Podcasts about lifespan

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measure of average lifespan in a given population

  • 932PODCASTS
  • 1,371EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jun 30, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about lifespan

Show all podcasts related to lifespan

Latest podcast episodes about lifespan

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)
Inside RI Public Health: A Partnership Between CCA and Lifespan Addresses Social Determinants of Health and Beyond

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 28:11


Inside RI Public Health presented by Commonwealth Care Alliance: a partnership between CCA and Lifespan addresses social determinants of health and much more.  We discuss in detail with CCA's Corey McCarty and Lifespan's Dr. Alan Kurose.Support the show

The Uncensored Unprofessor
265 Climate Change (2) Cold. No, hot! No, wait! (Alarmism)

The Uncensored Unprofessor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 33:59


When I was in high school a few teachers warned us of a looming ice age. Then for a couple decades we heard dire warnings of global warming. Today? It's a matter of climate change. Along the way what changed to cause the shift in terminology? And, as we think of it, on what does climate change science rest, computer models? I also reflect on the implications of the recent SCOTUS ruling about abortion. Come think and laugh with me!

Revolution Health Radio
RHR Research Review: Dietary Intake Reporting, Caloric Restriction, Insomnia, Lion's Mane, Lifestyle-Lifespan Correlation, Antibiotics & the Gut, and Aspirin

Revolution Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 55:37


In this episode of Revolution Health Radio, Chris examines studies related to the tendency of all body types to underreport their caloric intake, how our circadian rhythm potentially impacts the results of calorie restriction, how insomnia in middle age impacts cognitive function later in life, using lion's mane mushrooms to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, how making healthy diet and lifestyle choices can positively and significantly impact our lifespan, the impact of antibiotic use on the gut microbiome and how it can lead to systemic fungal infections, and whether people should be taking low-dose daily aspirin to help prevent heart attack and stroke. The post RHR Research Review: Dietary Intake Reporting, Caloric Restriction, Insomnia, Lion's Mane, Lifestyle-Lifespan Correlation, Antibiotics & the Gut, and Aspirin appeared first on Chris Kresser.

Prevmed
Genetic Diseases as Models of Aging (David Sinclair Book LIFESPAN - Part 7) - FORD BREWER MD MPH

Prevmed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 5:40


For more information, contact us at 859-721-1414 or myhealth@prevmedheartrisk.com. Also, check out the following resources:  ·Newsletter Sign Up·Jubilee website·PrevMed's website·PrevMed's YouTube channel·PrevMed's Facebook page·PrevMed's Instagram·PrevMed's LinkedIn·PrevMed's Twitter ·PrevMed's Pinterest

Overnights
Are you having a healthy dose of optimism?

Overnights

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 16:22


A newly released study has found optimism is linked to a longer lifespan

AskBRStv Live Podcast
DOUBLE the Lifespan of Your Saltwater Fish With Proper Disease & Parasite Management? Ep: 5

AskBRStv Live Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 14:19


Take your saltwater fish disease management to the next level! Today, Ryan and Elliot are continuing their series on saltwater fish health and quarantine and diving deep into the concept of disease management in our saltwater aquariums. This one is for all of us that don't or can't practice parasite eradication in our reef tanks. Full Playlist on YouTube: https://brs.li/FishHealthPlaylist Bulk Reef Supply on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and more!➡ AskBRStv Facebook Group➡ Bulk Reef Supply Instagram➡ BRS on TikTok

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
Alan Cash | Is Oxaloacetate The Best Supplement For Extending Lifespan? Tips For PMS Symptoms & More! KKP: 427

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 68:46


Today, I am blessed to have here with me Alan Cash. He serves as founder and chief science officer at Terra Biological.  Researching into the molecular and genomic mechanisms of aging and the effects of calorie restriction on aging, Mr. Cash developed unique molecular methods and compounds to mimic calorie restriction and extend lifespan in laboratory animals.  Mr. Cash has an MS in physics from the University of Oklahoma.  As an entrepreneur, Mr. Cash has gained recognition and awards from the White House, INC 500 business,  Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year, Deloitte and Touche Technology Fast 50, and Top 100 Hotfirm.   In this episode, Alan talks about his passion for researching the mechanisms behind aging. During a study, Alan found that oxaloacetate extends the lifespan of worms. He speaks about the other clinical research Alan has done around oxaloacetate and what are the most surprising benefits of this compound. Alan dives into reversing some of the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and chronic fatigue syndrome. Tune in as we chat about how Alan is researching the effects of oxaloacetate on women with breast cancer. 

KFI Featured Segments
@BillHandelShow - Medical News with Dr. Jim Keany

KFI Featured Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 11:38


Bill Handel is joined by Dr. Jim Keany, Co-Director of the ER at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo. He and Dr. Keany talk about heat exposure, Pfizer vs. Moderna when it comes to the COVID vaccine, and a 10-second balance test that might predict your lifespan.

Prevmed
Fasting, Valter Longo & Meat Products (David Sinclair Book LIFESPAN - Part 5) - FORD BREWER MD MPH

Prevmed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 7:21


For more information, contact us at 859-721-1414 or myhealth@prevmedheartrisk.com. Also, check out the following resources:  ·Newsletter Sign Up·Jubilee website·PrevMed's website·PrevMed's YouTube channel·PrevMed's Facebook page·PrevMed's Instagram·PrevMed's LinkedIn·PrevMed's Twitter ·PrevMed's Pinterest

Dot Today
Lifespan

Dot Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 4:49


Reading David Sinclair's book and confident our kids will live longer lives than all of us.

SuperFeast Podcast
#166 Jing: The Source Of Core Energy with Mason Taylor

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 31:39


If there is one thing the western lifestyle is exceptional at cultivating- it's EXCESS ...  The fast pace, busy busy busy, high-stress western lifestyles many of us live has us on the hamster wheel of always 'doing' and simultaneously always trying to cope with how much we're doing. In an attempt to handle (or survive) these obligatory motions of the daily grind, we reach for our beloved vices- coffee, sugar, meditation, alcohol, exercise, sex, Netflix, shopping, doom scrolling (you get the picture) to alleviate the stress and lighten the load. The more stressed we are, the more we tend to reach for a vice in an attempt to cope. Not such a bad thing if your 'vice' is conducive to good health- but for many, it tends to be the quick fix, like a coffee at 7:30, on route to school drop then work, while you mull over your endless 'to-do list in your head. Coffee is in the top ten most consumed legal addictive stimulants globally- humans LOVE to consume coffee. Sadly, our Kidneys and adrenals do not. Caffeine, alcohol, and a high-stress lifestyle, all excessively deplete our core energy- our Jing essence, which is stored within the Kidneys. The amount of Jing energy one has stored in their Kidneys is indicative of; Lifespan, immune system, and ability to cope with stress without reaching for a stimulant.  Enter 30 Days of JING. As many of our SuperFeast community know, The 30 days of JING Challenge is an annual opportunity to get off the stimulants and rejuvenate kidney and adrenal essence so you can begin regaining the zest in your step that was so familiar in our youth. In today's episode, Mason discusses his personal story with the Jing herbs (how they changed his life) and how the 30 days of JING challenge can transform your month, year, and (as an annual event)-the trajectory of your life. Mason dives deep into the dark waters of Kidney energy from a Taoist perspective and explains why 30 Days of JING, more than quitting coffee, is about creating an intention that will deepen our relationship with ourselves and our Jing essences through foundational lifestyle practices.   Mason discusses: -What is Jing essence? -Addiction and excess. -What are the Jing Herbs? -The Kidney's and Jing essence. -Yin and Yang transformation in the body. -How to protect and cultivate Jing essence? -Setting an intention for the 30 days of JING.  -Diving into the darkness of our Kidney essence. -Creating rhythms in our life that create automated flow. -How does 30 days of JING improve longevity and vitality?   Resource guide Guest: Mason's Instagram SuperFeast Instagram 30 Days Jing Starter Kit 30 days of Jing Facebook Tonics: JING blend SHEN Blend Deer Antler  Cordyceps Eucommia Bark Relevant Articles: Jing: What Is It? How to Cultivate It? JING Blend: Our Favourite Adrenal Tonic JING Challenge: 30 Days To Restore Core Energy Adrenal and Kidney Health- Breathing and Movement The Three Treasures: Jing, Qi and Shen Relevant Podcasts: Jing Energy with Mason Taylor (EP#02) Why The Weak Are Crumbling Right Now with Jost Sauer (EP#143)    Check Out The Transcript Here: https://www.superfeast.com.au/blogs/articles/30-days-of-jing-with-mason-taylor-ep-166  

Kahwa ou Podcast DZ
EPISODE #93: Lifespan علاش نشياخو؟ نقدرو نصغارو؟

Kahwa ou Podcast DZ

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 44:07


This episode is based on the work of Dr. David Sinclair and his team. The book references is called Lifespan: Why We Age and Why We Don't Have to. Episode 3la syam: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7bAFut0AAvj185yE5591AQ Episode 3la Epigenetics: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2KRM1We9gsMAWlX31zWetY David Sinclair Podcast on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/DavidSinclairPodcast

Prevmed
The Information Theory of Aging: David Sinclair's Book LIFESPAN (Part 1) - FORD BREWER MD MPH

Prevmed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 7:56


For more information, contact us at 859-721-1414 or myhealth@prevmedheartrisk.com. Also, check out the following resources:  ·Newsletter Sign Up·Jubilee website·PrevMed's website·PrevMed's YouTube channel·PrevMed's Facebook page·PrevMed's Instagram·PrevMed's LinkedIn·PrevMed's Twitter ·PrevMed's Pinterest

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S37E1 - Peak Performance Decision Making and the Impact of Decision Making on Work and Life, with Madelaine Claire Weiss

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 38:31


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Madelaine Claire Weiss about peak performance decision making and the impact of decision making on work and life. See the video here: https://youtu.be/guajOA9-xJk. Madelaine Claire Weiss, LICSW, MBA, BCC (https://www.linkedin.com/in/madelaineweiss/) is a Harvard trained Licensed Psychotherapist, Mindset Expert, and Board-Certified Executive, Career, Life Coach with an MBA, currently in private practice in Washington, D.C. She is a co-author in the Handbook of Stressful Transitions Across the Lifespan, and bestselling author of “Getting to G.R.E.A.T. 5-Step Strategy for Work and Life.” Madelaine is a former group mental health practice administrative director, a corporate chief organizational development officer, and associate director of the Anatomical Gift Program at Harvard Medical School. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Check out the Ready for Takeoff podcast at Wix.com/readyfortakeoff. Check out Zapier.com/HCI to explore their business automations! Go to Swag.com/HCI and use promo code HCI10. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Compliance Perspectives
Donna Schneider on Having Better Conversation [Podcast]

Compliance Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 11:34


Post by Adam Turteltaub When we talk about communications in the world of compliance, we tend to focus on training and other forms of mass information sharing. Not as often discussed, but just as important, are the individual one-to-one conversations between the compliance team, leadership, management, and frontline personnel. Getting these interactions right is essential to the success of a compliance and ethics program. Donna Schneider (LinkedIn), Vice President, Corporate Compliance and Internal Audit, Lifespan, has been running a series of six columns in Compliance Today magazine focused on communication done well. In this podcast she touches on a few of the key topics that she addresses. Her first piece of advice: stick to the facts. It's very important to be factual because if you do not rely on facts there is a tendency to tell yourself a story. By analogy she points out that when someone cuts you off driving we tend to come up with reasons why the person did it, even though all we know is that they cut us off. Likewise in a crucial conversation it's good to focus on what you know definitively:  the things you saw, heard or read yourself. She also shares how to handle one of the ongoing challenges when it comes to compliance:  setting expectations for leadership. Often, management is eager to come to a quick resolution and put the issue behind them. That is not always the best course since a thorough investigation takes time. For that reason, she advocates consistent communication, establishing a collaborative rapport and setting reasonable expectations.  Periodic updates are also exceedingly important. Before a difficult conversation she advises thinking through what outcome you want for yourself, others or the organization. Consider, too, the relationship between you and the person you are speaking to. Don't focus on the specific issue you are talking about but what you want to happen. Are you in a dialogue, do you want to share facts or are you there to learn facts? Think about your intent and then ask yourself: how would I behave to achieve that goal? Think through, too, both what verbal and nonverbal communication skills you will need. Think through also how you would respond if the conversation went south. What would you say or do to bring it back to the direction that you want? Listen in to learn more about how to best prepare for difficult conversations, including the power of “do” and “don't do” statements.

The Kevin Bass Show
Does sauna use increase lifespan through heat shock proteins?

The Kevin Bass Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 2:56


In this clip, I talk with Dr. Mike Hart about some of the research about lifespan and heat shock proteins that puts some of the hype about sauna and heat shock proteins into perspective.===Like, comment, subscribe.For more, find me at:PODCAST The Kevin Bass ShowYOUTUBE https://www.youtube.com/user/kbassphiladelphiaWEBSITE http://thedietwars.comTWITTER https://twitter.com/kevinnbass/https://twitter.com/healthmisinfo/INSTAGRAM https://instagram.com/kevinnbass/TIKTOK https://tiktok.com/@kevinnbassAnd above all, please donate to support what I do:PATREON https://patreon.com/kevinnbass/DONATE https://thedietwars.com/support-me/

Impact Radio USA
"Dr. Paul's Family Talk" (6-13-22) TWO HOUR SHOW

Impact Radio USA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 118:59


NOW YOU CAN CLICK ON THE TIMELINE TO FIND YOUR FAVORITE SEGMENT(S) OR LISTEN TO THE WHOLE SHOW! Please check out our full TWO-HOUR radio show, or snippets contained within, from Monday, June 13, 2022, wherein we discussed: 0:00 - Hello, Introduction, Update, and Today's Show Details 8:25 - Arrogant Al Officially Entered the Fray! 9:19 - The LIV Golf Tour? 15:23 - "Impact Music" - Episode #14 to Drop TOMORROW! 16:16 - Political Prisoners in the USA? Seriously? YIKES! 19:52 - A Police Officer Charged With 2nd Degree Murder While on Duty? WHAT??? 25:50 - Classic LIVE SINGING Segment, wherein "Paranoid Pete" came in to sing "After You've Gone", by Frank Sinatra. As Al always says, what could possibly go wrong? 47:52 - Lifespan in Okinawa in Japan is Less Than it Used to Be? Why? 51:52 - Paul's Interview With "Plans to Prosper" Leader, GAIL SWIFT 1:22:15 - Are YOU Paying Attention? Is ANYBODY Paying Attention? Questions to Ponder .... 1:30:18 - What is Going On In BOLIVIA??? YIKES! 1:36:53 - Classic LIVE SINGING Segment, wherein "cannabis Carl", "Hicksville Harry", and "Paranoid Pete" came in to sing "Taking Care of Business", by Bachman-Turner Overdrive. As Al always says, what could possibly go wrong? As a reminder, you can catch all of our live shows on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 11:00 am (ET) on "Impact Radio USA", through the following site: http://www.ImpactRadioUSA.com (click on LISTEN NOW) (NOTE: Each live show is also repeated at 2:00 p.m., 5:00 p.m., 8:00 p.m., and 11:00 p.m. ET on the same day) Enjoy!

Prevmed
Whack-a-Mole Medicine: David Sinclair's Book LIFESPAN (Part 2) - FORD BREWER MD MPH

Prevmed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 4:43


For more information, contact us at 859-721-1414 or myhealth@prevmedheartrisk.com. Also, check out the following resources:  ·Newsletter Sign Up·Jubilee website·PrevMed's website·PrevMed's YouTube channel·PrevMed's Facebook page·PrevMed's Instagram·PrevMed's LinkedIn·PrevMed's Twitter ·PrevMed's Pinterest

Autism in the Adult
Shifting Autistic Characteristics Across The Lifespan: The Impact of Aging

Autism in the Adult

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 29:35


Join Dr. Regan for the final episode in this series about how autistic characteristics may shift across the lifespan. This episode focuses on the life season of aging, including year 50 and beyond.  Recognizing Dysregulation on the Autism Spectrum Gaining Momentum for Daily Activities Email questions for Q and A podcast episode with Dr. Regan to adultandgeriatricautism@gmail.com Executive function book series (choose the book with the age range you are interested in): Smart But Scattered   Dr. Regan's Resources New Course for Clinicians - Interventions in Autism: Helping Clients Stay Centered, Connect with Others, and Engage in Life New Course for Clinicians: ASD Differential Diagnoses and Associated Characteristics Book: Understanding Autism in Adults and Aging Adults, 2nd ed Audiobook Book: Understanding Autistic Behaviors Autism in the Adult website homepage Website Resources for Clinicians   Read the transcript:   1 00:00:02,540 --> 00:00:05,010 Hi everyone, 2 00:00:05,020 --> 00:00:19,460 this is dr Regan joining you again for our final episode here on autism in the adult in our series about shifts in the characteristics of autism across the lifespan. 3 00:00:20,330 --> 00:00:21,530 Many of you know, 4 00:00:21,530 --> 00:00:24,160 already that I am a neuropsychologist, 5 00:00:24,540 --> 00:00:27,360 I'm a certified autism specialist, 6 00:00:27,840 --> 00:00:38,850 an author podcast host here at autism in the adult and the founder and director of a diagnostic autism clinic for adolescents, 7 00:00:38,850 --> 00:00:41,960 adults and aging adults in central Illinois. 8 00:00:42,840 --> 00:00:46,760 We're going to get into this final episode of our series. 9 00:00:46,920 --> 00:00:48,560 But before we do that, 10 00:00:49,440 --> 00:00:53,850 I want to talk to you about our next episode. 11 00:00:54,240 --> 00:00:59,760 I do have some ideas for topics for more episodes and another series, 12 00:01:00,140 --> 00:01:06,040 but I'm thinking that what I'd really like to do is to make space for an episode, 13 00:01:06,040 --> 00:01:18,220 answering your questions or talking about um maybe a particular statement or question or term that you would like some feedback about. 14 00:01:18,230 --> 00:01:24,160 So I'm either going to do that for the next episode or sometime soon. 15 00:01:24,440 --> 00:01:30,400 If you do have a question you would like me to cover or something to comment on. 16 00:01:30,940 --> 00:01:42,060 You can email that to me at my professional email which is adultandgeriatricautism@gmail.com. 17 00:01:42,740 --> 00:01:47,260 adultandgeriatricautism@gmail.com. 18 00:01:48,340 --> 00:01:53,480 And I cannot comment on any particular personal issue. 19 00:01:53,480 --> 00:01:56,080 Like I can't give you personal advice. 20 00:01:56,090 --> 00:02:06,290 But if you have a general question about what something looks like in autism or an approach people take for a certain situation, 21 00:02:06,300 --> 00:02:09,760 you can certainly email those questions in. 22 00:02:10,340 --> 00:02:17,700 I will try to get as many as I can and respond to those in an episode. 23 00:02:17,710 --> 00:02:20,930 I may not get to all of the questions, 24 00:02:20,940 --> 00:02:24,860 but I can save them for future episodes. 25 00:02:26,040 --> 00:02:30,480 If there are questions that really should be a whole episode or series, 26 00:02:30,490 --> 00:02:32,850 I'll go ahead and save those as well. 27 00:02:33,440 --> 00:02:41,660 But I hope you will participate and will have kind of a question and answer session for those things that are on your mind. 28 00:02:43,640 --> 00:02:47,960 So as we round out the final episode in our series, 29 00:02:49,140 --> 00:02:53,610 those of you who have followed the other episodes, 30 00:02:53,620 --> 00:03:10,760 you'll know that the way that I've structured my thoughts is that I'm going to present first on issues related to the physical body and changes in the development um or aging of the body and also the biochemistry. 31 00:03:11,340 --> 00:03:20,540 And then I talk about things related to changing life circumstances that as we live life across seasons, 32 00:03:20,630 --> 00:03:27,460 the things that we are in charge of doing or striving to do these kinds of things shift. 33 00:03:27,840 --> 00:03:38,660 And we also just talk about the interchange of both the physical shifting and the changes in life circumstances. 34 00:03:39,840 --> 00:03:41,800 So during adolescence, 35 00:03:41,800 --> 00:03:45,560 we talked about how we have a lot going on in the physical body. 36 00:03:45,940 --> 00:03:58,320 We have development of the body as a whole and of the brain and we have hormone shifts and also a lot of increased demand on the individual with things like academics, 37 00:03:58,330 --> 00:04:04,760 independence and the social environment during pregnancy or menopause for example, 38 00:04:05,440 --> 00:04:18,710 there are lots of physical and biochemical changes and these intersect with this increased demand on the individual and changes in the environment like increased clutter in the household, 39 00:04:18,720 --> 00:04:19,710 more noise, 40 00:04:19,710 --> 00:04:20,550 more visitors, 41 00:04:20,550 --> 00:04:21,250 etcetera. 42 00:04:22,340 --> 00:04:28,140 Today we're going to focus on the life season that has to do with aging. 43 00:04:28,140 --> 00:04:40,550 So we're going to look at age 50 and onward and we'll use that same structure where we'll talk about the physical body and changes and we'll also talk about life seasons, 44 00:04:41,240 --> 00:04:42,560 circumstances, 45 00:04:42,560 --> 00:04:43,410 environments, 46 00:04:43,410 --> 00:04:49,060 etcetera when it comes to physical changes in the body and in the brain. 47 00:04:50,140 --> 00:04:57,250 One of the ways that the aging of the body can impact the autistic is with regard to regulation. 48 00:04:57,840 --> 00:05:01,950 So as we've talked about on other episodes about regulation, 49 00:05:01,950 --> 00:05:12,350 which is the centering of the individual with alertness with attention and with an emotionally calm and resilient state, 50 00:05:13,440 --> 00:05:22,650 the autistic often has to be more intentional about how to get sensory inputs to help them feel centered. 51 00:05:23,640 --> 00:05:24,860 For some people, 52 00:05:24,860 --> 00:05:27,860 these inputs are involving physical activity. 53 00:05:27,870 --> 00:05:30,750 So some may have realized that hey, 54 00:05:31,140 --> 00:05:37,850 I feel the best when I am able to get regular bike rides, 55 00:05:38,630 --> 00:05:41,560 I get that movement input into the brain, 56 00:05:41,560 --> 00:05:43,160 that vestibular input. 57 00:05:43,840 --> 00:05:49,440 And maybe this has even turned into a special interest with owning several bikes, 58 00:05:49,440 --> 00:05:58,440 with going on bike trips with bicycle enthusiasts and entering biking events like races well, 59 00:05:58,440 --> 00:05:59,870 when the body ages, 60 00:05:59,870 --> 00:06:09,860 the individual may feel like not only am I being kind of robbed of my special interest if I can't keep doing these physical things, 61 00:06:10,540 --> 00:06:13,510 which can be a big deal because, 62 00:06:13,520 --> 00:06:13,940 you know, 63 00:06:13,940 --> 00:06:18,360 perhaps life has revolved a lot around this hobby, 64 00:06:18,740 --> 00:06:24,250 but also I'm not able to get the appropriate receptive input, 65 00:06:24,250 --> 00:06:31,250 that pressure in the joints when you're pedaling the bike and the vestibular input into the brain. 66 00:06:31,260 --> 00:06:33,360 That's that movement input. 67 00:06:33,370 --> 00:06:37,810 And the combination of those two things really helped someone. 68 00:06:37,810 --> 00:06:42,550 Let's say that these are the things that their nervous system needed. 69 00:06:43,340 --> 00:06:50,140 These pressure and movement inputs have helped the person get momentum for daily activities. 70 00:06:50,150 --> 00:06:56,660 If you haven't listened to this series yet on daily activities and getting momentum, 71 00:06:57,240 --> 00:07:09,660 I'll put the link in the notes and perhaps this is a person where bike riding has also helped them feel centered emotionally and also more resilient for the day. 72 00:07:11,240 --> 00:07:18,730 So for the individual who experiences this real benefit from bike riding, 73 00:07:18,740 --> 00:07:23,860 aging can present this dilemma of how can I fill this void. 74 00:07:24,240 --> 00:07:32,150 And a lot of people experience this kind of need to shift with aging where oh, 75 00:07:32,150 --> 00:07:38,060 I can't do the same physical things that I have always done and enjoyed. 76 00:07:38,940 --> 00:07:51,500 But for the individual on the spectrum who may really need a lot more intentionality to get these inputs in order to feel just right and to feel okay, 77 00:07:51,510 --> 00:07:52,040 you know, 78 00:07:52,040 --> 00:08:07,610 that can have a big impact on how centered they're able to feel one of the recommendations for the aging individual is to be really intentional about realizing the role that bike riding played, 79 00:08:07,610 --> 00:08:08,660 for example, 80 00:08:09,240 --> 00:08:15,860 and that there's a void that the person may need to get creative to fill. 81 00:08:16,540 --> 00:08:21,750 So the ideal situation would be that the person has the self awareness. 82 00:08:22,340 --> 00:08:22,790 That hey, 83 00:08:22,790 --> 00:08:34,710 the reason that I love this in part is because my system really benefits from movement or it really benefits from pressure, 84 00:08:34,710 --> 00:08:35,620 input, 85 00:08:35,630 --> 00:08:37,390 pressure through my joints, 86 00:08:37,390 --> 00:08:39,050 pressure into the muscles. 87 00:08:40,440 --> 00:08:45,410 If the person is self aware about the role that bike riding plays for them, 88 00:08:45,420 --> 00:08:48,260 but they can't bike bike ride anymore, 89 00:08:48,320 --> 00:08:54,300 then they can start to think how else can I get pressure input, 90 00:08:54,310 --> 00:08:56,760 How else can I get movement input? 91 00:08:58,140 --> 00:09:05,060 So they may need to think about more forgiving ways to get their system, 92 00:09:05,440 --> 00:09:07,450 this type of thing that they need. 93 00:09:08,240 --> 00:09:14,240 Someone could get pressure and movement input by laying in a hammock. 94 00:09:14,240 --> 00:09:17,400 So they have pressure all along their back, 95 00:09:17,410 --> 00:09:21,410 all from the tips of their toes up to their neck, 96 00:09:21,410 --> 00:09:26,450 and their shoulders in their head and some movement rocking back and forth. 97 00:09:27,120 --> 00:09:53,750 Somebody might have a big swing in the backyard and maybe it's um an old fashioned tree swing or they've got um a tire swing that their grandkids plan maybe being able to sit in there and have this movement of swinging that might really hit the spot for their nervous system. 98 00:09:53,760 --> 00:09:56,680 It's not something that we automatically think of, 99 00:09:56,680 --> 00:10:02,960 but it takes this awareness, this intentionality to it doesn't it? 100 00:10:03,440 --> 00:10:07,920 Someone else might try yoga to get pressure in their joints. 101 00:10:07,930 --> 00:10:41,050 A down dog gives a lot of pressure throughout their or different parts of the sun salutation. yin yoga is something that offers a lot of holding of poses and it's supposed to be you know a very restorative kind of practice and that be really match where your body is at during that different life season that I need something that's restorative rather than something that ends up feeling a bit punishing to me at this stage of life. 102 00:10:42,740 --> 00:11:08,780 Some people get inputs through swimming or doing things in a pool where they feel that resistance through the water and that is some pressure input or they're able to you know still slide down the pool slide and that gives them some really nice vestibular input or movement input whatever it is that your nervous system needs. 103 00:11:08,790 --> 00:11:15,960 You may have to have some creativity about how else can I get my system, 104 00:11:15,960 --> 00:11:21,260 what it needs with regard to sensory inputs to feel just right, 105 00:11:23,640 --> 00:11:27,860 this is similar to other life seasons for example, 106 00:11:27,870 --> 00:11:39,890 high schoolers who graduate have to do a lot of that same intentional shifting like oh I used to be on the diving team or um you know I used to go to PE (physical education) 108 00:11:40,070 --> 00:11:40,820 Class, 109 00:11:40,820 --> 00:11:56,590 I used to have to do these running laps or this game or that game and now there isn't this physical activity built in to my existence and if there's not that self awareness, 110 00:11:57,140 --> 00:12:04,960 that movement and pressure played a role in centering and helping this person get going, 111 00:12:04,970 --> 00:12:09,650 helping them calm down when they were too elevated. 112 00:12:10,040 --> 00:12:10,950 You know, 113 00:12:10,960 --> 00:12:12,830 without that self awareness, 114 00:12:12,830 --> 00:12:14,580 they won't be able to shift. 115 00:12:14,590 --> 00:12:19,760 So this is not only something that happens in a later life season, 116 00:12:20,140 --> 00:12:31,390 but it often is part of that shifting mindset of what do I need and how can I get that now? 117 00:12:31,400 --> 00:12:42,740 The physical body is not the only thing that's changing as far as our aging joints or muscles or uh maybe our physical endurance, 118 00:12:42,750 --> 00:12:47,080 but the brain is also an organ that's going to be aging. 119 00:12:47,090 --> 00:12:50,050 Even for people who age really well, 120 00:12:50,060 --> 00:12:54,410 there will be age related changes in the brain as humans. 121 00:12:54,410 --> 00:13:00,560 We just all are going to experience that change as related to aging. 122 00:13:01,240 --> 00:13:07,260 One of the things that happens with the aging of the brain is a slowing of thought process, 123 00:13:07,840 --> 00:13:12,180 a difficulty with the efficiency of recalling information, 124 00:13:12,740 --> 00:13:15,440 that's the tip of the tongue phenomenon, 125 00:13:15,440 --> 00:13:22,850 or I forget the name of this thing or this person or I can't remember why I walked into this room. 126 00:13:24,140 --> 00:13:30,210 These changes have a lot to do with the center of the brain and its connections with the front of the brain. 127 00:13:30,230 --> 00:13:42,860 And one of the reasons there are changes with aging in this area is that the blood vessels that give the brain oxygen and energy are really large and open. 128 00:13:43,250 --> 00:13:56,020 They're the biggest on the outside of the brain and the vessels curve and twist and go deeper and deeper into the brain and as they enter the brain and go deeper, 129 00:13:56,020 --> 00:14:02,980 they also get smaller and smaller and in the center of the brain they end up being very small. 130 00:14:02,980 --> 00:14:21,050 You have little capillaries in there and with age our smallest vessels may have the most difficulty getting blood traffic through and we may have kind of a sensitivity in the areas of the brain that are fed by some of these small vessels. 131 00:14:22,040 --> 00:14:26,960 So we can start to have more problems with the thinking skills related to this area. 132 00:14:27,340 --> 00:14:34,560 And these skills that are related to that area often fall within the domain of executive function skills. 133 00:14:36,240 --> 00:14:36,610 Well, 134 00:14:36,620 --> 00:14:46,050 everyone on the spectrum will have some challenge in the area of executive function already more so than the neuro typical individual will. 135 00:14:46,640 --> 00:14:51,180 I'm planning on doing a series on executive function in the future. 136 00:14:51,740 --> 00:14:55,280 But if you would like a really good resource to look at now, 137 00:14:55,340 --> 00:14:58,640 I look the book series called smart but scattered, 138 00:15:00,140 --> 00:15:03,350 there are also lots of other books and resources out there. 139 00:15:03,540 --> 00:15:10,020 An executive function and you're welcome to choose one that fits your needs in short, 140 00:15:10,020 --> 00:15:15,420 executive function includes lots of brain skills like planning ahead, 141 00:15:15,430 --> 00:15:19,010 understanding what is most and least important. 142 00:15:19,020 --> 00:15:30,560 Thinking quickly getting started with the task finishing multiple steps of a task handling multiple things coming at you in succession. 143 00:15:30,940 --> 00:15:47,200 Retrieving memories etcetera because this is an ability that's sensitive to the aging process and every autistic individual has some pattern of difficulty developmentally. 144 00:15:47,210 --> 00:15:52,950 What we typically see with aging is that these areas of executive function, 145 00:15:53,440 --> 00:16:02,240 they become more difficult because executive function abilities impact thinking skills like attention, 146 00:16:02,240 --> 00:16:08,750 mental organization as well as behavior patterns like getting started with the task. 147 00:16:09,270 --> 00:16:13,800 The individual may show shifts in these areas. 148 00:16:13,810 --> 00:16:17,660 So the shifts are related to aging alone, 149 00:16:18,140 --> 00:16:26,060 although it's aging within an area of your ability that was already sensitive or already weak. 150 00:16:26,740 --> 00:16:35,750 So sometimes what happens is that we do see some increased difficulty with executive function in the autistic, 151 00:16:35,760 --> 00:16:39,760 more so than for the neurotypical, 152 00:16:40,540 --> 00:16:46,490 although everyone who's aging will experience more difficulty in that area than they did in their twenties, 153 00:16:46,490 --> 00:16:47,470 for example, 154 00:16:48,740 --> 00:17:02,570 I've had the privilege of working with autistic individuals into their eighth decade and I've worked with our dementia clinic to determine whether an individual has dementia or an undiagnosed autism spectrum condition, 155 00:17:02,580 --> 00:17:11,670 which is only just impacted by age that there's no um separate disease process that we would call a dementia. 156 00:17:12,240 --> 00:17:13,940 When I'm talking about dementia, 157 00:17:13,940 --> 00:17:20,460 I'm talking about the presence of changes in the cells that advance. 158 00:17:20,460 --> 00:17:25,760 So there's a degeneration that's part of a disease process itself. 159 00:17:26,540 --> 00:17:41,770 So what we're contrasting is that autistics may have increased difficulty with aging even in the absence of any kind of overlay of a new medical process like a dementia. 160 00:17:42,440 --> 00:17:44,150 If you look through the literature, 161 00:17:44,150 --> 00:17:52,270 there really are not good statistics about how frequently dementia occurs in autism, 162 00:17:52,740 --> 00:17:53,690 particularly. 163 00:17:53,690 --> 00:18:04,330 The reason for this is that we have not captured autism in adults and aging adults enough to actually look at this. 164 00:18:04,340 --> 00:18:05,120 Um, 165 00:18:05,130 --> 00:18:15,790 so I can only tell you what my personal experience has been in my own experience in seeing people from the dementia clinic. 166 00:18:15,800 --> 00:18:17,720 Seeing people who are aging, 167 00:18:17,720 --> 00:18:24,950 I don't tend to think that there's any increased risk of a disease process that we would call dementia. 168 00:18:25,340 --> 00:18:25,710 Um, 169 00:18:25,720 --> 00:18:27,350 I haven't seen this. 170 00:18:28,140 --> 00:18:35,500 I have seen people present with concerns that perhaps there is a dementia or disease process. 171 00:18:35,510 --> 00:18:38,100 And after assessing this, 172 00:18:38,110 --> 00:18:45,380 it seems to be that this is part of the aging process and not a separate disease process. 173 00:18:47,640 --> 00:18:52,460 This is not to say that they aren't noticing differences in their home environment. 174 00:18:52,840 --> 00:18:58,010 Executive function certainly does impact day to day life. 175 00:18:58,020 --> 00:19:03,100 So someone may be having more difficulty getting started with tasks, 176 00:19:03,110 --> 00:19:04,860 taking care of themselves, 177 00:19:04,890 --> 00:19:10,960 really engaging in life being active in what they're needing to get done during the day. 178 00:19:11,630 --> 00:19:19,170 This may be a feature that the autistic experiences or expresses during the aging process, 179 00:19:20,440 --> 00:19:20,930 but again, 180 00:19:20,930 --> 00:19:23,840 we don't even know how typical that is. 181 00:19:23,850 --> 00:19:31,300 So all the people that I see are patients who are presenting because they're experiencing some difficulty. 182 00:19:31,310 --> 00:19:45,590 So it would be such a wonderful thing if in the future we're able to capture people with neuro diversity across adulthood and aging and we can actually see, 183 00:19:46,140 --> 00:19:46,690 um, 184 00:19:46,700 --> 00:20:04,550 how many of these clients are really um doing well and aging well and participating in things and have good mood and engagement and how many perhaps are struggling or showing some increased difficulty. 185 00:20:05,140 --> 00:20:11,480 One of the recommendations for the autistic individual is to focus on living a healthy lifestyle. 186 00:20:11,490 --> 00:20:14,410 So this is a good recommendation for anyone, 187 00:20:14,420 --> 00:20:15,090 of course, 188 00:20:15,090 --> 00:20:22,710 but anything that helps the health of the blood vessels will be likely supportive during aging. 189 00:20:22,720 --> 00:20:25,060 And that's true for all of us. 190 00:20:25,540 --> 00:20:25,900 Um, 191 00:20:25,900 --> 00:20:30,650 but especially if a person has a weakness and executive function already, 192 00:20:30,660 --> 00:20:31,430 um, 193 00:20:31,440 --> 00:20:35,520 they may really want to focus on that even more intentionally. 194 00:20:35,530 --> 00:20:37,780 So watching things like cholesterol, 195 00:20:37,790 --> 00:20:38,890 high blood pressure, 196 00:20:38,890 --> 00:20:40,060 diabetes, 197 00:20:40,070 --> 00:20:44,050 these are all things that can stress the blood vessel systems. 198 00:20:44,440 --> 00:20:48,620 And although we can't stop the impact of aging on the blood vessels, 199 00:20:48,630 --> 00:20:54,490 there are probably choices that we can make to just help support the health of the vessels. 200 00:20:54,500 --> 00:20:59,010 And of course this does not constitute medical advice for anyone. 201 00:20:59,020 --> 00:21:04,360 I really encourage you to engage with your doctors about what would be healthy for you. 202 00:21:04,740 --> 00:21:10,510 But certainly if you want to give your body what it needs to age well, 203 00:21:10,520 --> 00:21:15,540 um things like healthy diet and movement and exercise and sleep. 204 00:21:15,550 --> 00:21:20,360 These are all things that may support your body as you age. 205 00:21:21,040 --> 00:21:33,950 Let's shift from talking about changes in the physical body and changes in the brain to talking about changes in our environment or what's going on in life during this season, 206 00:21:35,940 --> 00:21:44,440 one of the things I want to talk about is that there's often less built in structure to our life during that season, 207 00:21:45,340 --> 00:21:53,770 because people often are either cutting down on the number of hours they're working or they've retired, 208 00:21:54,750 --> 00:21:57,220 their kids aren't living at home anymore, 209 00:21:57,220 --> 00:21:58,810 they have an empty nest, 210 00:21:59,540 --> 00:22:08,860 um there are less daily activities to kind of move people forward that I have to get going because I have to go to this place, 211 00:22:09,340 --> 00:22:24,300 so work or the schedule of the Children may have provided some inherent structure to the day and cutting down on the structure that helps people get momentum for their day, 212 00:22:24,310 --> 00:22:29,660 can mean that it's harder for them to get momentum for activities. 213 00:22:30,440 --> 00:22:39,050 The autistic who lean toward anxiety or wanting to know what the day would likely bring benefited from structure because it felt supportive, 214 00:22:40,140 --> 00:22:41,160 in contrast, 215 00:22:41,160 --> 00:22:44,150 the autistic who had trouble with momentum, 216 00:22:44,160 --> 00:22:45,790 like I feel lazy, 217 00:22:45,790 --> 00:22:48,320 I feel like I just can't get going, 218 00:22:48,320 --> 00:23:01,360 I don't know where to start benefited from structure because it helped propel them forward with tasks and daily activities and without the propelling force of a schedule, 219 00:23:02,040 --> 00:23:10,260 this group of people on the spectrum find it really challenging to find an internal source of momentum. 220 00:23:11,640 --> 00:23:14,140 Um they often struggle to say, 221 00:23:14,140 --> 00:23:18,520 oh I can plan my day this way or these are things that need to get done. 222 00:23:18,530 --> 00:23:23,050 Even issues of self care may kind of be put on the back burner, 223 00:23:23,050 --> 00:23:23,360 like, 224 00:23:23,370 --> 00:23:23,630 oh, 225 00:23:23,630 --> 00:23:26,920 I used to take a shower before work every day, 226 00:23:26,920 --> 00:23:28,670 but now I don't have to work. 227 00:23:28,940 --> 00:23:33,170 So can they have this internal momentum towards self care? 228 00:23:34,320 --> 00:23:42,200 Some would say they used to shower and eat breakfast and take medication as part of their morning routine, 229 00:23:42,640 --> 00:23:45,060 but if they're not even leaving the house, 230 00:23:45,060 --> 00:23:48,090 the morning routine doesn't get done as consistently, 231 00:23:48,100 --> 00:23:52,660 so pretty soon doing one activity can really feel demanding, 232 00:23:52,670 --> 00:23:53,210 like, 233 00:23:53,210 --> 00:23:53,360 oh, 234 00:23:53,360 --> 00:23:56,860 I can't get groceries today because I'm also getting a haircut, 235 00:23:57,640 --> 00:23:58,870 whereas before, 236 00:23:58,870 --> 00:24:01,100 when our day was so scheduled, 237 00:24:01,210 --> 00:24:10,850 we had this just internal momentum and we didn't have to get our energy up to do something. 238 00:24:11,540 --> 00:24:18,770 One thing for the individual to consider then is their need to make an artificial structure during retirement. 239 00:24:19,640 --> 00:24:26,560 Some people may wish to volunteer or have other reasons to leave the house on a particular schedule. 240 00:24:27,240 --> 00:24:32,080 They may make a list of life areas that they want to attend to every week. 241 00:24:32,080 --> 00:24:35,340 So one person may say, 242 00:24:35,350 --> 00:24:40,620 I really benefit from saying I want to learn something new every week. 243 00:24:40,630 --> 00:24:45,610 I want to see a friend every week I exercise on the schedule. 244 00:24:45,620 --> 00:24:54,170 I do chores on this schedule in having a schedule or a structure helps them stay engaged in life, 245 00:24:54,540 --> 00:25:02,170 helps them have momentum for what needs to get done in order to have really a balanced and healthy lifestyle. 246 00:25:04,240 --> 00:25:16,560 Another thing that's changing during the season of life is that there's a lot more engagement that's required with doctors and a lot more instruction to change, 247 00:25:17,940 --> 00:25:22,260 even though there's less engagement with the external world. 248 00:25:22,270 --> 00:25:23,710 In some respects, 249 00:25:23,720 --> 00:25:34,670 there's increasing demand to engage in self care to visit and communicate with physicians and to change all of a sudden, 250 00:25:34,670 --> 00:25:41,620 people are telling you to change your lifestyle what you eat or drink what medicines you take, 251 00:25:41,630 --> 00:25:47,090 instructions to change or shift gears can feel really demanding, 252 00:25:47,100 --> 00:25:53,260 and sometimes the individual may kind of bow out of the whole process and say, 253 00:25:53,270 --> 00:25:55,000 I'm just not going to do this. 254 00:25:55,640 --> 00:26:03,860 Doctors and family can try to keep in mind the demands on the individual and how that may feel to the person on the spectrum, 255 00:26:04,640 --> 00:26:08,190 Maybe they're more likely to pick their battles, 256 00:26:08,200 --> 00:26:09,310 so to speak. 257 00:26:09,310 --> 00:26:09,910 So, 258 00:26:09,920 --> 00:26:17,660 understanding how hard it is for the person to engage with people to shift what they're eating. 259 00:26:17,660 --> 00:26:18,770 For example, 260 00:26:19,240 --> 00:26:19,820 you know, 261 00:26:19,820 --> 00:26:25,450 if somebody has lived on pasta because that's all they can tolerate with regard to texture, 262 00:26:26,040 --> 00:26:26,500 um, 263 00:26:26,510 --> 00:26:26,960 you know, 264 00:26:26,960 --> 00:26:36,350 harping on and um talking again and again about vegetables may not be the battle that they want to have for this person. 265 00:26:37,140 --> 00:26:37,450 So, 266 00:26:37,450 --> 00:26:43,390 there can be both this increased environmental demand in the sense of medical issues. 267 00:26:43,400 --> 00:26:48,270 Doctors waiting rooms calling people asking questions. 268 00:26:48,940 --> 00:26:49,590 Um, 269 00:26:49,600 --> 00:26:57,870 but there's also this decreased environmental structure that previously may have been supportive, 270 00:26:57,880 --> 00:26:58,250 like, 271 00:26:58,250 --> 00:26:58,370 oh, 272 00:26:58,370 --> 00:27:00,020 I know what I do next. 273 00:27:00,030 --> 00:27:01,950 This helps me get out of the house, 274 00:27:01,960 --> 00:27:09,450 I don't have to effort to get up and take a shower because that's just what I do every morning before I go to work. 275 00:27:10,340 --> 00:27:11,280 As you can see, 276 00:27:11,280 --> 00:27:29,370 the aging season of life presents similar challenges in the sense of changes in the physical person and the environment when we compare this to other seasons of life and these shifts can lead to shifts in the way that the autistic characteristics feel, 277 00:27:29,380 --> 00:27:35,390 how they're experienced by the individual and also how they are expressed. 278 00:27:35,390 --> 00:27:41,990 So how other people see that this person is doing A spouse may say, 279 00:27:41,990 --> 00:27:54,960 I don't understand because my husband would get up and do this whole routine every day for 40 years at his job and now he can't get going with anything. 280 00:27:55,440 --> 00:27:57,030 So is this a dementia, 281 00:27:57,030 --> 00:27:58,010 what's happening? 282 00:27:58,020 --> 00:28:03,600 And sometimes it's just the total lack of structure that's, 283 00:28:03,610 --> 00:28:04,050 you know, 284 00:28:04,050 --> 00:28:14,850 all these this momentum has been taken and we can see that the autistic characteristics that have always been there are expressed differently. 285 00:28:15,940 --> 00:28:31,950 It's nice to have an increased understanding that this is common and we can also have a context for what we might be seeing as well as more intentionality about how we might want to enter this season. 286 00:28:32,340 --> 00:28:35,450 So how else can I get sensory inputs? 287 00:28:35,450 --> 00:28:39,260 How else can I create structure and momentum? 288 00:28:39,270 --> 00:28:42,340 How can I communicate with my doctors? 289 00:28:42,340 --> 00:28:44,510 That a lot of change is really, 290 00:28:44,510 --> 00:28:47,160 really impossible for me. 291 00:28:47,170 --> 00:28:49,450 It's just I just, 292 00:28:49,460 --> 00:28:54,560 I have a limit on how much I can change and maintain over time. 293 00:28:55,640 --> 00:29:03,670 Let's be intentional about how we enter certain life seasons and also support each other during their life seasons. 294 00:29:04,640 --> 00:29:11,620 Thank you so much for joining me for this series and how autistic characteristics can shift over life seasons. 295 00:29:12,240 --> 00:29:26,960 I hope you join me again soon and please remember to write down questions that you want covered in future podcast episodes too, adultandgeriatricautism@gmail.com      

The [P]Rehab Audio Experience
#139| Why Training Muscular Power Has The Biggest Benefit For Longevity and Independent Living Across The Lifespan

The [P]Rehab Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 37:13


In this episode, Dillon discusses the most important training that you need for longevity and independence: muscle power! We answer: what is the difference between muscle strength and muscle power, is power training safe for older adults, what are the benefits of power training, and how do you implement power training into your current routine?  All of this and more are answered in this episode!   Hope you enjoy! -Team [P]Rehab Learn More About Dr. Dillon Caswell, PT, DPT, SCS Learn More About [P]Rehab Programs   Follow [P]rehab: Website Instagram LinkedIn Twitter Facebook TikTok   info@theprehabguys.com [P]Rehabbers thank you for listening and let us know what to talk about next. We hope to help you take control of your health through education! Did you enjoy this? Please rate, review, share, and subscribe. Every bit of feedback, comments, subscriptions, and sharing helps others to discover this content and find solutions available!!!  

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu
The DAILY HACKS To Look Younger, Live Longer & REVERSE YOUR AGE | Dr. David Sinclair

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 105:04


As you know, it's my mission to help teach you how to build the MINDSET and SKILLS that will help you live an extraordinary life - and over the last few months I've been working hard behind the scenes to help create a brand-new tool that will help you do that. It's called Kyzen - and I am proud to announce that I will be bringing it to the world later this year to challenge you to empower yourself and accomplish greater things in life. To learn more, join my Discord at http://impacttheory.com/discordBig goals require DISCIPLINE. By it's very nature, discipline requires you to do hard things - and that is a skill you can LEARN. I'm teaching my process to build Ironclad Discipline in a new workshop - you can register at discipline.impacttheory.com!The fountain of youth is a mythical spring that has been the basis of many Hollywood movies and cosmetic marketing campaigns! Our obsession with youth and being young forever has been the source of cosmetic surgery and endless stories of ‘back in my day'.David Sinclair is a Professor in the Department of Genetics and co-Director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School. As a professor, scientific investigator and co-founder of multiple biotech companies, his knowledge with epigenetics and reverse aging is highly regarded among professional colleagues in the industry. He's appeared on dozens of podcasts, written books, and hosts his own podcast, Lifespan. As a guest on Health Theory the conversations around reverse aging and biological clocks are more than enlightening.Finding the root cause to aging and understanding how diet, exercise, and lifestyle choices impact our aging process puts the power of perspective and knowledge within your control. You don't have to guess or hope for a mythical spring of magical water that holds the secret of youth. You can make a decision everyday to turn back the clock, slow the aging process, and reset your age.SHOW NOTES:0:00 | Introduction to David Sinclair0:12 | Daily Hacks to Slow Aging28:50 | How to Reset Your Age58:43 | This Causes Aging1:32:23 | How to Understand AgingQUOTES:“80% of your longevity and health in old age is controllable and only 20% is dictated by your genes, the genome. The rest is your epigenome that responds to how we live [7:36]“Our livers are much smarter than our eyes and our mouths…” [24:35]“Anything that stresses your body, puts it into a state of shock is good in the long run.” [38:16]“When I boiled it down to its essence I realized aging was a loss of information.” [1:01:58]“That's part of the problem with aging, which is genes getting turned on when they should be kept off for decades, and then cells start to get confused.” [1:14:17]Follow David Sinclair: Website: https://sinclair.hms.harvard.edu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/davidsinclairpodcast Podcast: https://anchor.fm/lifespan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidsinclairphd/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidasinclair Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidsinclairphd

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu
The DAILY HACKS To Look Younger, Live Longer & REVERSE YOUR AGE | Dr. David Sinclair

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 105:04


As you know, it's my mission to help teach you how to build the MINDSET and SKILLS that will help you live an extraordinary life - and over the last few months I've been working hard behind the scenes to help create a brand-new tool that will help you do that. It's called Kyzen - and I am proud to announce that I will be bringing it to the world later this year to challenge you to empower yourself and accomplish greater things in life. To learn more, join my Discord at http://impacttheory.com/discordBig goals require DISCIPLINE. By it's very nature, discipline requires you to do hard things - and that is a skill you can LEARN. I'm teaching my process to build Ironclad Discipline in a new workshop - you can register at discipline.impacttheory.com!The fountain of youth is a mythical spring that has been the basis of many Hollywood movies and cosmetic marketing campaigns! Our obsession with youth and being young forever has been the source of cosmetic surgery and endless stories of ‘back in my day'.David Sinclair is a Professor in the Department of Genetics and co-Director of the Paul F. Glenn Center for Biology of Aging at Harvard Medical School. As a professor, scientific investigator and co-founder of multiple biotech companies, his knowledge with epigenetics and reverse aging is highly regarded among professional colleagues in the industry. He's appeared on dozens of podcasts, written books, and hosts his own podcast, Lifespan. As a guest on Health Theory the conversations around reverse aging and biological clocks are more than enlightening.Finding the root cause to aging and understanding how diet, exercise, and lifestyle choices impact our aging process puts the power of perspective and knowledge within your control. You don't have to guess or hope for a mythical spring of magical water that holds the secret of youth. You can make a decision everyday to turn back the clock, slow the aging process, and reset your age.SHOW NOTES:0:00 | Introduction to David Sinclair0:12 | Daily Hacks to Slow Aging28:50 | How to Reset Your Age58:43 | This Causes Aging1:32:23 | How to Understand AgingQUOTES:“80% of your longevity and health in old age is controllable and only 20% is dictated by your genes, the genome. The rest is your epigenome that responds to how we live [7:36]“Our livers are much smarter than our eyes and our mouths…” [24:35]“Anything that stresses your body, puts it into a state of shock is good in the long run.” [38:16]“When I boiled it down to its essence I realized aging was a loss of information.” [1:01:58]“That's part of the problem with aging, which is genes getting turned on when they should be kept off for decades, and then cells start to get confused.” [1:14:17]Follow David Sinclair: Website: https://sinclair.hms.harvard.edu/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/davidsinclairpodcast Podcast: https://anchor.fm/lifespan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidsinclairphd/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/davidasinclair Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidsinclairphd

BlackWhite Advisory
WTF: USA 46th In The World For Life Expectancy!

BlackWhite Advisory

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 24:15


We suck! It must be the food we eat that is causing us to die. We have the cleanest country, best doctors, and the most fast food. What could it be? 3 Books, 1 Author: Nick Kolenda's :The Tangled Mind", "Methods of Persuasion", and "Imagine reading This Book"

The Health and Wellness Connection PODCAST
Podcast RELAUNCH! The summer gun violence epidemic, the ongoing Monkeypox outbreak, Coffee linked to longer lifespans? And much MORE!

The Health and Wellness Connection PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 34:35


Hello and welcome to the Health and Wellness Connection! This episode discusses the latest information in the health and wellness space! Join Dr. Barry as he discusses the latest topics trending in the health and wellness space. This week's show discusses the ongoing gun violence epidemic and how the nation's Trauma surgeons are speaking out against it. We also discuss the new disease outbreak making health care providers nervous, monkey pox. We also discuss new research findings showing how moderate coffee consumption may be linked with longer life! Join us for a deep dive into these interesting topics, and expand your health and wellness knowledge. To support the show, please consider donating to the CASH APP! Send all donations to @drbarryhealth to support the show today!

Prevmed
Metformin: Anti Aging Drug? (David Sinclair Book LIFESPAN - Part 4) - FORD BREWER MD MPH

Prevmed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 7:32


For more information, contact us at 859-721-1414 or myhealth@prevmedheartrisk.com. Also, check out the following resources:  ·Jubilee website·PrevMed's website·PrevMed's YouTube channel·PrevMed's Facebook page·PrevMed's Instagram·PrevMed's LinkedIn·PrevMed's Twitter ·PrevMed's Pinterest

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
People Should Get Used To Having Lower Levels Of Sodium To Maximize Lifespan - Joel Fuhrman, MD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 6:31


People Should Get Used To Having Lower Levels Of Sodium To Maximize Lifespan -  Joel Fuhrman, MD Joel Fuhrman, M.D. •           http://www.drfuhrman.com/•           Book - The End of Heart Disease: The Eat to Live Plan to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Joel Fuhrman, M.D. is a board-certified family physician, six-time New York Times best-selling author and internationally recognized expert on nutrition and natural healing, who specializes in preventing and reversing disease through nutritional methods. Dr. Fuhrman coined the term “Nutritarian” to describe his eating style, which is built around a diet of nutrient-dense, plant-rich foods. Dr. Fuhrman has authored numerous research articles published in medical journals and is on the faculty of Northern Arizona University, Health Science Division. He serves as President of the Nutritional Research Foundation. #JoelFuhrman #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #WholeFood #Vegan #Vegetarian #PlantBasedNutrition  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Trending In Education
The 60-Year Curriculum with Dr. Rovy Branon

Trending In Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 40:17


Dr. Rovy Branon is the Vice Provost at Continuum College at the University of Washington. He joins host Mike Palmer in a conversation about reaching and teaching adult learners across the fullspan of their lives. We begin by hearing Rovy's “origin story” starting as a student who was advised that he wasn't cut out for college and then proceeding through a series of engagements in formal education across his professional life culminating in a career in educational technology focused on extending access to adult learners in ways that fit into their lives. Along the way, he played drums in a heavy metal band and came around to lifelong learning with the birth of his son. We talk through two books connected to the idea of the 60-year curriculum: The 100-Year Life: Living and Working in the Age of Longevity and Learning at the Back Door: Reflections on Non-Traditional Learning in the Lifespan as we begin to flesh out a vision for continued education and upskilling across an increasingly long work life. Rovy shares his perspectives on emerging technical skills like DAOs, crypto, and web3 before diving into the role that private enterprise and big tech are playing in the certificate and skills-based pathways that are growing in relevance and popularity at Continuum College and across continuing education institutions more broadly. It's a wide-ranging and visionary look at the future of adult education that you don't want to miss. Subscribe to Trending in Education wherever you get your podcasts. Visit us at TrendinginEd.com for more sharp takes on the future of learning.

UF Health Podcasts
Mouse diet study sheds light on calories and lifespan

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022


Cutting out late-night meals or runs to the refrigerator for a snack might well…

Terry Talks Nutrition Radio Show
LIFESPAN EXTENDERS: POLYPHENOLS

Terry Talks Nutrition Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 54:54


Experts recommend 1,000 mg of polyphenols daily! Polyphenols are the Next Most Important Nutrient Group after a Daily Multiple.

Becker’s Women’s Leadership
Megan Ranney, Emergency Physician, Director at Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health, and Associate Dean at Brown University School of Public Health

Becker’s Women’s Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 14:38


This episode features Dr. Megan Ranney, Emergency Physician, Director at Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health, and Associate Dean at Brown University School of Public Health. Here, she discusses working as an emergency physician during the pandemic, creating digital mental health services that are accessible to all, and more.

JCBC Podcast
How To Be Human - Part 19 - Lifespan

JCBC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 33:51


A message from our 2022 Series "How To Be Human" on May 22nd, 2022.

Autism in the Adult
Shifting Autistic Characteristics Across the Lifespan: The Experience of Women

Autism in the Adult

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 30:50


Join Dr. Regan for the third episode in this series about how autistic characteristics may shift across the lifespan. This episode focuses on the life seasons of women, including monthly cycles, pregnancy, and menopause. Tune in next time for the final episode in the series which will focus on autism and aging.  You may also enjoy the episode: Autism in Women Published Articles for Additional Reading: “Life is Much More Difficult to Manage During Periods”: Autistic Experiences of Menstruation Prevalence of premenstrual syndrome in autism: a prospective observer-rated study Sensory challenges experienced by autistic women during pregnancy and childbirth: a systematic review Exploratory Study of Childbearing Experiences of Women with Asperger Syndrome ‘When my autism broke': A qualitative study spotlighting autistic voices on menopause   Dr. Regan's Resources New Course for Clinicians - Interventions in Autism: Helping Clients Stay Centered, Connect with Others, and Engage in Life New Course for Clinicians: ASD Differential Diagnoses and Associated Characteristics Book: Understanding Autism in Adults and Aging Adults, 2nd ed Audiobook Book: Understanding Autistic Behaviors Autism in the Adult website homepage Website Resources for Clinicians Read the episode content: 1 00:00:04,740 --> 00:00:06,280 Hi and welcome back. 2 00:00:06,290 --> 00:00:08,130 This is Dr Theresa Regan, 3 00:00:08,140 --> 00:00:10,070 a neuropsychologist, 4 00:00:10,080 --> 00:00:13,210 mother of a teen on the spectrum author, 5 00:00:13,210 --> 00:00:17,250 speaker and your podcast host for autism in the adult. 6 00:00:17,740 --> 00:00:27,800 You are joining us for the 3rd episode in a four part series on variations in the characteristics of autism across the lifespan. 7 00:00:29,140 --> 00:00:46,260 Our first episode focused on just foundational knowledge about neurology and why we can expect neurologic characteristics to feel and be expressed with some variation across time and also across context. 8 00:00:47,640 --> 00:00:56,760 The second episode focused on adolescents as a season of the lifespan during which some of these variations can become really noticeable. 9 00:00:57,440 --> 00:00:59,470 There's chemical changes going on, 10 00:00:59,470 --> 00:01:00,730 physical development. 11 00:01:00,740 --> 00:01:09,260 A lot of increase in independence is requested of the person and also just the demands of social interaction, 12 00:01:09,270 --> 00:01:11,010 academic demands, 13 00:01:11,020 --> 00:01:15,560 all these things converging to sometimes make that perfect storm. 14 00:01:17,140 --> 00:01:32,790 This third episode is going to focus on women because there are really some pretty market hormone shifts that females experience across their lifespan and these can be accompanied by shifts in the experience of autism. 15 00:01:32,800 --> 00:01:37,000 So we want to focus specifically on that topic today. 16 00:01:37,000 --> 00:01:38,450 For the episode, 17 00:01:40,740 --> 00:01:49,760 we're going to review issues related to a woman's monthly cycle to pregnancy and post pregnancy issues and also to menopause. 18 00:01:50,940 --> 00:02:04,160 I'm going to include links to some articles in the show notes for those who want to read more and I'll let you know that many of the articles really focus on solely identifying that this area needs more study. 19 00:02:04,170 --> 00:02:08,570 So you may start to read thinking that it's going to tell you something. 20 00:02:08,570 --> 00:02:10,420 We don't know when really, 21 00:02:10,420 --> 00:02:11,260 it's just saying, 22 00:02:11,260 --> 00:02:11,580 gosh, 23 00:02:11,580 --> 00:02:13,110 there's not much out there. 24 00:02:13,120 --> 00:02:27,920 We really should be looking at this more in particular and then other studies focus on gathering comments and taking surveys of women on the spectrum and really listening to the experiences of autistic women, 25 00:02:27,930 --> 00:02:30,830 which I think is really informative and helpful. 26 00:02:30,830 --> 00:02:37,310 So we are going to kind of focus on that side of things for the majority of this episode. 27 00:02:39,540 --> 00:02:42,960 So we focused on adolescents in the second episode. 28 00:02:43,340 --> 00:02:52,270 But here we're going to focus specifically on the seasons and a female's lifespan beyond adolescence. 29 00:02:52,270 --> 00:02:57,050 So we are going to start with the topic of monthly cycles in particular. 30 00:02:57,740 --> 00:02:59,850 So these begin during adolescence, 31 00:02:59,850 --> 00:03:06,690 but they continue across much of the female's lifespan and they can impact individuals differently. 32 00:03:06,700 --> 00:03:07,280 So, 33 00:03:07,280 --> 00:03:09,560 across all human females, 34 00:03:09,560 --> 00:03:18,830 there is a lot of variation on how that cycle impacts them how much um consistency they experience in that area, 35 00:03:18,840 --> 00:03:22,500 what kinds of changes in their physical state, 36 00:03:22,500 --> 00:03:24,950 their emotional state they might experience. 37 00:03:25,830 --> 00:03:28,860 And this is really true for the autistic female as well. 38 00:03:29,540 --> 00:03:45,260 One overall theme in the comments of women who are on the spectrum is that many of the issues that can be a challenge for them on a day to day basis can really feel like more of a challenge just before and also during their cycle. 39 00:03:45,940 --> 00:03:50,240 Many of the characteristics specifically mentioned by women on the spectrum. 40 00:03:50,240 --> 00:03:56,260 Focus around sensory sensitivities emotional regulation. 41 00:03:56,570 --> 00:04:02,550 So that ability to feel calm and centered social communication. 42 00:04:02,940 --> 00:04:05,760 So figuring out what am I feeling, 43 00:04:06,240 --> 00:04:08,230 Finding words to express, 44 00:04:08,230 --> 00:04:17,450 that communicating with others in a social exchange and also feeling flexible in everyday situations. 45 00:04:17,460 --> 00:04:18,430 So, 46 00:04:18,440 --> 00:04:33,460 um I really prefer routine and now this unexpected barrier has happened and I also happened to be in that time of my cycle where dealing with these unexpected things feel so much harder. 47 00:04:34,640 --> 00:04:45,460 One woman said it can become much more overwhelming and harder to maintain control of the things that already take a lot of effort for us to keep on top of during our period. 48 00:04:46,740 --> 00:04:52,460 One woman said I have more meltdowns and worse meltdowns just before my period. 49 00:04:52,840 --> 00:05:02,970 And she also noted that understanding that this is what happens in her life makes those episodes in those periods of time more manageable. 50 00:05:02,970 --> 00:05:04,130 So they don't feel, 51 00:05:04,140 --> 00:05:09,650 she doesn't feel quite so thrown off now that she understands what to expect, 52 00:05:10,040 --> 00:05:11,660 although it is challenging. 53 00:05:12,940 --> 00:05:20,260 Some women on the spectrum reported that self injury behavior was more common before periods as well. 54 00:05:20,640 --> 00:05:28,970 Uh for some women's self injury includes um cutting or biting themselves, 55 00:05:28,980 --> 00:05:30,740 hitting their head on something, 56 00:05:30,740 --> 00:05:31,860 hitting their body. 57 00:05:32,440 --> 00:05:36,360 And there was a 2008 study which, 58 00:05:36,370 --> 00:05:36,870 you know, 59 00:05:36,870 --> 00:05:43,150 that's been a while ago and it used some diagnostic criteria that are out of date. 60 00:05:43,540 --> 00:05:47,700 And there weren't a lot of follow up studies in this regard, 61 00:05:47,700 --> 00:05:49,650 but I will link it in the show notes, 62 00:05:49,910 --> 00:06:08,350 but they found that if they looked at women who experienced Um greater than or equal to 30 difficulty with emotions and other things just prior to their periods and during their periods, 63 00:06:08,740 --> 00:06:24,950 that the prevalence of this significant shift And their ability to stay centered was 92% in the autism group and 11% in the control group, 64 00:06:25,340 --> 00:06:28,110 meaning that in their study again, 65 00:06:28,110 --> 00:06:31,090 this has not been replicated that I can see, 66 00:06:31,090 --> 00:06:38,090 but it does really um hold true as far as what we typically see in women, 67 00:06:38,090 --> 00:06:44,260 that this significantly more difficult experience of emotions. 68 00:06:44,540 --> 00:06:52,700 Um that's really much higher in the autism female group than in the neuro typical group who are experiencing monthly shifts. 69 00:06:55,240 --> 00:07:05,650 The hormone shift themselves can really heighten sensory experiences and they can make emotions more intense or even just come out easier. 70 00:07:05,650 --> 00:07:10,580 Like um I might be able to think or feel something inside typically, 71 00:07:10,580 --> 00:07:13,230 but now during this period of my cycle, 72 00:07:13,230 --> 00:07:32,860 it just really easily comes out and I feel like I don't have as much control over that gate of what I let out and what I keep in another layer seems to be that monthly cycles really increase the amount of sensory experiences and also often involve pain or discomfort. 73 00:07:33,340 --> 00:07:40,200 So the women on the spectrum is processing quite a bit more experience and discomfort than typical. 74 00:07:40,210 --> 00:07:47,630 So it's not only that hormones make the common things more disruptive, 75 00:07:47,640 --> 00:07:52,450 but also you're experiencing even more sensation than typical. 76 00:07:53,140 --> 00:07:59,120 This can increase the difficulty that women have during their periods with focusing, 77 00:07:59,130 --> 00:08:00,640 communicating, 78 00:08:00,650 --> 00:08:03,360 staying centered in their experiences. 79 00:08:03,740 --> 00:08:06,860 And one female on the spectrum said, 80 00:08:06,860 --> 00:08:07,330 you know, 81 00:08:07,340 --> 00:08:12,330 there's so much more coming at me and life is intense enough as it is, 82 00:08:12,330 --> 00:08:20,360 but every month I go through this time of even more intensity and that's really challenging for me to sort through. 83 00:08:21,540 --> 00:08:35,090 In addition to descriptions of the shifts and experience a subgroup of autistic females also expressed that they really wish they had more preparation for what the experience would be like. 84 00:08:35,100 --> 00:08:39,630 So for many on the spectrum who love routine or repetition, 85 00:08:39,630 --> 00:08:41,200 preparation detail, 86 00:08:41,200 --> 00:08:43,260 knowing what's going to happen ahead of time, 87 00:08:44,140 --> 00:08:44,580 you know, 88 00:08:44,580 --> 00:08:52,260 having as much information as possible related to monthly cycles would have felt more grounding to them. 89 00:08:52,640 --> 00:08:52,850 Mhm. 90 00:08:54,040 --> 00:09:00,170 The information they wanted more of included practical things like where do I get these supplies? 91 00:09:00,170 --> 00:09:03,280 What kinds of things do I need to buy also? 92 00:09:03,280 --> 00:09:06,150 How long is this expected to last every month? 93 00:09:06,640 --> 00:09:12,460 How to communicate their needs if they're at school and they need to leave to go to the restroom, 94 00:09:12,940 --> 00:09:13,360 you know, 95 00:09:13,360 --> 00:09:19,750 having some preparation as to what kinds of things they could do in different situations. 96 00:09:20,340 --> 00:09:20,550 Mhm. 97 00:09:21,240 --> 00:09:30,000 They also said that they wished they had understood that women experience variation um across time and also between women, 98 00:09:30,010 --> 00:09:37,150 you know that their best friend may have quite a different experience than they do and that's common. 99 00:09:38,040 --> 00:09:48,520 Um So their experience is likely to be somewhat different than their peers experience and that doesn't mean that something is wrong or that they need to feel anxious about that. 100 00:09:48,530 --> 00:10:03,050 The important thing is for them to notice what is typical for them and to communicate with family or doctors if they're typical experience shifts or it's disrupted steps in some way or changes. 101 00:10:04,440 --> 00:10:09,440 They also voiced that they wish they had understood that pain and discomfort was really normal. 102 00:10:09,450 --> 00:10:14,780 Sometimes they felt like it meant something that was really dangerous to them. 103 00:10:14,790 --> 00:10:19,200 Like maybe this was not supposed to be true, 104 00:10:19,200 --> 00:10:21,260 Maybe it meant that something was wrong, 105 00:10:21,260 --> 00:10:22,260 that they were dying, 106 00:10:22,260 --> 00:10:28,980 that they had a medical problem and also that emotional intensity and shifts were very common. 107 00:10:28,990 --> 00:10:32,490 So sometimes they had the basic physical information, 108 00:10:32,500 --> 00:10:40,260 but they really didn't understand that they can expect emotions to feel different during this period of time. 109 00:10:42,240 --> 00:10:55,560 Some individuals on the spectrum really struggle with health anxiety anyway and may quickly feel nervous if they think that they might be sick or if they don't know what to expect in their physical experience. 110 00:10:56,440 --> 00:11:02,360 Other women said it was quite a struggle because there was variation for a month to month. 111 00:11:02,360 --> 00:11:06,440 And so they didn't really know exactly what day they're cycle would start, 112 00:11:06,450 --> 00:11:07,860 how it would feel, 113 00:11:07,860 --> 00:11:09,190 how long it would last. 114 00:11:09,200 --> 00:11:13,360 And even though they had a sense of their typical rhythm, 115 00:11:13,740 --> 00:11:14,750 there's always, 116 00:11:14,760 --> 00:11:15,070 you know, 117 00:11:15,070 --> 00:11:18,620 some variation is this going to start today or tomorrow, 118 00:11:18,630 --> 00:11:20,690 How heavy is it going to be? 119 00:11:20,700 --> 00:11:28,230 Uh and so that may not feel like a big variation to neuro typical females, 120 00:11:28,230 --> 00:11:34,640 but for the autistic female that relies on repetition and detail and knowing what's going to happen. 121 00:11:34,650 --> 00:11:35,280 You know, 122 00:11:35,280 --> 00:11:43,960 sometimes that anxiety about when is this going to happen and what's it going to be like can be kind of a real struggle. 123 00:11:45,640 --> 00:11:50,460 The next season we'll touch on is the season of pregnancy and post pregnancy. 124 00:11:50,840 --> 00:11:52,900 And this could include breastfeeding. 125 00:11:53,540 --> 00:11:55,960 For women who experience this season, 126 00:11:55,970 --> 00:12:08,260 there are many significant hormone changes of course and a lot of physical changes and some women really struggle with feeling like this isn't my body anymore. 127 00:12:08,540 --> 00:12:11,550 And I have all this increased discomfort, 128 00:12:11,560 --> 00:12:13,110 I have sleep problems, 129 00:12:13,110 --> 00:12:13,980 fatigue, 130 00:12:13,980 --> 00:12:15,350 I'm nauseated, 131 00:12:15,350 --> 00:12:17,560 my appetite is different. 132 00:12:17,560 --> 00:12:21,950 I don't fit in my favorite comfortable clothes anymore. 133 00:12:22,340 --> 00:12:27,860 And so having so much different about their own physical experience. 134 00:12:28,240 --> 00:12:32,460 In addition to all the shifting hormones can really be impactful. 135 00:12:33,940 --> 00:12:38,350 Many neuro typical women experience sensory symptoms when they're pregnant. 136 00:12:38,740 --> 00:12:43,260 So a lot of times that involves increased smell sensitivity, 137 00:12:43,270 --> 00:12:52,450 like I cannot stand the smell of food or cologne or the pets have such a strong scent to them now. 138 00:12:53,240 --> 00:13:03,060 And sometimes that's most noticeable in the early months of pregnancy and then just kind of peters out for the neuro typical female, 139 00:13:03,440 --> 00:13:07,420 but for the autistic female who has sensory characteristics. 140 00:13:07,430 --> 00:13:07,960 Anyway, 141 00:13:07,960 --> 00:13:21,200 this can really be a time of heightened difficulty with a variety of census rather than just smell Some women report needing more deep pressure during pregnancy. 142 00:13:21,210 --> 00:13:21,850 Um, 143 00:13:21,850 --> 00:13:31,730 we've talked about deep pressure and other episodes that this is something that can be calming and grounding and centering for the person on the spectrum. 144 00:13:31,730 --> 00:13:40,430 And that is why some will use weighted blankets and other methods to get really some deep pressure that's calming. 145 00:13:40,450 --> 00:13:44,280 And so the women who report this feel like during their pregnancy, 146 00:13:44,280 --> 00:13:48,850 they noticed they needed more in order to feel calm and centered. 147 00:13:51,440 --> 00:13:54,820 Some talked about using things like massage. 148 00:13:54,830 --> 00:14:00,000 Other women talked about wrapping things around like their fingers, 149 00:14:00,000 --> 00:14:00,820 for example, 150 00:14:00,820 --> 00:14:02,180 or their hands. 151 00:14:02,230 --> 00:14:05,010 Some would have their pets lay on top of them. 152 00:14:05,020 --> 00:14:19,290 So whatever way they could get some extra pressure really helped them feel more grounded and calm nausea and sensitivity to food textures and sent maybe heightened. 153 00:14:19,300 --> 00:14:26,280 And many of the individuals on the spectrum already have some repetition and how they eat. 154 00:14:26,290 --> 00:14:30,690 So they may go on what I call food jags where, 155 00:14:30,700 --> 00:14:31,380 oh, 156 00:14:31,380 --> 00:14:37,550 I'm so into yogurt and salami and they'll eat that for a couple of months and then switch. 157 00:14:37,840 --> 00:14:39,740 And that's without pregnancy. 158 00:14:39,740 --> 00:14:43,610 And so when you add the pregnancy and there can be cravings, 159 00:14:43,620 --> 00:14:48,160 there can be nausea texture sensitivities that are even more significant. 160 00:14:48,640 --> 00:14:55,530 Sometimes you'll get this reliance on a few foods for nutrition and that's not necessarily a problem, 161 00:14:55,530 --> 00:15:03,060 but it may be something that they want to monitor and make sure they're getting enough nutrition during their pregnancy, 162 00:15:03,940 --> 00:15:06,960 emotions can be extra challenging to manage. 163 00:15:07,340 --> 00:15:10,550 Similar to what we discussed about monthly cycles. 164 00:15:11,150 --> 00:15:16,350 The impact of hormone changes on emotions during pregnancy may be really noticeable. 165 00:15:16,740 --> 00:15:23,060 And many individuals on the spectrum also experience sleep disturbance at the best of times. 166 00:15:23,540 --> 00:15:29,360 And the extra physical changes during pregnancy can increase problems resting and sleeping. 167 00:15:30,240 --> 00:15:35,890 So this decreased sleep may reduce resilience even more for things like staying centered, 168 00:15:35,900 --> 00:15:36,960 staying calm, 169 00:15:36,960 --> 00:15:38,080 paying attention, 170 00:15:38,090 --> 00:15:43,150 handling unexpected changes and socially communicating. 171 00:15:43,480 --> 00:15:45,010 This is what I'm experiencing. 172 00:15:45,010 --> 00:15:46,250 This is what I need, 173 00:15:46,640 --> 00:15:51,510 what do you need And also similar to monthly cycles, 174 00:15:51,510 --> 00:16:00,000 having to process so much more sensation for such a long period of time can also be noticeable to the autistic woman. 175 00:16:00,440 --> 00:16:11,380 So once the baby is born there are hormonal shifts again and this can be impacted by whether or not the mother chooses to breastfeed or use formula. 176 00:16:11,560 --> 00:16:35,860 And so awareness of how hormone shifts can impact this experience and the expression of autistic characteristics that can help the mother and her partner and her friends and her family at least have this context for what she is experiencing and then they can think um kind of intentionally about what she needs and how to be supportive. 177 00:16:36,240 --> 00:16:37,980 So they can think about Heywood, 178 00:16:37,980 --> 00:16:39,150 deep pressure help. 179 00:16:39,740 --> 00:16:54,210 Um and thinking in that way may really help this season go more smoothly so that she feels more resilient as we talked about in the previous episodes, 180 00:16:54,210 --> 00:17:03,670 Physical changes are often occurring at the same time of life that a lot of just life complexities land on our doorstep. 181 00:17:03,680 --> 00:17:05,590 And when we talk about pregnancy, 182 00:17:05,600 --> 00:17:09,360 we're of course talking about all the life changes that go with it, 183 00:17:09,640 --> 00:17:12,300 so changes in the physical environment, 184 00:17:12,300 --> 00:17:13,010 for example, 185 00:17:13,010 --> 00:17:13,890 of the house, 186 00:17:14,240 --> 00:17:16,610 there's extra furniture in your space, 187 00:17:16,610 --> 00:17:18,630 people are moving things around, 188 00:17:18,830 --> 00:17:23,060 you might have to get rid of things that actually you feel kind of attached to. 189 00:17:23,540 --> 00:17:28,910 Uh and sometimes we just have to get used to having more clutter around and this, 190 00:17:29,340 --> 00:17:29,560 you know, 191 00:17:29,560 --> 00:17:35,270 maybe stressful for the person that likes their physical environment to be a certain way. 192 00:17:36,940 --> 00:17:43,140 Some autistics really depend on their physical environment to help them feel grounded and calm. 193 00:17:43,150 --> 00:17:46,670 Um there's a subset of people on the spectrum, 194 00:17:46,670 --> 00:17:47,410 for example, 195 00:17:47,410 --> 00:17:51,270 that really love a visually simple space. 196 00:17:51,730 --> 00:17:57,670 Other people really love to have objects in certain places or facing a certain way. 197 00:17:58,040 --> 00:18:05,450 So having a shift in the environment can impact this sense of grounded Nous. 198 00:18:08,440 --> 00:18:27,790 Women may report feeling like they have less control over the environment and therefore they may need to rely more on other strategies to find that peaceful place in their own spirit preparing for baby often involves more social contact. 199 00:18:27,800 --> 00:18:35,890 And so people may come up to her and want to touch her or talk to her about their own birth experiences. 200 00:18:35,900 --> 00:18:39,010 They might ask questions about her pregnancy. 201 00:18:39,020 --> 00:18:54,380 So there can be less personal space in a social context and this can feel demanding and draining to the autistic woman who's already really managing a lot of physical and environmental changes. 202 00:18:55,040 --> 00:19:00,460 So this woman may want to decide ahead of time how much social context she wants, 203 00:19:01,040 --> 00:19:03,070 Does she want a baby shower? 204 00:19:03,080 --> 00:19:07,670 Does she want family to visit and stay over when the baby's born? 205 00:19:09,040 --> 00:19:29,000 She may want to practice comments that she can make when strangers want to ask her about the pregnancy in order to just kind of create a safe space for herself without feeling like people are kind of coming into her space more often than she can really handle and and balance. 206 00:19:31,840 --> 00:19:42,240 Some women on the spectrum realize that they have really high standards for themselves and they don't want to take risks or fail or make mistakes. 207 00:19:42,460 --> 00:19:47,440 Inattention to detail may be very important to them and getting this right. 208 00:19:47,450 --> 00:19:48,730 And in that sense, 209 00:19:48,730 --> 00:20:01,770 pregnancy and childbirth and parenting may feel really daunting because it's really difficult to get through that process without realizing that you don't have as much control as you wish you did. 210 00:20:01,780 --> 00:20:05,390 And it feels like a big risk in some ways, 211 00:20:05,400 --> 00:20:08,030 like I can influence the situation, 212 00:20:08,030 --> 00:20:11,170 but I don't have all the answers and nobody else does either. 213 00:20:11,440 --> 00:20:14,400 And that can kind of increase anxiety. 214 00:20:14,840 --> 00:20:21,100 And so having this self awareness if this is your um kind of rhythm, 215 00:20:21,100 --> 00:20:28,860 your internal rhythm that you try to stay on top of so many details and facts so you can get everything right. 216 00:20:29,440 --> 00:20:41,760 Um you may need to process how can you manage that during this really complex life change of pregnancy and becoming apparent. 217 00:20:43,240 --> 00:20:48,970 Some described feeling guilty when there were problems during their pregnancy. 218 00:20:48,980 --> 00:20:57,960 So if they went to the doctor in their blood pressure was high or their sugars were high or there was something that the doctor wanted to monitor more. 219 00:20:58,840 --> 00:21:03,720 They kind of felt like they had failed their doctor's appointment and you know, 220 00:21:03,730 --> 00:21:19,270 having this awareness of what the struggle is about and how to process that can really help um adjust to not having all the answers and not being able to get everything right and avoid risk. 221 00:21:19,740 --> 00:21:31,310 Many women describe to that pregnancy birth plans and breastfeeding and also parenting issues became their special interest and this isn't necessarily a bad thing at all. 222 00:21:31,310 --> 00:21:33,060 They become very informed, 223 00:21:33,440 --> 00:21:41,260 they have strong opinions and things they would like to choose in their parenting um in a really intentional way, 224 00:21:41,270 --> 00:21:58,050 but some also say they wish they had been more aware that this is what was happening so that when they hit obstacles or rough spots and they felt out of control um they could also focus on balance. 225 00:21:58,440 --> 00:22:01,320 Like I have some other interests. 226 00:22:01,330 --> 00:22:05,280 I have um ways of restoring myself, 227 00:22:05,280 --> 00:22:10,780 I have ways of grounding myself and this is a special interest that's okay, 228 00:22:10,780 --> 00:22:17,580 but I also want to seek balance and um and what I'm doing so that when these difficult, 229 00:22:17,580 --> 00:22:19,050 unexpected things happen, 230 00:22:19,050 --> 00:22:21,360 I can still hold the course and be okay. 231 00:22:23,740 --> 00:22:28,260 Also the increased chaos in the home after baby is born, 232 00:22:28,270 --> 00:22:30,190 that really needs no explanation. 233 00:22:30,190 --> 00:22:33,670 There are so many more demands on the parent. 234 00:22:33,680 --> 00:22:35,790 They have less rest time, 235 00:22:35,810 --> 00:22:38,240 there's a lot more sensory input. 236 00:22:38,250 --> 00:22:46,090 So really close attention to having strategies ahead of time and as you go along, 237 00:22:46,090 --> 00:22:51,170 adjusting strategies so that you know what you need, 238 00:22:51,930 --> 00:23:11,820 whether that's pressure or quiet time or um rest breaks and all of these things to really do this marathon of mothering rather than trying to sprint through doing everything perfectly all the time again, 239 00:23:11,820 --> 00:23:38,770 this is really a common experience for any woman who's gone through that season and it just maybe more so for the autistic female that they really want to figure out how to add balance and restorative kinds of activities in their life as we move on to menopause. 240 00:23:39,140 --> 00:23:40,020 Um, 241 00:23:40,280 --> 00:23:41,210 this again, 242 00:23:41,220 --> 00:23:50,020 is a season of a lot of hormonal shifting and some women report that they really did well, 243 00:23:50,020 --> 00:23:52,880 understanding their autistic characteristics, 244 00:23:52,890 --> 00:23:58,360 using their strengths to get ahead at work to get promoted to accomplish life goals. 245 00:23:58,840 --> 00:24:05,270 And they found compatible partners and they really got into this nice groove with um, 246 00:24:05,270 --> 00:24:15,660 a life that fit them and it fit their nervous system and all of a sudden menopause happens and there just was a lot of shift that they didn't expect. 247 00:24:16,040 --> 00:24:22,020 Um one woman described that she felt that her autism broke during menopause, 248 00:24:22,020 --> 00:24:23,790 that it kind of broke through, 249 00:24:23,800 --> 00:24:29,860 whereas she didn't really have to think about it a lot during other Seasons of Life, 250 00:24:31,040 --> 00:24:34,420 A quote from a woman in menopause said during menopause, 251 00:24:34,420 --> 00:24:42,070 I was on three meltdowns a week at times and my meltdowns were of the nature that people would call a basket case, 252 00:24:42,640 --> 00:24:46,660 I'd strip down to my underwear sometimes during a meltdown at work, 253 00:24:47,440 --> 00:24:50,750 so that feeling that my body, 254 00:24:50,750 --> 00:24:51,820 my nervous system, 255 00:24:51,820 --> 00:24:57,730 my my whole system is so overwhelmed that I need to just strip down. 256 00:24:57,730 --> 00:25:00,780 So I'm not getting so much sensory input, 257 00:25:00,780 --> 00:25:10,050 I'm not getting input that feels like it just takes me over the edge of feeling upset. 258 00:25:10,060 --> 00:25:17,770 Um and so I love these quotes because I feel like it really helps us here, 259 00:25:17,770 --> 00:25:19,370 the humanity of that, 260 00:25:19,380 --> 00:25:33,450 and we can probably all relate in certain areas or certain times of our life where we have felt um just overwhelmed by change or by things that hit us harder than we thought. 261 00:25:33,940 --> 00:25:35,360 Um So here again, 262 00:25:35,360 --> 00:25:40,020 we're talking about similarities with the report of many women during menopause, 263 00:25:40,020 --> 00:25:50,670 but it's really crossed with these common autistic characteristics that I feel more anxiety that I feel more sensory difficulty that I have more meltdowns. 264 00:25:50,940 --> 00:25:55,290 An autistic woman may feel that her attention to detail in getting things right, 265 00:25:55,290 --> 00:25:58,050 worked for her and so many aspects of life, 266 00:25:58,440 --> 00:25:59,820 but that during menopause, 267 00:25:59,820 --> 00:26:04,400 her hormone shifts have really led to this increased anxiety. 268 00:26:04,410 --> 00:26:08,060 This feeling of being overwhelmed by the demands of the environment. 269 00:26:09,440 --> 00:26:16,500 And she may feel like she's now getting stuck on detail rather than using that as a real gift. 270 00:26:16,500 --> 00:26:19,280 That helps her move forward with projects. 271 00:26:19,280 --> 00:26:25,850 So getting stuck to the point that it really makes it hard to move on with things to make decisions to feel calm. 272 00:26:26,640 --> 00:26:30,700 Women also report that changes in their physical form again, 273 00:26:30,700 --> 00:26:43,070 that our body really changes without our permission and there are weight changes and wrinkles and sometimes the ways that we use to exercise or have fun and do our leisure time. 274 00:26:43,070 --> 00:26:46,900 Sometimes we just can't physically engage in the same things. 275 00:26:47,340 --> 00:26:54,650 Sleep disturbance is common in menopause and of course for the autistic who already had sleep disturbance. 276 00:26:54,650 --> 00:26:56,760 That can be really challenging. 277 00:26:57,220 --> 00:27:10,350 And the emotional symptoms can all impact how this season feels the physical and hormonal changes impact many aspects of the autistic experience itself. 278 00:27:10,740 --> 00:27:14,380 And similar to other portions of our episodes, 279 00:27:14,380 --> 00:27:18,720 we need to look also at the life season changes as well. 280 00:27:18,720 --> 00:27:20,780 So life complexity, 281 00:27:20,790 --> 00:27:22,670 environmental changes. 282 00:27:23,510 --> 00:27:26,490 Some women are facing the need to downsize, 283 00:27:26,490 --> 00:27:27,560 for example, 284 00:27:27,590 --> 00:27:29,140 during menopause, 285 00:27:29,140 --> 00:27:31,060 maybe they're empty nesters, 286 00:27:31,440 --> 00:27:34,670 maybe they've gone through the loss of a partner, 287 00:27:34,670 --> 00:27:47,300 a divorce or the death of a spouse and they may be thinking about getting rid of their um possessions enough that they're downsizing into a new space. 288 00:27:47,310 --> 00:27:49,500 How will this new space feel? 289 00:27:49,500 --> 00:27:50,960 That can be really hard. 290 00:27:51,640 --> 00:28:00,380 Some women on the spectrum are going to be very attached to things in the environment in a way that feels stronger than a neuro typical may feel. 291 00:28:00,410 --> 00:28:05,260 And doing all this in the midst of physical changes can be really difficult. 292 00:28:06,640 --> 00:28:15,460 They may also be caring for ill or aging parents or have experienced loss in other aspects of their life. 293 00:28:16,340 --> 00:28:17,420 So as we said, 294 00:28:17,420 --> 00:28:31,160 these physical changes that occur in menopause also coincide with shifts and life experience and all of these things together can lead to some pretty big changes and how autism is experienced and expressed, 295 00:28:31,740 --> 00:28:38,040 A woman may feel like she needs to figure out how her system works again from the beginning. 296 00:28:38,050 --> 00:28:40,780 Like I used to have this figured out, 297 00:28:40,790 --> 00:28:43,800 I had come to understand myself and what I need, 298 00:28:43,800 --> 00:28:48,450 but now things have changed and I really have to figure this out again. 299 00:28:50,940 --> 00:28:51,550 Finally, 300 00:28:51,550 --> 00:28:55,850 it is important to recall that these are generalizations. 301 00:28:55,850 --> 00:28:59,810 So I I really want to emphasize that, 302 00:28:59,810 --> 00:29:07,400 I'm not saying that everything falls apart in certain seasons of hormonal shift, 303 00:29:07,410 --> 00:29:09,930 there's so much generalization, 304 00:29:09,940 --> 00:29:22,370 but I think that when the autistic woman goes through a season of life and the things that she thought she understood about herself really seemed to shift, 305 00:29:22,380 --> 00:29:29,520 I think it is helpful to know the context for that that has a context within the nervous system, 306 00:29:29,530 --> 00:29:31,730 within the autistic experience, 307 00:29:31,730 --> 00:29:36,960 within all these life changes and that in itself can be really helpful. 308 00:29:37,540 --> 00:29:38,290 And also, 309 00:29:38,290 --> 00:29:43,070 I think it allows us to be intentional about what do I need now? 310 00:29:43,080 --> 00:29:44,730 I didn't used to need this, 311 00:29:44,730 --> 00:29:45,870 but I need this now. 312 00:29:45,870 --> 00:29:48,500 And so I'm prepared to shift. 313 00:29:48,510 --> 00:29:58,170 I understand that it's not that I figure myself out for a lifetime and I need the same things all the time. 314 00:29:58,540 --> 00:30:04,480 It's that I figure things out for a season and I am prepared to shift when that changes. 315 00:30:05,440 --> 00:30:14,170 I hope this gives a nice overview of some of the physical and life season changes that impact autistic women. 316 00:30:14,840 --> 00:30:17,870 And in our final episode of the series, 317 00:30:17,870 --> 00:30:19,130 coming up next time, 318 00:30:19,130 --> 00:30:23,050 we're going to talk about shifts that have to do with aging. 319 00:30:23,060 --> 00:30:25,430 So we're going to talk about the aging, 320 00:30:25,430 --> 00:30:26,890 brain and body. 321 00:30:26,900 --> 00:30:34,550 We're going to talk about retirement and other aspects of just aging within the context of autism. 322 00:30:34,840 --> 00:30:42,270 I hope you join us for that next episode as we round out this series.      

The Tuning Room
The Lifespan of Worship Songs

The Tuning Room

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 48:34


Mike Tapper and Marc Jolicoer did a deep dive into CCLI data to analyze how long it takes a worship song to become popular in the church and how long it stays there. While the results of the study might not totally surprise you, the implications are profound.

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Thoughts on Thursday: Time to Choose What You Really Want

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 2:21


Hello to you listening in San Rafael, California!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is Stories From Women Who Walk with 60 Seconds for Thoughts on Thursday and your host, Diane Wyzga.I've been slowly making my way through a sobering and humorous book entitled Four Thousand Weeks - Time Management for Mortals by Oliver Burkeman.  According to Burkeman the average human life span is only 4,000 weeks. Now what?  Now we get to choose what we need to accomplish and what we want to accomplish. The world is awash in possibilities. We're taught that we can have it all, do it all. They got it wrong. Just because it's there does not mean we need it, want it, or will get it. What we can do for our peace of mind and productivity is to reorient our understanding of time and our place in time by embracing ‘finitude'. Yes, there's a finish line dead ahead. But, instead of experiencing despair because we'll never get to it all, we can ask, “What is the best use for this portion of my time right now?”Question: What will it be? You're invited: “Come for the stories - stay for the magic!” Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, share a nice shout out on your social media or podcast channel of choice, and join us next time! Remember to stop by the website, check out the Services, arrange a Discovery Call, and Opt In to stay current with Diane and Quarter Moon Story Arts and on LinkedIn.  Stories From Women Who Walk Production TeamPodcaster: Diane F Wyzga & Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 to Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts

Running After Age 40
Aging and Running: Is Aging Something You Can Prevent and Keep You Running Longer and Faster?

Running After Age 40

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 24:29


David Sinclair, author of Life Span, Why We Age and Why We Don't Have To, states that aging is a disease, not something inevitable.If that is true, treating aging will allow you to keep running and keep living more vibrantly and productive. In this episode, we discuss Dr. Sinclair's thoughts and research on:Nutrition- WHAT and WHEN you should eat and whyFasting and why stressing our body can be a good thingExercise-Why exercise is good for longevity (not for the reasons we thought)What specific amounts and types of exercise are beneficial Cold and Heat-How cold supercharges brown adipose tissueHeat and heat shock proteinsWe also do a quick review of the supplements Dr. Sinclair takes, including NMN, resveratrol, vitamin D, K2, and aspiring.Listen in to hear how 20% of aging is genetic- the other 80% of longevity is in our hands! Keep running and keep living!This episode is sponsored by:www.zox.com- use code SARAH49700 to save 20% off your orderOutschool- use www.outschooler.me/sarah for $20 off your first classes for your childVisit https:/runningwithgrit.com for all things related to running after age 40!

TechFirst with John Koetsier
The 500-year-lifespan geodesic dome home is now real, actual, built

TechFirst with John Koetsier

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 25:17


We desperately need more housing that is affordable, sustainable, and mass producible. Geoship thinks they've created exactly that, and have now actually built a full-scale prototype using their advanced materials science and construction methodology. In this TechFirst, we chat with CEO and cofounder Morgan Bierschenk. Way too many can't afford homes right now, especially young people, and the homes we do build are generally horrible for the environment. Plus, the isolated wood boxes we build for people don't tend to bring us closer together. Geoship is building sustainable bioceramic domes. They're non-toxic, have a near-zero carbon footprint, are and designed to last 500 years. They're also intended to be affordable, mass producible, and maybe even to be deployed in communities where people can live together, not apart. Sounds idealistic? Maybe. But the company has completed its first full-size prototype, has 500 orders, and is looking to enter full-scale production. Links: Support TechFirst with $SMRT coins: https://rally.io/creator/SMRT/ Buy $SMRT to join a community focused on tech for good: the emerging world of smart matter. Access my private Slack, get your name in my book, suggest speakers for TechFirst ... and support my work. TechFirst transcripts: https://johnkoetsier.com/category/tech-first/ Forbes columns: https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnkoetsier/ Full videos: https://www.youtube.com/c/johnkoetsier?sub_confirmation=1 Keep in touch: https://twitter.com/johnkoetsier

Best of US Investors's Podcast
Stock Market Super Cycle: Baby Boomers Get What They Want: Life Span

Best of US Investors's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:58


StockCard.io is free to use. However, I recommend upgrading to VIP for unlimited access to all features.❤

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
Use These Fasting Secrets to Reverse Aging and Increase Your Lifespan with Dr. Valter Longo

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 91:21


This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox and InsideTracker.We all know that fasting has amazing benefits: reduced inflammation, increased cognitive function, fat loss, decreased risk of metabolic dysfunction, and the list goes on and on. But is there a correct way to fast? Is fasting for everyone? Should we exercise while we fast? How do we make the most of our fasts and how do we optimize our diets when we aren't fasting? Today on The Dhru Purohit Podcast, Dr. Valter Longo answers all of these questions and more. Dhru and Dr. Longo discuss the key pillars of the Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD), created by Dr. Longo to provide the body with the benefits of fasting without completely starving it. They also dive into the foundation of a longevity diet—how can we increase our lifespan and our healthspan using targeted nutrients and dietary protocols. Dr. Longo is internationally recognized as a leader in the field of aging studies and related diseases. Known as the “Guru of Longevity,” Dr. Longo is currently Professor of Biogerontology and Biological Sciences and Director of the Institute of Longevity of the School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California, as well as Director of the Oncology and Longevity Program at IFOM in Milan. He is also the Scientific Director of the Create Cures Foundation and the Valter Longo Foundation. Valter is the author of The Longevity Diet, a culmination of his 25 years of research on aging, nutrition, and disease across the globe. It provides an easy-to-understand, accessible, and implementable road map to living well longer through improved nutrition.In this episode, we dive into: -Why you shouldn't skip breakfast (2:23)-What happens if you fast incorrectly (13:59)-The key pillars of the Fasting Mimicking Diet (21:43)-Exercise and fasting (24:10)-The impact of the Fasting Mimicking Diet on chronic disease (31:05)-How the Fasting Mimicking Diet impacts the brain (35:18)-The foundation of the longevity diet (38:52)-Optimal protein consumption and longevity (51:02)-Why walking one hour a day is so central to longevity (1:04:14) -Stem-cell therapy and longevity (1:09:03)-Longevity supplement recommendations (1:15:57) For more on Dr. Valter Longo, follow him on Instagram @prof_valterlongo, Facebook @provalterlongo, and through his website, valterlongo.com. Get his book, The Longevity Diet, here.This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox and InsideTracker.Right now, ButcherBox is offering new members a great deal. You'll receive two pounds of FREE salmon in your first box. Sign up at ButcherBox.com/dhru.InsideTracker provides detailed nutrition and lifestyle guidance based on your individual needs. Right now, they're offering my podcast community 20% off. Just go to insidetracker.com/DHRU to get your discount and try it out for yourself. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Preconceived
Forever Young - Would You Choose to Live Indefinitely?

Preconceived

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 41:54


Imagine you could take a pill that would biologically halt the aging process. Barring any traumatic accidents or lethal infections, you could essentially live indefinitely at the same age you are today, perhaps until age 1,000 or beyond. Would you take that pill? Professor John Davis, author of New Methuselahs: The Ethics of Life Extension, joins the podcast. https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/new-methuselahs

Bulletproof Radio
Upgrade Spotlight: Find Your Footing in Minimalist Footwear – Xero Shoes : 935

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 46:07


IN THIS EPISODE OF THE HUMAN UPGRADE™... …you're listening to a new Upgrade Spotlight series based on what you told me you wanted to hear on this podcast. On one Friday each month, these shorter episodes will feature guests who'll get right into useful information in a Q&A style. You'll find out how to improve your energy and upgrade your performance. You'll also get the latest knowledge about powerful tools and technologies that allow you to change your biology and the environment around you. Introducing Xero Shoes! During this Upgrade Spotlight, you'll learn how minimalist footwear reduces injury, improves foot strength and supports healthy feet. You'll learn that getting grounded is a good thing.Today's guest—serial entrepreneur Steven Sashen—is a competitive sprinter. He knows the mechanics of human feet. He also knows what it feels like to move in shoes that suck. So, he and his wife, Lena Phoenix, founded the footwear company Xero Shoes. They ran headlong into shoe history and shoe science to intentionally create “a MOVEMENT movement” of people with happy, healthy, strong feet in addictively comfortable footwear. “A quarter of the bones and joints of your whole body are in your feet and ankles,” Steven says. “They're supposed to bend and move and flex just like any other joint. If you're wearing shoes that don't let them do that, that function tries unsuccessfully to move into your ankle, your knee, your hip and your back joints. Those joints aren't built for those micro motions that keep you balanced, that give you agility and mobility.”Your feet, and by design the rest of your body, know something's off with cushioned shoes. So does Steven.“The value of natural movement, the importance of foot health, and all the things that relate to foot health got me going,” he says. “But what really catalyzed it was discovering that what the footwear industry has been doing for 50 years is lying to people– selling people on ideas that they know don't work, but they can't pull back. They can't tell a different story, because they've been promoting this story for so long about arch support, motion control, padding, cushioning, etc.” Research published by the American College of Sports Medicine in 2021, “Stepping Back to Minimal Footwear: Applications Across the Lifespan," showed that minimal footwear leads to improved musculoskeletal health across your lifetime. “It's all about natural motion,” Steven explains. “Our ancestors didn't have a problem being on their feet all day, every day. It wasn't because they're different from us, it was just that they got used to using their feet correctly. We can still do that any day, anytime, any of age.”CHECK OUT XERO SHOES and the 5,000-MILE SOLE WARRANTY! U.S.: https://xeroshoes.com and EU: https://xeroshoes.euSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BIN Radio
BONUS EPISODE: Study of the Week- TDEE Across Lifespan

BIN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 16:16


In the first episode of our new short Bonus Episodes, Coach Chris dives into the groundbreaking study by Pontzer et al that looked at Daily Energy Expenditure Through the Human Life Course. We talk about the design of the study, the findings, and what the practical applications for people is. The study can be found at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34385400/

Aligned & Well
15. Healing Trauma, Religious Deconstruction & Nurturing Your Inner Child with Alyssa Converse

Aligned & Well

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 45:42


In this episode, I interview Alyssa Converse with Converse Counseling. Alyssa is a clinical mental health therapist who works primarily with young adults who are experiencing trauma, faith deconstruction, life transitions, stress/anxiety, and self esteem issues. She uses a variety of trauma-informed and holistic approaches to help folks heal their mind-body system. During our conversation, we took a deep dive into the following topics: Trauma-informed care Religious deconstruction Lifespan integration Inner child work and Reparenting Memory reconsolidating Tips for dealing with triggers related to trauma Shame around having a trauma experience Comparing your trauma to others RESOURCES: Healing Your Inner Child Handout Inner Child: 7 Days of Journaling CONNECT WITH ALYSSA CONVERSE: Website: www.conversecounseling.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/converse.counseling CONNECT WITH NURSE COACH SHAWNE: JOIN MY FREE COMMUNITY: Heart-Aligned Humans Click HERE to follow me on social media, visit my website, learn about my programs and schedule a free Discovery Session with me!

THE ED MYLETT SHOW
Gut Health for Mental Health w/ Dr. Amy Shah

THE ED MYLETT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:13


I've got a GUT FEELING you're going to really like this week's episode.That's because this week's episode is all about GUT HEALTH featuring one of the TOP EXPERTS in the field, DR. AMY SHAH.DO NOT TAKE THIS LIGHTLY!If you want to take your health and wellness to an even higher level, you need to listen to this episode…Or if you've got some unexplained issues like fatigue, brain fogginess, discomfort of any type, aches and pains… You gotta listen to this!!After a serious car accident that jolted her into thinking about her life differently.  Dr. Shah realized while she didn't sustain any physical injuries in the accident, mentally she wasn't happy.  Against the backdrop of a busy schedule of studying for her medical boards and building a practice from scratch, her health was suffering.  She began struggling with WEIGHT GAIN, LOW ENERGY, and UNEVEN MOODS before coming to the realization she needed a complete mental, hormonal, and inflammatory reset. That led her to her life's work, WELLNESS, and the strong MIND AND BODY connection necessary to achieve OPTIMAL HEALTH. Dr. Shah has become obsessed with creating methods and tools to help people move forward in their lives.  She has authored an incredible must-read book, “I'M SO EFFING TIRED:  A PROVEN PLAN TO BEAT BURNOUT, BOOST YOUR ENERGY, AND RECLAIM YOUR LIFE” named one of the five best business books of 2021 by FORTUNE MAGAZINE.  Using cutting-edge science, she has helped thousands of people tap into their powerful energy trifecta: the complex relationship between your GUT, your IMMUNE SYSTEM, and your HORMONES. Based on years of research Dr. Shah explains how your GUT and your BRAIN are connected.  You're going to hear how your gut impacts your mental health, and how we think impacts our gut.We also cover why being exposed to BACTERIA is better for your immune system, how INFLAMMATION is linked to your gut bacteria, and what you can do to FIX YOUR GUT.You're also going to get deep insights into Dr. Shah's NUTRITIONAL RESEARCH, including what foods we should and should not be eating, and HOW WHAT TIME WE EAT AFFECTS OUR GUT.If you're like a lot of people, you'll also want to hear what Dr. Shah has to say about those dreaded SUGAR CRAVINGS and how they're connected to our DOPAMINE PATHWAYS.  Make no mistake, your gut health does affect your LIFESPAN.  So, if you haven't been doing a good job of taking care of it before now, what you learn on this week's episode from Dr. Shah should be more than enough to get you thinking about gut health with a degree of urgency.

The Source
New research that identifies your ‘true age' could lead to a longer lifespan

The Source

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 40:00


Research from one of the leading experts on longevity suggests that a better indicator of a person's health and well being is their biological age — the age at which their body is functioning.

The Brian Keane Podcast
#379: David Sinclair Ph.D. on Lifespan, Why We Age and Why We Don't Have To!   

The Brian Keane Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 43:06


Dr. Sinclair is a professor of genetics and co-director of Harvard Medical School's Center for Biology of Aging Research.    He is also the author of the great book Lifespan, why we age and why we don't have to and the host of the podcast Lifespan with Dr. David Sinclair that covers topics such as  the science behind why we age and interventions for slowing and even reversing aging.   Time Magazine has him as one of the 100 most influential people on earth and we packed so much incredible content into this podcast.    If you are interested in longevity, health, looking or feeling better and how to reduce ageing, this one is not to be missed.    Here are some of the things we talked about        What to eat and when to eat for longevity     Why fasting is hard for a few weeks and then it becomes considerably easier as your body gets used to it     The major misconceptions around aging     David's anti-aging regimen     Why aging is a disease and how that disease is treatable,     Anti-aging supplements to look into     Using exercise, heat and cold as acute stressors for longevity      His top seven tips for living a longer and younger life     And much more     Biological age test website:  Tallyhealth.com   His social   Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/davidsinclairphd Twitter - https://twitter.com/davidasinclair Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidsinclairphd/?hl=en Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/sinclairda/ Linktree: https://linktr.ee/lifespanbook   Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/davidsinclairpodcast     His website / Podcast   https://www.lifespanpodcast.com/  

Autism in the Adult
Shifting Autistic Characteristics Across The Lifespan: Adolescence

Autism in the Adult

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 33:23


Join Dr. Regan for the second episode in this series about how autistic characteristics may shift across the lifespan. This episode focuses on the life season of adolescence. Stay tuned for the next episodes in the series to hear about hormonal shifts in women and autism in the aging adult (50's and beyond).  Recognizing Dysregulation on the Autism Spectrum: Fight, Flight, Freeze   Dr. Regan's Resources New Course for Clinicians - Interventions in Autism: Helping Clients Stay Centered, Connect with Others, and Engage in Life New Course for Clinicians: ASD Differential Diagnoses and Associated Characteristics Book: Understanding Autism in Adults and Aging Adults, 2nd ed Audiobook Book: Understanding Autistic Behaviors Autism in the Adult website homepage Website Resources for Clinicians   Read the Transcript:   1 00:00:03,340 --> 00:00:08,560 Hello and welcome to this episode of Autism in the Adult podcast, 2 00:00:08,940 --> 00:00:10,030 I am your host, 3 00:00:10,040 --> 00:00:11,550 Dr Theresa Regan. 4 00:00:11,560 --> 00:00:13,980 I am a neuropsychologist. 5 00:00:13,990 --> 00:00:23,750 The director of an adult diagnostic autism clinic in central Illinois, and I'm the mother of a teen on the autism spectrum. 6 00:00:25,140 --> 00:00:45,660 We are starting the second episode of a four part series today and the series is about characteristics of autism that fluctuate or shift across the lifespan according to different seasons in life of the individual or changes in the environment. 7 00:00:46,340 --> 00:00:53,960 And our first episode in this series was that foundational information about shifting characteristics, 8 00:00:53,970 --> 00:01:06,460 shifts in how the individual experiences the characteristics and how those around them experience or are impacted by these autistic characteristics. 9 00:01:07,840 --> 00:01:08,500 Today, 10 00:01:08,500 --> 00:01:09,700 in the second episode, 11 00:01:09,700 --> 00:01:26,360 we're going to focus on the time period of adolescence in the lifespan and talk about why that can be such a huge shift and why there can be so many changes for the individual at that time. 12 00:01:27,540 --> 00:01:47,860 one of the things we covered last time is that the changes in how we experience ourselves and express ourselves are often impacted by characteristics of the person that would include their physical development, 13 00:01:47,860 --> 00:01:49,540 the development of the brain, 14 00:01:49,550 --> 00:01:56,220 the biochemistry of the body and the brain also... things like the environment. 15 00:01:56,230 --> 00:01:59,770 So what kinds of demands are in the environment, 16 00:01:59,770 --> 00:02:05,860 what kind of assistance and structure are within that environment at the time. 17 00:02:07,340 --> 00:02:18,860 Things that may shift may also include coping strategies that we've learned certain things we've learned to mask something or to cope with something and regulate ourselves better. 18 00:02:20,040 --> 00:02:24,360 Let's start with the physical person during adolescence. 19 00:02:25,240 --> 00:02:37,980 So one thing that happens of course is that the physical body has been developing and changing and during adolescence there's just a lot of acceleration in that we've got a lot more muscle mass, 20 00:02:37,980 --> 00:02:39,510 you've got a lot of height, 21 00:02:39,520 --> 00:02:41,560 the voice changes etcetera. 22 00:02:42,140 --> 00:02:48,110 And the person at the end of that whole cycle has a different body in many respects. 23 00:02:48,740 --> 00:03:09,660 And one of the things that clients on the spectrum have discussed with me is that for people who like consistency and predictability and who they are and what's happening sometimes this season of having a different body can really be frustrating and upsetting. 24 00:03:10,140 --> 00:03:13,100 And I've had clients say, 25 00:03:13,110 --> 00:03:14,240 you know, 26 00:03:14,250 --> 00:03:16,420 this is not my body. 27 00:03:16,430 --> 00:03:20,920 I really want my 10 year old body back because that was me. 28 00:03:20,930 --> 00:03:37,320 It felt like my internal person was connected to that physical person and to have so many things change without my permission so that I'm a different height and weight and I just don't feel like this is my body anymore. 29 00:03:37,320 --> 00:03:39,430 I just don't like it. 30 00:03:39,440 --> 00:03:44,090 I want to go back in time and to have my original body, 31 00:03:44,090 --> 00:03:46,650 the body that fits my personhood. 32 00:03:50,140 --> 00:03:55,270 Sometimes this will come out where people say I as an adult, 33 00:03:55,280 --> 00:04:04,660 focused a lot on staying at the weight of 118 because that's what my weight was when I stopped getting taller. 34 00:04:04,660 --> 00:04:07,190 So when I graduated from high school, 35 00:04:07,190 --> 00:04:13,440 I was 118 And I really can't tolerate being 120. 36 00:04:13,450 --> 00:04:16,770 I can't tolerate being 100 and 10. 37 00:04:16,780 --> 00:04:34,080 I need to be kind of that same foundational number that I associate with my body and I don't want it to change as you can predict by thinking about the lifespan of the individual. 38 00:04:34,740 --> 00:04:42,370 This stress related to unexpected or unplanned changes in the body, 39 00:04:42,380 --> 00:04:45,460 can really happen across lots of life seasons. 40 00:04:45,940 --> 00:04:49,750 So adolescence is certainly a big one, 41 00:04:49,760 --> 00:04:51,790 pregnancy is a big one, 42 00:04:51,800 --> 00:04:53,270 aging is a big one. 44 00:04:54,060 --> 00:05:00,960 we can all relate to wanting our younger body back and for the individual on the spectrum, 45 00:05:01,340 --> 00:05:14,160 the angst of feeling disconnected with their personhood when their body changes may maybe even more acute that this really has happened without my permission and I do not like it. 46 00:05:15,440 --> 00:05:20,340 The brain also has been doing a lot of development during this period of time. 47 00:05:20,350 --> 00:05:22,800 And as we talked about in the first episode, 48 00:05:22,800 --> 00:05:30,110 the brain itself does not stop developing as a part of the body until about 20, 21, 49 00:05:30,480 --> 00:05:33,010 that early adulthood phase. 50 00:05:33,020 --> 00:05:36,310 So the brain is not grown, 51 00:05:36,310 --> 00:05:44,260 is not fully developed until the person is really out of high school and starting that young adulthood phase, 52 00:05:45,640 --> 00:05:51,760 This development of the brain includes things like thinking at a different level, 53 00:05:51,770 --> 00:05:55,260 challenging what you've always been told, 54 00:05:55,640 --> 00:06:01,250 trying to graduate into more abstract ways of thinking conceptualized thinking. 55 00:06:01,740 --> 00:06:14,260 So there's a lot of changes in the brain itself and the anatomy and the connections and that can impact how autism feels or is expressed during that time. 56 00:06:15,440 --> 00:06:19,070 The chemistry of the body and the brain also shifts. 57 00:06:19,080 --> 00:06:21,300 And so we talked about this before, 58 00:06:21,300 --> 00:06:31,990 that hormones are meant to change the body and the brain and they do and the impact can really feel quite dramatic, 59 00:06:31,990 --> 00:06:33,850 especially during adolescence, 60 00:06:34,440 --> 00:06:44,320 where sometimes that's just this period of the perfect storm for the most centered individual. 61 00:06:44,330 --> 00:06:44,720 You know, 62 00:06:44,730 --> 00:06:56,240 every person probably has stories about adolescents when they were tearful or yelling or or stomping off, 63 00:06:56,250 --> 00:06:57,620 jumping on their bike, 64 00:06:57,620 --> 00:07:03,530 riding away whatever the drama of that period of time may have been for you, 65 00:07:03,540 --> 00:07:17,120 you can relate to that feeling that this hormonal storm for someone that already has some dysregulation difficulty can also be pretty profound. 66 00:07:17,130 --> 00:07:21,260 So it's even harder for me to stay centered. 67 00:07:21,270 --> 00:07:41,150 It's even harder for me to keep my emotions in check or to um focus or get rid of that anxiety or sleep well that this regulation and you can go ahead and listen to the series on regulation that was not too long ago, 68 00:07:41,150 --> 00:07:44,640 a four part series if you want to know more about that. 69 00:07:44,640 --> 00:07:53,760 But the ability to stay centered and even it's just more difficult once those hormones kick in. 70 00:07:54,140 --> 00:07:58,660 And even more so for the person who struggled to begin with, 71 00:07:59,440 --> 00:08:05,040 it's also true that the body and the brain become sexualized during that time. 72 00:08:05,050 --> 00:08:17,850 And so there are even these additional layers of emotion and physical response related to the sexualization of the body that the person has to navigate. 73 00:08:18,540 --> 00:08:19,290 You know, 74 00:08:19,300 --> 00:08:20,960 it's just not. 75 00:08:21,440 --> 00:08:25,960 this is the time of life anymore when please, thank you, and sorry 76 00:08:25,960 --> 00:08:29,610 was going to help you connect with people around you. 77 00:08:29,620 --> 00:08:39,860 There's this really complicated social environment now and that also includes this sexualization of some relationships, 78 00:08:42,440 --> 00:08:44,470 a psychological task. 79 00:08:44,470 --> 00:08:48,150 So we're still talking about the individual at this moment, 80 00:08:48,150 --> 00:08:56,400 but I want to stop and talk about not the physical piece but the psychological task of much of adolescence. 81 00:08:56,590 --> 00:09:05,180 If you're familiar with Erik Erickson and his work with the tasks that we all have at different seasons of life. 82 00:09:05,190 --> 00:09:12,560 He would say that the adolescent's job is to navigate this journey of identity. 83 00:09:12,940 --> 00:09:14,260 Who am I? 84 00:09:14,640 --> 00:09:21,410 Who am I as separate from my parents or from my family history and I'm my own person. 85 00:09:21,410 --> 00:09:21,930 If so, 86 00:09:21,930 --> 00:09:26,360 what does that look like and how can I connect with my tribe? 87 00:09:26,370 --> 00:09:27,310 Where is my, 88 00:09:27,320 --> 00:09:28,160 my people, 89 00:09:28,160 --> 00:09:42,090 my tribe... peer relationships really are an important piece of the connection at that time where I switch from not so much having my best friend be mom or dad anymore or Joey down the street, 90 00:09:42,090 --> 00:09:49,260 but I really switched toward a lot more peer companionship that I'm going to connect with... 91 00:09:49,640 --> 00:09:51,170 A romantic peer... 92 00:09:51,170 --> 00:09:57,440 I'm going to connect with peer groups at my school or in my neighborhood or at my part time job. 93 00:09:57,450 --> 00:10:01,220 And these people may have different values than my parents had. 94 00:10:01,230 --> 00:10:05,960 And I may explore all these different ways of being and thinking. 95 00:10:06,240 --> 00:10:10,860 And my parents no longer seemed to have all the rules, 96 00:10:11,040 --> 00:10:11,380 uh, 97 00:10:11,380 --> 00:10:13,240 and all the keys to life. 98 00:10:13,250 --> 00:10:17,940 And so this process of navigating life, 99 00:10:17,950 --> 00:10:20,640 navigating the social environment, 100 00:10:20,650 --> 00:10:23,060 navigating all of the um, 101 00:10:23,940 --> 00:10:32,360 the reasoning and facts and cognitive pieces that a person might think throw as far as what do I believe? 102 00:10:32,740 --> 00:10:39,380 Do I believe the same thing my parents do and where can I connect? 103 00:10:39,390 --> 00:10:43,460 Where can I belong and find connection with other people? 104 00:10:45,540 --> 00:11:00,550 What we see in the autism community is that there can be a lot of gender diversity that overlaps here and part of it can be this feeling that this is not my body. 105 00:11:00,940 --> 00:11:01,370 Um, 106 00:11:01,380 --> 00:11:09,510 I don't feel connected to the community of people who were born female or born male, 107 00:11:09,510 --> 00:11:11,060 whatever the case may be. 108 00:11:11,070 --> 00:11:13,360 I don't identify as that. 109 00:11:13,360 --> 00:11:14,730 It's not my identity. 110 00:11:14,730 --> 00:11:16,310 I don't feel connected to that. 111 00:11:16,310 --> 00:11:19,060 I can't connect with the peer group in that way. 112 00:11:19,740 --> 00:11:23,510 And in the case of this emerging sexuality as well, 113 00:11:23,510 --> 00:11:26,300 that I'm looking for my identity, 114 00:11:26,300 --> 00:11:27,760 I'm looking for my group. 115 00:11:28,140 --> 00:11:33,660 And there's this gender diversity journey for some people on the spectrum. 116 00:11:34,440 --> 00:11:41,200 So a lot of the research shows that although we would expect to see two um, 117 00:11:41,210 --> 00:11:45,430 autism within any group throughout the world, 118 00:11:45,430 --> 00:11:47,980 whether it's a um, 119 00:11:47,990 --> 00:12:02,160 type of nation that we're looking at or whether it's a city or That about 2% of people in any particular area would be on the spectrum and within the gender diverse community that's higher. 120 00:12:02,640 --> 00:12:11,870 So the research says about 5-8 % of the gender diverse community maybe on the spectrum, 121 00:12:11,870 --> 00:12:14,560 I suspect it's somewhat higher than that. 122 00:12:15,140 --> 00:12:15,490 Um, 123 00:12:15,490 --> 00:12:21,180 but certainly there's that process of understanding the physical body, 124 00:12:21,180 --> 00:12:23,510 understanding the peer group connection, 125 00:12:23,510 --> 00:12:36,190 seeking that out and this who am I kind of journey in addition to changes in the person that can make, 126 00:12:36,200 --> 00:12:36,630 um, 127 00:12:36,630 --> 00:12:40,060 some added stress during a life season. 128 00:12:40,840 --> 00:12:51,020 There are also a lot of changes to the environment of the individual who's in that adolescent period within autism. 129 00:12:51,020 --> 00:13:03,450 What we see is that the autistic individual has more difficulty than their peers with things like independent daily activities and behavior. 130 00:13:04,040 --> 00:13:11,590 What that means is that this person may have this brilliant sense of math or music or art. 131 00:13:11,600 --> 00:13:15,460 Their head may be filled with facts and ideas. 132 00:13:15,470 --> 00:13:16,190 Um, 133 00:13:16,200 --> 00:13:20,990 but their ability to just kind of flow through the day and get things done. 134 00:13:20,990 --> 00:13:23,200 Like I'm going to take my shower, 135 00:13:23,200 --> 00:13:26,550 I'm going to throw my laundry in as a high school student, 136 00:13:26,550 --> 00:13:27,790 I'm going to learn to drive, 137 00:13:27,790 --> 00:13:30,140 I'm going to learn how to save money, 138 00:13:30,140 --> 00:13:31,530 I'm going to learn to cook. 139 00:13:31,540 --> 00:13:31,960 You know, 140 00:13:31,960 --> 00:13:34,280 that kind of stuff is just harder. 141 00:13:34,280 --> 00:13:37,690 Like I can name all these physics equations, 142 00:13:37,690 --> 00:13:44,400 but I just can't catch up with my peers in this area of being independent and, 143 00:13:44,410 --> 00:13:59,840 and this um kind of emerging into adulthood and this disconnect between the neuro typical peer and the individuals on the spectrum who's going through adolescent that gets bigger, 144 00:13:59,850 --> 00:14:00,660 wider, 145 00:14:00,660 --> 00:14:03,780 The gap gets wider with age. 146 00:14:03,790 --> 00:14:05,590 So as you know, 147 00:14:05,590 --> 00:14:07,190 a five year old, 148 00:14:07,200 --> 00:14:15,050 there's some gap there where neuro typical peers are doing more independently typically than the autistic individual, 149 00:14:15,440 --> 00:14:16,600 but you know, 150 00:14:16,600 --> 00:14:22,360 there's not a whole lot of independent things that a five year old is being asked to do. 151 00:14:22,840 --> 00:14:26,560 But when you get to middle school high school young adulthood, 152 00:14:26,570 --> 00:14:27,210 whoa, 153 00:14:27,210 --> 00:14:33,460 the independent demand just skyrockets and this gap becomes more and more visible. 154 00:14:33,840 --> 00:14:34,300 Um, 155 00:14:34,300 --> 00:14:39,150 and although the person may really be ahead with academic knowledge, 156 00:14:39,540 --> 00:14:44,670 this person may be really feeling the gap of cash, 157 00:14:44,670 --> 00:14:47,680 how do my peers get through life this way? 158 00:14:47,680 --> 00:14:49,170 This is really overwhelming. 159 00:14:49,170 --> 00:14:50,740 I have a lot of anxiety, 160 00:14:50,740 --> 00:14:54,250 I feel like I don't know how to navigate all these things. 161 00:14:55,840 --> 00:15:14,950 So the environment begins to demand more independence and the autistic individual going through this adolescent period starts to fall behind more and more with what's expected as far as independent daily behavior. 162 00:15:15,440 --> 00:15:24,460 So can you approach a teacher and ask a question or talk to your teacher about, 163 00:15:24,840 --> 00:15:25,090 hey, 164 00:15:25,090 --> 00:15:31,150 I think the reason I am falling behind in math is that I don't understand this core concept. 165 00:15:31,160 --> 00:15:36,790 Can you help me understand this or can they approach their peer and say, 166 00:15:36,790 --> 00:15:37,190 hey, 167 00:15:37,190 --> 00:15:41,230 do you want to go to the dance with me or hey, 168 00:15:41,240 --> 00:15:44,540 I think we had kind of a rough interaction back there. 169 00:15:44,540 --> 00:15:46,360 I really didn't mean to, 170 00:15:46,740 --> 00:15:47,540 um, 171 00:15:47,550 --> 00:15:48,010 you know, 172 00:15:48,010 --> 00:15:49,440 criticize you, 173 00:15:49,450 --> 00:15:51,860 I think it was a misunderstanding. 174 00:15:52,640 --> 00:16:05,850 So this increased demand for communication from the individual that mom is going to be calling the school less and the students going to be doing the talking more often than before. 175 00:16:09,330 --> 00:16:20,250 There are demands for independence in self care that all of this hygiene and grooming and eating independently and making sure you drink water and wear deodorant. 176 00:16:20,740 --> 00:16:27,820 These things start to become the person's responsibility instead of the parents' responsibility. 177 00:16:27,820 --> 00:16:34,790 And they're just can be a gap there where the expectation for independence is growing, 178 00:16:34,800 --> 00:16:38,950 but the person is struggling to keep up. 179 00:16:40,240 --> 00:16:45,170 There are increased demands with independence within what we call executive function. 180 00:16:45,200 --> 00:16:51,320 So that ability to plan and organize and multitask time management, 181 00:16:51,320 --> 00:16:57,850 These things that the person becomes more and more in charge of... these become harder and harder. 182 00:16:58,240 --> 00:17:14,450 These are things that are always difficult on the spectrum to some extent and the gap again becomes larger as the demand becomes larger. chores are things that the person is supposed to start doing. 183 00:17:14,450 --> 00:17:14,850 You know, 184 00:17:14,850 --> 00:17:23,770 can I start to do my laundry or I'm in charge of um caring for this pet that the family has or doing the dishes. 185 00:17:24,540 --> 00:17:32,350 Can I message my doctor through the electronic medical record and ask a question and then driving? 186 00:17:33,340 --> 00:17:33,700 You know, 187 00:17:33,700 --> 00:17:39,160 driving can be a milestone that feels overwhelming for the individual on the spectrum. 188 00:17:39,640 --> 00:17:47,830 And I looked this past year at the clinic patients I've seen across several years. 189 00:17:47,840 --> 00:17:55,800 I took ages 16 through 20 who individuals who had uh, 190 00:17:55,810 --> 00:17:57,860 no intellectual disability. 191 00:17:58,440 --> 00:18:16,270 And I saw that 80% of the clients I have seen in the clinic either did not do any driving by the age of 20 or they were significantly anxious about driving where I only drive to this one place and that's it. 192 00:18:17,340 --> 00:18:23,750 So there can be this kind of overwhelming sense that things happen too fast on the road. 193 00:18:23,750 --> 00:18:25,070 Things are overwhelming. 194 00:18:25,070 --> 00:18:27,650 Or what if I make the wrong choice? 195 00:18:27,660 --> 00:18:28,750 What if I crash? 196 00:18:28,750 --> 00:18:37,370 What if I hurt someone in the midst of this increasing demand for independence? 197 00:18:37,380 --> 00:18:43,350 There's also this reduction in structure or helpful support, 198 00:18:44,540 --> 00:18:46,470 as we said before, 199 00:18:46,480 --> 00:18:51,940 the person starts to be encouraged to be their own self advocate. 200 00:18:51,950 --> 00:18:54,690 And I don't know about where you live, 201 00:18:54,700 --> 00:19:05,170 but self advocacy is a word that's used more and more once you get into middle school and high school and college and even in the workplace, 202 00:19:05,840 --> 00:19:12,260 it means that the individual is in charge of doing their own talking to people. 203 00:19:12,840 --> 00:19:16,760 Self advocacy means that you can um, 204 00:19:16,770 --> 00:19:18,610 look at your situation, 205 00:19:19,840 --> 00:19:30,760 think about why it is that you're struggling and what you need to make a plan for improvement and approach someone in your situation and talk to them about it. 206 00:19:31,240 --> 00:19:33,800 So I approach my guidance counselor, 207 00:19:33,800 --> 00:19:35,440 I approach my professor, 208 00:19:35,450 --> 00:19:44,080 I approach my boss and I initiate this discussion and we come to an agreement about what a good plan would be for. 209 00:19:44,090 --> 00:19:48,540 Let's say for me to arrive on time for me to get my work in on time, 210 00:19:48,540 --> 00:19:49,270 et cetera. 211 00:19:49,540 --> 00:19:54,680 So parents start to play less of a role and the, 212 00:19:54,690 --> 00:20:05,070 so the structure and the support starts to be pared back while the demand is increased socially, 213 00:20:05,070 --> 00:20:07,960 things are more complex as well. 214 00:20:08,440 --> 00:20:19,010 So gone are the days where running around and chasing each other and playing tag and hiding things is really a great social interaction. 215 00:20:20,240 --> 00:20:32,660 I remember talking to some parents who were saying what great socialization their child had as a youngster and that when they would go to the park, 216 00:20:33,140 --> 00:20:37,030 the child would play with other kids for example. 217 00:20:37,740 --> 00:20:54,870 But when I asked what kind of play it typically was it was that the child would chase other kids and other kids would chase the child and they would laugh and play and fall and which is good for that age group. 218 00:20:54,870 --> 00:20:55,770 That's fine. 219 00:20:56,340 --> 00:21:07,180 But it's also this kind of instinctual physical play that puppy dogs can play and little kids know how to play that and it's a fun game, 220 00:21:07,200 --> 00:21:23,160 but it doesn't really require the social skills and the social navigation that middle school relationships require right when you get from physical to play to this more relational connection, 221 00:21:23,180 --> 00:21:32,670 that's where you can see some of the social things really begin to be much more difficult and the person really can't navigate that? 222 00:21:33,140 --> 00:21:35,770 How do I start a relationship? 223 00:21:36,340 --> 00:21:38,580 How do I maintain this relationship? 224 00:21:38,580 --> 00:21:42,520 How do I understand this relationship? 225 00:21:42,520 --> 00:21:43,770 What just happened? 226 00:21:44,740 --> 00:21:46,960 Why did this relationship end? 227 00:21:47,540 --> 00:21:49,920 Why did they misinterpret me? 228 00:21:49,920 --> 00:21:51,770 Because that's not what I meant. 229 00:21:52,740 --> 00:22:07,160 So there there becomes a lot more at stake and a lot more complexity when you're navigating not physical play and not play dates that your mom organized, 230 00:22:08,140 --> 00:22:13,770 but you're really navigating your own emerging adult relationships. 231 00:22:14,840 --> 00:22:24,160 Another thing that happens is that life becomes less predictable. 232 00:22:24,940 --> 00:22:27,590 It's not your life in a box anymore. 233 00:22:27,620 --> 00:22:30,320 You know when you're in first grade, 234 00:22:30,320 --> 00:22:35,500 you know that next year you go to second grade and the next year you go to third grade, 235 00:22:35,500 --> 00:22:43,530 fourth grade and life has this very predictable rhythm where you know where you go next. 236 00:22:43,540 --> 00:22:47,910 Now you don't know what classes will be like or what your teacher will be like, 237 00:22:47,920 --> 00:22:52,240 but you're going to the same school or you're switching schools, 238 00:22:52,250 --> 00:22:55,560 but you have the structure ahead of you. 239 00:22:55,940 --> 00:23:00,430 There's still something that propels you along and when you get to the next place, 240 00:23:00,430 --> 00:23:07,960 there's a structure in place for you and someone will tell you where you're going to be next. 241 00:23:10,040 --> 00:23:12,260 When you get to the end of high school, 242 00:23:12,640 --> 00:23:14,580 at least in the United States? 243 00:23:14,590 --> 00:23:17,440 What happens is that people start to say to you, 244 00:23:17,440 --> 00:23:19,060 what are you going to do next? 245 00:23:20,640 --> 00:23:23,530 What are you going to be when you quote grow up, 246 00:23:23,540 --> 00:23:24,860 what do you want to be? 247 00:23:25,340 --> 00:23:39,850 And they'll say things like you can be anything you want to be the whole world is your oyster and you start to see that your peers are no longer following the same path as every other peer, 248 00:23:39,850 --> 00:23:43,460 that everyone is kind of making their own path. 249 00:23:44,240 --> 00:23:46,970 And the person on the spectrum can feel like, 250 00:23:46,970 --> 00:23:47,450 well, 251 00:23:48,140 --> 00:23:49,710 what am I supposed to do? 252 00:23:49,710 --> 00:23:49,910 What, 253 00:23:49,920 --> 00:23:52,060 what is my life supposed to look like? 254 00:23:53,240 --> 00:23:54,600 Where is the path? 255 00:23:54,610 --> 00:23:56,870 Show me the path and I'll follow the path. 256 00:23:56,880 --> 00:24:00,200 But to forge my own path, 257 00:24:00,200 --> 00:24:04,360 may not actually feel that empowering or exciting. 258 00:24:04,940 --> 00:24:08,770 I kind of like to know that I'm on the correct path. 259 00:24:08,780 --> 00:24:11,800 I like to know how to meet people's expectations. 260 00:24:12,240 --> 00:24:14,910 I like to know that I'm not getting lost. 261 00:24:15,180 --> 00:24:18,860 I like to know that I'm not taking a risk that it's not unsafe. 262 00:24:20,140 --> 00:24:24,060 So the future becomes more self propelled. 263 00:24:25,340 --> 00:24:35,680 And this can also be a task of young adulthood that is daunting to the person with neurology that likes to know, 264 00:24:35,680 --> 00:24:36,060 like, 265 00:24:36,840 --> 00:24:38,570 did I get an A on that, 266 00:24:38,670 --> 00:24:39,000 you know, 267 00:24:39,000 --> 00:24:40,230 did I do it right. 268 00:24:40,370 --> 00:24:42,060 Is this where I'm supposed to be? 269 00:24:43,140 --> 00:24:49,260 So here we have the picture during adolescence that the internal self, 270 00:24:49,740 --> 00:24:52,400 the psychological biochemical, 271 00:24:52,400 --> 00:24:56,050 physical self and the external life, 272 00:24:56,540 --> 00:24:58,570 the supportive structure, 273 00:24:58,630 --> 00:25:06,170 the demands on the individual are creating this sense of just a lot less stability. 274 00:25:07,140 --> 00:25:07,550 You know, 275 00:25:07,550 --> 00:25:09,730 my internal self is less stable. 276 00:25:09,730 --> 00:25:11,680 I feel all over the place. 277 00:25:11,690 --> 00:25:14,080 I'm crying one minute I'm laughing. 278 00:25:14,080 --> 00:25:15,700 One minute I'm throwing something. 279 00:25:15,700 --> 00:25:19,710 One minute I have all these demands on me. 280 00:25:19,720 --> 00:25:21,920 People seem to be figuring this out, 281 00:25:21,920 --> 00:25:23,820 but I can't figure it out. 282 00:25:23,830 --> 00:25:25,020 I can't sleep, 283 00:25:25,020 --> 00:25:26,050 I'm anxious. 284 00:25:27,040 --> 00:25:35,560 Um And there's all this stuff that goes along with this less stable season. 285 00:25:37,140 --> 00:25:38,950 The person on the spectrum, 286 00:25:38,950 --> 00:25:40,820 as we said earlier, 287 00:25:40,830 --> 00:25:43,400 with relationship to regulation, 288 00:25:43,400 --> 00:25:48,450 they're more likely to get dis regulated just from a neurological perspective. 289 00:25:48,940 --> 00:25:57,860 And dis regulation looks like fight where it's any externalized expression of being unsent erred, 290 00:25:57,880 --> 00:25:59,410 I'm crying, 291 00:25:59,410 --> 00:26:00,730 I'm melting down. 292 00:26:00,730 --> 00:26:01,920 I'm screaming, 293 00:26:01,920 --> 00:26:03,080 I'm throwing something, 294 00:26:03,080 --> 00:26:06,460 I'm shouting and arguing at you and I'm slamming doors. 295 00:26:07,440 --> 00:26:09,060 You get flight. 296 00:26:09,740 --> 00:26:11,850 I can't go to school anymore. 297 00:26:11,920 --> 00:26:12,970 My stomach hurts. 298 00:26:12,970 --> 00:26:14,270 I need to come home. 299 00:26:14,840 --> 00:26:16,830 I'm staying in my room. 300 00:26:16,840 --> 00:26:18,810 I'm not going to eat at the table. 301 00:26:18,820 --> 00:26:19,950 I have homework to do. 302 00:26:19,950 --> 00:26:21,170 I'm not coming out. 303 00:26:21,940 --> 00:26:33,360 You get this social withdrawal and freeze is also part of this regulation that if you force me to I will sit sit here physically. 304 00:26:34,040 --> 00:26:36,640 But psychologically I'm offline. 305 00:26:36,650 --> 00:26:39,400 I can't process what's happening anymore. 306 00:26:39,410 --> 00:26:41,000 I'm checked out. 307 00:26:41,010 --> 00:26:42,820 I'm staring at the wall, 308 00:26:42,830 --> 00:26:46,470 I might be having a seizure that's not electrical. 309 00:26:46,480 --> 00:27:01,360 I might lose my memory for parts of the day and all of that is this dis regulation and the dis regulation of adolescents can be quite a bit more noticeable that there's this real crisis of regulation. 310 00:27:02,140 --> 00:27:09,760 But also what I see in the clients that I serve is that the regulation difficulty can all of a sudden look different. 311 00:27:10,140 --> 00:27:12,770 So that would not be unusual either. 312 00:27:13,140 --> 00:27:20,460 So what I see is that sometimes if little kiddos were under reactive to their environment, 313 00:27:20,470 --> 00:27:24,360 they were less reactive to what's going on around them, 314 00:27:25,740 --> 00:27:33,170 they may look really um compliant and passive and go with the flow. 315 00:27:33,640 --> 00:27:39,060 But what that really is is that they should have some response to what's going on in the environment. 316 00:27:39,060 --> 00:27:41,760 But instead they just lack a response. 317 00:27:41,770 --> 00:27:44,130 And if someone tells them to sit up, 318 00:27:44,130 --> 00:27:44,750 they set up. 319 00:27:44,750 --> 00:27:47,330 If someone tells them to go here or there, 320 00:27:47,330 --> 00:27:47,970 they do it. 321 00:27:47,980 --> 00:27:52,170 But they don't have a lot of reactivity to what's going on. 322 00:27:53,340 --> 00:27:54,440 And adolescence. 323 00:27:54,440 --> 00:28:03,820 This may be a person that flips into an over reactive state or an elevated reactive profile where oh my gosh, 324 00:28:03,820 --> 00:28:07,340 the littlest thing happens and I react to it now. 325 00:28:07,350 --> 00:28:17,230 So I have like this flip from passive to so elevated in my response or you can have vice versa. 326 00:28:17,240 --> 00:28:19,310 Where as a little kid, 327 00:28:19,310 --> 00:28:25,910 this person was melting down and rolling on the ground and biting people and now as an adolescent, 328 00:28:25,920 --> 00:28:33,030 they can't get out of bed and they're sluggish and they don't eat and they don't have momentum for activities. 329 00:28:34,040 --> 00:28:38,790 That could also be something that you see where there's this dis regulated state, 330 00:28:38,800 --> 00:28:40,410 but it looks different, 331 00:28:40,420 --> 00:28:49,170 but it's still dysregulation and it's still uh kind of falls within what we talked about in that past series. 332 00:28:52,540 --> 00:28:57,740 Some people feel like with biochemical and hormonal changes, 333 00:28:57,740 --> 00:29:00,960 that their anxiety really is elevated. 334 00:29:01,390 --> 00:29:09,260 Sometimes there are self harm behaviors that may look like cutting or um hitting yourself, 335 00:29:09,270 --> 00:29:10,460 biting yourself, 336 00:29:10,840 --> 00:29:12,850 banging your head on the wall. 337 00:29:14,340 --> 00:29:18,450 Sometimes there are elevated sensory concerns where, 338 00:29:19,040 --> 00:29:19,560 you know, 339 00:29:19,560 --> 00:29:24,290 this food never bothered me before or noise or whatever, 340 00:29:24,290 --> 00:29:29,110 but all of a sudden I just really can't tolerate the sensory environment, 341 00:29:29,110 --> 00:29:38,050 It's too much and that can be part of this physical and environmental season of dis regulation. 342 00:29:40,040 --> 00:29:57,310 Now I do wanna um say that this I think is a really good summary of what I tend to see during adolescence as far as shifts in the qualities of autism and people I do want to say however, 343 00:29:57,310 --> 00:30:00,570 that I work in a clinic. 344 00:30:00,580 --> 00:30:17,160 So people come to me during adolescence when they are struggling and so I really don't get to see folks that have improved through adolescence and are doing better and not needing to come through. 345 00:30:17,640 --> 00:30:36,360 So I'm fully aware of that piece as well and I have seen people in my community and in my personal life and in my friendships that have had a bit of a smoother course as well where the sensory issues have really come down by adolescents, 346 00:30:36,740 --> 00:30:39,490 there's a bit better social connection. 347 00:30:39,500 --> 00:30:40,570 Um, 348 00:30:40,580 --> 00:30:43,760 executive functions not that much of a problem. 349 00:30:44,440 --> 00:30:58,770 So you can certainly see this variety of individualized um kind of seasons and my purpose and talking about this isn't to say, 350 00:30:58,780 --> 00:30:59,880 oh gosh, 351 00:30:59,880 --> 00:31:01,350 when people get to adolescence, 352 00:31:01,350 --> 00:31:02,450 that's going to be rough. 353 00:31:02,840 --> 00:31:03,180 No, 354 00:31:03,180 --> 00:31:20,360 it's just to point out that it is an individualized season of life and that just because autism is neurologic in its base doesn't mean that there there aren't shifting seasons and how that feels or how that looks. 355 00:31:20,840 --> 00:31:25,990 And I think whenever that happens in your life or the life of those, 356 00:31:25,990 --> 00:31:26,860 you love that, 357 00:31:27,340 --> 00:31:27,880 um, 358 00:31:27,890 --> 00:31:28,330 you know, 359 00:31:28,330 --> 00:31:31,090 certainly it's likely to happen for you. 360 00:31:31,090 --> 00:31:34,180 It may be adolescents for someone else. 361 00:31:34,190 --> 00:31:34,580 Uh, 362 00:31:34,590 --> 00:31:34,950 you know, 363 00:31:34,950 --> 00:31:40,550 maybe pregnancy or menopause or even just life seasons that aren't physical, 364 00:31:40,550 --> 00:31:41,540 that oh, 365 00:31:41,540 --> 00:31:47,360 my parent dies and that's a season where my body is really responding differently. 366 00:31:49,240 --> 00:32:09,790 I hope this information gives you a context for recognizing when you're going through those ups and downs of season and normalizing that these kinds of things can shift If you would like to review strategies for regulation. 367 00:32:09,800 --> 00:32:22,560 I encourage you to go back to our regulation series not too long ago to look at strategies for centering and feeling better in your own skin. 368 00:32:23,640 --> 00:32:26,810 And I'm looking forward to the third episode. 369 00:32:26,810 --> 00:32:32,270 We're going to focus on next time and this is going to have to do with hormonal shifts. 370 00:32:32,740 --> 00:32:39,170 A lot of that will talk about the experience of females on the spectrum, 371 00:32:39,170 --> 00:32:41,540 just because they're tend to be, 372 00:32:41,540 --> 00:32:46,870 of course more discreet hormonal shifts in the lives of women. 373 00:32:47,540 --> 00:32:50,560 This will include menstrual cycles, 374 00:32:51,040 --> 00:32:51,980 pregnancy, 375 00:32:51,980 --> 00:32:52,920 breastfeeding, 376 00:32:52,920 --> 00:32:53,950 menopause. 377 00:32:54,340 --> 00:32:54,840 Um, 378 00:32:54,840 --> 00:33:03,360 so some of these hormonal shifts will also impact males on the spectrum and some will be more specific to females. 379 00:33:03,740 --> 00:33:14,360 But I really hope you can join us next time as we start rounding out this series on shifting characteristics in autism.  

Abraham Hicks - Infinite Intelligence
#892 - Longer Life Span

Abraham Hicks - Infinite Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 4:47


New episodes daily. Learn more about The Law of Attraction, primarily through the teachings of Abraham Hicks. Improve your life and believe in the power of your mind.

Gossipnista: A New York City Podcast
Plant Powered Metro New York with Lianna Levine Reisner

Gossipnista: A New York City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 41:49


This is one of the most impactful topics and conversations to date on the podcast, with guest  @plantpoweredmetrony, because it could actually help transform and save lives in small steps but dramatic ways. New York City isn't just about the dining and food experiences, nightlife, attractions, landmarks, etc., but it's also the energy of the people, the communities built here, the connections we make, giving back and not just taking, and how we choose to build our everyday lives here. Did you know chronic diseases are the leading cause of mortality not only in the U.S., but across the world and Covid-19 did not help. All caused by a short list of risk behaviors that are generally under our control:•Tobacco use and exposure•Poor nutrition, including diets low in fruits and vegetables and high in sodium and saturated fats•Lack of physical activity•Excessive alcohol useWith pizza, bagels and BEC's as the culture of NYC…I bring this conversation to the forefront to not only inform and educate myself and fellow New Yorkers on what resources are available in our community, but also for those who want to elevate their well-being and lifespan. ***TONS OR RESOURCES LINKED IN THE SHOW NOTES***Lianna Levine Reisner, Newtwork Director at Plant Powered Metro New York, a non-profit organization in the city that started in 2019, helps to empower people to find better health and overcome chronic disease through whole food, plant-based nutrition. Lianna joined me to share her NYC story and initial culture shock of NYC and how finding places beyond the tourist traps ended up being her safe haven, as well as, how freedom of movement with transportation and all that the city offers has been a dream come true. She'll also share how she and many others like our NYC Mayor have overcome chronic diseases through nutritional changes and how one can start their own path today. This is a much listen to interview, if not for you, then for your loved ones. Sign-up for Plant Powered Metro New York's Programs below  (Click Program Name) ***Get Started with Whole Food, Plant-Based Nutrition (Start's May 5th, 2022) ***21-Day Plant Powered Jumpstart (Starts in mid-May) CONNECT WITH PPMY BELOW WebsiteInstagram ------HEALTH BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS BY GUEST & HOST 1. LifeForce by Tony Robbins (Host) - My new must read and life changing book...start on chapter 12 2. The China Study by T. Colin Campbell (Guest) - "The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted and the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss and Long-term Health"3. Lifespan by David Sinclair (Host) Xoxo, GossipnistaSupport the show (http://www.gossipnista.com)

The Word For Today (Daily)
The Decline of Human Lifespan

The Word For Today (Daily)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 25:00


Beyond Wellness Radio
Dr Bernd Friedlander - Immune Support, Extend Life Span, Best Supplement, Perfect Diet | Podcast #353

Beyond Wellness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 52:07


Dr Bernd Friedlander - Immune Support, Extend Life Span, Best Supplement, Perfect Diet | Podcast #353 Schedule a FREE Consult: http://www.justinhealth.com/free-consultation Review us at: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/itunes Recommended products - Immuno Supreme: https://justinhealth.com/products/immuno-supreme Thyro Replete: https://justinhealth.com/products/thyro-replete Iodine Synergy: https://justinhealth.com/products/iodine-synergy Podcast Transcription: https://justinhealth.com/dr-bernd-friedlander-immune-support-extend-life-span-best-supplement-perfect-diet-podcast-353/ Get Show Updates Here: http://justinhealth.com/beyondwellness-newsletter You-tube Podcast Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=justinhealth 0:00 - Introduction 2:20 - The issue behind immune stress 6:25 - Things to know about natural light 17:04 - Who are good candidate for extra glucose? 26:37 - How and when does adding sugar good? 46:46 - The important role of full spectrum light In this video, Dr. J and Dr Bernd Friedlander talk about immune system in general. Immune system is the natural defense and it's an complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that band together to defend your body against invaders. Those invaders can include viruses, bacteria, parasites, even fungus, all with the potential to make us sick. They are everywhere – in our offices, homes, and backyards. A good immune system protects us by first creating a barrier that stops those invaders, or antigens, from entering the body. The immune system can acknowledge millions of contrasting antigens. And it can make what it needs to eliminate nearly all of them. This detailed defense system can keep health problems ranging from cancer to the common cold at bay when it's working correctly. ===================================== Subscribe on I-Tunes: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/itunes Review us at: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/itunes Visit us at: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com Have a question: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/question