdrawal syndromes and that children whose parents had addictive eating themselves were more likely to experience withdrawal. So, I just think for parents how challenging that is if you're trying to help your child and maybe help yourself simultaneously move away from these ultra-processed foods, that if it's triggering this aversive withdrawal syndrome that makes your child far harder to parent and while you're also feeling that way, it really sets people up to fail.   So, let me ask you one final question. How do we reduce the harm that's associated with these ultra-processed foods?   You know, I think if there's one lesson we've learned from addiction over and over again, is that while we need to have good treatments and we need to provide people with psychoeducation, if we don't address the environment, our treatments aren't powerful enough to overcome that. So, again, cigarettes is our best example. We knew so much and we were developing nicotine gum and we had treatments out there that were available, but what really helped us turn back the tide was by addressing the environment around cigarettes through policy, by things like restricting marketing and taxation and restricting vending machines that children could so easily access. So, I fundamentally believe that for this same change to take place in the context of the harms of these foods, it's going to have to take policy initiatives that focus on giving us an environment that allows us to have a fighting chance. And it's even more relevant in the context of food because you don't get to opt out of eating. So, you have to go into the grocery store that's dominated by ultra-processed foods. My students here in college, they have to go into the dining hall that's dominated by ultra-processed foods and that environment that's so dominated by that, I think really works with our biology in ways that really mimics what we see with addictive substances that makes it hard for us to eat in a healthy, nourishing way.   Bio   Ashley Gearhardt, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Psychology in the Clinical Science area at the University of Michigan. She also earned her B.A. in psychology from The University of Michigan as an undergraduate. While working on her doctorate in clinical psychology at Yale University, Dr. Gearhardt became interested in the possibility that certain foods may be capable of triggering an addictive process. To explore this further, she developed the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) to operationalize addictive eating behaviors, which has been linked with more frequent binge eating episodes, an increased prevalence of obesity and patterns of neural activation implicated in other addictive behaviors. It has been cited over 800 times and translated into over ten foreign languages. Her areas of research also include investigating how food advertising activates reward systems to drive eating behavior and the development of food preferences and eating patterns in infants. She has published over 100 academic publications and her research has been featured on media outlets, such as ABC News, Good Morning America, the Today Show, the Wall Street Journal, and NPR.

The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Obama COVID, GOAT Returning, The Surgeon General Says, Kim K and more.

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 97:10


Good morning and welcome to the ride! Someone is touching themself right now. Again and again. The CLO turns the ignurosity way up today. Kanye don't want no parts of DL. Tom Brady coming back got everybody confused. Tommy is letting them fly and he acting scary in this round of Would You Rather. The Surgeon General stopped by to drop some health gems. Big Dog has something in common with K-Ci and JoJo. Kim K gets some heat for comments she made about getting up and working. Today in Closing Remarks, Steve breaks down what giving really is and he drops a couple of real good ones as well. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
The Surgeon General Says

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 10:22


Vice Admiral Vivek Murthy is here to reinforce the importance and effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway
More COVID Disruptions, Government Internet Carve-Ups, and Friend of Pivot, Dr. Vivek Murthy

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 63:11


Kara and Scott discuss the latest COVID-related supply chain interruptions in China, and Disney's pause on all political donations in Florida. Plus, governments are carving up the global internet. Friend of Pivot Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy joins to talk about misinformation and loneliness. You can find Dr. Murthy on Twitter at @Surgeon_General and @vivek_murthy. Send us your Listener Mail questions by calling us at 855-51-PIVOT, or via Yappa, at nymag.com/pivot. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Dan Bongino Show
Exposing This Scandalous Biden Coverup (Ep 1723)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 60:50


The Biden administration is hiding something about this growing scandal in Ukraine. In this episode I address the evidence that they're colluding to censor damaging information.  News Picks: Republican congressman wants answers about the January 6th “bomber.” Breaking news about that infamous “hack” of the DNC.  Of course inflation is Biden's fault. New information about the Ukrainian bio lab. The despotic Surgeon General is calling for censorship, again. Major study shows masks don't work. The CDC gives up the gig on masks. Are they coming back? Copyright Bongino Inc All Rights Reserved

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2: Jussie Smollett Sentenced to Jail Time

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 37:46


 What's Trending: Everett Bandit has robbed 16 businesses before being arrested while wearing his clothes that he committed his crimes in, CNN Medical Analyst calls out Florida's Surgeon General for his position on both vaccine and mask mandates, //  Big Local: Tacoma News Tribune tries to smear a Lakewood police officer, they reported first that Said Joquin was shot by an officer for not keeping his hands up, but later reported that he was reaching for a gun in his car floorboard, Joquin's mother and sister filed a wrongful death lawsuit in response, a key witness told cops how we saw the events play out but told the victim's family a different version of the events // Jussie Smollett has been sentenced to 150 days in jail, fines, probation, and other requirements for staging a hate crime in Chicago in 2021 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

(EA) Eternal Affairs TRUTH Radio
We Are The News Now w/Dan Hennen on EA Truth Radio: Ron DeSantis - Vernon Jones - Dennis Doyle - Joy Behar and More

(EA) Eternal Affairs TRUTH Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 29:18


We Are The News Now w/Dan Hennen on EA Truth Radio: Ron DeSantis - Vernon Jones - Dennis Doyle - Joy Behar and MoreThis is Dan's LIVE Show from Monday, March 7, 2022. Thank you for tuning in & showing your support! Our Hosts' viewpoints don't always reflect what EA TRUTH Media believes as a whole!Please join us chatting on social media about our shows using hashtag #EATruthRadioDan provides commentary and analysis on the past week's “news” stories.  And strips out the Fake News so you don't have to.Topics this week include:  Miss Ukraine; Election Fraud in Wisconsin, Missouri and Colorado; Bill Barr's new book; Pfizer docs; Ron DeSantis; Vernon Jones; Joy Behar; Dennis Doyle; Florida's Surgeon General; Trucker Convoy, "Sex Ed" in Indianapolis Summer Camps for Grades 3-5 and More!*** Visit our Media Site at www.EternalAffairsMedia.com & Please Consider Planting A SEED IN OUR MINISTRY! Sign up and become a Monthly Patron for EXCLUSIVE PERKS ...*** NEW *** TRUTH PREMIUM on EA Truth Media Website ~ Exclusive Premium Content & Less AdsSupport us and receive these amazing benefits for ONLY 0.99 cents per month ~~ Click Here! You can also send Bitcoin to: 3MrcjvjkVUyP5dDmELDZkqD5JT5TTYyQHnCASH APP$eamediaonlineTHE TRUTH SHALL PREVAIL ~ WE ARE THE STORM! Our Independent Media Operation & End Times Ministry has been online for nearly 12 years now since Curtis "Ray Biselliano" Bizelli FOUNDED EternalAffairsMedia.com in 2010 as an alternative to mainstream mockingbird fake news propaganda media! We have since morphed into a partial end times prophetic ministry!!!! We are on the frontlines leading the fight against the Fake News Mockingbird Media! Check out our Online Store and get some COOL GEAR! If there is anything you'd like to see that isn't there, message us! We wish to hear from you! The SILENT MAJORITY isn't going back to sleep! Corrupt, Sleepy, Pedo Joe & The Hoe STOLE this election! He will NEVER be our President! He's an enemy to the People! People are waking up! This is THE GREAT AWAKENING! God bless you & your loved ones! GOD BLESS THE REPUBLIC OF AMERICA!   *** Support the show (https://donate.eamedia.online)

The Todd Herman Show
Let the Covid awakening begin - Episode 72 - Hour 2 COVID Awakening

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 56:18


THE THESIS: The Party is desperately trying to put as much history between them and their murderous Covid conspiracy as they can. But, the Lord is good and the awakening is afoot . . . there are even brave, moral doctors apologizing to the founders of The Great Barrington Declaration.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Proverbs 26:23-28 23 Like a coating of silver dross on earthenware     are fervent lips with an evil heart. 24 Enemies disguise themselves with their lips,     but in their hearts they harbor deceit. 25 Though their speech is charming, do not believe them,     for seven abominations fill their hearts. 26 Their malice may be concealed by deception,     but their wickedness will be exposed in the assembly. 27 Whoever digs a pit will fall into it;     if someone rolls a stone, it will roll back on them. 28 A lying tongue hates those it hurts,     and a flattering mouth works ruin. Psalms 25:8-10  Good and upright is the LORD; Therefore He teaches sinners in the way. 9 The humble He guides in justice, And the humble He teaches His way. 10 All the paths of the LORD are mercy and truth, To such as keep His covenant and His testimonies. THE NEWS & COMMENT: Here is Jenn Psaki attacking a doctor--remember when The Party pretended that was a crime?--for concerning a committee of doctors and scientists who told people the obvious: nothing The Party forced people to do stopped the virus. Psaki is particularly flustered, here, paging through her script book, trying to defend the entirely indefensible lie that children can receive any benefits from the mRNA injections. Jen Psaki says that @FLSurgeonGen is a politician who is "peddling conspiracy theories." That's not all! The deeply conflicted and corrupt Surgeon General, has ordered tech companies to turn over personal details about people who questioned his liars at the CDC and the FDA. The Biden Admin is illegally demanding tech companies provide info on Americans engaged in wrongthink and the NYT writes it up as if this is just a legit attempt at purging “misinformation”  But, despite all of these tyrannical efforts, God has not allowed The Party to block the truth . . . The Double and Triple-Jabbed are More Likely to Be Reinfected and Natural Immunity Likely Lasts a Lifetime. Dr. Richard Urso: "We have SARS-Cov-1 patients who still had immunity 18 years later. Let that sink in... This is long, broad, durable immunity." . . . and, brave, moral doctors have developed the decency to apologize to the truth speakers of The Great Barrington Declaration.  Dr. Joseph Fraiman: “Personally, I would like to apologize to the three other scientists sitting with me here on Zoom, the proponents of the Great Barrington Declaration…I'm sorry, because I believe now you guys were correct. And you were correct from the beginning.” From October 16, 2020! CENSORED and SLANDERED: Todd Herman interviews Dr Martin Kulldorff, PhD - end the lockdowns . . . thank you, KTTH.com It's not just doctors, apparently. Look at the number of likes for a story of a family member apologizing for blocking un-injected family from Christmas.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The News Diet
The Surgeon General against Covid vaccines for healthy children, the "Don't Say Gay" bill, Bill Cosby, and Russia and Ukraine

The News Diet

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 6:25


The surgeon general against vaccines for healthy children, Florida's “Don't Say Gay” bill, Bill Cosby, and Russia and Ukraine. Let's be informed so we can get on with our day.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/thenewsdiet)

AMA COVID-19 Update
Reviewing a national plan to get us to a new normal with Andrea Garcia, JD, MPH

AMA COVID-19 Update

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 14:05


AMA CXO Todd Unger reviews COVID-19 case numbers and trending topics related to the pandemic over the past week with AMA Director of Science, Medicine and Public Health Andrea Garcia. Also covering the government's newly released COVID response strategy and how it will take the nation out of crisis mode, the CDC's scaled back contact tracing efforts and the U.S. Surgeon General's renewed push to fight misinformation online.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – March 8, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 158:29


Gas price madness, U of M puts Jon Vaughn's stuff in storage, Oxford Strong scam, Drew Crime, Bachelor Nation uprising, Deion Sanders' toes, International Women's Day, and Drew is catching up from COVID.March Madness is underway with a great final from two teams no one know.Cult News: The Michigan Wolverines have replaced Jim Brandstatter & Dan Dierdorf with 97.1 The Ticket. Michigan takes all of Jon Vaughn's stuff and places it in storage... right before his birthday!Drew is catching up from COVID: Our listeners are paying our Wi-Fi. Drew has been fined $95 for parking illegally in Detroit. Lyla got a new haircut and looks amazing. Drew got his first oil change in 2 years. Marc needs a roof... in 3 years.Drew Crime: Sherri Papini is a picky eater. Being racist at Dunkin' falls under the Florida stand your ground law. Curtis Reeves is still following the George Zimmerman playbook.The Stock Market is a circus.Tom Mazawey FINALLY gives us the Legacy gift card winners from January and February.Poor Danny Dekeyser was waived by the Red Wings on his birthday.Kanye West's latest poem is a cry for help.All We Ever Talk About is The Bachelor: Colton Underwood has found his person. No pre-nup, baby. The Bachelor is totally scripted. Jesse Palmer is a great host. Clayton Echard's brother wants to nail Teddy. Get ready for the most dramatic ending in Bachelor history.Russia vs Ukraine: President Biden bans Russian energy imports. McDonald's, Starbucks and Pepsi bail on Russia. UK cracks down on the Oligarchs. The WNBA is just 'Squid Game' in Russia. Poland gives Ukraine there hand-me-down airplanes. Putin talked ragged on George W. Bush's dog. Putin stole Robert Kraft's Super Bowl ring.Sports: Aaron Rodgers is the highest paid player in NFL as he returns to Green Bay after acting like a brat. Russell Wilson has been traded to the Denver Broncos. Antonio Brown and Kanye really want to purchase the Broncos. Deion Sanders has lost two toes.Marijuana killed Miss Alabama.People are scamming Oxford Strong.Vladimir Konstantinov has been screwed over. Gas prices are so high right now that they are "ridickilus".Florida's new Surgeon General recommends no COVID vaccines for the kids.Howard Stern remains scared of COVID-19.Matthew Rondeau attacked a transgender in February.Britney Spears is on the cover of US Magazine.Chris Brown's latest rape victim sent him text messages after the encounter praising his sexual prowess.Drew Crime II: Sherri Papini is bailed out. Cosmo DiNardo is a dickhead. A Cadillac man turned in his son for being a pervert.Happy International Woman's Day!Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

Mike Gallagher Podcast
The Mike and Mark Davis Daily Chat - 03/08/22

Mike Gallagher Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 18:04


Mike's daily visit with legendary Dallas/Ft. Worth talk show host Mark Davis of 660AM The Answer has become appointment listening. Here's today's segment: Stephen Colbert literally said that if we want to have a clear conscience, we should be fine with paying more money at the gas pump. Also, what does America do about innocent families being slaughtered in the streets in Ukraine? The role that America should play in this is a big debate & at first many of us didn't want to be involved at all. Plus, Florida's Surgeon General said that healthy children should not take a Covid vaccine. The beauty of America is that we get to pick which state we get to live.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rising
Biden To Announce Russian Energy Import Ban, Rep. Omar Discusses Possible WH, Saudi Talks & More: Rising 3.8.22

Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 100:16


Today on Rising, Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) joins Ryan Grim and Robby Soave in the studio to respond to reports that President Biden's advisers are discussing a possible visit to Saudi Arabia this spring to help repair relations and convince the Kingdom to pump more oil. Omar also responds to reports that Biden plans to announce an import ban on Russian energy. Then, Kim Iversen joins with author, Thom Hartmann, to discuss his new book on cybercrime and Russia. Plus, Ukraine updates, WH Press Briefing Feud, and more! Where to tune in and follow: https://linktr.ee/risingthehillTime codes:Ukraine update with independent journalist, Manny Marotta (00:00)WH Presser scandal with Kim Iversen and RCP WH Reporter Philip Wegmann (11:23)FL recommends against COVID vaccinations for healthy children (26:47)U.S. Surgeon General calls on Big Tech to turn over COVID-19 data misinformation with Rachel Bovard (37:17)Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) on possible WH talks with Saudi Arabia amid oil crisis (48:12)Kim Iversen Joins. Thom Hartmann discuss new book: The Hidden History of Big Brother in America: How the Death of Privacy and the Rise of Surveillance Threaten Us and Our Democracy (1:12:28)Amazon Rainforest Tipping Point Looms with Kim Iversen (01:28:26)More about Rising:Rising is a weekday morning show hosted by Ryan Grim, Kim Iversen, and Robby Soave. It breaks the mold of morning TV by taking viewers inside the halls of Washington power like never before, providing outside-of-the-beltway perspectives. The show leans into the day's political cycle with cutting edge analysis from DC insiders and outsiders alike to provide coverage not provided on cable news. It also sets the day's political agenda by breaking exclusive news with a team of scoop-driven reporters and demanding answers during interviews with the country's most important political newsmakers. 

Up On Game
Up On Game Presents: Conversations With A Legend: LaVar Arrington Talks With The 20th Surgeon General Of The U.S Dr. Jerome Adams About Mental Health

Up On Game

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 10:17


The Mental Health Crisis is affecting many people. From the field to the homes and Dr. Jerome Adams wants you all to know that "It's ok, too not be ok." LaVar Arrington sits down on this impactful conversation With A Legend to discuss the mental state some face. From the high cost of medical care to opioid addiction. Listen as Dr. Jerome Adams lends a helping hand to those that need it the most UP On GAME Presents Conversations With A Legend. LaVar Arrington is sitting down with the best from the field, the stage, and beyond. These are intimate conversations and storytelling with legendary humans about their lives and successful careers. In this episode, Arrington talks with The 20th Surgeon General Of The U.S Dr. Jerome Adams. ***National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800-273-8255**** Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Up on Game Presents
Up On Game Presents: Conversations With A Legend: LaVar Arrington Talks With The 20th Surgeon General Of The U.S Dr. Jerome Adams About Mental Health

Up on Game Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 10:17


The Mental Health Crisis is affecting many people. From the field to the homes and Dr. Jerome Adams wants you all to know that "It's ok, too not be ok." LaVar Arrington sits down on this impactful conversation With A Legend to discuss the mental state some face. From the high cost of medical care to opioid addiction. Listen as Dr. Jerome Adams lends a helping hand to those that need it the most UP On GAME Presents Conversations With A Legend. LaVar Arrington is sitting down with the best from the field, the stage, and beyond. These are intimate conversations and storytelling with legendary humans about their lives and successful careers. In this episode, Arrington talks with The 20th Surgeon General Of The U.S Dr. Jerome Adams. ***National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 800-273-8255**** Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wining About Herstory
Ep138. Her Body is a Temple & Sex Positive Surgeon General

Wining About Herstory

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 85:29


After an unintended break (and some serious kismet) the ladies are delivering a blast from the past! First, Kelley covers Dr. Jocelyn Elders who took her sex positivity and focus on sexual education all the way to the White House where she was deemed "too controversial" (by '90s standards) for wanting to promote things like safe sex and contraception. Then, Emily covers Dr. Ruth Temple, who has the distinction of being the first woman both ladies have researched for the same episode! She was also a healthcare pioneer in California who started her life-saving career when she was just a kid. Get ready to roll your eyes and stay away from that gunpowder because it's time to wine about herstory!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/winingaboutherstory/overview)

Tacos and Jihad Podcast
3/6/22 State of Confusion

Tacos and Jihad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 111:18


Kamala Harris is the absolute WORST at this. The Russian war with Ukraine presents many more problems than just what lies on the surface. There is propaganda and fake news EVERYWHERE. Not to mention, Ol' Alex Jones had the number yet again.  A Russian entrepreneur in America puts a bounty on Putin's head... is that a wise move? The Surgeon General wants you to turn in your neighbors for sharing information contrary to the narrative.  What was "The Holocaust by Bullets"? We bring in the historical context to an attack on a memorial to the Holocaust. Join our telegram channel! Link below! https://linktr.ee/TheTacosandJIhadPodcast   Rate us and leave a review! ‎Tacos and Jihad Podcast on Apple, Spotify or wherever you listen. We also have a Patreon and a Subscribe Star if you'd like to support the show! CLICK THE LINKTREE Snapchat: @tacosandjihad   Voicemail: (937)949-0335 Disclaimer: Views and opinions held by third parties, including sponsors, do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions held by the hosts of The Tacos and Jihad Podcast.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Thursday 3/3 - Hour 3

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 36:39


Surgeon General, Dr. Vivek Murthy, has called on Big Tech to provide information about the scale of misinformation related to COVID-19 shared on its platforms. It's unclear (but unlikely) if they will submit by the 5/2 deadline. Internal Facebook research shows that as much as 36% of users are lonely and that the use of the app may exacerbate that loneliness. Katie Meyer, a star soccer player at Stanford, was found dead in an on-campus residence. She was 22 and no cause of death has been provided. "Another Feather in Your Cap" was the idiom that stumped all three contestants on "Wheel of Fortune." The 2-minute clip has over 3m views and due to troll comments, host Pat Sajak took to Twitter to defend the massive failure.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

StridentConservative
Calling it COVID 'misinformation,' surgeon general steps up war on free speech - 030422

StridentConservative

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 1:59


In the latest evidence of the war on free speech, Surgeon General Vivek Murthy is demanding that Big Tech companies surrender user data to the federal government regarding so-called COVID "misinformation."

VetaHumanz Live!
Episode 7: GENERAL HEALTH, Dr. Jerome Adams

VetaHumanz Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 48:13


In this episode of VetaHumanz Live! we'll hear from former Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. Jerome Adams, about why it is so important for physicians and veterinarians to work together to help everyone stay healthy. Learn more about GENERAL HEALTH and other VetaHumanz at www.VetaHumanz.org In this episode, you'll learn:How General Health went from growing up on a farm in rural Southern Maryland to becoming Surgeon General of the United StatesHow humans, animals, and the environment are all connected through One HealthAbout the United States Public Health Service Corp and why it's so important for physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, engineers, and therapists to work together to protect our health.How Bella and other animals lower our stress levels and keep us healthyWhere you can get and apply good science-based information and use it to protect the health of others like a superheroHow to scale the positive things we've learned from experiencing the pandemic to prevent future health challengesAbout the importance of nutritional choices on health, including the ability to recover from COVID-19. How mistrust of the scientific community as a result of historical abuse, experimentation, and exploitation, as well as current inequities, continue to impact public healthAbout listening to and alleviating concerns about vaccines and vaccination How to find a good, trustworthy source of information to answer your questions about healthGeneral Health's strategy for finding a career you loveWhat it's like to be asked to be Surgeon General of the United StatesWhat General Health does for funHow to be inspiredThanks for listening to VetaHumanz Live! If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe, rate, and share this podcast with your friends on social media. VetaHumanz Live! is a production of the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine and is supported by the Science and Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program of the NIGMS of the NIH. Be sure to visit us at www.VetaHumanz.org!Thank you and Use Your Powers For Good!

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. - Out of this World: Astronaut Physicians (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 22:08


In part one of a two-part conversation, Oncology, Etc. hosts Patrick Loehrer (Indiana University) and David Johnson (University of Texas) have a blast speaking with two physician astronauts. Hear the incredible stories of Drs. Robert L. Satcher (MD Anderson), Ellen Baker (MD Anderson), and their lives on and off this planet. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org. TRANSCRIPT Patrick Loehrer:  Hi, I'm Patrick Loehrer. I'm Director of Global Oncology and Health Equities at Indiana University. Dave Johnson: My name's Dave Johnson. I'm at UT Southwestern in Dallas. Patrick, we're excited to be back for another segment of ASCO's Educational Podcast, Oncology, Etc. We have two very special guests today, Drs. Ellen Baker and Robert Satcher, oncologist and former astronauts. So I predict this will be an out of this world segment. Patrick Loehrer: It's starting out pretty slow right now, with that one. Thank you though.  Dave Johnson:  Well, listen, this should be a great segment. But before we get started, do you have a favorite astronaut book?  Patrick Loehrer:  Well, the one I read this summer was called American Moonshot by Douglas Brinkley, and it basically took the story of John F. Kennedy and how the space race happened from 1960 and actually earlier than that, into getting onto the moon. It was really, I thought very extraordinary.  Dave Johnson:  So, I haven't read that yet. My favorite would be Rocket Boys by Homer Hickam. I thought that was a fantastic book about his life growing up in West Virginia and ultimately, becoming a NASA engineer and rocket scientist. So that was really great. Patrick Loehrer:  I read that several years ago after you recommended it. They made a movie out of that.  Dave Johnson:  Yeah, I think October Sky was the name of the movie. Yeah. >Patrick Loehrer: Yeah, it's a terrific book. Dave Johnson: Well, why don't we introduce our guests? You want to start with Dr. Baker?  Patrick Loehrer: Oh, sure. It's my pleasure to introduce Dr. Ellen Baker. I have known Ellen over the years through interactions in global oncology. She was born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, graduated from Bayside High School in New York, got a bachelor of arts degree in geology from the State University at Buffalo. A doctorate in medicine for Cornell, masters in public health at UT Public Health, and then trained in internal medicine at UT San Antonio. And during her residency, she decided to join in the NASA program as a medical officer. And it was actually, she did a residency around the same time I did, and I remember the space call for astronauts at that time. She was selected as an astronaut in may of 1984, had a variety of jobs. She's logged more than 680 hours in space and has been a mission specialist. She retired from NASA in 2011 and is Director of the MD Anderson project, Echo Program in which he does projects in rural Texas, as well as Zambia, Mozambique, in Central and South America. It's such a great pleasure to have you here today, Ellen.  Dr. Ellen Baker:  Thank you, Patrick.  Dave Johnson:  Our other guest is Dr. Robert Satcher, currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Orthopedic Oncology Division of Surgery at MD Anderson, as well. Dr. Satcher grew up in Hampton, Virginia. He's the son of a university professor and English teacher, so I'm sure they made him do all of his homework. He received a bachelor degree, as well as a PhD in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received his MD degree from Harvard. By the way Patrick, Dr. Satcher enrolled at MIT at age 16 and graduated at the top of his class. Later, we'll find out what you were doing at age 16? Patrick Loehrer: I do have to interject that I was a mechanical engineer at Purdue, and it's like being in high school compared to chemical engineers. Dave Johnson: Yeah, there's a hierarchy in the engineering world for sure. Dr. Satcher's medical degree was followed by internship and residency in orthopedic surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. In addition, he did a post doc research fellowship again at MIT and University of California, Berkeley. And completed a fellowship in muscular skeletal oncology at the University of Florida, before joining the faculty at Northwestern in Chicago. You guys have a lot of connections it seems? Not satisfied with that massive amount of education and training, Dr. Satcher went on to NASA to train as an astronaut, culminating in a flight aboard the space shuttle Atlantis in November of 2009. Apparently, he got a little bored cooped up in the shuttle because he took a couple of space walks, which I'd like to know more about. In fact, I read on NASA's website that he did some lubricating on one of his walks. I'm not sure what that's about, but I assume there's not a lot of gas stations in space. I also read that he repaired one of the robotic arms, which seems perfect appropriate for an orthopedic surgeon. You'll have to tell us more. Anyway, while these achievements would be enough for most people, it only begins to scratch the surface of the many accomplishments of Dr. Satcher's career to date.  I really can't cover it all, but our audience should know that Dr. Satcher's has been involved in a number of community activities, as well, ranging from his involvement in Big Brother for Youths at Risk, counseling program, to serving as a lay minister in his church. He's also undertaken a number of medical mission trips to underserved areas in countries, such as Nicaragua, Venezuela, Nigeria, and Gabon, where he once served as a Schweitzer fellow at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné. Dr. Satcher, welcome to Oncology, Etc., we very much appreciate your joining us. Dr. Robert Satcher: Thanks Dave. Glad to be here. Dave Johnson: Perhaps I'll start by asking the two of you, if you could give us just a little bit about your background, other than what we've stated and what got you interested in medicine and how you got interested in space? Dr. Baker, maybe we'll start with you? Dr. Ellen Baker: I've always been interested in space. I was a child of the '60s, and I think one of the very memorable parts of the '60s was the US Space Program. It was a fairly tumultuous decade in the US, I think otherwise, and the space program was really literally a shining star. However, there were no girls in the space program at that time. Right? There were no girl astronauts and so I thought about it, but it didn't seem like it was even possible. I come from a family of medical people. My mother was a nurse, my father was a doctor, my brother is a doctor, and so that had a lot of influence, I think, in my choosing to go into medicine. And in fact, my brother is an oncologist and though I am actually not an oncologist, I've been hanging around with him long enough that some people think I'm an oncologist. So I think that's what got me pointed in that direction. Dave Johnson: Your brother is Larry Schulman, by the way, right? Humanitarian of the Year Award from ASCO, a couple years ago. Dr. Ellen Baker: It is, yes, and he is a great humanitarian. I was actually at my last year of medical school when I saw a little article in the New York Times that NASA was selecting new astronauts and women and minorities were urged to apply. And I kind of filed that away and went off to do my medicine residency and at the end of my residency, I applied to work for NASA as a physician. And that's how I got to Houston and to Johnson Space Center. Dave Johnson: Dr. Satcher, what about yourself? Dr. Robert Satcher: I got interested in space and being an astronaut when I was a kid too, and I was watching astronauts land on the moon. And I was sitting there listening what Ellen was saying and yeah, it was a time where all the astronauts were of course, white males and I didn't see myself there walking on the moon, but I knew it was something that I would really like to do, but didn't really see a way either, at the time. So it really was with the shuttle era that women, people from underrepresented groups finally had the opportunity to become astronauts. And right around the same time too, was when I was starting as an undergraduate at MIT and had the good fortune of meeting Ron McNair, who got his PhD from MIT. And that was the first time I ever saw someone who looked like me, who was an astronaut and that planted the seed that maybe I could do that one day. I also come from, as you mentioned, a family that values education and we've got a number of physicians in our family. Most famously my uncle, Dr. David Satcher, who was Surgeon General of the Clinton Administration. And I always remember, this is a funny story I like to tell if he's listening. When I was going around getting advice on whether or not I should stick with medicine or think about applying to become an astronaut, he advised me just to stick with medicine. So didn't take his advice, this is the one time I didn't, but I did take his advice, in terms of going to medical school. And I wound up applying to become an astronaut, right actually, before the Columbia accident and so they actually paused taking astronauts for a number of years. And in those years, actually that's when I went to Northwestern and was on faculty there. So they opened it up again and that's when I submitted my application and I was in Chicago and was selected from there. Dave Johnson: There's a number of questions that spill off from that. You guys may know David Wolf, who's an astronaut, who's from Indiana University. I had him in my clinic when he was a medical student and as I always do, I basically say, "What do you want to do when you grow up?" And he said, "I want to be an astronaut." And I just smiled and I don't think I ever went back in the room with him, I just figured, "This guy is a flake, what's going on with him?" And I think he's logged more space miles than just about anybody, he's an incredible human being. And again, if he's listening, you're terrific. David. Patrick Loehrer: I just have to ask this as a boyhood thing, because I did contemplate being an astronaut because I was an engineer and MD just like you were Ellen and so were you Bobby. But it hit me, one is, you have not to be afraid of heights, I think. And then, you have to be willing to go around in a circle a thousand times a minute and not throw up. But in the training there, did any of that stuff bother you or was this no big deal? Dr. Ellen Baker: That sounds a little like Hollywood and not so much like the real thing, actually. In the early days of the space program, they did put astronauts in rotating chairs. I'm not exactly sure why? But we don't do that anymore. I would say that the training is rigorous, but it's not unreasonable. I don't know what you think, Bobby? It's fairly predictable. And I will put a little shout out for Purdue, which maybe has one of the highest number of astronauts of any university outside the military academies. I don't know if that's true now, but 10 or 15 years ago, we just had a large number of engineers from Purdue who were in the astronaut office. Dr. Robert Satcher: I agree, the training is not quite how it's portrayed sometimes in the media. The question I get asked from my doctor friends a lot, "I guess you can't be claustrophobic going into space because you're in the space capsule." And that really does deter a significant number of people, probably more than myself or Ellen appreciate because I'm always surprised when I get that question. Dave Johnson: But I'm 100% sure I couldn't be an astronaut if claustrophobia is an issue because I can't stand to be in an elevator. Dr. Ellen Baker: Let me step back a little, I don't want anybody to get discouraged. But you'd be surprised at how many pilots have a fear of heights if they're not encased in an airplane. So fear of heights is not necessarily something that you might worry about if you're an astronaut. And I disagree with you Bobby, I don't think space vehicles are claustrophobic. It's not like being in a submarine, which I would find very claustrophobic. Particularly in the shuttle because we actually had great windows and great views and we didn't feel confined. I don't know what you think Bobby, but I didn't think it was like being in a cave or closet or a submarine. Dr. Robert Satcher: Yeah, I definitely agree with that, the views are spectacular. Patrick Loehrer: So William Shatner just went up and had a brief stint in space and is now considered an astronaut, but he came back with such a sense of awe. Can you describe a little bit what it's like, the view from up there and how does it leave you, particularly your first time up in space? Dr. Robert Satcher: The words don't completely capture it. The colors are so vivid, the view is so breathtaking. It's really impressive seeing the Earth, not only at daytime, but at nighttime and it goes beyond. It's one of a few things I always tell people, that really exceeded my expectation, in terms of what my preconceived notion of what it would be. And ever since going, that's what's so addictive about going into space, it makes you want to go back just to see that again and experience it again. The closest that I've come to seeing anything like that is, they have these new virtual reality experiences, where they actually got footage that they shot in high-def on the space station, outside the space station. It comes close, in terms of the look but it still doesn't fully capture it because the colors and everything, aren't as clear and crisp as it is when you're there. Because you're in the vacuum of space and there's nothing interfering with it and it's just spectacular. Dr. Ellen Baker: Yeah. I'll jump in here too and I absolutely agree with Bobby. And the other thing is, you orbit the Earth every 90 minutes, so you cover a lot of ground and you see a lot of the planet and in that one orbit, you get a sunrise and a sunset. So you orbit the Earth 16 times a day and get 16 sunrises and sunsets, so every 45 minutes the sun is either coming up or going down. It's really hard to know what time of day it is, in terms of your work day in orbit, but it's just magnificent. And it did give me a sense that we're all from the same planet and of course, it makes me wonder why we can't all get along better? Patrick Loehrer: I think people our age remember a few things, we remember the day Kennedy was shot. We remember the landing on the moon with Neil Armstrong. We also sadly, also remember the Challenger disaster and where we all were at that point in time. Ellen, you were an astronaut at that time. Dr. Ellen Baker: I was. Patrick Loehrer:> Can you reflect a little bit about that, if you can? I'm not sure I could do it without getting emotional, if I was there. Dr. Ellen Baker: Yeah, I was actually at work of course, and watching the launch and it was just devastating. Obviously, I knew everybody on board, I knew their families very well. And I have to say, we knew flying in space was risky, but we were still pretty unprepared for Challenger and for Columbia. It is something that I still think about. As weird as it might sound, I actually rescued the plant from Dick Scobee's office. He was the Commander of Challenger and I still have it growing. So it's a reminder that he was a good friend and a good colleague, it was a terrible blow, as was the Columbia accident. In that same tradition, I have African violets by my sink that were in Laurel Clark's office and Laurel was a physician who was aboard the Columbia, as well as Dave Brown, who was also a physician on the Columbia. Dave Johnson: That's an amazing tribute to both of your colleagues. It's very touching to hear that. I wonder if the two of you could share with us, what you actually did on your missions scientifically? How did you use your medical knowledge, if at all? And Robert, what about your oncologic knowledge, was that useful at all? Dr. Robert Satcher: Fortunately, no use for the oncology training in space. I got to use the orthopedic training. One of the most common problems is back pain the first few days when you're in space. We attribute it to, you're going into weightlessness and all of a sudden, there's these fluid shifts, you get more fluid in your inner discs, everybody gets taller. Dave Johnson: Well, let's send Patrick to space. Patrick Loehrer: We need to get up there soon, Dave. Dr. Robert Satcher: Yeah. Actually, during our visit, we measured everybody's height just so that we know what that change was and we did do a experiment actually, that my background came very useful for. We were looking at the effects of bisphosphonate on bone loss. So bisphosphonates, well, everybody knows, this is ASCO, a class of drugs, anti-absorptives, used in patients with bone metastasis. It was actually being tested in rats, thinking about countermeasures for keeping people from losing bone in long duration, space trips. Unfortunately, bisphosphonates come with a lot of effects. But it did seem to work, in terms of the bone mass, which is induced by weightlessness in rats. And then finally, I was the crew medical officer for my group because I was the only MD up there in our crew. Ellen probably was the same in hers. So, what that involves is, NASA was one of the first places to pioneer use of telemedicine. So, you're basically, communicating with the flight surgeons on the ground every day, talking about what sort of medical issues there are with the crew and getting their recommendations for dealing with whatever it is. So yeah, being a doctor actually came very much handy. Dave Johnson: I was going to ask both of you. During your flights, did you encounter any medical emergencies without violating HIPAA? I mean, did you have to do an appendectomy? Dr. Ellen Baker: No appendectomies and fortunately, no emergencies, astronauts are pretty well scrutinized and examined before flights. And I think the best insurance against a medical problem in space is to send crews that are really fit and really healthy. And of course, there's always the risk of things like trauma, but the risk is actually fairly low. So no emergencies on my flight. Patrick Loehrer: There's no RVUs up there are there, that you have to worry about billing or no? Dr. Robert Satcher: No, we didn't have to deal with third-party payers. Patrick Loehrer: This is looking more and more like a job I want to pursue here, I'm going to be taller and there's no billing. This is great. Dave Johnson: I want to hear from Ellen, what sort of experiments she was involved in and how her medical background helped her assist with that? Dr. Ellen Baker: Yeah. People think, "Gee, if you're a doctor and you're an astronaut, they selected you to be a doctor in space." But in fact, astronauts are selected sort of generically. So once you come into the office, you're trained as an astronaut and Bobby and I were both mission specialists, as opposed to astronaut pilots. And so we received training on all sorts of different things. Bobby did a space walk. I trained for space walks, but never did one. We trained on the remote arm. We trained how to fix things when they were broken. I was actually a flight engineer on one of my flights. But that aside, I was also the crew medical officer and on every flight astronauts participate in medical experiments, because we are trying to gather lots of information from very few people on the physiologic effects of space flight, particularly looking towards longer flights, perhaps back to the moon or to Mars. So I did participate as a subject, I was an operator in a few medical experiments, but the bulk of my responsibilities actually were not medical. And I think Bobby, maybe you would agree with that? We did have some flights that were designated as what I would call, space life sciences flights, but there was only a handful of them and I was not a crew member on any of those flights. Patrick Loehrer: Boy, I could spend another three hours on this and would love to hear more stories. Dave Johnson: This concludes part one of our interview with former NASA astronauts, Drs. Ellen Baker and Robert Satcher. Please be sure to tune in to part two of the interview, where we will learn more about the incredible work they're doing in their post NASA careers. Thank you for tuning in to Oncology, Etc., an ASCO Educational Podcast. If you have an idea for a topic or guest you would like us to interview, please email your suggestion to education@asco.org. Thank you for making Oncology, Etc. a part of your day. Announcer: Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education Podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe, let us know what you think by leaving a review. 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