Podcasts about epa

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Best podcasts about epa

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Latest podcast episodes about epa

Diesel Performance Podcast
EPA Raid Results With Mike Hanzuk

Diesel Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 35:36


Mike Hanzuk is back on the show to discuss what happens after the EPA raids your shop for deleting diesel trucks. This stuff is rough for us enthusiasts and that is what Mike is at his core. Mike thanks for sharing your story and we look forward to having him back!

Business Matters
US Attorney General defends search of Trump's home

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 50:56


The US Attorney General, Merrick Garland, has asked a court to unseal the unprecedented search warrant for Mar-a-Lago, Donald Trump's residence in Florida. Allies of the former president have accused the FBI of raiding the property for political reasons but they haven't provided any evidence. Mr Garland, however, says upholding the rule of law meant applying it without favour. We hear from the BBC's Washington correspondent Nomia Iqbal. Canada will ban the import of handguns from 19 August as part of a wider proposed freeze in the wake of high-profile mass shootings in the United States. Economist Ed Lotterman tells us more. The Unification Church, commonly known as the Moonies, have come under the spotlight in Japan after the assassination of former prime minister Shinzo Abe. Professor Levi McLauhglin explains how this controversial religious group became so powerful in Japan. Meta's BlenderBot3 has been criticising its own boss, Mark Zuckerberg. Bloomberg's Charlie Hancock explains the purpose of the chatbot and what it has learned from its interactions with users one week after being launched. Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by two guests on the opposite side of the world to discuss the latest business news: Alison van Diggelen, host of Fresh Dialogues, in California and Peter Landers, Tokyo Bureau Chief of the Wall Street Journal, in the Japanese capital. (Picture: US Attorney General, Merrick Garland. Picture credit: EPA)

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 08.12.22 - Thousands of Government Records Lost, Destroyed, During Obama Administration

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 42:23


Hour 1 -  Nick Reed is live at Scramblers Diner for the Friday Road Show. Here's what he covers this hour: The Washington Post indicates that classified documents relating to nuclear weapons were among the items FBI agents sought in the raid of former President Donald Trump's home. Nick shares a story from June of 2018 that many key records were missing from the National Archives. The accumulation of congressional testimony made it clear that the Obama administration engaged in the wholesale destruction and “loss” of tens of thousands of government records covered under the act as well as the intentional evasion of the government records recording system by engaging in private email exchanges. So far, former President Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former Attorney General Lynch and several EPA officials have been named as offenders. The IRS suffered record “losses” as well. Conspiracy of a conspiracy. The Springfield News-Leader has a new piece titled "MU researcher delves into QAnon, including followers' reaction to FBI search of Trump's house." Why is it always the left talking about QAnon? Actress Anne Heche will reportedly be taken off life support and is not expected to survive the injuries she sustained in a horrific car crash in Los Angeles last Friday that left her with severe burns. ALSO -  Ryan with A-1 Custom Car Care gives us the car care tip of the week: Right now is the perfect time to prepare your vehicle for winter. That way you can save money by preparing and you won't be stranded. Check your coolant and battery.

Electrek
Tesla Semi, FSD smear campaign, EV tax credit, EQS review and more

Electrek

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 61:51


This week on the Electrek Podcast, we discuss the most popular news in the world of sustainable transport and energy. This week, we discussed Tesla Semi finally coming, a FSD Beta smear campaign, the EV tax credit reform passing the Senate, and more. The show is live every Friday at 4 p.m. ET on Electrek's YouTube channel. As a reminder, we'll have an accompanying post, like this one, on the site with an embedded link to the live stream. Head to the YouTube channel to get your questions and comments in. After the show ends at around 5 p.m. ET, the video will be archived on YouTube and the audio on all your favorite podcast apps: Apple Podcasts Spotify Overcast Pocket Casts Castro RSS We now have a Patreon if you want to help us to avoid more ads and invest more in our content. We have some awesome gifts for our Patreons and more coming. Here are a few of the articles that we will discuss during the podcast: Tesla Semi electric truck with 500 miles of range starts shipping this year, says Musk Tesla self-driving smear campaign releases ‘test' that fails to realize FSD never engaged Tesla discloses lobbying effort for new factory in Canada Tesla teases new energy products coming this year Elon Musk sells massive $6.9 billion chunk of Tesla (TSLA) stake Senate improves EV tax credit in largest climate bill ever If you want an EV, buy this week – Rivian, Fisker and others rush to lock in EV tax credits before changes Autonomy places giant EV order from Tesla, GM, VW, Ford, Rivian, and more Ford reopens F-150 Lightning orders, increases prices $6-8.5k, std EPA to 240 miles Rivian (RIVN) releases Q2 earnings, confirms $1.7 billion loss in race to make money on its electric pickups Mercedes EQS review: You can no longer call internal combustion vehicles ‘luxury' Here's the live stream for today's episode starting at 4 p.m. ET (or the video after 5 p.m. ET): https://youtu.be/vSMgQyvuqhk var postYoutubePlayer;function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() { postYoutubePlayer = new YT.Player( "post-youtube-video" ); }

Project Resurrection
BHoP#105 Values Assigned

Project Resurrection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 64:47


Dr Koontz and Rev Fisk spend this show answering listener questions about a single man's place in the church and how to deal with singleness and marriage, having a right understanding of the hearts of men informed by the whole bible, and recent US Supreme Court decisions about the EPA and public prayer. They close by examining the importance of realism in life and the application of wisdom. Visit our website -  A Brief History of Power Many thanks to our sponsors, Blessed Sacrament Lutheran Church in Hayden, ID and Our Savior Lutheran Church and School in Pagosa Springs, CO Dr Koontz -  Trinity Lutheran Church Rev Fisk - St Paul Rockford Music thanks to Verny

The Diesel Podcast
What Happens During an EPA Raid

The Diesel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 34:08 Very Popular


A diesel shop owner asked to be on the podcast and share his EPA story. He tells us what the raid was like, the charges he's facing and the toll it can take mentally, emotionally and financially. We are sharing his story to help educate the community on how things really work. 20% off with code: DIESEL20 https://kershaw.kaiusa.com/

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.11.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 55:13


VIDEOS: Bernie Turns Pro-War & Votes To Expand NATO – Jimmy Dore Ukrainian Terrorism: Firing Munitions Containing Petal Mines On Donbass Orphanage, Another War Crime  The moral roots of liberals and conservatives – Jonathan Haidt   HEALTH NEWS Vitamin K protects cells 3 grams of fresh salmon does wonders for high blood pressure, study reveals Physical activity stimulates the generation of new heart muscle cells in aged mice The Human Mind Is Not Meant to Be Awake After Midnight, Scientists Warn Social Isolation, Loneliness Raise Risk Of Death From Heart Attack Or Stroke By Nearly A Third Mushrooms of the Far East hold promise for the anti-cancer therapy Vitamin K protects cells Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany), August 5 2022 An article appearing  in Nature reported that the reduced form of vitamin K has an antioxidant effect that inhibits cell death caused by ferroptosis: an iron-dependent type of programmed cell death characterized by the oxidative destruction of cell membranes. “We identified that vitamin K, including phylloquinone (vitamin K1) and menaquinone-4 (vitamin K2), is able to efficiently rescue cells and tissues from undergoing ferroptosis,” first author Eikan Mishima announced. Ferroptosis has been implicated in Alzheimer disease and other disorders. “Ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death marked by iron-dependent lipid peroxidation, has a key role in organ injury, degenerative disease and vulnerability of therapy-resistant cancers,” the authors explained. “Here we show that the fully reduced forms of vitamin K—a group of naphthoquinones that includes menaquinone and phylloquinone—confer a strong anti-ferroptotic function, in addition to the conventional function linked to blood clotting.” In the current investigation, they determined that the fully reduced form of vitamin K (vitamin K hydroquinone) is a strong antioxidant and prevents ferroptosis. “The reduced forms of Vitamin K and coenzyme Q10 are not very stable, so our finding that FSP1 can maintain them in their active (reduced) state is key to understanding how they are able to function to maintain cell viability,” coauthor Derek A. Pratt stated.  The team found that vitamin E and three forms of vitamin K— phylloquinone, menaquinone-4 (MK4) and menadione (vitamin K3)—rescued cells that were genetically modified to undergo ferroptosis.  3 grams of fresh salmon does wonders for high blood pressure, study reveals Macau University of Science and Technology (China), August 9, 2022 Omega-3 carries many health benefits, and a new review suggests eating three grams of it per day is enough to lower your blood pressure. The findings include omega-3 fatty acids obtained from food or dietary supplements. “According to our research, the average adult may have a modest blood pressure reduction from consuming about 3 grams a day of these fatty acids,” says Xinzhi Li, MD, PhD, assistant professor and program director of the School of Pharmacy at Macau University of Science and Technology in China. The average fish oil supplement carries an average of 300 mg of omega-3 per pill. A four to five-ounce Atlantic salmon carries about three grams of omega-3 fatty acids. “Most of the studies reported on fish oil supplements rather than on EPA and DHA omega-3s consumed in food, which suggests supplements may be an alternative for those who cannot eat fatty fish such as salmon regularly,” explains Dr. Li. “Algae supplements with EPA and DHA fatty acids are also an option for people who do not consume fish or other animal products.” The National Institutes of Health recommends 1.1 to 1.6 grams of omega-3 fatty acids daily. The American Heart Association advises getting some of your omega-3 intake through two servings of three to four ounces of cooked fish per week. The review combed through the data from 71 clinical trials studying the relationship between blood pressure and the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA in adults with or without high blood pressure or cholesterol disorders.  High blood pressure was lower in people who ate between two and three grams of combined DHA and EPA omega-3 fatty acids daily than adults who did not. Eating more than three grams of omega-3s made a tremendous difference in adults with high blood pressure or high blood lipids. With three grams of daily omega-3s, the average blood pressure in people with hypertension decreased about 4.5 mm/Hg. Those without high blood pressure saw their blood pressure drop by 2.0 mm/Hg. Eating five grams of omega-3s lowered the blood pressure by nearly 4.0 mm/Hg for people with hypertension. Those without high blood pressure who ate five daily grams of omega-3s saw an average decrease of less than 1.0 mm/Hg. Physical activity stimulates the generation of new heart muscle cells in aged mice Heidelberg University (Germany), August 8, 2022 Can physical activity support the generation of heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) even in aged animals? Researchers at Heidelberg University Hospital (UKHD) together with a team of international collaborators demonstrated positive effects on the formation of new heart muscle cells (cardiomyogenesis) in aged mice and investigated the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. The current research results have been published in the journal Circulation. The heart of adult mammals has a very limited ability to generate new cardiomyocytes. With aging, this capacity continues to decrease, while at the same time the risk of cardiovascular disease increases. Dr. Carolin Lerchenmüller, head of the Cardiac Remodeling and Regeneration research group in the Department of Cardiology, Angiology and Pneumology at the UKHD, and her team have found evidence that physical activity stimulates the new formation of heart muscle cells in aging mice. The researchers found that the calculated annual rate of newly generated heart muscle cells in the “exercising” group of older mice was 2.3 percent. In contrast, there were no new heart muscle cells in the “sedentary” control group. A previous study with young animals had already shown that mice had a calculated annual rate of 7.5 percent new heart muscle cells through exercise, compared to 1.63 percent in the corresponding “sedentary” control group. The Human Mind Is Not Meant to Be Awake After Midnight, Scientists Warn  Harvard University, August 4, 2022 In the middle of the night, the world can sometimes feel like a dark place. Under the cover of darkness, negative thoughts have a way of drifting through your mind, and as you lie awake, staring at the ceiling, you might start craving guilty pleasures, like a cigarette or a carb-heavy meal. Plenty of evidence suggests the human mind functions differently if it is awake at nighttime. Past midnight, negative emotions tend to draw our attention more than positive ones, dangerous ideas grow in appeal and inhibitions fall away. A new paper summarizes the evidence of how brain systems function differently after dark. Their hypothesis, called ‘Mind After Midnight', suggests the human body and the human mind follow a natural 24-hour cycle of activity that influences our emotions and behavior. In short, at certain hours, our species is inclined to feel and act in certain ways. In the daytime, for instance, molecular levels and brain activity are tuned to wakefulness. But at night, our usual behavior is to sleep. According to the researchers, to cope with this increased risk, our attention to negative stimuli is unusually heightened at night. Where it might once have helped us jump at invisible threats, this hyper-focus on the negative can then feed into an altered reward/motivation system, making a person particularly prone to risky behaviors. Add sleep loss to the equation, and this state of consciousness only becomes more problematic. The authors of the new hypothesis use two examples to illustrate their point. The first example is of a heroin user who successfully manages their cravings in the day but succumbs to their desires at night. The second is of a college student struggling with insomnia, who begins to feel a sense of hopelessness, loneliness and despair as the sleepless nights stack up. Both scenarios can ultimately prove fatal. Suicide and self-harm are very common at nighttime. In fact, some research reports a three-fold higher risk of suicide between midnight and 6:00 am compared to any other time of day. A study in 2020 concluded that nocturnal wakefulness is a suicide risk factor, “possibly through misalignment of circadian rhythms.” Social Isolation, Loneliness Raise Risk Of Death From Heart Attack Or Stroke By Nearly A Third University of California, San Diego, August 9, 2022 Loneliness increases the risk of cardiovascular disease by almost a third, according to new research. Socially isolated individuals are about 30 percent more likely to suffer a stroke or heart attack — death from either. Scientists at the University of California, San Diego also identified a lack of information on interventions that may boost the health of vulnerable individuals. The findings are based on data pooled from studies across the world over the past 40 years. “Over four decades of research has clearly demonstrated social isolation and loneliness are both associated with adverse health outcomes,” says lead author Dr. Crystal Wiley Cené, a professor of clinical medicine and chief administrative officer for health equity, diversity and inclusion at the school, in a statement. “Given the prevalence of social disconnectedness across the U.S., the public health impact is quite significant.” Risk increases with age due to life factors, such as widowhood and retirement. But the problem is increasingly affecting young people. The study finds social isolation and and loneliness increase the risk of death from heart disease or stroke by 29 and 32 percent, respectively. People with heart disease who were socially isolated had a two to threefold increase in death during a six-year follow-up study. Socially isolated adults with three or fewer social contacts a month were up to 40 percent more likely to suffer recurrent strokes or heart attacks. In addition, five year heart failure survival rates were 60 and 62 percent lower for those who were socially isolated or both socially isolated and clinically depressed, respectively. Isolation and loneliness are associated with elevated inflammatory markers, increasing symptoms of chronic stress. It becomes a vicious circle. Depression may lead to social isolation, and social isolation may increase the likelihood of experiencing depression. Social isolation during childhood can even lead to cardiovascular disease in adulthood, increasing the risk of obesity, high blood pressure and raised blood glucose levels. Mushrooms of the Far East hold promise for the anti-cancer therapy Far Eastern Federal University (Russia) & University of Lausanne (France), August 3, 2022 Mushrooms from the Far East area contain the natural chemical compounds, which could be used for the design of the novel drugs with highly specific anti-tumor activities and low-toxicity. These compounds may offer new avenues for oncology, providing us with either stand-alone alternatives to chemotherapy, chemopreventive medicines, or drugs to be used in combination with other therapies. The international team of scientists from the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), University of Lausanne, and Federal Scientific Center of the East Asia Terrestrial Biodiversity FEB RAS describes the available body of research on four fungi species with high anti-cancer potential. The article is published in Oncotarget and contains the list of tumors, which were reported to be promising targets of the fungal compounds. Among them sarcoma, leukemia, rectum and colon cancer, stomach cancer, liver cancer, colon carcinoma and others. For the purpose of the current study scientists chose mushrooms widely used in Asian and Far Eastern folk medicine: Fomitopsis pinicola (conk), Hericium erinaceus (Lion's mane), Inonotus obliquus (Chaga), and Trametes versicolor (polypore). Each is also indigenous to North America. These species of fungi were shown to selectively target certain malignant tumors. The desired effect is achieved thanks to the various bioactive compounds contained in the mushrooms: polyphenols, polysaccharides, glucans, terpenoids, steroids, cerebrosides, and proteins. These substances are not only capable to hit different critical targets within cancer cells levels but also in certain cases to synergistically boost the chemo. Scientists emphasize that four species of fungi were chosen due to the fact that their medicinal properties are relatively well described. Some of them are already actively used for the anti-cancer drugs manufacturing in certain countires. Undoubtedly, there are many other species of fungi that contain chemical compounds to defeat cancer cells. The scientists hope that the high potential of the fungi for the anti-cancer therapy showcased in their article will encourage the further research at the junction of oncology and mycology. Currently in the laboratories of the School of Biomedicine (FEFU) led by Vladimir Katanaev and Alexander Kagansky,the new experiments are conducted to reveal the anti-cancer activities of the mushrooms extracts. This work is aimed at creating the new generation of highly specific low-toxic drugs, which could be specifically targeted on different tumor types.

Denkuhl_hallo_Nachbar
Live Recherche| 415 |vor Sonnen Aufgang | Silizium Wirkung

Denkuhl_hallo_Nachbar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 85:59


Was man mit mehr Energie am Morgen macht....wenn man einfach Mal mitten in der Nacht gegen 2 Uhr aufwacht...Die Wirkungen von Silizium Kieselsäure bzw.erde...Omega 3 ALGENÖL DHA und EPA .... Alpha-Liponsäure und Glutathion habe ich nicht drüber gesprochen....Gut nicht nur für Haut und Haar...auf fürs Herz und gegen Entzündungen bzw. Schlechte Laune...also ist Stimmungsaufhellend und baut Selbstbewusstsein auf. Mehr im PODCAST live lernen.

The Model Health Show
TMHS 607: The Inflammation-Obesity Connection & How To Upgrade Your Brain Health

The Model Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 116:06 Very Popular


Inflammation is a necessary part of human biology. It's a critical function of our immune response that allows us to heal infections and overcome viruses. In fact, inflammation is one of the key components that has allowed us to evolve to this point. Chronic inflammation, on the other hand, is one of the greatest threats to human health. Chronic inflammation is at the root of most chronic conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. On today's show, you're going to learn exactly what inflammation is, how it occurs in the body and its connection with obesity.  This episode is my interview with Lewis Howes on his podcast, The School of Greatness. You'll hear key insights on neuroinflammation, the science on sleep and cognitive function, and the necessary components for optimal brain function. There are so many powerful insights and impactful takeaways in this interview. So listen in and enjoy this episode from The School of Greatness Podcast!  In this episode you'll discover: The root of the word inflammation.  An important distinction between acute and chronic inflammation.  How getting adequate sleep can help you reach optimal body composition.  The connection between quality sleep and cognitive performance. What the glymphatic system is.  The number one driving force of the human psyche. Why change can be so uncomfortable.  How the human brain can sync up with others.  The dangers of neuroinflammation. How brain inflammation and obesity create a vicious cycle. What hypothalamic inflammation is.   How your beliefs can affect the way your body processes food. The best time to consume indulgent food.  Three things that can break down the blood-brain barrier.  What structural fats are.  The three primary fats that make up the brain.  Why DHA and EPA are critical for brain health.  Items mentioned in this episode include: PiqueLife.com/model -- Use code MODEL at checkout for 10% off! DrinkLMNT.com/model -- Get a FREE sample pack with any order!  Role of the vagus nerve in the development and treatment of obesity COVID-19 Associated Hospitalizations  COVID-19 Demographics  Underlying Medical Conditions Among Adults Hospitalized with COVID-19  The School of Greatness Podcast with Lewis Howes Eat Smarter  Sleep Smarter   Join TMHS Facebook community - Model Nation  Be sure you are subscribed to this podcast to automatically receive your episodes:  Apple Podcasts Stitcher Spotify Soundcloud *Download Transcript  

The Health Ranger Report
Situation Update, Aug 10, 2022 - Lawmakers call for NULLIFICATION of corrupt federal agencies like FBI, IRS, EPA, ATF, DOJ

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 91:24 Very Popular


0:00 Federal Agencies 24:50 Cowboy Game 43:35 Kari Lake For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

The Nick DiPaolo Show
Raid Judge, Obama Sycophant | Nick Di Paolo Show #1255

The Nick DiPaolo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 46:54


Levin upset on Hannity. Obama judge signed off on raid. Kerik worried about Trump assassination. A naked FL man... Rhode Island Orwellian. EPA intimidating TX oil fields.

Quick Charge
Quick Charge Podcast: August 9, 2022

Quick Charge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 6:29


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from Electrek. Quick Charge is available now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn and our RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. New episodes of Quick Charge are recorded Monday through Thursday and again on Saturday. Subscribe to our podcast in Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories we discuss in this episode (with links): Tesla Model 3 and Y become best-selling vehicles in California, pushing EVs to new record Tesla (TSLA) sales and export in China are down, but factory upgrade is to blame Autonomy places giant EV order from Tesla, GM, VW, Ford, Rivian, and more Ford reopens F-150 Lightning orders, increases prices $6-8.5k, std EPA to 240 miles Jaguar Land Rover opens new facility to test next-generation EVs Foxconn to manufacture electric tractors for Monarch at newly acquired Lordstown facility https://youtu.be/MfeZHCH3hZg var postYoutubePlayer;function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() { postYoutubePlayer = new YT.Player( "post-youtube-video" ); } Subscribe to the Electrek Daily Channel on Youtube so you never miss a day of news Follow Mikey: Twitter @Mikey_Electric Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify TuneIn Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at tips@electrek.co. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

Optamiz Your Health!
Episode 21 - Dr. Mark Ratner, Chief Science Officer of Theralogix

Optamiz Your Health!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 57:18


Dr. Ratner is the Chief Science Officer of Theralogix, a Washington, DC based company which markets micronutrient supplements that are recommended by healthcare providers in multiple clinical specialties. Dr. Ratner did his undergraduate and Master's degree studies in nutrition at Cornell University. He received his M.D. from Tulane University Medical School.In this episode, Dr. Ratner joins Dr. Ken Kaufman and Heather Hackett-Kaufman on Optamiz Your Health! We take a deep dive in how Dr. Ratner founded Theralogix and how he incorporated nutritional strategies in his mens health clinic. After reviewing the growing body of research on the connection between nutritional deficiencies and many of the medical conditions his patients were suffering from, he began introducing supplementation into his practice. He then, with the assistance of his science advisory board, began creating formulation to help his patients. Not satisfied with just making nutritional supplements, he dedicated enormous resources into making sure the products they were creating were of the very best quality. Going so far as to ensuring the Theralogix products are NSF certified, the very pinnacle of quality assurance. Over the past two years, Theralogix has created a formulation specifically designed for individuals that adopt a plant-based diet. With the understanding that plant-based eaters run the risk of developing specific micronutrient deficiencies, the PhytoLife product by Theralogix provides these essential micronutrients such as vitamin B12, vitamin D3, K2, Iron, Iodine, Magnesium, Calcium, and Zinc. In addition, the PhytoLife product contains Essential Fatty Acids in the most utilized form of EPA and DHA. You can purchase PhytoLife at the Theralogix or Optamiz web sites. Make sure to use the PRC code: 234232 to save nearly 10% on your order.Theralogix Theralogix vitamins & supplements are high-quality, research-based & NSF certified.Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

Teleforum
Courthouse Steps Decision Webinar: West Virginia v. EPA

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 62:42


On June 30, 2022, the Supreme Court decided West Virginia v. EPA. In a 6-3 decision, the Court held that EPA exceeded its authority under Clean Air Act Section 111 when it issued the 2015 Clean Power Plan, which sought to control carbon dioxide emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power plants by imposing limits based on a “system” of shifting power generation away from fossil fuels and towards renewable fuels at the grid-wide level. Although the Supreme Court stayed the Clean Power Plan in February 2016 before it could take effect, the Court's decision in West Virginia v. EPA was the first time it pronounced on the Plan's merits.This case is a major development in administrative law. For the first time, a majority opinion of the Supreme Court used the phrase “major questions doctrine” to describe its methodology. The Court determined that the Clean Power Plan dealt with issues of such “economic and political significance” that it required a clear statement of Congressional intent to authorize this specific type of action. Because the CAA contains no such clear statement, the Clean Power Plan was unlawful.Justice Gorsuch, joined by Justice Alito, wrote a concurring opinion expanding on the “major questions doctrine” and its relationship to the constitutional principle of non-delegation. Justice Kagan, joined by Justices Breyer and Sotomayor, wrote a dissenting opinion arguing the Court improperly placed “major questions” at the beginning of its statutory analysis—instead of conducting a traditional Chevron-style textual inquiry and concluding with “major questions.” Further, the dissent states that Congress provided EPA with the authority to require “generation shifting” in the CAA's use of broad language authorizing the Agency to identify a “system of emission reduction” to address air pollution.Please join our legal experts to discuss the case, the legal issues involved, and the implications going forward.Featuring:-- David Fotouhi, Partner, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, former Acting General Counsel, EPA-- Justin Schwab, Founder, CGCN Law; former Deputy General Counsel, EPA.-- Moderator: Garrett Kral, Associate Member of the Environmental Law & Property Rights Practice Group's Executive Committee; former Special Advisor for Oversight, EPA.

Climate Now
Understanding EPA v. West Virginia: How will the Supreme Court's ruling impact GHG regulation?

Climate Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 23:13


On June 30, 2022, the United States Supreme Court handed down a decision on the case “EPA v. West Virginia,” ruling in a 6-3 vote that the EPA exceeded its statutory authority by setting greenhouse gas emissions standards that would effectively require utilities to shift away from fossil fuel-sourced power generation to renewables.At the time of the decision, it was met with a raft of alarmist headlines, forecasting that it would be a disaster for climate change mitigation, and that it threatens the future regulatory authority of all federal agencies. Is it really that bad?In this episode, Michael Gerrard, professor of professional practice in climate change law and policy at Columbia University, helps us understand exactly what the EPA v. West Virginia decision said, and what its impact is likely to be.

The Truck Show Podcast
Ep. 238 - Ford F-150 Lightning, Government Overreach Or Enforcement, Alcan 5000

The Truck Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 122:10 Very Popular


Holman gets his hands on a Ford F-150 Lightning and the discussion ensues, the guys talk to enthusiast Mike Sebold who was contacted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection after listing his truck on Facebook Marketplace, and Andy and Mercedes Lilienthal talk about their participation in the epic Alcan 5000.

Getting Schooled Podcast
What Is Happening With The Flint Water Crisis?

Getting Schooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 32:15 Very Popular


This week, Florida State University Associate Professor of Sociology and Author of Tainted Tap, Dr. Katrinell Davis joins Abby in the classroom to help explain the Flint, Michigan Water Crisis. Dr. Davis explains the key indicators that alerted Michigan officials and Flint residents that their water had been contaminated. She also explains the role of FEMA and the EPA in the handling of this humanitarian crisis. Later, Dr. Davis reflects on the efforts to evolve this situation from crisis to recovery. Keep up with Abby after class on Twitter: @abbyhornacek Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Filmstudy with Ken McKusick
AFCB QB EPA Per Play

Filmstudy with Ken McKusick

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:33


Tej Seth joins Ken to discuss his projections for full season EPA per play for each of the AFC North QBs Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Town Hall Ohio
The Future of American Farmland

Town Hall Ohio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 48:09


Agricultural lands in the U.S. grow an astounding array of food, fiber, biofuels, and other raw materials. This abundance has made the U.S. one of the most food secure nations in the world. Yet it can also mask vulnerabilities. For too many Americans, it is easy to brush off farmland loss or view it as inevitable. This puts our future at risk according to American Farmland Trust's newest Farms Under Threat 2040 Report. The report focuses on the unsustainable impacts of development on American farmland and it quantifies what our nation could lose if sprawling development continues—or save through more compact growth—by the year 2040. Find out more about this report on this Our Ohio Weekly. 00:00 - American Farmland Trust Midwest Regional Director Kristopher Reynolds shares what trends are showing us for farmland loss across the country and how Ohio falls into the mix. 16:50 - American Farmland Trust has mapped out three scenarios for the future of farmland across the country. Reynolds talks about what they all would mean. 23:50 - On this “To the Beat of Agriculture” we continue to spotlight Ohio Farm Bureau state trustees. This week we'll hear from a Farm Bureau representative from the Northwest part of our state. He'll tell you about his family background and how he grew his grandfather's farm into the operation it is today. 32:20 - An Ohio Farm Bureau pilot project will test a unique combination of staffing and service delivery over eight counties instead of the typical four-county model. Ohio Farm Bureau's vice president of membership, Paul Lyons, talks about the project's focus and goals. 42:20 - Sackett v. U.S. EPA is a water case under review by the U.S. Supreme Court. Ohio Farm Bureau recently joined with other state Farm Bureaus to file an amicus brief with the court. Leah Curtis, policy counsel for Ohio Farm Bureau has the details.

So 80's
Elisabeth II, reine de la mode

So 80's

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 37:16


Dans cet épisode, Noémie et Valérie-Anne endossent le costume de la #fashiopolice pour examiner les tenues de la reine Elizabeth II d'Angleterre. Et plus précisement, leurs 10 tenues préférées de la queen of fashion...  Cet épisode de la série "L'été des princesses" s'appuie particulièrement sur un excellent livre « Elizabeth II, les chapeaux de la couronne » par Thomas pernette (ed EPA). La musique du podcast c'est David Nilsson, et So 80's fait partie du label podcut, merci pour  vos contributions à notre patreon !

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy
West Coast Cookbook and Speakeasy - Metro Shrimp and Grits Thursdays 04 Aug 22

West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 63:17


West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy is Now Open! 8am-9am PT/ 11am-Noon ET for our especially special Daily Specials, Metro Shrimp & Grits Thursdays!Starting off in the Bistro Cafe, Constitutional Sheriffs around the country are vowing to stop the nonexistent 2020 election steal because the FBI are acting like “Nuremberg Officers.”Then, on the rest of the menu, the Transportation Department proposed to increase refund protections for air travelers; the EPA announced flights to look for methane “super emitters” in the Permian Basin of Texas; and, the Justice Department detailed threats against election workers.After the break, we move to the Chef's Table where a court in Belarus sentenced yet another independent journalist to a lengthy prison term; and, the UN Secretary-General sharply criticized the “grotesque greed” of oil and gas companies. All that and more, on West Coast Cookbook & Speakeasy with Chef de Cuisine Justice Putnam.Bon Appétit!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~“Everyone in this good city enjoys the full right to pursue his own inclinations in all reasonable and, unreasonable ways.” -- The Daily Picayune, New Orleans, March 5, 1851~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Show Notes & Links:https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2022/8/4/2114431/-West-Coast-Cookbook-amp-Speakeasy-Daily-Special-Metro-Shrimp-amp-Grits-Thursdays

Administrative Static Podcast
EPA's “Orange River” Disaster; NCLA Calls for Full Sixth Circuit to Reconsider FDIC ALJ Protections

Administrative Static Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 25:00


1. Mark and Kara discuss Hennis case over EPA land grab 1 EPA's “Orange River” DisasterTodd Hennis spent decades building his nest egg as owner of the Gold King Mine near Silverton,Colorado. But seven years ago, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency destroyed the entranceto the mine causing a breach and releasing a toxic sludge of over three million gallons of acidmine drainage and 880,000 pounds of heavy metals. Referred to as the “orange (or yellow) riverseen around the world”, the rush of contamination snaked down the Animus River watershed.NCLA represents Mr. Hennis in his lawsuit, Hennis v. U.S., seeking compensation for the yearsEPA has been squatting on his property without his permission or constitutional authority to doso without just compensation. Mark and NCLA Litigation Counsel Kara Rollins discuss Hennisover EPA's land grab. 2. Mark and Russ discuss latest NCLA amicus, involving ALJ tenure protection at FDIC 2 NCLA Calls for Full Sixth Circuit to Reconsider FDIC ALJ ProtectionsNCLA has filed an amicus brief in a case addressing whether certain Federal Deposit InsuranceCorporation officers, including the agency's ALJs, are protected by multiple layers of tenureprotection in violation of the “Take Care” clause of the Constitution. NCLA asks the SixthCircuit Court of Appeals to grant the petition for rehearing in Calcutt v. FDIC.Mark and NCLA Senior Litigation Counsel or Russ Ryan discuss the latest NCLA amicus.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Energy Evolution
How will US Democrats' new deal on climate affect the energy transition?

Energy Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 19:24


A new package of energy policy is moving through the U.S. Congress after Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., struck a deal with fellow Democrats. Energy Evolution recently sat down with colleagues from the S&P Global Commodity Insights newsroom to talk about the implications of the legislation. Guests include Molly Christian, Bill Holland and Camellia Moors. Energy Evolution co-hosts Dan Testa, Allison Good and Taylor Kuykendall are veteran journalists with broad expertise covering the utility, oil and gas and mining sectors. Subscribe to Energy Evolution on your favorite platform to catch our latest episodes!

AgriTalk
AgriTalk-August 5, 2022

AgriTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 42:00


The Friday Free-for-all featuring panelists Jim Wiesemeyer of Pro Farmer, Shaun Haney of RealAgriculture and Davis Michaelsen includes discussing the 3.5% unemployment rate announced today, Speaker Pelosi visiting Taiwan resulting in China's reaction, EPA heading into overtime on Glyphosate and more.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Houston Matters
What it would take to bring Brittney Griner home, and Indian composer and violinist L. Subramaniam (Aug. 5, 2022)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 48:38


  On Friday's show: A Russian court has found WNBA star Brittney Griner guilty on drug smuggling and possession charges. The judge sentenced Griner to nine years in prison. What are the chances of the United States government arranging for her release much sooner in some sort of prisoner exchange or other diplomatic effort? An international relations expert weighs in. Also this hour: We discuss the implications for us here in Houston and across Texas of a recent Supreme Court ruling signaling dwindling power for the EPA. Then, we break down The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of the week, including a man using 3D-printed guns to make a point at the city's recent gun buyback event, and an award-winning songwriter finding herself in over her head after a comment about Beyoncé on Twitter. And renowned Indian composer and violinist Dr. L. Subramaniam is in Houston this week preparing for a concert Saturday with the Houston Symphony in the world premiere of his Mahatma Symphony, written to celebrate 75 years of Indian independence.

GovExec Daily
The Decision That May Upset the Administrative State

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 17:55


Last month, the Supreme Court decided that Congress may not authorize the Environmental Protection Agency to address an issue of great economic and political importance or significance unless Congress speaks precisely in allowing it to do so. According to analysts, environmentalists and even Presiden Biden, this “major question” issue is a step backward for the environment and for the administrative state's ability to address problems like climate change.  Dr. Donald F. Kettl is professor emeritus at the University of Maryland and former dean of its School of Public Policy. He is the author of many books, including the Politics of the Administrative Process, System Under Stress and The Next Government of the United States.  He has a GovExec.com post headlined “How the Supreme Court's West Virginia v. EPA Decision Will Upset the Administrative World.” He joined the podcast to discuss the EPA decision and what it means for the administration of government.

All Things Chemical
The National Tribal Toxics Council — A Conversation with Dianne Barton, Ph.D.

All Things Chemical

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 69:50


This week, I sat down with Dr. Dianne Barton, Water Quality Coordinator at the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission in Portland, Oregon, where she puts her Ph.D. in geochemistry to good use by providing technical expertise related to water quality, environmental toxics, regulatory processes, and the fate and transport of contaminants. Dr. Barton, who is a member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Chairs the National Tribal Toxics Council (NTTC), which is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) - tribal partnership group that provides tribes with opportunities to engage more specifically with EPA on toxics issues. In our conversation, Dr. Barton shares her significant expertise on toxics issues and how the NTTC is engaged with EPA on a wide variety of Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act implementation issues, particularly those affecting tribal communities. ALL MATERIALS IN THIS PODCAST ARE PROVIDED SOLELY FOR INFORMATIONAL  AND ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES. THE MATERIALS ARE NOT INTENDED TO CONSTITUTE LEGAL ADVICE OR THE PROVISION OF LEGAL SERVICES. ALL LEGAL QUESTIONS SHOULD BE ANSWERED DIRECTLY BY A LICENSED ATTORNEY PRACTICING IN THE APPLICABLE AREA OF LAW. ©2022 Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.  All Rights Reserved

Pratt on Texas
Episode 3005: Biden concocts new plan to keep gasoline prices high | Many stench of local gov’t stories – Pratt on Texas 8/4/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:22


The news of Texas covered today includes:Our Lone Star story of the day: While gasoline prices are outrageous, the Biden Administration has concocted a new plan, through the EPA, to harass Texas oil and gas producers as well as raise the cost of American energy independence: EPA flyover inspects of Permian Basin oil and gas wells.Our Lone Star story of the day is sponsored by Allied Compliance Services providing the best service in DOT, business and personal drug and alcohol testing since 1995.A host of local government stories from Harris Co. suing the state to prevent an audit of its elections operation to cutting the salaries of judges who don't move cases (Dallas Co.) and City of Houston bribery and corruption uncovered (again) to misleading the press and public on property tax increases calling such cuts. And then there is the City of Wylie once again adopting the No-New-Revenue-Rate, for the 5th year when others say such is impossible.And, other news of Texas.Listen on the radio, or station stream, at 5pm Central. Click for our affiliates.www.PrattonTexas.com

Climate Positive
Mike Casey, Emily Chasan, Gil Jenkins, Nico Johnson, Tim Montague, Bill Nussey, and Joshua Porter | Cleantech podcasters quarterly roundtable

Climate Positive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 65:12


This week we're presenting a special bonus episode where Gil Jenkins joined fellow podcasters for the most recent edition of the Cleantech Podcasters Quarterly Roundtable, hosted by Tigercomm & SunCast Media.We covered topics such as the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court decision on EPA power plant regulations, the implications for energy markets due to the ongoing war in Ukraine, the escalating attacks by pro-fossil fuel pundits, and a whole lot more. Please note that we recorded this conversation before Senator Manchin's surprise and welcome support for climate provisions in the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022. In the show notes, we've linked to all the terrific podcasters included in this roundtable. Please give them a follow when you have a chance. We hope you enjoy this rich, one-hour discussion on the top clean energy trends, developments, challenges, and opportunities ahead of us. Other podcasters included in this roundtable (you can find them wherever you listen to podcasts): Mike Casey – Scaling Clean Podcast Emily Chasan – The Energy Gang Nico Johnson – SunCast PodcastTim Montague – Clean Power HourBill Nussey – The Freeing Energy PodcastJoshua Porter – The Solar Coaster PodcastEpisode recorded: July 21, 2022 Email your feedback to Chad, Gil, and Hilary at climatepositive@hannonarmstrong.com or tweet them to @ClimatePosiPod.

Digest This
1: Get Back To Real Food with Courtney Swan of Realfoodology

Digest This

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 80:20 Very Popular


On this episode, Courney Swan (M.S. in Nutrition and Integrative Health) founder of popular Instagram and Podcast “Realfoodology” joins me to talk about the benefits of getting back to real food. Bite of Knowledge: Collagen On This Episode We Cover: Regenerative farming  Issues with the food industry in the US.  Subsidies  Rise in Obesity Metabolic disease  Types of Sugar  Benefits of fat  Pesticides  Endocrine disrupters  Fruit concentrates  Canola Oil  Oils  Best butter to use  Mansanto and Bauer Dangers of Pesticides Gut health  Eating organic in a budget  Vegan and Vegetarian diets  Check Out Courtney: Realfoodology Podcast Courtney's Instagram: @realfoodology www.realfoodology.com Sponsored By: Further Food https://www.furtherfood.com Use code LILSIPPER for 15%-25% OFF Life Seasons https://lifeseasons.com Use code DIGEST for a discount Nuzest Digestive Enzymes https://nuzest-usa.com/digest  Use code DIGEST for 15% OFF Show Links: https://kisstheground.com/ https://regenerationinternational.org/ EPA on climate change emissions "A Teaspoon Of Soil Contains More Living Organisms Than There Are People On Earth” As always, if you have any questions for the show please email us at digestthispod@gmail.com.  And if you like this show, please share it, rate it, review it and subscribe to it on your favorite podcast app.  Check Out Bethany: Bethany's Instagram: @lilsipper Bethany's Website My Digestive Support Protein Powder Gut Reset Book 

The Diesel Podcast
SCOTUS Rules against EPA! Or Did They?

The Diesel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:29


Lawyer Stewart Cables joins us today to talk about the recent Supreme Court ruling in W. VA vs EPA. It was seen as a huge victory against federal agency overreach, but does it apply to the diesel industry? Are deletes ok now? Can trucks be turned into race vehicles? Stewart answers these questions on today's talk! Stewart D. Cables is a founding partner of Hassan + Cables. Stewart specializes in general business representation and a variety of trial work. Stewart's practice areas include complex civil litigation, employment law, criminal and DUI defense, transactional work for corporations and LLCs, and counsel for non-profit entities. Stewart Cables E: stewart@hassancables.com P: 303-625-1025 ext.2 https://www.hassancables.com/stewart-... -------------------------------- Disclaimer: This video is for general information purposes only. It is not intended to provide legal advice of any kind. No one should act, or refrain from acting, based solely upon the information provided on this podcast, without first seeking appropriate legal or other professional advice.

Burnin' Daylight
Cattle News Central 8-2-22

Burnin' Daylight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 9:43


Cattle News Central August 2 headlines: The Inflation Reduction Act opens the door for a climate-focused farm bill. The newly introduced spending package includes funding to address green house gas emissions from cattle. President Biden recently released an EPA study claiming farmland emissions kill nearly 20,000 Americans every year. NCBA opposes newly introduced legislation to benefit small farmers and ranchers. Sponsored by AgRisk Advisors, Circle 5 School for Cattleman, & 4 T Ag Insurance. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/burnindaylight/message

Talk, Tales and Trivia
The Carbon Footprint - What Is It? What Does It Mean For You?

Talk, Tales and Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:13


In this week's episode, I look at the carbon footprint and what it means. Did you know that everything you do every day can be calculated and given a number as to the carbon emissions you put out into the atmosphere? I will also give you the facts about the event that happened a little over a decade ago that might be America's biggest cover-up. And where the words, “carbon footprint” originated. This might be the biggest sham that we've been told. But, as usual, I let you decide. Like this episode and share this episode. And question everything! *Remember to be kind to everybody, everywhere. Here are the links for this episode to explore and learn more about the carbon footprint and contemplate this important topic: Carbon footprint calculator: https://www.nature.org/en-us/get-involved/how-to-help/carbon-footprint-calculator/ EPA article: Deepwater Horizon BP Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: https://www.epa.gov/enforcement/deepwater-horizon-bp-gulf-mexico-oil-spill Are They Tricking You: https://clear.ucdavis.edu/blog/big-oil-distracts-their-carbon-footprint-tricking-you-focus-yours Carbon Footprint PR Campaign – Sham:  https://mashable.com/feature/carbon-footprint-pr-campaign-sham The world's carbon emissions grew in 2019 to their highest levels ever "We have dug ourselves into a pretty deep hole.": https://mashable.com/article/carbon-emissions-grow-2019-climate-change The Tab – Celebs That Racked Up The Most CO2 Emissions: https://thetab.com/uk/2022/07/25/celebrity-private-jets-carbon-emissions-climate-change-263281 Daily Beast article entitled: “Why Your Carbon Footprint Is Meaningless”: https://www.thedailybeast.com/why-your-carbon-footprint-is-meaningless?ref=scroll Daily Beast article entitled: "Think This Week's Climate News Was Bad? It Will Get Worse Before It Gets Better": https://www.thedailybeast.com/climate-change-needs-to-get-worse-so-it-can-get-better  Bill Gates' “Guilty Pleasure” article from the Western Journal: https://www.westernjournal.com/climate-alarmist-bill-gates-unveiled-guilty-pleasure-infuriate-everyone/ Keep America Beautiful video: https://youtu.be/8Suu84khNGY Smokey The Bear “Only you can prevent forest fires” video: https://youtu.be/U6xMd0wSbZc Pollution prevention ad-council campaigns - Pollution Prevention: Keep America Beautiful – Iron Eyes Cody (1961-1983): https://youtu.be/U6xMd0wSbZc Website: http://truthdetectivepodcast.com Email: truthdetectivepodcast@gmail.com

S&C Critical Insights
Supreme Court Business Review: Introduction, NFIB v. OSHA and West Virginia v. EPA

S&C Critical Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:51


In this episode of S&C Critical Insights, Judd Littleton, Julia Malkina and Morgan Ratner introduce the third annual podcast series accompanying S&C's Supreme Court Business Review. The Review summarizes the decisions from each Term that are most relevant to business leaders, and offers practical guidance on the implications of those decisions. Judd, Julia and Morgan preview upcoming episodes and discuss two closely watched administrative law decisions from this Term. The first is National Federation of Independent Business v. OSHA, in which the Court considered whether the Occupational Safety and Health Administration had the authority to implement a national COVID-19 vaccine mandate. The second is West Virginia v. EPA, in which the Court considered whether the Environmental Protection Agency had the authority to issue the Clean Power Plan, which established carbon dioxide emissions limits for coal power plants. They also briefly touch on the Court's decision in American Hospital Association v. Becerra, in which the Court declined to address the continued viability of the Chevron doctrine in a case addressing how the Department of Health and Human Services sets drug reimbursement rates for hospitals treating Medicare patients. S&C's Supreme Court and Appellate Practice Led by former Acting Solicitor General of the United States Jeffrey Wall—who has argued more than 30 times before the U.S. Supreme Court—and drawing on the experience of 17 former U.S. Supreme Court clerks and more than 80 former federal circuit court clerks, S&C's Supreme Court and Appellate Practice adeptly handles challenging and high-profile appeals around the country. Our Supreme Court and Appellate lawyers collectively have significant experience before the Supreme Court and scores of other federal and state courts of appeals.

The Diesel Podcast
EPA Visits, Impounded Vehicles & Fines

The Diesel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 50:14 Very Popular


Vinny Himes joins us to update his last episode talking about an EPA visit. He shares his opinion on EPA enforcement, pollutants, shops being put out of business, and truck owners having their vehicles impounded. Don't miss this episode!

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Alphabet Soup Agencies Shouldn't Dictate Your Life

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 9:50


What's the problem with letting "the experts" decide public policy? Daniel Ortner from the Pacific Legal Foundation has a new piece in The Hill arguing why it's better that Congress, and not unaccountable bureaucrats, make the laws that affect everyone.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Quick Spin
2022 Audi e-tron GT: Lacks Rumble, Not Power

Quick Spin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 14:18


Electric cars are coming. Or more accurately, they're here. Audi's e-tron crossover helped push the company's EV efforts, but the stylish e-tron GT turns the Audi EV portfolio into something you'd be excited to see at your local Cars and Coffee. The Audi e-tron GT comes standard with a pair of electric motors that drive the front and rear axle. These permanent magnet motors supply 496 hp and 464 lb-ft of torque to the wheels, which help this EV sedan sprint to 60 from a dead stop in 3.9 seconds. Those figures increase in RS trim to 590 hp and 612 lb-ft of torque, which shrinks the 60 mph time to 3.1 seconds. Powering the e-tron GT's motors is a 93 kWh battery pack that can feed these motors for 238 EPA-estimated miles. On this episode of Quick Spin, host Wesley Wren hops behind the wheel of the 2022 Audi e-tron GT and puts it through its paces. Wren walks you around the e-tron GT and highlights the car's features and styling before climbing into the interior to explain how it feels. Wren also takes you along for a live recorded drive review. Adding to this, Wren talks with Autoweek's Patrick Carone about the e-tron GT. The two talk about the car's performance, its features and its direction. The pair also discuss how normal the e-tron GT feels. Closing the show, the two talk about what makes the e-tron GT special. Presented by eBay Motors

The Ezra Klein Show
The Supreme Court's power grab

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 65:31 Very Popular


Sean Illing talks with Harvard Law professor Nikolas Bowie about the U.S. Supreme Court's recently-concluded term, which produced landmark opinions restricting the power of the EPA, expanding gun rights, and overturning Roe v. Wade. They discuss how the conservative court's arguments are structured and why they are in fact quite radical, what "legal liberalism" is and whether it has just been decisively repudiated, and whether there are any reforms that could stop the conservative majority from reshaping American jurisprudence. Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), Interviews Writer, Vox Guest: Nikolas Bowie (@nikobowie), Louis D. Brandeis Professor of Law, Harvard Law School References:  Presidential Commission on the Supreme Court, Public Meeting, Panel 1 (C-SPAN; June 30) "How the Supreme Court dominates our democracy" by Niko Bowie (Washington Post; July 16, 2021) A Twitter thread on the repudiation of legal liberalism, by @nikobowie Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health (SCOTUS; June 24) 42 U.S. Code §1983 - Civil action for deprivation of rights 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1868) New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen (SCOTUS; June 23) Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey (SCOTUS; June 29, 1992) Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don't Talk about It) by Elizabeth Anderson (Princeton; 2017) "A new Supreme Court case is the biggest threat to US democracy since January 6" by Ian Millhiser (Vox; June 30) Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Patrick Boyd Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Circulation on the Run
Circulation August 2, 2022 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 37:05


This week, please join authors Paul Ridker and Eric Van Belle, editorialist Robert Harrington, and Guest Editor Allan Jaffe as they discuss the original research articles "Effects of Randomized Treatment With Icosapent Ethyl and a Mineral Oil Comparator on Interleukin-1β, Interleukin-6, C-Reactive Protein, Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Homocysteine, Lipoprotein(a), and Lipoprotein Associated Phospholipase A2: A REDUCE-IT Biomarker Substudy" and “Cerebral Microbleeds During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Prospective Magnetic Resonance Imaging Cohort” and the editorial "Trials and Tribulations of Randomized Clinical Trials." Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the Journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center, and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor, Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             It's double feature time Greg. We've got two totally unique and interesting papers that we'll be discussing. The first, a biomarker substudy from the REDUCE-IT trial, that is looking at the effects of randomized treatment with icosapent ethyl, versus a mineral oil comparator, on inflammatory biomarkers. Now, don't use roll your eyes at me, because I'm telling you, this has results that you may not expect, and very, very important clinical implications, and implications for clinical trials. The second paper, very much up your alley, Greg, is a prospective MRI study of cerebral microbleeds during TAVR. But okay, enough now to whet your appetite, let's now just first grab coffees, and discuss the other papers and the issue, shall we? Dr. Greg Hundley:           You bet, Carolyn. And how about if I go first? Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Please. Dr. Greg Hundley:           So, Carolyn, my first paper comes from a group of investigators led by Dr. Araz Rawshani from the Institute of Medicine, and it included 715,143 patients with diabetes, registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register, and compared them with over two million match controls, randomly selected from the general population, to determine the role of diabetes in the development of valvular heart disease, and particularly, the relation with risk factor control. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Huh? Interesting, diabetes and valve disease. All right. What did they find, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley:           Right, Carolyn. So they found, that individuals with type one and two diabetes, have greater risk for stenotic lesions. Whereas, risk for valvular regurgitation was lower in type two diabetes. Patients with well controlled cardiovascular risk factors, continued to display higher risk for valvular stenosis, without a clear stepwise decrease in risk between various degrees of risk factor control. So Carolyn, diabetes and a link with valvular heart disease. Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Wow. Really interesting, Greg. Thanks. Well, the next paper is a preclinical study with really interesting clinical implications. Now, we know the human heart has limited capacity to regenerate new cardiomyocytes, and that this capacity declines with age. Now, because loss of cardiomyocytes may contribute to heart failure, it is important to explore how stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration, to favorably shift the balance between loss of cardiomyocytes and birth of new cardiomyocytes, occurs in the aged heart. Now, these authors, Doctors Rosenzweig, from Massachusetts General Hospital, and Dr. Lee from Harvard University and colleagues, previously showed that cardiomyogenesis can be activated by, guess what? Exercise in the young adult mouse heart. However, whether exercise also induces cardiomyogenesis in aged hearts, however, is not yet known. So in today's paper, the authors aim to investigate the effect of exercise on generation of new cardiomyocytes in the aged heart. And here, we're talking about 20 month old mice, who were subjected to an eight week voluntary running protocol, and age matched sedentary animals who served as controls. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Wow, Carolyn. Really interesting evaluation of exercise on cardiomyogenesis. So what did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam:             Endogenous cardiomyogenesis can be stimulated by exercise in aged hearts. Comparative global transcriptional analysis further revealed, that exercise and age specific changes occurred in gene programs. The regulator of calcineurin RCAN1.4 was specifically found to be induced with exercise in aged hearts, and was accompanied by reduced calcineurin activity. So what's a take-home message? Exercise induced cardiomyogenesis may counter the increased cardiomyocyte loss and reduced cardio myogenic capacity in elderly patients. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Great, Carolyn. Well from the mail bag, there's an exchange of letters to the editor from Professor Zhou and Veith regarding a prior letter to the editor from Professor Jin and associates, pertaining to the previously published article “SPARC, A Novel Regulator of Vascular Cell Function in Pulmonary Hypertension.” And also, there's a Perspective piece, from Professor Mentz entitled, “Catastrophic Disruptions in Clinical Trials.” Dr. Carolyn Lam:             There's also a Research Letter by Dr. Kumar on [entitled] “von Willebrand Factor Is Produced Exclusively by Endothelium, Not Neointima, in Occlusive Vascular Lesions in Both Pulmonary Hypertension and Atherosclerosis.” There's also this beautiful tour of Cardiology News from the literature, from Tracy Hampton, which ranges from a study linking COVID-19 to higher long term cardiovascular risks, which was published in Nature Med, to uncovering alternative metabolic pathways involving cell fate transitions, published in Nature, to designing an autonomous biohybrid fish, from human stem cell derived cardiac muscle cells, that was published in Science. Wow. Isn't that amazing, Greg? Well, let's get on now though, to our two feature papers. Shall we? Dr. Greg Hundley:           You bet. Welcome listeners, to these two feature discussions on this particular day. And our first feature today, we have with us Dr. Paul Ridker, from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Bob Harrington, from Stanford University in California. And also, Dr. Allan Jaffe, from Rochester, Minnesota. Welcome to you all. And Paul, we're going to start for you. Can you describe for us, the background information that really went into the construct of your study, and what was the hypothesis that you wanted to address? Dr. Paul Ridker: Sure, Greg. So first of all, my thanks to the AHA and the Circulation for publishing this paper, we always want to support the AHA, and we're delighted to be here today for these podcasts. The field of omega-3 fatty acids has been a complicated one for a long time. Epidemiology suggested that, fish consumption would lower cardiovascular risk, and there was a number of trials done. And my friend and colleague here at the Brigham, Deepak Bhatt, was the lead of a very big trial, called REDUCE-IT. Some 8,000 plus patients who received EPA alone, and they got a terrific result. A 25% reduction in their primary endpoint. And this was a New England Journal paper, back in 2019 or so. But another friend of mine, Steve Nicholls, ran another large trial of a combination of eicosapentaenoic acid, or EPA, plus docosahexaenoic acid that's DHA called STRENGTH. And that one showed, really, no benefit. And so, there's been some controversy out there. In any event, when Deepak and his colleagues published their original paper, they said it's interesting, because they got this big risk reduction, but it wasn't apparently due to the triglyceride lowering of the drug. And so, my interest, as many people know, has largely been in inflammation biology. And so we said, well maybe we should just do a test. Well, we said, we'll measure a number of biomarkers that we know were associated with atherosclerosis, some inflammatory, some with coagulation. And so, that was the core hypothesis, was simply to look at some other markers, and see what we might learn. And sometimes, you learn things that you didn't expect. And I think, that goes to the heart of what complicated clinical trials are all about. And I'd also say perhaps, what the roles of surrogate endpoints are, as compared to hard clinical endpoints, and things that make this whole field kind of interesting. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Right. Very nice, Paul. So you mentioned REDUCE-IT, so describe a little bit more for your study. What was the study population, and what was your study design? Dr. Paul Ridker: We were fortunate enough to work with REDUCE-IT investigators, to use their biobank. They had put together, again, it's 8,000 plus patients. I think, it was two thirds secondary prevention, one third primary prevention. And when they received the combination of EPA and DHA, as I said earlier, they had about a 25% reduction in the risk of their primary endpoint, which was cardiovascular death, nonfatal AMI, nonfatal stroke, coronary revascularization, and the like. What we did is, we basically said, "Okay, since the mechanism was uncertain, why don't we go ahead and measure a series of biomarkers?" Things that a lot of us are interested in, homocysteine, LPLa, oxidized LDL, my own interest in inflammation. We measured, IL-1β, we measured, IL-6, we measured CRP. We measured another molecule, Lp-PLA2, that people have been interested in. And the hypothesis, of course, was to see what the drug did, as compared to the comparator did. And the findings were interesting to us, in that, to simplify them, the actual icosapent ethyl arm didn't do much to most of those biomarkers, very little change. But the mineral oil comparator arm had some small to modest effects on all those biomarkers, all of which went up again. Now, some of these effects are pretty small, two to 3% for things homocystine, LPLa. Others were moderate, 10 to 20% increases in oxidized LDL, Lp-PLA2. And the inflammatory markers went up about 25%, sometimes, even a little more. So it's complicated. It's important to point out, that these changes on an absolute scale are relatively small. On a percent scale, they're different. The REDUCE-IT investigators themselves, to their credit, had earlier published that, they saw some increase in LDL cholesterol as well, about 10, 11% in those who had received the mineral oil comparator. So it's not exactly what we thought we were going to find, I guess, is the simplest way to express it. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. And so, describe for us just a little bit more, any differences in men and women, and what about age? Or for example, premenopausal, postmenopausal women. Dr. Paul Ridker: No, the effects were quite consistent across all various subgroups. It's a very large study. There were, again, 8,000 patients, lots of blood samples been drawn. And I should again, commend the REDUCE-IT investigators, for allowing us to do this work with them. And again, as I point out, sometimes you find things out that weren't what you expected. And the hard part, I was glad this got tossed over with Dr. Harrington, is sort to figure out well, what's it really mean? Because again, as a clinical trial list, I will say, my instincts are to trust the primary endpoint of the trial. That's what they did. They're going to go out and lower heart attacks and strokes. And then, here we are a couple years later, trying to figure out what the mechanism might be, and just came across some puzzling results. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. Well, next listeners, we're going to turn to the editor that actually processed this manuscript, Dr. Allan Jaffe. Allan, what drew you to this particular article? Dr. Allan Jaffe:   Well, I was asked to be a guest editor this week, by the Journal, because of some conflicts that were intrinsic to the editorial board. And since I have an interest in biomarkers, and had for a long time, it made perfect sense for me to become involved. I was particularly interested in this particular area, because I was aware that there were these two trials that had found different endpoints, and that there were some controversy as to what the mechanisms might be by which these effects could occur. And so I was pleased to get involved. And I think it's a compliment to the REDUCE-IT investigators, and to Dr. Ridker, that they were willing to put the data out there so that everybody could see it. And we could then begin to look. So it was of interest to me. I thought it was important to the field, to get really good reviewers who would be, make sure that the data that would eventually be published was clear, so that readers would understand it. And so that, at the end, we'd be able to at least, come to some conclusions that we could end up having an expert in clinical trials. And I thought about Bob Harrington, right from the beginning, might be able to comment on. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. Well, Bob he's setting you up here nicely, both Paul and Allan, to really help us put these results in perspective with other studies that have been performed in this space. What are your thoughts? Dr. Robert Harrington:   So first off, Greg, thanks for having me. And Allan, thanks for inviting me to review and comment on the paper. As both Allan and Paul have indicated, that I've spent the last 30 plus years doing clinical trials of all sizes. Very small, where we try to understand mechanisms, and very large, where what we're trying to understand is clinical outcomes. And I've been intrigued in this field, because of the inconsistency of the data across the field. Where in some trials, Paul had indicated this STRENGTH, there seemed to be no effect of omega-3 fatty acids, and in REDUCE-IT, there was quite a pronounced effect of the test agent. And so, when one sees discordance in a field, one tries to understand, well, why might that be? And so in the editorial, I took the position that, well, what are we trying to do in clinical trials? And in outcomes trials, we're trying to figure out what matters to patients. Do they live longer? Do they feel better? Do they avoid bad stuff happening to them? Like having to undergo revascularization procedure. So you're trying to do things that are really clinically meaningful, but that doesn't say that you're also not trying to understand mechanism. And as Allan said, there have been some questions raised. And so, trying to understand mechanism in the edit in trials can be quite useful, not just to understand that trial results, but to really form hypothesis for a field going forward. And so, I took the approach of, we learn things from different trials, and sometimes we learn things in the same trial. Meaning that, there's mechanistic work embedded in the large trial. One of the most famous examples of this, in the GUSTO trial 30 years ago, we learned through the mechanistic substudy, that it was rapid reprofusion TIMI-3 establishment of TIMI-3 flow, that really explained the difference between TPA and streptokinase. So I was very intrigued by how we might use these data to explore the results. And I find the findings fascinating, as Paul said. It is complicated, but it raises a really fundamental issue in clinical trials. There's an assumption in a placebo control trial, that because randomization is allowing you to balance everything, except for the randomized treatment groups, and therefore, that comparison has causal information in it. There's an underlying assumption that's really important. And that is, that the placebo is inert. That it has no biological effect of its own. Well, that assumption was violated here. The placebo is not inert in this clinical trial. Now, the investigators, I think to their credit, have said, "Well, this is small, probably doesn't matter." And that might be right, but it also may be wrong. And you can't just say, well, it doesn't matter, these are small effects. As Paul said, some of the effects are small, some are medium, some are large. So what explains it? And I made a point in the editorial, you could model all of this. If you get 5% of this, and 10% of this, and 20% of this, you could make some assumptions and say, well, the magnitude of the benefit was so great that it couldn't have been overcome by this. But that's just modeling, and there's uncertainty. So for me, as a trialist, and somebody who really believes in using evidence to guide practice and to guide public policy, I think there's uncertainty here. It's likely that the treatment effect is not as large as was observed, but how large is it? And how large is important? And how large might we want to consider to put into our practice guidelines? I think all of those open questions, particularly in a field where there is inconsistency across trials, in terms of the observation of the outcome. So my conclusion is, we need more work. We need another trial, if we really want to understand this. And we need to use an inert placebo, to really understand what the contribution was. I'd like nothing better to see that it didn't matter. But I can't say that it doesn't matter because I don't know. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Well, listeners, boy, we've got kind of some interest here in that an unexpected result. So Paul, it's nice doing an interview like this listeners, because each speaker sets up the next one. Paul, Bob is saying, well, what should we do next to clarify the results here? So maybe we'll go through each of you, and start with Paul. Just describe for us, what do you think is the next study that we need to perform? Dr. Paul Ridker: Well, Greg, it's a really interesting issue. We saw it, as authors, to write as neutral a paper as we could possibly write, and sort of do our academic job and say, here are the data. And I think we did it that way because, we don't really know what the interpretation should be. On the one hand, you have a very big beneficial result, which is great for patients. And there's a prior clinical trial called JELIS, which was open label, the same drug, and also got a large benefit. And we were trying to figure out mechanism. That being said, as Bob pointed out, I think what we stumbled into is some level of uncertainty. And the question is, how uncertain would it be, and does it matter in the big picture? Allan was interesting, because the Journal asked us to use the word comparator, rather than placebo. Now this was designed as a placebo controlled trial, but our paper uses the word comparator, because of the possibility, that as Bob Harrington points out, it may not be totally inert. So the writing of this was quite carefully done. I think, at the end of the day, my REDUCE-IT colleagues, who I have great respect for, and really worked terribly hard to do the main trial, understandably feel, that the trial would've showed, and I have a lot of sympathy for that, because it's the hard endpoints we should go with. On the other hand, I have sympathy with the idea that it never hurts to have more data. And if there could be a way to have a second trial, and I might change the population a little bit, maybe I'd do it in true primary prevention. This was one third primary prevention. My colleague, Joanne Manson had done her, she had a trial where they showed some potential benefit in the black populations. Maybe you might over sample some minority groups. But just the pragmatic issues here, make it tough to have a second trial. And so, uncertainty is just part of what we, as physicians, have to learn to live with. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Allan, turning to you. What do you think is a next study to perform in this space? Dr. Allan Jaffe:   Well, I think what Paul has said is correct. That it would be very hard to generate enthusiasm funding for a large trial. But it might not be nearly as difficult to begin to explore the effects of the mineral oil comparator, versus the active agent, versus perhaps, another potential placebo, and see over time what happens in primary prevention patients, as a way of beginning to put some context around what these results might mean. So for example, it could turn out that, the active agent actually kept the values from rising as they normally would've, and mineral oil had no effect at all. Alternatively, mineral oil may well have been a negative. It had a negative effect. And I think, those are the sorts of questions that could be explored reasonably in the short term, without doing another multimillion dollar randomized trial. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And Bob, your thoughts. Dr. Robert Harrington:   Well, and I mentioned this in the editorial, Greg. I didn't make my recommendation lightly. I know that these trials are expensive. I know these trials take a great deal of time, a great deal of energy. And I know that the REDUCE-IT investigators worked enormously hard over the years to get this done. So I don't say tritely, "Oh, just do another trial." But if you think about the magnitude of the public health issue here, there are millions of people to who this kind of therapy might apply globally. And so, shouldn't we be more certain than less certain, if we want to include it, for example, in ACC/AHA guidelines? I would say, the answer to that is yes. And so, I think of it as, okay, let's make some assumptions. Let's assume, that the effect that was observed in JELIS and REDUCE-IT, is the true effect. That's ground truth. Well, there are different study designs one might think about, from an analytic perspective, using Bayesian statistics, as opposed to frequency statistics. One might think about an intense interim analysis plan, to understand where the data are going, and be able to pull in the prior data for evaluation. I would advise getting a smart group of people together, who spend their lives thinking about trials in the atherosclerotic space, and the REDUCE-IT team is pretty darn good, and say, "How could we do this efficiently?" I do think, there's enough uncertainty that it would be ethical, from an equipoise perspective, to include high risk patients in a second evaluation, because we do have uncertainty. And if we really want to nail this down, I think we could look at high risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia, and try to use some interesting design issues, and some interesting analytical issues, to try to reduce the sample size, lot of attention in interim analyses, to try to answer the question. I'd like, as I said, nothing better to say, "Oh look, REDUCE-IT was the truth." This next trial is consistent. That'd be, to me, a terrific outcome of this. On the other hand, if you said to me, "Well, the effect's not 25%, it's more in the 15% range." Well, maybe then we think about how we apply it to our patients a little differently, maybe a little more cautiously. So I don't make the recommendation lightly, as I said, but I do think that there are some conversations that could be had, being respectful of the effort and the expense that goes into these kind of things. To try to answer the question efficiently. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. Well listeners, we want thank Dr. Paul Ridker, from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dr. Bob Harrington from Stanford University, Dr. Allan Jaffe, from the Mayo Clinic, for bringing us the results of a substudy of the REDUCE-IT trial, that assessed a variety of serum biomarkers, pertaining to systemic inflammation, and highlighting uncertainty around the mechanism regarding the efficacy of icosapent ethyl, that's been used previously for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. And next listeners, we are going to move to our second feature discussion and review some data pertaining to microbleeds in the central nervous system, during and after TAVR procedures. Welcome listeners, to our second feature discussion on this August 2nd. And we are going to explore some of the world of TAVR and its potential complications. And we have with us today, Dr. Eric Van Belle, from Lille, France. And also, Dr. Manos Brilakis, from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Welcome gentlemen. And Eric, we'll start with you. Can you describe for us a little, the background information that you use to assemble and construct your study, and describe, or list for us, the hypothesis that you wanted to address? Dr. Eric Van Belle:           Yes. Thanks a lot for the question. So we knew for many years, that some of the complication of the TAVR procedure relate to the brain. And it has been described by many others, that there were some complication in the brain of patient undergoing TAVR. And there was no previous investigation on potential bleeding or microbleeding in this population. And on the other side, there are previous publication on, of course, initially chronic microbleeding, in patient with some of, let's say, disease in the brain, but also, a possibility of acute microbleeding. And especially, in some interesting population relating to the TAVR feed, that is patient with valve disease, patient with endocarditis, or patient with assist device. In this population, microbleedings, acute microbleeding, have been described. And what is interesting, if you look at all these populations, these are population in which the Von Willebrand factor has been impacted and modified, and could be one of the reason of the microbleeding. And one of the similar feature of the patient with aortic stenosis that undergo TAVI, or TAVR, that are patient with indeed also, this kind of Von Willebrand disease. So if we put everything together that is previously, we only looked at antibody complication in those population, and that Von Willebrand disease, which is present in patient with aortic valve stenosis, could promote a bleeding, in particular, bleeding in the brain. We decided to look at the potential appearance of microbleeding, in patient undergoing TAVR procedure. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. And Eric, can you describe for us, your study design, and who was your study population? Dr. Eric Van Belle:           Yes. So basically, the study population is a basic population of patient undergoing TAVI. Just to make sure that one of the difficulty of this study, was to conduct and perform an MRI, a brain MRI, before the procedure, and as short as possible after the procedure, within three days, which is logistically challenging. And also, to make sure that we keep most of the population to undergo the MRI, we had to exclude patient with a high risk of pacemaker, or patient with pacemaker that could not undergo the MRI. But basically, without this, it's just a regular population. And if we indeed, compare to some of the previous work I was mentioning, about describing the acute MRI, it was important for us to make sure, or to be as sure as we could get, that indeed, this microbleeding, if we observe them, could be related to the procedure. And it means that, the MRI, after the procedure, should be done as short as possible. And also, that an MRI, a baseline MRI, should be performed. Because we know, that in this population, you could have some microbleedings also observed before starting the procedure. Dr. Greg Hundley:           So a cohort study design where MRIs are performed before, and then very soon after, TAVR procedures. So Eric, what did you find? Dr. Eric Van Belle:           So what we observed, the first thing that we confirmed was indeed, that in this population of that age, that is patient around 80 years old, when we do the baseline MRI, you find in about one out of four patients already, some microbleedings. And this was expected, and it is very similar to what is expected in this kind of population. But what was indeed more striking, that when we repeated the MRI after three days, we observed another 23% of patient with a new microbleedings that were observed. This is indeed the most important observation. What was also important that, the patient with microbleedings, and the location of the microbleedings, were not related to the cerebellum brain, because indeed we could observe some cerebellum arise in this population, as it is expected. And there was no relation between the two. So it's also, an important observation, suggesting that this microbleeding are not hemorrhagic transformation of cerebellum brain, for instance. And we also observed that, the risk of microbleeding, or the chance to observe the microbleeding, was increased when the procedure was longer. And also, when the total duration of anticoagulation was longer, we also observed that, when the procedure was, when we used protamine at the end of the procedure, the risk of microbleeding was less. And also, importantly, the status of the Von Willebrand factor, and indeed, an alteration of the multimer of Von Willebrand factor, was also associated with the risk of microbleeding in this population. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. So in this cohort of 84 individuals, average age around 80, undergoing TAVR procedure, and about 50/50 men and women, you had several factors. Prior history of bleeding, amount of heparin, absence of protamine, all indicating a higher risk of these microbleeds. So very practical information. Well, Manos, you have many papers come across your desk. What attracted you to this particular paper? And then secondly, how do we put these results really, in the context of maybe other complications that can occur during or after TAVR procedures? Dr. Emmanouil Brilakis: Yes, thanks so much, Greg. And also, congratulations Eric, for a wonderful paper, and thanks for sending it to circulation. I think, with increasing the number of targets, as you know, TAVR now is becoming the dominant mode for treating severe aortic stenosis. Safety is of paramount importance. And even though there's been a lot of progress, we still have issues with the safety of the procedure. So understanding how can make it safer is very important. And I think, what was unique in this paper, again, congratulations for creating this study, is that it opens a new frontier. We worry about stroke. We're all very worried about the stroke, and having the patient have a permanent neurologic damage during the procedure. But there may be more to it than the classic embolic stroke. And I think, this study opens actually, a new frontier with the micro cerebral bleeds. Now we don't completely understand, despite the study, we don't understand the functional significance from this. And I think, that's one of the areas that will need further research. But I think, trying to understand what causes them, and preventing those microbleeds, would have a very important role in the future, for making TAVR even safer than it is. Dr. Greg Hundley:           Very nice. Well, Manos, you really lead us into the kind of the next question. So Eric, what do you see as the next study to be performed in this sphere of research? Dr. Eric Van Belle:           Again, to me, and to follow with the comment of Manos, we need to include, I would say, to solve two questions. We have to solve the question of, what could really impact these microbleedings. And what would be the impact of this microbleeding on the long term outcome of this patient? So it's means that we have to set, as part of the studies that we will design, potentially studies on aortic immolation. Or let's say for instance, we could investigate the role of protamine. It has been suggested that protamine could be something interesting, so it could be tested as part of a randomized study. But this means that, as part of such randomized study on the use of protamine, for instance, you would include a last cohort of patients with MRI after the procedure. And also, a long term follow of the neurological complication, which indeed, is the missing part of our current study. We would need to have a much larger cohort of patients, to be able to reconnect the neurological outcome to the MRI outcome, and also to include this. So let's say, for me, one of the studies we would be interested to perform, is to conduct a study on the use of protamine, which is very simple, randomized, yes or no, and includes brain MRI in this population, as a systematic investigation, which is difficult to conduct. You have to know that it's difficult to do, but it will be very important. And then, to look at the long term neurological outcome. Dr. Greg Hundley:           And I see, Eric, you mentioned the long term, because really in the short term, so within six months, you really didn't see any changes in neurological functional outcome or quality of life. So Manos, just coming back to you. What do you see is the next study that should be performed in this space? Dr. Emmanouil Brilakis: Yeah, I agree actually, with Eric. The next step is, this was an 80 patient study. Right? It's a very small preliminary data, all that opens a new system for evaluation, we're still a very small number of patients. So having a larger number of patients, I think for me, the key thing is to understand the connection. Does this actually cause neurologic symptoms? What does it mean having a microbleed? I think right now, we're still confused on the study. There was not really much impact on the neurologic status of the patient. So for me, the number one thing is, to understand how it impacts the patient's quality of life, the neurologic status. Perhaps more sensitive studies, neurocognitive studies, to understand exactly how it impacts. And then after doing that, I agree with Eric, if this is a bad, something really bad, then we can find different ways to prevent them from happening. Protamine is one of them during the procedure time, and not be a very feasible one. Or it could be interesting to see if different valves, for example, have different propensity for causing those microbleeds. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well listeners, we want to thank Dr. Eric Van Belle, from Lille, France, and also, our own associate editor, Dr. Manos Brilakis, from Minneapolis, Minnesota for bringing this very important study, highlighting that one out of four patients undergoing TAVR has cerebral microbleeds before the procedure. And then, after the procedure, one in four patients develop new cerebral microbleeds. And then, procedural and antithrombotic management, and persistence of acquired Von Willebrand factor defects, were associated with the occurrence of these new cerebral microbleeds. Well, on behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week, and we will catch you next week On the Run. Dr. Greg Hundley:           This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own, and not necessarily those of the editors, or of the American Heart Association. For more, please visit ahajournals.org.

Stewardship Calling
Effective Parish Assessment Program Part 1

Stewardship Calling

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 127:28


Doctors know the tests to administer to assess our personal health. Financial planners know how to assess our financial health. However, our parishes lack similar empirical and validated tools to help them. After over 20 years of working with over 500 Orthodox Christian parishes and completing strategic plans that cover over 26% of Orthodox Christians in the U.S., the Orthodox Ministry Services (OMS) team has developed the Effective Parish Assessment (EPA). The EPA is a reliable and easy way for you to assess your parish's health and effectiveness in the 6 Pillars and 30 Building Blocks of operational excellence. OMS is providing the Effective Parish Assessment Program for free to selected Cohort Effective Parishes with the support of Leadership 100 and the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese. Tune in to these TWO programs and find out if your parish is eligible, and how you can apply, to participate in this dynamic free and helpful parish improvement program. We also welcome your calls and questions. If your parish is an innovator with Clergy and Lay Leaders committed to operational excellence and the best possible parish health and effectiveness, these programs are for you. Join my fellow OMS Team members as over 2 programs we describe in more detail the 6 Pillars, 30 Building Blocks, the Effective Parish Assessment Program, and how it can benefit your parish.

Ever Forward Radio
EFR 624: Boost Brain Performance, Get More REM Sleep, Increase Longevity, Decrease Inflammation, and Key Supplementation for Brain Health with Louisa Nicola

Ever Forward Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 76:05


Louisa Nicola is a neurophysiologist, brain coach to elite athletes, and Founder of Neuro Athletics, a full-service neuroscience diagnostic testing company.  Back in episode #436, Louisa Nicola gave us an introduction to the brain and nervous system, setting the foundation for us to understand how neuroscience can help us get more out of life. This week, Louisa is back to dive deeper into the science behind brain performance.  In this discussion, Chase and Louisa talk about the three domains of peak brain performance: nutrition, physical exercise, and neurophysiology. Louisa breaks down how to utilize nutrients, exercise, and sleep, so you can better optimize your brain health. The pair also talk about keeping the blood-brain barrier strong, the benefits of using exogenous ketones, and why you need to be more mindful of maintaining your dopamine levels.  Plus… Can our brain cells regenerate or are the connections just getting stronger? Stick around until the end to hear Louisa's shocking answer!   Follow Louisa Nicola @louisanicola_ Learn more about NeuroAthletics Follow Chase on Instagram @chase_chewning Follow him on Twitter @chasechewning   Key Highlights Sleep: “Sleep is probably the most underrated high performance tool we have,” Louisa says. If you're an athlete who doesn't get enough quality sleep, it affects almost every aspect of your performance and increases risk for injury. Louisa goes on to describe the impacts of sleep on brain health, brain disorders, and brain aging. Nutrition: “When it comes to the brain, there are certain things that the brain favors, especially as it relates to nutrition and supplementation,” Louisa says. Listen in to learn how stress, inflammation, and supplementation of key nutrients, like EPA and DHA, can play a role in longevity and cognitive performance. Plus, Louisa explains the benefits of going on a high fat diet immediately after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion). Hydration is a key indicator of brain functioning. If we are 2% dehydrated, we can have a decrease in our cognitive performance by 30%. Exercise: “You can grow the gray matter of your brain by physical activity alone,” Louisa says. She then recaps various research studies that show the relationship between exercise, particularly resistance training, and cognitive performance as well as how exercise can prevent Alzheimer's disease. Your brain loves quality time with other humans, loving relationships, social interactions, and of course, self-love.  How will you know these practices are actually improving your brain health? Tune in to find out!   Episode resources: Save 20% on your wellness and telemedicine needs with code EVERFORWARD at https://www.WildHealth.com  Save 15% on Mello magnesium superfood drink mix with code EVERFORWARD at https://wwwHelloNed.com/everforward  Watch this video on YouTube https://youtu.be/Jk7VpS9jooM EFR #436: Neuroscience That Will Help You Perform Better, Think Faster, and Live Longer with Louisa Nicola EFR #612: Dr. Gabrielle Lyon on Plant Protein Versus Animal Protein and How to Prevent Disease and Promote Longevity Using Muscle Centric Medicine Listen to The Neuro Experience episode with Layne Norton, PhD  FITLIGHT 

Congressional Dish
CD256: Poisonous Pet Collars

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 81:32 Very Popular


Seresto Flea and Tick Collars for dogs and cats have been sold to Americans since 2013. During that time, the EPA has received approximately 100,000 reports of illnesses and 2,500 reports of deaths of animals that wore a Seresto Flea and Tick collar, by far the most reports received about any flea and tick treatment on the market. In this episode, hear testimony from scientists about the Environmental Protection Agency's disturbingly lax review processes for pesticides in pet products and learn why your vote in November is likely to determine if these popular but dangerous products will stay on American shelves. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Listen to the latest episode of Jen's new podcast with Andrew Heaton and Justin Robert Young — We're Not Wrong Episode 12: About The Never Ending Ukraine War, Biden's COVID and Mike Pence (LIVE FROM BERLIN) To report an incident directly to the EPA via email Report.Pesticide.Incident@epa.gov View the shownotes on our website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd256-poisonous-pet-collars Executive Producer Recommended Sources CD200: How to End Legal Bribes Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith. The Dictator's Handbook: Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics. Public Affairs: 2011. Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD254: Baby Formula Shortage CD234: AWOL Recall: The Rock and Play Sleeper Reports on Seresto and Pesticides “Oversight Subcommittee Report Reveals EPA Failed to Protect Pets, Owners From Dangerous Flea and Tick Collar.” Jun 15, 2022. House Committee on Oversight and Reform. House Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy. June 2022. “Staff Report: Seresto Flea and Tick Collars: Examining why a product linked to more than 2,500 pet deaths remains on the market.” Lauretta Joseph. May 19, 2022. “Notification of Evaluation: The EPA's Response to Reported Incidents of Unintended Effects from Pet Collar Pesticides, Project No. OSRE-FY22-0120” Johnathan Hettinger. Sept. 24, 2021. “Is your pet wearing a Seresto flea collar? Company reports thousands more adverse incidents.” USA Today. Jordan Liles. Mar 8, 2021. “Did Seresto Flea Collars Cause 1,698 Dog and Cat Deaths?” Snopes. Johnathan Hettinger. Mar 2, 2021. “Popular flea collar linked to almost 1,700 pet deaths. The EPA has issued no warning.” USA Today. Jen's highlighted copy Lawrence J. Dyckman et al. July 1995. “Pesticides: EPA's Efforts to Collect and Take Action on Exposure Incident Data, GAO/RCED-95-163.” U.S. Government Accountability Office. Lobbying “Lobbyist Profile: Ryan Canfield.” 2022. Open Secrets. “Employment History: Ryan Canfield.” Open Secrets. “Elanco Animal Health.” Open Secrets. The Hearing Seresto Flea and Tick Collars: Examining why a product linked to more than 2,500 pet deaths remains on the market June 15, 2022 Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy Witnesses: Faye Hemsley & Omarion Hemsley, Owners of Deceased Pet Thomas Maiorino, Owner of Deceased Pet Jeffrey Simmons, President and Chief Executive Officer, Elanco Animal Health Incorporated Nathan Donley, Ph.D, Environmental Health Science Director, Center for Biological Diversity Karen McCormack, Former Scientist, Policy Analyst, and Communications Officer (ret.), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency Carrie Sheffield (minority witness), Senior Policy Analyst, Independent Women's Voice Clips 1:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): As early as 2015, just a few years after the collar entered the US market, an EPA investigation found that among similar products, the Seresto collar “ranked number one” by a wide margin in terms of total incidents, major incidents and deaths, even after factoring in companies' relative sales. Those findings weren't enough to drive the makers of Seresto collar or the EPA to act. 1:50 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): In 2016, Canada's equivalent of the EPA known as the PMRA, concluded based on a review of the same American data available to the EPA that the collar posed too great a risk to pets and their owners to be ever sold in Canada. 2:10 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): Even as the death count rose, the EPA allowed Seresto to remain on the market here without even so much as requiring additional warning labels that regulators mandated in places ranging from Australia to Colombia to the European Union. 2:30 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): The companies that manufactured the Seresto collar first Bayer animal health and then later Elanco were also aware of the risks, the incidents and the deaths, but they too failed to act. Instead, they hired third party industry insiders to conduct so-called independent reviews of the incident data, which ended up protecting their $300 million a year market but ended up endangering pets. So the Seresto collar stayed the same and so did the consequences. 4:15 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): This particular collar has caused 100,000 incidents reported to the EPA and over 2500 pet deaths reported to the EPA. 4:30 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): The steps that we are asking for today are crucial, because it's important to protect our pets and our families, too. I now call upon my distinguished colleague, Mr. Cloud for his opening statement. Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Thank you, Chairman. This is the first hearing of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee this year, and we've been in session for 52 days this year. And our first hearing is on pet collars. And I do realize that our pets are a huge part of our lives, they enrich our families, they provide companionship for my kids, they've helped foster responsibility and compassion and care, important ethics we need in our society. Just recently, our family mourned the loss of our guinea pig, biscuit. And so pets are a huge part of our family lives. But I have to admit that when I saw that this was going to be on the agenda for this week, I cannot help but be concerned, especially coming from South Texas about the 1000s 10s of 1000s of human lives that have passed away due to fentanyl and due to an open border and due to the policies of this administration to continue to aid and abet cartels. And I realized that this is the economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee. And so I think about economic policy happening right now and where the minds of the American people are. Gas is now averaging $5 A gallon nationwide. For the first time in history. We have not had a hearing. Inflation is at a 40 year high. We have not had a hearing, the American people cannot find baby formula. We still haven't had a hearing. I've mentioned fentanyl is killing Americans, especially our teens at unprecedented rates. We have not had a hearing. Biden's systemic elimination of the safe and secure border he inherited has led to the worst humanitarian and national security crisis in this country's history. We have not had a hearing this term, we could talk about how inflation is affecting the cost of owning a pet, including the increased cost of food, toys, accessories, but we're not talking about that either. Instead, we're holding a hearing on the pet collar, which fights fleas and ticks. And as any pet owner knows fleas and tick management is an essential part of pet care. But I'm not sure it's an essential part of congressional oversight, especially when we take in mind where the American people are at. And frankly, I've talked to a number of people in my district and others who live in other parts of the country and they are really surprised that this has risen to one of the top priorities of commerce at this time in juncture. The subcommittee Republicans would rather explore efforts to help American consumers during these trying times, we would gladly have joined the chairman in holding a hearing on the shortage of baby formula. Moreover, we have welcomed the chance to explore TikTok's troubling practice of showing dangerous content to minors, an investigation you all started last year. In fact, it's now come to light that teenagers are using tick tock and other social media platforms to purchase illicit drugs including unknowingly in many cases, in most cases, fentanyl. Social media platforms are also using it to recruit young people into the gig economy of human trafficking. A hearing on that crisis could be incredibly important. And on the subject of our nation's youth, CDC bureaucrats have actively pursued an agenda to close schools during the pandemic instead of following the science damaging our children's financial, mental, physical, emotional, and also their learning for years to come. But we still have not had a hearing. Americans are facing incredible economic issues which require us as elected officials to listen and to respond. I do appreciate the fact that our pets play an important part of our lives. We should be kind to animals and we should teach our children to do the same. But I do care immensely more about the human lives that we were elected to serve. 10:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): A recorded vote has been requested — we will pause while the we will get the clerk out. 12:00 Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL): Mr. Chairman, it's already been about what? A minute and a half. Where's the clerk? Is the clerk on lunch and not here today? Rep. Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): I think the clerk is on the way Mr. Donalds, thank you. Rep. Donalds: Is the clerk sitting in the side office just hanging out? I mean, come on, Mr. Chairman. 21:20 Clerk: Mr. Cloud? Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Yes Clerk: Mr. Cloud votes yes. Mr. Keller? Rep. Fred Keller (R-PA): Yes Clerk: Mr. Keller votes yes. Mr. Franklin? Rep. C. Scott Franklin (R-FL): Yes Clerk: Mr. Franklin votes yes. Mr. Clyde? Rep. Andrew Clyde (R-GA): Yes. Clerk: Mr. Clyde votes yes. Mr. Donalds? Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL): Yes Clerk: Mr. Donalds votes yes. 26:31 Thomas Maiorino: My name is Thomas Maiorina. I reside in Mount Laurel, New Jersey with my wife Monica. I am the father of three boys. My youngest son, Robert turned 12 in 2011. After years of asking for a dog, he wore us down and we decided to rescue a dog from a southern shelter for my son's birthday. After researching online, we adopted a mixed breed mutt that Robbie and his two other brothers named Rooney. Rooney swiftly became a loved member of our family. A bit rambunctious, she was just what a 12 year old boy needed. She loved the run and chase anything the move in the yard. By all measures, we took great care to ensure Rooney had a healthy and happy life. We took her on daily walks, sometimes three a day, hikes on park trails. We monitor her diet and made sure she was seen by the veterinarian as needed, and she received all of her shots. Because she was a bit rambunctious and we lived in a wooded area where there's a lot of wildlife, we were constantly concerned about the problems of fleas and ticks. We consulted with a veterinarian after getting Rooney to determine the best way to protect her against this. We use a variety of prevention methods for the first few years and when we changed veterinarians in approximately 2013 or 14, the new veterinarian strongly recommended that we use the Seresto flea and tick collar, based on all of our options. We heeded that advice and purchased Seresto collars from our local PetSmart. The collars were intended to provide protection for up to eight months. We noticed that after fixing a collar to Rooney's neck, she began to itch and first had that treated and tested for allergies. We took her to the vet several times during 2018 seeking to find the cause for the ever increasing itching. After several visits and multielement medications, they were unable to determine the cause and we switched to a specialist in 2019 to seek further assistance, where they provided allergy shots and other medications to address the worsening itching and related symptoms. Rooney's behavior then became more erratic as the months wore on she began linking her paws so feverishly they would bleed. She also developed bleeding patches on her stomach. Ultimately, in October 2020, Rooney suffered horrendous grand mal seizure in the presence of myself and my wife. The damage done by the seizure was irreversible. She was a shell of her former self and ultimately, the family decided the most humane thing would be to put Rooney to sleep at the age of nine. In early March 2021, I read an article online about Seresto pet collars resulting in the deaths of 1700 Pets without any warnings from the EPA or the manufacturer. I sought out legal representation not because I wanted financial compensation, but because I took great pains to care for Rooney. The final 18 months of her life were agonizing to watch if I could help prevent another family from going through what my family went through. I wanted to act. I'm here today in furtherance of that effort. I appreciate the committee taking the time to investigate this matter. And thank you for your time. 33:30 Jeffrey Simmons: There are a few points I'd like to emphasize upfront. First, the EPA approved Seresto following more than 80 safety and toxicity studies, all of which show that Seresto and its ingredients have a strong safety profile. Second, more than 80 regulatory bodies around the world have approved Seresto. Seresto is widely used and more than 80 million collars worn over the past decade to protect dogs and cats from fleas and ticks around the world. 34:00 Jeffrey Simmons: Third, adverse event reports are not intended to be, and in fact are absolutely not, proof of causation. Reports require further investigation and analysis to determine cause. And after years of review, our pharmacovigilance team made up of veterinarians and other experts who study adverse event reports has not identified a single death caused by the active ingredients in the collar. 36:45 Jeffrey Simmons: No product is without risk. What matters is whether those risks are reasonable. And in light of the benefits and numerous studies and the incident report data for Seresto demonstrate the product does not pose an unreasonable risk and has a strong safety profile, which is why the American Veterinary Medical Association opposed canceling Seresto's EPA registration. 38:05 Nathan Donley: My name is Dr. Nathan Donley. I'm the science director for the Environmental Health Program at the Center for Biological Diversity. I have a PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology from Oregon Health and Sciences University. The last seven years of my professional life have been spent researching how pesticides impact people and the environment and the regulatory failures that can actually facilitate harm rather than prevent it. I published three peer reviewed scientific articles and five technical reports on this subject. I've authored over 100 technical scientific comments to the EPA on pesticide documents, including flumethrin and imidacloprid, the two active ingredients in the Seresto collar. I've read through 1000s of pages of FOIA documents I requested on matters related to the approval and continued use of Seresto. 39:40 Nathan Donley: While other agencies like the FDA have robust systems in place to surveil harms from products under their purview, EPA only requires minimal information be submitted four times a year and they delegate this responsibility to the pesticide industry itself. The limited information that is collected includes only the pesticide product name, where the incident occurred, and the severity of the incident. That's it. Oftentimes, the agency doesn't even know if the incident involves a dog or a cat. Even though the EPA determines what incident information it collects, it then turns around and laments that the incident data are insufficient to take regulatory action to protect public health, the environment and our pets. It's a system designed to achieve nothing other than maintaining the status quo. Worse yet, reported incidents significantly underestimate the true scope of harm. The EPA recently estimated that only one in 25 pesticide incidents involving another pesticide called Kamba was actually reported to the authorities. That's only a 4% reporting rate. Given that 100,000 people have reported their concerns about Seresto, this is very alarming because the true number of harmful incidents to pets could be potentially far higher. 41:05 Nathan Donley: The EPA's counterpart in Canada was so concerned about Seresto incidents and harms of pets and humans that it denied Seresto approval in 2016. Canada analyzed U incident data and determined that Seresto collars had an incident rate 50 times greater than the average flea collar and 36 times greater than Canada's trigger for review. 41:25 Nathan Donley: EPA has no trigger for review of any pesticide product, no matter how much harm is being reported. And because the agency has no mandated trigger for reviewing pesticides like Seresto, rather than choosing to use incident reporting data to inform a robust regulatory process and take dangerous products off the market, EPA routinely chooses to do nothing at all. And that's especially troubling when you consider that Seresto is just one of 18,000 pesticide products currently approved by the EPA. 42:40 Karen McCormack: My name is Karen McCormack. At the present time I am a retired government employee after working over 40 years at the Environmental Protection Agency. During my career at EPA, I first worked in an EPA laboratory as a research coordinator. And in that capacity, I conducted research on numerous pesticides. Later I transferred to EPA headquarters in Washington DC, and worked in various positions in the pesticide program as a scientist, policy analyst, and a communications officer. I also worked in a number of offices at EPA including the Office of the Assistant Administrator for Pesticides and Toxins. Although I'm retired from EPA, I'm still closely following a number of environmental topics and one of those topics of interest to me has been the impact of flea and tick pet products on cats and dogs. 43:30 Karen McCormack: The US Environmental Protection Agency is charged with regulating products that contain pesticides and in ensuring that all pesticide products are safe to use. Before 1996, EPA did not consistently require manufacturers to conduct animal safety studies for pet products containing pesticides. Because pet products with pesticides were available readily in commercial stores, consumers thought they must be safe. This is not necessarily the case. Flea and tick products are designed to kill insects, and they often contain poisonous chemicals. When combined with pesticides that are used outside the home and in the water and food that people drink and eat, the aggregate risks from all these sources of pesticides can be high, especially for children who are vulnerable to toxic chemicals -- much more vulnerable than adults. And it wasn't until the passage of the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act that EPA began to examine the risks from sources other than food, including risks from pet products containing pesticides. After the passage of FQPA, pesticide manufacturers were required to submit to EPA animal safety studies and incident reports showing harm to animals and humans exposed to pesticides and pet products. Between 2012 and the present time the EPA received an increasing number of incident reports related to the use of flea and tick pet collars for dogs and cats. The toxic effects that were described in these many incident reports from the use of certain pet collars ranged from mild effects, such as skin irritation to more severe effects such as intense tremors, seizures, paralysis, organ failure and death. The largest number of incident rate counts that EPA received during this period were from the use of pet collar called Seresto. 45:35 Karen McCormack: Between January 2012 and the present time, EPA has received over 100,000 incident reports, and these incident reports include human incidents as well as pet incidents. These reports also include at least 2300 reports of pet deaths. The number is most likely a very low estimate of the actual number of incidents that are occurring since many pet owners do not know that they can report incidents to EPA and they may not know how to correlate the adverse effects in their pets with a particular pet product. 46:30 Karen McCormack: There are no independent organizations that rank the safety of pet products. And the sales data which is needed to rank the safety of pet products is considered confidential business information by the manufacturers. EPA's risk assessments also do not tell the full story of what pet products are safe, as they rely heavily on industry generated studies that were conducted on mice and rats rather than dogs and cats. And EPA's risk assessments also are based mainly on studies that were conducted with only one pesticide in Seresto rather than the combined pesticides in this pet product. 47:10 Karen McCormack: Although the original manufacturers of Seresto, Bayer, did conduct a number of efficacy and safety studies in dogs and cats treated with Seresto, the company did not conduct two very critical studies that are important for determining the safety of a pet product. These tests include a pet transferable residue study, a petting study, to determine the exposure of humans to Seresto. And they did not conduct a study that measures the amount of pesticide that gets in the blood of treated dogs and cats. 48:45 Carrie Sheffield: My name is Carrie Sheffield and I'm a senior policy analyst at the Center for Economic Opportunity at Independent Women's Forum. We are a nonprofit organization committed to increasing the number of women who value free markets and personal liberty. 2:44:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): Let me just show you some analysis that was conducted by Elanco, which we would just refer to as well as the EPA, as well as the Canadian equivalent of the EPA, which is called the PMRA. Essentially, we look at this chart here, and we see that at the top Elanco computed that 0.51% of pet deaths were “possibly or probably” caused by the Seresto collar. The PMRA in Canada, looking at a sample of pet deaths concluded that 33% of those pet deaths were possibly or probably caused by Seresto collars. And the EPA here, concluded that 45% were possibly or probably caused by pet by the Seresto collar. Now, sir, I think originally, you said that there is no scientific evidence, no evidence of a causal link, this is clearly evidence, it was so compelling that the Canadian equivalent of the EPA never allowed for Seresto collars to be sold in Canada, correct? Jeffrey Simmons: Yes, I'm aware of that decision. I would also add that 80 other countries have approved this product, we've had over 80 million collars actually used. I'm not familiar with this data comparison, but what I can say is following the EPA regulatory process around the oversight, that we have pharmacovigilance, close to 200 veterinarians and staff on our team, looking at the data through the way the EPA wants us to we have not seen a linkage from the active ingredients. Rep. Krishnamoorthi: I understand that sir, I understand you haven't seen the linkage, although other authorities have and their scientists who are not paid by you have done so. 2:46:25 Nathan Donley: This is what we commonly see, quite frankly, when the regulated industry is doing their own research. It commonly finds that their products are safer than when government agencies or academic scientists take on a similar analysis. 2:46:55 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): We have FOIA documents from the EPA, and emails internal to the EPA talking about the Seresto collar. Here's just one of them. This is from an employee who basically voiced their opinion about recent coverage of the Seresto controversy, he said, “looks like the sh*t has hit the fan….will be interesting seeing where this goes. I hope there is a FOIA for all communications on this so that our emails are made public. We have been screaming about Seresto for many years.” I presume that you've heard some of these screams and concerns, correct, Ms. McCormack? Karen McCormack: That's correct. A number of EPA employees have contacted me and given me detailed descriptions about what's happening with Seresto and they were very upset that EPA refused to do anything about it. 2:48:25 Karen McCormack: A number of the scientists, and this is not unusual, feel that the decision makers are not considering the science and they're making decisions based on political reasons. I don't know if I have time to talk about this, but I did look at the science that the Canadian government did, the causality analysis. They looked at the consistency and toxicity of effects from exposure of pets to Seresto. And what they found was very disturbing. It was so disturbing that they decided the risks were too high to approve Seresto and they could not be mitigated by putting a label statement on the product or by issuing warning labels, so they refused to approve Seresto. 2:49:25 Rep. Michael Cloud (R-TX): Thank you, Ms. McCormack, for acknowledging that the EPA sometimes makes political decisions, so that's something we'll definitely be coming back to next term. 2:55:05 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Are the active ingredients for Seresto in the United States different from the active ingredients for Seresto collars in other countries? Jeffrey Simmons: No, I do not believe they're any different than the other 80 countries. Rep. Porter: In other countries like in Colombia and Australia, the warning labels for Seresto collars classify the collar as highly toxic and as poison. 2:55:50 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): Does the label in the United States have language? Like highly toxic or poison? Yes or no? Jeffrey Simmons: It does not. Rep. Porter: Okay. So the warning label here in the United States, though does say that mild reactions may occur and mentions hair loss, scratching and redness. The most severe symptoms listed are eczema and lesions. This is the warning label: does it mention the potential for death? Jeffrey Simmons: It does not. Rep. Porter: So a pet owner looking at this label that we're looking at would have absolutely no reason, no way to know that Seresto may have caused roughly 100 pet deaths. That's what both the Canadian Pest Management Agency, the PMRA, and the EPA found. Will you change this label, so that it includes deaths as a possible side effect? Jeffrey Simmons: Congresswoman, we do not believe the scientific data warrants a label change. And again, that is not just the 80 studies were submitted. There's been 20 additional added studies since and all of the oversight data that's been done on the 33 million pets over the 10 years. So again, following an EPA regulated process, we're always open if a data warranted, some need for a change, we would do that. 2:57:30 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): The EPA encouraged both your predecessor, Bayer, and your company, Elanco, to update the warning label. Yet, you just said that you never have. So the federal government did in fact advise you to update the label and you failed to do so. Is that correct? Jeffrey Simmons: I do not believe that is correct. We are in regular engagement with EPA. We have not received any formal…there's no data that warrants that and there's been no formal engagement on that. 2:58:15 Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA): The EPA asked Bayer, the predecessor here, in 2019 to help the agency collect data on adverse incidents for cats and dogs using the Seresto collar. EPA asked Bayer to split the registration for cats and dogs, so the agency could better understand and evaluate the risks for each type of pet. They refused, saying that change might have, “an adverse impact on sales” and they also said, “it would be a substantial increase in work.” Mr. Simmons, are you willing to make that change and split the registration for cats and dogs as the EPA requested? Or do you believe it's too much work? Jeffrey Simmons: I am willing to engage with the EPA on anything that the scientific data and the engagement under the regulatory body of the EPA merits the right thing to do. We believe the 80 studies and all of the pharmacovigilance data that we've submitted to them stands that this is a safe product. 3:00:10 Rep. Andrew Clyde (R-GA): I feel obligated to begin by stating the obvious this afternoon. Today's hearing is a colossal waste of time and resources. 3:13:25 Rep. Henry Johnson (D-GA): And the only reason that the public knew about the harm caused by this pesticide is because the Center for Biological Diversity publicly petitioned the EPA to cancel registration for Seresto flea collars. If they had not bought this to light, do you think we would even know of the dangers presented by these collars? Nathan Donley: No, we wouldn't. You know, the investigation that came out in USA Today in 2021 really brought this to the public attention. And if there wasn't that amount of pressure from the public, this would just still be completely unknown. EPA, for the last 10 years, has not done anything to alert consumers to the harms associated with this product or any other pesticide products where there are a very high number of incidents. 3:15:10 Karen McCormack: I think some of the people at EPA are programmed to go along with whatever industry says. It makes life easier for you, you can go home earlier and you can also get promoted easier if you go along with what industry says. It's unfortunate a problem there. And I've seen it over the years and it's very hard to do something about it. 3:15:40 Karen McCormack: Canada's analysis was very scientific. It was not only based on incident data and sales data, it was based on the toxicity of the two pesticides in Seresto. And they looked at the consistency and what happened eventually with the pets that were exposed to Seresto. 3:19:20 Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL): And so because of the tremendous number of pet incidents, the tremendous number of deaths, even when factoring in sales, I sadly have no choice but to recommend that the EPA commence a notice of intent to cancel proceedings and to fully investigate what's going on with the Seresto collar, and I respectfully request Elanco to voluntarily recall these collars at this time, pending this further investigation. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)