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Latest podcast episodes about gulf coast

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast
Duke Renewables For Sale, TPI Signs Deal with GE, Gulf Offshore Wind, WindESCo Interview

The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 58:14


Joel and Allen dig into Duke Energy dealing their renewables business for $4B, and Intelstor's Philip Totaro provides insight. Meanwhile, blade production ramps in the US with TPI signing a 10-year deal with GE to restart an Iowa plant. Louisiana and Texas are big winners in the future of offshore wind in the Gulf of Mexico. Plus, a special interview with WindESCo's Jonathan Kossuth about their Find, Fix, Measure system to improve turbine performance. Visit Pardalote Consulting at https://www.pardaloteconsulting.com Wind Power Lab - https://windpowerlab.com Weather Guard Lightning Tech - www.weatherguardwind.com WindESCo - https://www.windesco.com Intelstor - https://www.intelstor.com Sign up now for Uptime Tech News, our weekly email update on all things wind technology. This episode is sponsored by Weather Guard Lightning Tech. Learn more about Weather Guard's StrikeTape Wind Turbine LPS retrofit. Follow the show on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Linkedin and visit Weather Guard on the web. And subscribe to Rosemary Barnes' YouTube channel here. Have a question we can answer on the show? Email us!  Uptime 139 Allen Hall: Joel, we have a really interesting show. So much has happened in the last couple of days, so we're trying just to catch up here at Uptime and give you the latest and greatest of Wind Energy News. Duke Energy is. Putting their renewable business up for sale and there's talks of, of it being around $4 billion and they have suitors already, which is amazing. So there's, there's transactions happening in wind and then TPI composites and GE make a 10 year agreement in Iowa. For reopening a plant. Thank goodness. It's about time we see some blade plants opening in the us  Joel Saxum: so we are gonna jump down to the Gulf Coast and talk about Texas and Louisiana. Why we think that they're gonna be offshore wind winners in the us. It's ready to go down there. We just gotta worry about some hurricanes.  Allen Hall: And then I have an interview with ESCO's, Senior Director of Customer Success Analytics, Jonathan Kath. And we go back and forth about all the technology that ESCO is bringing from SCADA data, enhanced SCADA data, and all the little defects they can find in your wind turbine and how to to improve the efficiency. And it's crazy how. Well, their software analytics are they, They can really improve the performance of wind turbine. So we have a really busy show. Stay tuned. More to come. I'm Alan Hall, president of Weather Guard Lightning Tech, and I'm here with my good friend from Wind Power Lab. Joel Saxon Rosemary's on a well-deserved break, and this is the Uptime Wind Energy Podcast. Well, Joel Duke Energy has decided to sell its renewable business, which is a complete shock. I don't know anybody in the business community that was No. Heard anything about it. Yeah, right. Everybody figured Duke was in it for the long term, but they, the estimate for the business is about $4 billion and it sounds like they have. Tentative offers or aggressive bidders for, for that business. And it sounds like Duke is trying to bankroll themselves a little bit with the $4 billion. You could do a lot with $4 billion but they're trying to build up cash for. Taking on other projects. So they're, they're doing a lot of energy transitioning through in the next several years and they, they figured they better have some cash on hand, especially if interest rates are higher. They're at the same time, they're actually cutting, cutting costs. They're cutting about 300 million in costs. So 4 billion in the bank if they could sell the renewables business plus another couple hundred millions in savings, they're trying to, trying to protect themselves, and I think rightly so. But is this the first of, of this type of, of business sale or, or such? A large asset of renewables hits the blocks? I,  Joel Saxum: I don't know if it's the first I. This size, man,

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report
Mobile Bay, Dauphin Island, Gulf Shores and Orange Beach Fishing Reports for November 7-13, 2022

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 83:37


On this episode, Butch talks about early Fall weather Gulf Coast fishing with the best anglers in Lower Alabama waters and fisheries. Our contributing fishing experts this week are Mathew "Bama Beach Bum" Isbell and Capt. Bobby Abruscato. Plus, Joe from the Northwest Florida Fishing Report and they talk with Boatsetter.com to talk about offsetting the cost of boat ownership by listing it on a boat sharing and renting platform. Check Out Boatersetter.com >>> GET A FREE  AFCTO SUN PROTECTION MASK ASFR has partnered with AFTCO, and they are offering all of our listeners a FREE SUN PROTECTION MASK with the purchase of any AFTCO products. All you have to do is text the word “fishing” to 6475589895 to subscribe to our email list, and we'll send you the AFTCO promo code via email. Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, just head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/asfr, and we'll send you the new show each week. Check Out The NEWEST WAY To Get Your Fishing Reports: TEXT "fishing" to 314-665-1767 Keep Whackin'em!

Gulf Coast Radio
Gulf Coast Radio Ep25- Drunken Bastards

Gulf Coast Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 65:21


The gang is in the studio this week to talk about the recent election and being interrupted by drunken bastard Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

True Crime Obsessed
266: Murder on the Gulf Coast

True Crime Obsessed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 51:10


When the body of former policewoman Taylor Wright was discovered on a remote Pensacola farm, detectives had a lineup of suspects to investigate - her ex- husband from whom Taylor stole $100,000, her new girlfriend Casandra, and Taylor's new best friend, Ashley. But which one of them did it? And Why? FAM!! THE FULL VIDEO OF OUR LIVE SHOW FILMED AT OBSESSED FEST  IS NOW LIVE ON PATREON! The Broadway Dancers! The Obsessed Fest crowd! The Energy! The laughs!! You can see it all now by joining here! LOOKING FOR MORE TCO? On our Patreon feed, you'll find over 300 FULL BONUS episodes to BINGE RIGHT NOW! Including our episode-by-episode coverage of "Bad Vegan" "LuLaRich" "John Wayne Gacy: Devil in Disguise" "Night Stalker" "The Jinx," "Making A Murderer," "The Staircase," "I'll Be Gone in the Dark," "A Wilderness of Error" "The Vow"  "Tiger King" "Don't F**K With Cats," "The Menendez Murders," "The Murder of Laci Peterson," "Casey Anthony: American Murder Mystery," "Serial," "Lorena," "The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann," "OJ: Made in America" and so many more! JOIN HERE!  Update Description

The Gulf Coast Growth Show
Kelli Howard, Talent Acquisition Manager, SAM Companies – Gulf Coast Growth Show S7E30

The Gulf Coast Growth Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 24:45


Tune into Kelli Howard, Talent Acquisition Manager, SAM (Survey & Mapping) Companies as she talks about how they are integrating a veteran-based approach to staffing & filling positions with our veterans and youth. She tells us how they've hired Raymond Amador, Jr. as their Military Program Manager to take the veteran initiative to the next level. This is a newly created position within SAM, find out why his role is so valuable to their company, current military folks as well as youth within our region. SAM is in the middle of creating their own Department of Labor Apprenticeship program where they will work with local community colleges to implement the program in an effort to produce more licensed surveyors for the industry. Check out the great things that SAM is doing within their community! Thank you and all other companies that supply great jobs & offerings to those who have defended our great country over the years. Raymond, thank you for your dedication, service, and sacrifice! Reach out to Kelli and Raymond via LinkedIn: Kelli Howard: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelli-howard-252bb53b/ Raymond Amador: https://www.linkedin.com/in/raymond-amador-jr-ab650422/ Stay tuned in - subscribe today, stay in the know! Share This Story, Choose Your Platform: https://allianceportregion.com/subscribe-to-podcast/ Brought to you by Economic Alliance Houston Port Region, Produced in the Shell Deer Park Studio. Feedback or speaker suggestions? Email our Marketing & Communications Director: amanda@allianceportregion.com

Drep and Stone
Automation and Highland Park Gulf Coast

Drep and Stone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 66:16


On this episode we sample and review the Highland Park Gulf Coast Single Cask Edition while discussing the future of automation, why self checkout isn't efficient, whether or not automation is taking away from jobs, gloopy robot arms, more leisure time, Scottish geography, and why Nick always spills whisk(e)y on himself. Support Us On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DrepandStone We'd love to hear from you! https://linktr.ee/DrepandStone Don't forget to subscribe! Music by @joakimkarudmusic Episode #163

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron
Gulf Coast Huddle 110822

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022


Gulf Coast Huddle 110822 made possible by Citizens Medical Center as well as Fat Cow Jerky Junior's Smokehouse Camacho Tractor & Equipment Repair American Shield Roofing Stay tuned for all the great shows on the Lone Star Gridiron Sports Network. Contact the Gulf Coast Huddle Twitter @chrisdoelle, @lsgridiron Facebook ALL I NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED […]

Faith Covenant Church Podcast
Kingdom Conversations - Gulf Coast Community Church Chat

Faith Covenant Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 30:54


Join two Jesus-Loving women from Gulf Coast Community Church who are instrumental in the start up of Salt & Light at their churchy.  Listen to the beautiful testimonies and get lost in lots of laughter as we had a lively conversation around the Word of God.  You will walk away encouraged and inspired. 

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
PLAIN GARDENING ON THE GULF COAST NOV 6, 2022 POD

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 87:37


Lawn and gardening expert Bill Finch talks about changing weather and how it affects planting.  Tree planting and planting tips highlight this week's show.

Y'all-itics
Where are the Voters in Texas? Y'all-itics Early Release: November 4, 2022

Y'all-itics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 33:31


We are now just days away from the midterms and many Elections Administrators across Texas are asking the same question: where are the voters? Even taking into account this isn't a Presidential Election driving higher turnout, those running elections just aren't seeing the numbers they expected. In this early release episode of Y'all-itics, we head all over the state to check the temperatures of those behind the vote. And turnout isn't the only thing keeping those folks up at night. Because of the current political climate, we've discovered many firsts: from de-escalation teams to elections workers being told how to politely end a call with an irate voter. Join us as we travel from north Texas to the Mexico border, the Gulf Coast to central Texas for a snapshot of what's happened so far in early voting and whether election day could turn into a long night for all of us.   Guests   Jacquelyn Callanen, Bexar County Elections Administrator Kristin Miles, Bastrop County Elections Administrator Hilda Salinas, Hidalgo County Elections Administrator Bruce Sherbet, Collin County Elections Administrator Clifford Tatum, Harris County Elections Administrator

Sports Radio 105.5 WNSP
Prep Spotlight 11.3.22 - Williamson HC Antonio Coleman

Sports Radio 105.5 WNSP

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 45:04


Get prepped for round one of the playoffs on the Gulf Coast! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wnsp/support

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report
Mobile Bay, Dauphin Island, Orange Beach and Gulf Shores Fishing Reports for October 31 - November 6, 2022

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 71:32


On this episode, Butch and co-host Capt. Richard Rutland talk about early Fall weather Gulf Coast fishing with the best anglers in Lower Alabama waters and fisheries. Our contributing fishing experts this week are "Bearded Brad" Warren, Capt. Patric Garmeson, and Capt. Delynn Sigler. Enjoy the show, get out on the water weekend and be safe. GET A FREE  AFCTO SUN PROTECTION MASK ASFR has partnered with AFTCO, and they are offering all of our listeners a FREE SUN PROTECTION MASK with the purchase of any AFTCO products. All you have to do is text the word “fishing” to 6475589895 to subscribe to our email list, and we'll send you the AFTCO promo code via email. Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, just head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/asfr, and we'll send you the new show each week. Check Out The NEWEST WAY To Get Your Fishing Reports: TEXT "fishing" to 314-665-1767 Keep Whackin'em!

Eastern Current Fishing
Fall Speckled Trout Fishing Overview

Eastern Current Fishing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 50:11


In this episode of The Easter Current Saltwater Inshore Fishing Podcast Capt. Jud talks with Capt. Jeff and Capt Ozzy all about fall inshore  fishing for Speckled Trout also known as Spotted Sea Trout.  The fall Speckled Trout bite along the South East and Gulf Coast is hot and getting hotter so don't miss out! Do you love Eastern Current and want to help support us as well as gain access to tons of extra content that has never been released to the public? Donate through our PATREON Account! https://www.patreon.com/user?u=31609753&fan_landing=true Be Sure to checkout Eastern Current on Youtube, Facebook and Instagram as well as anywhere that you can listen to podcasts. Check out Eastern Current's website! https://etcurrent.com/ Book a Fishing Trip -Jud Brock - https://www.easternangling.com/ Book a Hunt  -Jud Brock- https://www.easternwaterfowl.com/   inshore fishing , saltwater fishing , sight fishing , speckled trout , North Carolina fishing   

Gulf Coast Radio
Gulf Coast Radio Ep24- The Whitest Movies

Gulf Coast Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 63:30


The gang is back in the studio this week to talk about their Halloween, also about the recent decline in movies and how its a lie. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
155: Sustainable Vineyard Management Across Different Climates

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 39:01


As a vineyard advisor across the United States, Fritz Westover, Viticulturist at Westover Vineyard Advising and host of the Virtual Viticulture Academy, has the opportunity to see a lot of different vineyards, varieties, diseases and climates. Much of his work in recent years is in Texas. This large state about the size of France has a number of challenges including rain that is not seasonal, Pierces Disease, late spring and fall freezes, hail, and poor water quality. Fritz and Craig, both former staffers with Vineyard Team, discuss a variety of practices that impact the long-term sustainability of a vineyard including leaching salts, why irrigation systems are important in wet climates, and the number one way to manage disease. References: 110: How to Develop a New Vineyard Site 121: Regenerative Agriculture (Rebroadcast) 137: The Pierce's Disease and Glassy-winged Sharpshooter Board Instagram @westoverviticulture SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 | Use code PODCAST for $50 off Twitter @WestoverVit Vineyard Underground Podcast Virtual Viticulture Academy Westover Vineyard Advising Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org.   Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  Our guest today is Fritz Westover viticulturist with Westover Vineyard Advising and the virtual viticulture Academy. Is that right?   Fritz Westover  0:10  That's correct, Craig.   Craig Macmillan  0:11  He's got some other things in the in the works that we'll maybe talk about a little bit later. Fritz and I have known eachother for a long time. And actually, we had the same job   Fritz Westover  0:19  That we did that we did that we did.   Craig Macmillan  0:21  He is based in Texas, lives in Houston. But he works in all parts of the country. You're you're all over the place. What different states do you work in in these days?   Fritz Westover  0:30  Yeah, Craig, thanks, again, for having me on the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast, love to be here. Actually, it's my second time. So this is really an honor to get to get invited back. I didn't screw it up too bad the first time. So I appreciate that. You know, to answer your question, I work primarily in Texas, that's where I'm currently office in Houston. Got a great airport. So I do go to other parts of the country. The second largest area working would be Georgia, primarily in the north mountains of the state of Georgia, I also do some consulting a little bit in some of the states in between Louisiana, Alabama, and some virtual advising that I've started doing, where I'm actually, you know, on site to see the site to understand it, but I'm not there on a frequent visitation basis, like I am, in, let's say, Texas, or Georgia. So those are the primary areas I'm working. And they have a lot of things that overlap. And they have a lot of differences. So the cool part is I get to see a lot of different scenarios, varieties, climate and challenges.   Craig Macmillan  1:26  So let's, let's start with Texas, obviously, we're very interested in sustainability, and sustainable approaches to problems, roadblocks, obstacles, issues, and every region that I'm familiar with anywhere, they have different sustainability issues and hurdles, you know, you say like, oh, here, we're doing this in a sustainable way to do it. And these other people, people are like ah that't not going to work for us. So they're trying to find a different way. So in the case of Texas, which I understand is now not just the hill country, it's quite a broad spectrum of climates and soils and whatnot. What are some of the challenges that Texas growers and these different regions are facing?   Fritz Westover  2:03  Yeah, great question. And, you know, if you look at Texas, it's a state roughly the size of France. So there's a lot of different growing regions in Texas, anywhere from the Gulf Coast region to which is you know, the eastern part of North Texas. Closer to Oklahoma, there's grapes grown that far north and Texas to hill country, which is outside of Austin, Fredericksburg, San Antonio, that's probably where the majority of wineries are, and also a large concentration of vineyards. And then the majority by far of grapes grown in Texas are grown on the High Plains region, which is West Texas, or northwest on the High Plains. That's about 3000 to 4000 feet above sea level. So we have a lot large range and climate and topography and rainfall. I mean, we can get 40 inches in East Texas a year and 10 inches in West Texas a year. And we haven't had that much unless Texas this year, there's been a drought that's affected growers,   Craig Macmillan  2:58  How much of that rain is during the growing season?   Fritz Westover  3:00  Okay, so in Texas, the rain can come at any time. It's not necessarily seasonal. So we don't have the luxury of saying, hey, you know, harvest is done, we should be getting some rain. Now let's plant a cover crop, and let the soil profile fill for the winter. In fact, sometimes we have to irrigate in the wintertime to keep our profile moist. In other times, it's raining, right at harvest or right before harvest or right at bloom when you don't want rain necessarily in a vineyard setting. But in terms of sustainability, if you start on the east part of Texas, and that's our example we're using now we have severe Pierce's Disease there. So there are only certain hybrids of wine grape that are resistant or tolerant Pierce's disease that you can grow there. So if you're growing those varieties, it's almost like here's this disease is not an issue, right. So you've kind of found a way around that. But then you get into the hill country more in Central Texas and we're growing vinifera there anything from Bordeaux varieties to Spanish or Portuguese varieties, Italian varieties are growing there as well. And so Pierce's Disease is a big issue with those varieties. And so is the erratic weather patterns, like seasonal rain, hail, things like that. I think the best example, though, would be to just jump right up to the high plains, because I can look back at my consulting in the last four years. And one year, we had a terrible, devastating late spring freeze. And that happens frequently, maybe two or three out of every five years, we have sites getting hit by late spring freeze, and it takes out a majority of the crop. So now you see these orchard right or other types of fans going up. And those are there for when we have, you know, a radiational freeze, we can we can hopefully skirt through that. So you put these expensive fans up, you solve the problem. And then the next year, you think you've got that you get through the freeze, there's no freeze at all late spring, right? And then all of a sudden, you're just at the point where you finish shoot thinning all of your vines and everything's perfect and set for the year. And then it hails and then you get a hailstorm takes up all of all of your crop for the year and set you back another year. So then what are we doing? We're putting up helmets and a lot of vineyards in West Texas now. So you put up the hill net And that solves with a physical barrier, the hill issue. So now you got the fans for the late spring freeze. You've got the netting for the hail, which also can protect from birds and other things. We're using that year round. So the next year comes up, we don't get away spring freeze, we don't get a hail. What we had instead was this freeze in the fall and early fall freeze, where it got down in October, late October, just after harvest got down into the 20s, which doesn't seem like it should do a lot of damage. But I mean, it will if vines are not cold hardy and ready for it. It's devastating. I wrote a little bit about that and wine business monthly for an article a few months ago and summarized it. But the summary here is that it wholesale killed vines, took vines down to the graft knocked out cordons, and there's a lot of retraining that needs to be done. So now the question is, okay, what's the variety of grape we can plant that's late bud burst right to get past the spring freeze late spring freeze that harvest early. So we had time to harden off for the winter and not get hit by that early fall freeze. And, you know, is bulletproof and doesn't get hit by hail? Right. That'd be nice. But that's,   Craig Macmillan  6:03  I was gonna say it's hail resistant. I can't wait to see the plant breeding on that one.   Fritz Westover  6:07  Yeah,right. Oh, by the way, consumers have to love the wine made from it, and it has to be a good yielder. Okay, is that too much to ask Craig?   Craig Macmillan  6:14  No,? the plant breeding community can take care of that I'm I'm concerned.   Fritz Westover  6:19  I hope you're right. We could use it. I'd like to get invited to their to their planning meeting, I can give them some input. Those are some examples. But you know, Pierce's Disease, water is a big thing. Just like in California, we you know, we have limited water supplies in certain areas of the state, I'm sure you'll you'll want to touch on that. And, you know, its water quality, too, is an issue in some areas. But the really the erratic changes in climate that we see from year to year, it's, there's, you know, there's always a surprise, if you don't like the weather, just wait an hour, and it'll change.   Craig Macmillan  6:51  I'm glad you brought that up. Because I am a big believer in if you plant the right plant in the right place. That's how you address a lot of sustainability issues. So for instance, California, what we've done is we planted lots and lots of Chardonnay in areas that are like perfect, prone for powdery mildew, you know, it's 75 or 80, every single day year round. There's coastal fog is just designed to have disease and you look at it and you're like, Oh man, what maybe we shouldn't be doing that we could cut our chemical load down and we weren't planting this plant in this environment. But the problem is it makes great wine wine quality, that's where you want to be, you know, and so there's some tension there. I am very interested in this variety selection piece. So for instance, I understand that I don't know in detail in Texas, I don't really do grow vinifera you mentioned but they also grow alleles hybrid. So things like Marechal Foch I think it's pronounced, Frontenac or sac showing my my lack of knowledge. Are those working out viticulturally and then are they also working out from a wine quality standpoint of wineries buying these making products that people are buying because that would be like this, your solution is finding varieties that are going to tolerate. Can you turn that around then into a product. How's that going?   Fritz Westover  8:07  to be exact in Texas, there's there are not a lot of hybrid vineyards, it's mostly vinifera. However, if you go to the Gulf Coast region, that is where we do, we do grow primarily Pierce's Disease tolerant hybrid. So that would be blanc Du Bois or Lenoir. And then there's some of the Andy Walker, Dr. Andy Walker, UC Davis, PD tolerant that 98% 97% vinifera varieties that are just now being planted. I mean, we're just at the pioneering stages for those in both Texas and in Georgia, where we have high PD or Pierce's disease pressure, the blanc Du Bois, the Lenoir, the things that have been growing for 25 years now or more have established a market and it took that time to do it. Right. So really, the question is, as these new varieties and the new breeding programs come out with grapes that have tolerance to Pierce's disease, or tolerance to cold, or tolerance to whatever it might be rootstocks that tolerate nematodes and salt, you know, that's, that's a rootstock issue. But when it comes to the variety of the thing that we're putting in the glass that we make the wine from these newer ones, are not quite as proven. So we're gonna have to have this learning curve of where they're best suited, because here's the thing. You take this variety of grape, that's mostly vinifera, and it happens to be have the single gene resistance for Pierce's disease. So you say okay, great, that's gonna work for now, let's put it in the vineyard in the gulf coast of Texas or West Georgia, or South Carolina or whatever, Alabama, you name it, wherever there's Pierce's disease in the southeast, and that's all good, and well, it probably won't die from Pierce's disease, but it's still going to get powdery mildew, which other hybrids are very resistant to, it's still going to get downy mildew, which we have various levels of resistance to it's still going to get black rot, it's going to get phmompsis and then it's all that all the trunk diseases. So I mean, you you think about hard places to grow grapes. It's like when I moved to California back in 2013 to work with the Vineyard Team I thought, man, how am I gonna help these grammars in California, you know, they've been doing this for so long, but they have problems just like anywhere else. In fact, I would argue I almost cringe at the say it, they have less problems. You know, the first as far as diversity of pathogens, at least, let's just say it's safe to say that than we do here east of the Rockies just because of those diseases that I've mentioned. Here, you solve one problem, and then you have five other problems that pop up that you didn't anticipate, and you then need to solve. So there's there's going to be, oh, five to 10 years before we know which of the UC Davis Any Walker selections are going to thrive in all these new environments that growers have not been growing grapes for very long and because of Pierce's disease, and now all of a sudden, you say, sure, you can grow grapes now, but there's a but but no one's done it yet. No one's done it yet. And you're gonna be a pioneer.   Craig Macmillan  10:50  You're a visionary, or you're a crazy person, you know, depends on which way it goes.   Fritz Westover  10:54  Those crazy people, they help the next person learn what didn't work and what not to do.   Craig Macmillan  10:59  Just what we're talking about Pierce's Disease, Pierce's Disease has turned out everywhere to be a very difficult thing to manage in a sustainable fashion. First of all, why don't you tell us what Pierce's Disease is?   Fritz Westover  11:10  I'm so glad you asked Craig, I was gonna say we should probably talk about what Pierce's Disease is.   Craig Macmillan  11:14  I think our listeners are probably pretty sophisticated.   Fritz Westover  11:17  I think so too. I think so too. But here's for that new vineyard manager fresh out of a place that doesn't have Pierce's Disease. It is a bacterial pathogen, and it's Xylella fastidiosa is the name of the pathogen, and it's transmitted vectored I should say, and transmitted into the vineyard from native grape vines. But the vector itself is the most famous is the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter. These were introduced to California many years ago and became the target of a large campaign to eradicate Glassy Winged Sharpshooter. But there's other xylem feeding insects that can also transmit this disease. So basically, an insect feeds on a wild grape that has tolerance to this bacteria and the bacteria are then moved into the vineyard. When the insect then flies into the vineyard and Glassy Winged Sharpshooters can fly a mile or more, they fly into the vineyard and they feed on the the xylem of that the nifer a vine that's susceptible and they transmit this bacteria into the xylem. It's a xylem limited bacteria that kind of clogs the veins like gives the vine a little bit of a plumbing issue. And there's toxins produced by it that cause symptoms like leaf scorch. leaf blades fall off leaving matchstick petals or petals attached to the vine, there's uneven maturation of the paradigm. And then there could be fruit shrivel. So I usually look for two or three of those symptoms before we rogue vines and pull them out of the vineyard, there's no cure for the disease, you have to pull the vines out so it doesn't spread, either replant or deal with the missing teeth, so to speak out in the vineyard. So it's a very big problem in the southeastern United States, you need cold weather to kill both the bacteria populations. Also, I guess, really just the insect vectors, they're also affected by these cold temperatures. So we found that, you know, you get south of pretty much North Carolina, Georgia, these areas are kind of in that transition where a good cold winter or two in a row will knock it back. But a warm winter to it starts coming back out in the vineyards. And so we see it even in the north Georgia mountains almost as far as Tennessee, it's it's really something that's that's moved around and found its niche. It's kind of working in the background, they're waiting for the right conditions.   Craig Macmillan  13:26  So what kinds of things are growers doing in these high pressure areas? And there's super high pressure areas in California as well, because of riparian areas where the insects hanging out, what are people doing? What are people trying, I can think of a couple of things that you could try. But I'd like to know what people are actually doing.   Fritz Westover  13:39  The most obvious we already talked about as growing tolerant varieties that Pierce's disease might infect, but it doesn't move around in his island and cause vine death, like it would to vinifera. So growers are used if they're growing vinifiera, or susceptible grape varieties, there's the possibility to use insecticides to control the vector. So you're a medical imidicloprid based products that are designed for either a spray, or most notably through injection through irrigation. And that's going to give a little bit more longer residual activity to deter the feeding. So the really, the plan is to know when those vectors are coming in. And there could be about 30 to 40 vectors in the southeastern United States. It's not like California that's got one or two major vectors, we've got, you know, 30 at any given time, so the pressure is really high in comparison. And so those insecticides would need to be time for peaking when the populations come in. And then you got to make sure you're careful about pre harvest intervals and things like that. So there's knockback sprays. There's the soil application that's done. These are not restricted use products, but they're certainly conventional products. They're not organic. Some of my growers who are trying to spray less conventional will use products like surround which is a kaolin clay and there's been some reported efficacy on on his island feeding insects. It disturbs them and they don't like to crawl around in the clay also I have some revers using that in hot hot climates also just to keep some shade or sunscreen on the grapes in the fruit late in the season too. But you know, correct when it rains during the growing season, you could put kaolin clay up one day, and it rains off after an inch of rain three days later. So we have those challenges too. And then of course, you know, there's there's trap crops you could consider. But I haven't seen anyone really successful using that just elimination of host grape vines near the vineyard, just trying to make the habitat less thriving for both the vectors and for the bacteria that live inside the wild grape vines. So we put a lot of focus on looking at the surrounding environment in addition to what we're doing in the vineyards.   And so people can actually go into those areas and rogue out host plants are ones that are popular host plants.   If you own the property and there's some muscadine grapes wild muscadine or rotundifolia growing in the woods, and it's right next to the vineyard on a fence line growing along the fence line. That's probably not a good idea. So yeah, you would want to go in and rogue those vines that are around the perimeter at the very least.   Craig Macmillan  16:02  What about setback well Glassy Winged Sharpshooter, this clearly isn't going to work? And I don't know if that's the primary, you said you had like 3040 factors. But when ideally it was been kicked around was not planting close to habitat. So leaving large barriers, now you're losing land as a result of that. Sure, or people tried that. And we didn't get exposed to that?   Fritz Westover  16:21  Yeah, sure. When you're when you're choosing a site for a vineyard, Craig, you're always looking to distance yourself from any problems, whether it be a floodplain, or possible vectors of disease, or host plants. So sure, but the idea is that eventually, an insect that can fly a mile is going to find the vineyard, you just need to know the symptoms, know what to look for, and be proactive at removing it. And testing for it. If you need to test I've gotten to the point where I can look at it visually, and I don't need to do testing anymore, which might McGregor's love, because it saves the money. But occasionally, we test to just validate that because every new girl I work with, we always do a test to show Yes, this is absolutely positive, we see the symptoms, and we've tested it. And now we're comfortable with calling that by because there are other things that can look like Pierce's Disease. And you know, we always talk about these as educators, you don't just talk about the problem you talk about, what are the things that it could possibly be, you know, when someone sees a leaf scorch, you know, well, it could be drought, it could be wind, it could be heat stress, you know, you could lose the leaf and have a matchstick pedal. If you have deer going to your vineyard eating leaves, they leave matchstick petiole symptoms, right. But that's only one of the four key symptoms. So yeah, we're going to be looking for the symptoms, and we're going to be roguing. And we're also going to be distancing, and we're also going to be trying to rogue the problem from the surrounding environment.   Craig Macmillan  17:38  So you got a lot of options, rather than just trying to spray yourself out of it. Yes, we've got a lot of tools, and they're not all chemical. There's cultural practices. Vigilance is always again, probably one of the key pieces to any pest management issue in any sustainability issue. I want to shift gears and talk about water. You know, my career has been strictly in California, where it doesn't rain. It does, like it doesn't rain   Fritz Westover  18:03  It Just doesn't rain as much as you want it to exactly when you want it to right.   Craig Macmillan  18:08  It's actually raining outside right now, we're almost done with harvest, but not quite. I heard early. And usually we get rain. This is like a record rain right now. Not a lot, but enough, but a lot of these other places in the United States, they get some rain, I was talking to somebody the other day about using undermined vegetation as a way of managing the increases in the water from the rains and trying to, you know, kind of have a plant help you out. And to get this dried out a little bit. You mentioned that like in Texas, for instance, if I understood correctly, you know, rain can come in any time. How do you manage that when in terms of like disease pressure or find bigger things like that? What What can you do? Is there anything that you can do that any management strategies for that kind of thing?   Fritz Westover  18:47  Sure that you know, Craig, there's lots of management strategies and they all start at dormant pruning, just like you know, you know, any good vineyard management starts with pruning, to get the right spacing of your shoots and positioning. And then it goes into your thinning and other practices that we all know and love and viticulture, and if you keep on top of that, and can create a microclimate and when we say microclimate, we mean the real scientific microclimate that area right around the grape cluster, right? Not the site, not the misoclimate, like commonly is called the microclimate. But, but that area, right?   Craig Macmillan  19:21  I've given up on that. By the way. It's same thing I was trained and it's like it's not microclimate. It's a misclimate. It's a music climate. And now I'm just like, whatever.   Fritz Westover  19:28  Yeah, after a while you get kind of worn down. It's like trying to describe the difference between grape varietals and grape variety. Because, you know, yes. Oh, yeah, that drives you crazy as a plant person. So it's been I feel like I'm taking crazy pills. It's a variety of grape varietals. That's the wine. So we digress. We digress. We digress. I have to remind me the question now, Craig, you'll have to remind me.   Craig Macmillan  19:50  You get rain at different times of the year. Yeah, some of it during the growing season. This creates its own kind of management problems. What kinds of things can you do and I know it's going to depend on the storm and what's out there and when it happens, but I have no experience with this. I'm very interested in you just pray. I mean...   Fritz Westover  20:08  Well, let me give you an example. Yeah, the northern Georgia grape growers this year had over 50 inches of rain from bud burst. And they're in their inversion, the pasteurization, they're at 18 to 20 bricks, maybe two weeks away from harvest, they've had over 50 inches of rain during the season at random times, sometimes raining for five to seven days in a row, sometimes raining for 10 days in a row. And I was just there visiting all the vineyards looking at dissecting and reverse engineering all of their spray programs there canopy management, there are some venues I walked into that were completely clean. I mean, no fungal disease, no downy mildew, no powdery mildew, maybe a little bird pecking here and there. And then there were some that were absolutely devastated. And so you know, why? Why was that the case? Well, I talked about, you know, good canopy management pruning, it starts at the beginning of the season, you know, when you're working in an environment that absolutely has a high fungal disease pressure, which is the number one thing all other overlying factors aside that we talked about, like Pierce's Disease, or freeze or climate, if you have the right variety match to the right side, but you've just got to control these fungal diseases that grow in the leaves and fruit. It's all about the timing on the applications. And this is true, whether you're a conventional or an organic grower, or whatever you may practice, yeah, it doesn't matter. I mean, you have probably less modes of action as an organic grower because your products are not moving systemically into the plant or into the vine itself. So your reliance on maybe even more spraying, because context sprays like a lot of organic products, or they can get washed off. So what we really hone in on is the critical period for your disease, which is two weeks before Bloom to about six weeks after fruit set. And what we find is if you can control disease on the fruit and the majority of the foliage, and when I say the majority, I mean those bottom leaves all the way up to the top of your VSP wires, if you're doing vertical, shoot those first 10 leaves on the shoot, if you can get those through to verasion, and you can get the fruit through verasion and keep it clean, it'll typically stay clean, and the leaves will have this oncogenic or resistance to disease at that point, they get more leathery, right, they get more harder to infect by a lot of these fungal diseases. So if you can get to that point, you can kind of pull back a little bit and get to the end of the season. Well, timed sprays just before bloom, right after fruit set, keeping in mind matching the product to the disease, right? If we're trying to control detritus, we want to hit that before bloom, and right after fruit set, and then probably again, right before a bunch closure. And if we have challenging conditions from verasion to harvest, we might need another spray from verasion to harvest. And again, conventional or organic, whatever that product is, the timing is still the same. I think what the growers who are most successful have been able to do is really not drop the ball during that critical period, that eight week period, they learn the modes of action of all of their products. Is this systemic? Is it contact, how much rain will wash this off before I have to go out and apply it again, the number one question I get from new growers is, why would I spray right before the rain isn't the rain is going to wash the product off. And the whole point of having that product on before the rain, we always explain it so that it protects the plant tissue or the grapes throughout that wet period. So that an infection doesn't get established. Because once you have an infection in the vineyard established, it is so much harder to go in and eradicate you've got to use different strategies for that. And it cost more. And that disease can linger all the way through harvest, causing loss and leaf area that's going to cause delays and ripening possible quality issues and fruit, you name it. So that's really where I think the successful grower, the one who you know does all the things you're supposed to do in a sustainability program, for example, to keep good records, track the weather data, record how much rain you get, and when and then just be proactive about about the spray program not reacting always. And coming in after after you see an issue or after it's been raining already.   Craig Macmillan  24:04  Now, if I am in an area where I'm getting rain during the growing season, do I still need to irrigate?   Fritz Westover  24:11  Okay, so good question. And, you know, I always recommend vineyards in areas that don't reliably get their 20 to 30 inches of rain in a calendar year, which is, you know, common in the East Coast, for example, that they put in irrigation and I get some kickback from some growers thinking gosh, it rains here, I just want to turn off the irrigation and take the water and we were planting cover crops to remove water from the system. But the irrigation system is not just there for when you're establishing the vines. That's the number one thing if you have a drought year, the year you plant, you could be in trouble. It's a lot of work to water those vines. Number two, you're going to be able to put fertilizer out through drip irrigation system. So whether it be organic or conventional, again, doesn't matter. There's lots of products that are designed to go out and your drip irrigation and that's one of the most efficient ways to deliver a small amount of a product or fertilizer to a vine in a very precise and measured way, which will save costs in the long run and create less runoff and pollution, if you're targeting the grapes, so, so in terms of sustainability, that's really a big tool in my book, and I wish more growers would consider putting in irrigation early in the process. And especially if you're in a Pierce's Disease, high risk area, and you're growing vinifera, then that is one of the major ways to deliver some of our best control measures for Pierce's Disease.   Craig Macmillan  25:30  I'm going to put an irrigation obviously, I'm going to be drawing on some groundwater, groundwater quality varies infinitely from place to place. What are some of the experiences that you've had that caused viticultural issues down the line with different kinds of water quality problem? And were there things to do to improve those because again, well, I had a vineyard once where we were, we had a magnesium problem, we were watering off of a municipal watering system, which was great drinking water. Wonderful. Well, one day I get the report, and the magnesium level in the water was through the roof, not a threat to people, but I was just making a brick, right to the watering more and watering more and watering more, and it was just getting worse. What kinds of things have you seen? And what could you kind of do about it?   Fritz Westover  26:13  Yeah, it's a really good question. As you know, I'm familiar with the a lot of the problems on the central coast there where were you and I both worked, you know, in terms of getting into some Paleolithic waters, that earthquakes now have changed your your water quality and your site that was very good before that occurrence happened. So you have boron, you have high salts, sodium and other salts as well in Texas. And I'll come here because this is the area I live in work in the most, we see issues that are pretty similar. We see boron being high. In some areas, certain aquifers and water sources are high and boron, we see high SAR sodium absorption ratio, that you know, if your SAR levels above six or seven, and you're relying on irrigation water, you're gonna see issues in the leaves, saltburn and decline of the vines, and we can hit 20 or 30 on a SAR in some areas of North Texas. And I've seen in drought years, this was a drought year for Texas. This is a real I mean, it rained in October, November of 2021. And then didn't rain in parts of Texas until about a month ago. And so right now, as we're recording this, we're in September. So until really about variation, no rain. So if you didn't have good quality water, and you're relying 100% on your irrigation and didn't have any rain in the wintertime to flush out salts or leach boron or other things that are a problem that build up in the soil, especially from frequent shallow irrigations. It was a problem. So boron symptoms were showing on leaf margins. So some growers were trying to capture rainwater to alleviate their irrigation issues. But if it didn't rain, that approach did not work. So they're trying to do longer irrigation set so that they don't build up salts in the shallow part of the soil. So that's one strategy, using the wheats leaching fraction, for example, that to push water below, or occasionally do very long sets. And I know, you know, sounds counterintuitive. We have bad water, less water more with it. And with water more, right, yeah, but the thing is, you need to push the salts down below the root zone, if you can, and watering on long sets can do that. So that was the strategy through you know, there's really no solution that I'm aware of for high boron levels, I wish there was one that was reliable, and that that someone could present to me for the salts, we use the irrigation strategy that I just mentioned, to try to push it down below the root zone as much as possible. But there's really beyond that not a whole lot you can there's course there's some soil amendments, I shouldn't say there's nothing some growers tried to displace sodium with gypsum or calcium additions, or by adding organic matter to the soil to try and bind it up or you know, and still have other cations available on the cat on exchange. Some growers are injecting acid using acid injection to try to help with nutrient uptake that sodium sometimes is blocking. There's other things that go well beyond even my understanding of all the chemistry behind it. But I think it's fair to say that the growers who have the worst problems and have that proactive kind of frame of mind have been have been doing some of these things to try and combat it. But really what they're doing Craig is they're saying why isn't it raining? Like it usually does. That solves the problem for me. And it just hasn't happened in the past year here. And it's not to say we won't get back on the normal pattern. We'll just have to see.   Craig Macmillan  29:18  We're running out of time. Unfortunately, we could go on forever. Lok forward to seeing you here in the future. We have the Sustainable Ag Expo. It's put on by Vin, your team coming up in November and you are going to be here for that I believe you're presenting Yes. Yeah. hoping we can connect. I don't see why we can't in just a couple of sentences again, thinking like you're on stage. What one piece of advice would you give to a grape grower in the realm of how to improve the sustainability or how to farm a sustainability as sustainable as possible? And what's your one piece of advice?   Fritz Westover  29:51  But wait, we're not on the stage here. This is a podcast Craig This is one of the largest stages you can get without actually being looking someone in the eye right? This isn't acing who invented this stuff. It's true. So so when I am at Sustainable Ag Expo, my talk is going to be about the long term view on sustainability, it's going to be about things that you can do from the beginning onward, moving the needle a little bit on on some of the fine points that we tend to overlook on a daily basis, because we're focusing on more big picture stuff. So my focus for anyone who wants to start off, and they know that they want to be doing things the right way, 10 years down the road, and they want things to be a little easier for them, it goes back to what you and I've been talking about earlier, the beginning of our conversation, choosing the right varieties, making sure your site selection is all going to work out if you don't have the expertise to do that, you should really find someone who specializes in that, you know, I've drawn upon soil scientists that come out and look at sites and map sites, on projects that I'm working on, you know, we need to bring the team together that can make the right decisions from day one, and choosing your varieties and your rootstocks and making sure your vineyard design is done in a way where you reduce erosion and foresee some of the issues that are going to come up the other thing that that I'll touch on quite a bit at the Sustainable Ag Expo is the the smaller detail things after the vines go in the ground, how we train our first and second year vines, where we make the cuts on those vines for die back and proper healing and preventing infection by by diseases that want to get into our trunks early on and establish and then all the way through to the young vine care. What are some of the things that I see growers making mistakes on that we could be overcoming. And it's really I don't want to say to viticulture 101 because it downplays the importance of it a little bit, when you make it sound. So basic the challenge is, sometimes we know what we need to be doing. But we have trouble conveying that to the workforce that we're using to the contract labor that we're using to our own team. And so I'm going to talk a little bit about a combination of those things about what's important, what shouldn't be overlooked, and how we can make sure we don't overlook it and put a team in place to get it done. Because the establishment will just umbrella that term with the vineyard establishment that first three to five years of getting your cordons developed. Or if you're in a cane pruning system, establishing your renewal zone and, and everything else. I'm super excited about it. I'd be lying to you to say that my talk is ready as of today. But I've got it outlined in my in my mind, and I've got the ideas already in my head that I clearly would love to share.   Craig Macmillan  32:22  And hopefully that will spread. Where can people find out more about you what you do?   Fritz Westover  32:27  Well, I'm available on social media through Westover Viticulture, on Facebook and on Instagram. And as you know, I also do an online vineyard advising and education community that I snuck you into, to kind of see behind the scenes on that and that is known as virtual viticulture Academy. That's really where I share all of my information with growers who are not necessarily my clients that I consult for on a one on one basis. You know, you have all this information, you want to share it with other growers. I know that's my passion is helping growers. And I've been doing that for my whole career. So through Virtual Viticulture Academy, I have a way to get together with that community. For this, those who join and answer their questions in the vineyard and share some of the trials and tribulations the what works and what doesn't work, and give some direct feedback to a community of growers. And what's awesome about that Craig is we didn't just do Virtual Viticulture Academy because of the pandemic. We're in our fifth year, you know, a lot of people went virtual and went online and found new innovative and creative ways to reach their audience, whether it's a grape grower or winemaker in this industry. We've been doing that for five years. And when the pandemic came on, and we weren't visiting sites as much or doing things in person, we just kept on going and kept on teaching and trying to try to make an impact. And just like the Vineyard Tam has been doing with all their great online programs. So so that's one of the things that I've been working on there. And then I'd really letting the cat out of the bag here a little bit. But I think by the time this podcast is released, I'll also be releasing a podcast known as Vineyard Underground podcast. And that's going to be just where I hang out like this and share information through the ear buds about grape growing very similar to what you're you're doing there. Our goal is to have some quick wins that growers can take back to the vineyard. Some practical advice for the everyday grower. Well, we'll get into the science of grape growing but we really want to focus on the how to interviewing growers and getting down into the dirt a little bit into the underground, where things get a little bit hidden and overlooked.   Craig Macmillan  34:26  That's awesome. Our guest today has been Fritz Westover viticulturist with Westover Vineyard Advising, of course, the Virtual Viticulture Academy, and the upcoming Vineyard Underground podcast. Thanks so much for taking the time. This has been really fun. There's going to be links to all the things that he's mentioned in our notes regarding this, this little show here and we hope that you check them out tons of great stuff. One thing that Fritz does really well is communicate to the world. He's got he's got the Twitter, he's got the Instagram, he's got the Facebook, he's got the website really easy to find really great information super useful. We really appreciate everything that you're doing. I think one of the things I just want to say personally is that you know, to the public Fritz has been a an asset to the viticulture community throughout the United States in a way that I can't think of very many other people have been just speaking personally, I really appreciate that because you people who are really passionate about it and are really knowledgeable about it, and here's the piece that are willing to go out, who are willing to get on a plane or willing to get in a truck and really go out and meet one on one with people and then stay connected, whether it's virtual or otherwise, I think is really fantastic. And so you should be applauded for that.   Fritz Westover  35:38  Thank you, Craig, so much for having me and thanks to the vineyard team as well.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The Gulf Coast Growth Show
Robert Armstrong, Project Director at Kuraray America, Inc. – Gulf Coast Growth Show S7E29

The Gulf Coast Growth Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 14:56


Tune into Robert Armstrong, Project Director at Kuraray America, Inc. and podcast guest-host, Patti Bell, Workforce Development Manager, Dream It. Do It. Southeast Texas, Economic Alliance Houston Port Region as they talk about how Robert got to where is he today. Robert tells us about the great things Kuraray makes and how their products protect the environment. Did you know that Kuraray partnered with Nike when they wanted to get out of using greenhouse gases for their air soles? Pretty cool! Patti talks with Robert about career opportunities students may have at Kuraray, options available, and intern programs they have for college students. Patti tells us about PetrochemWorks and what a great resource it is for students. Robert also gives advice to students stepping into the workforce and what it takes for them to grow and develop. Thank you, Patti and Robert for your continued service within our community, helping to make quality of life better for our young people! Stay tuned in subscribe today, stay in the know! Share This Story, Choose Your Platform! https://allianceportregion.com/subscribe-to-podcast/ Brought to you by Economic Alliance Houston Port Region, Produced in the Shell Deer Park Studio. Feedback or speaker suggestions? Email our Marketing Director at amanda@allianceportregion.com Share This Story, Choose Your Platform!

Ron Fuller's Studcast
#273 Tn. Tanaka Gone, Al. 2 Losers Leave! 110222

Ron Fuller's Studcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 68:03


Major changes, Tanaka disappears Knoxville, Assassin #2 & Ron Fuller gone Gulf Coast!

Earth Wise
A Bad Year For California Rice | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 2:00


Rice production is the third largest cereal crop in the United States after corn and wheat.  Four regions in the country produce almost the entire U.S. rice crop:  the Arkansas Grand Prairie, the Mississippi Delta, the Gulf Coast, and the Sacramento Valley in California.  Arkansas is the largest producer of rice in the country by […]

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron
Gulf Coast Huddle 110122

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022


Gulf Coast Huddle 110122 made possible by Citizens Medical Center as well as Fat Cow Jerky Junior's Smokehouse Camacho Tractor & Equipment Repair American Shield Roofing Stay tuned for all the great shows on the Lone Star Gridiron Sports Network. Contact the Gulf Coast Huddle Twitter @chrisdoelle, @lsgridiron Facebook ALL I NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED […]

The Infrastructure Show - Podcasts
Keeping the Port of Virginia Flowing

The Infrastructure Show - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 20:55


Marine ports are gateways to world trade, and their efficient functioning is a pillar of our economy. East and Gulf Coast ports have grown more important in recent years because of the expanded Panama Canal locks opened in 2016 and continuing congestion in West Coast ports and overland transportation. The Port of Virginia has been making important infrastructure investments to secure its position in this competition for world trade. To learn how it became the second busiest container port on the East Coast, in this podcast we talk with Stephen Edwards, CEO and Executive Director of the Virginia Port Authority (VPA).

The Green Divas
Eco-Art: How it can Inspire Change

The Green Divas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 18:13


A great discussion about how art can inspire change, especially as it relates to the earth and our climate dilemma. We talked with artist, Geraldina Interiano Wise, who is based in Houston Texas area, about how her art is inspired by our connection to the earth. She creates art that evokes that connection and empathy for all that is going on with the mama earth and all her creatures.This episode was sponsored by The Climate Listening Project, who is working with GulfCoastMurals.com to help merge art and community to protect the Gulf Coast.

Speaking of Travel®
The Speaking of Travel + Gulf Coast Love Story Series With Dayna Reggero

Speaking of Travel®

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 43:57


The Speaking of Travel + Gulf Coast Love Story series with Dayna Reggero of the Climate Listening Project is a platform to keep you informed on what's happening in one of the most beautiful and vulnerable areas, The Gulf Coast. The Climate Listening project is in the Gulf Coast region listening to artists and activists working together for Dayna's new film, The Gulf Coast Love Story. The Gulf is beautiful and rich with beaches and bayous. But there's also cancer alley and dangerous oil rigs. Now there are 20+ LNG export terminals proposed along the Gulf Coast. These are huge liquid natural gas export facilities where all the pipelines bring the gas to the coast to ship it overseas with fossil fuel companies profiting billions. It's dangerous. Our special guest is Joshua Duttweiler of Corpus Christi, Texas. Joshua was selected for the collaborative Coastal Alliance to Protect our Environment (CAPE) artist activist grant to create community art for Corpus Christi / Coastal Bend activism in collaboration with groups like Texas Campaign for the Environment. Joshua is a designer, artist, and educator. His multi-disciplinary practice encompasses personal, collaborative, and client-based projects focused on social justice and community building.  Connect via GulfCoastMurals.com for more information. Support the Gulf Coast to help save this special and important place. Thanks for listening to Speaking of Travel! Visit speakingoftravel.net for travel tips, travel stories and so much more.

Nèg Mawon Podcast
[Scholar Series #24]"Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World." A Conversation w/ Dr. Jessica Marie Johnson

Nèg Mawon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 65:21


This is the story of freedom, of choices black women made to anchor their humanity,to retain control over their bodies, selves, loved ones, and their futures. The story of freedom is ambiguous, but often begins with intimate acts steeped in power. Listen as Dr Johnson discusses the peculiar oppressions faced by African women and women of African descent. And it pivots on the self-conscious choices black women made to retain control over their bodies and selves, their loved ones, and their futures. Slavery's rise in the Americas was institutional, carnal, and reproductive. The intimacy of bondage whet the appetites of slaveowners, traders, and colonial officials with fantasies of domination that trickled into every social relationship—husband and wife, sovereign and subject, master and laborer. Intimacy—corporeal, carnal, quotidian—tied slaves to slaveowners, women of African descent and their children to European and African men. In Wicked Flesh, Jessica Marie Johnson explores the nature of these complicated intimate and kinship ties and how they were used by black women to construct freedom in the Atlantic world. Johnson draws on archival documents scattered in institutions across three continents, written in multiple languages and largely from the perspective of colonial officials and slave-owning men, to recreate black women's experiences from coastal Senegal to French Saint-Domingue to Spanish Cuba to the swampy outposts of the Gulf Coast. Centering New Orleans as the quintessential site for investigating black women's practices of freedom in the Atlantic world, Wicked Flesh argues that African women and women of African descent endowed free status with meaning through active, aggressive, and sometimes unsuccessful intimate and kinship practices. Their stories, in both their successes and their failures, outline a practice of freedom that laid the groundwork for the emancipation struggles of the nineteenth century and reshaped the New World. Her profile page on our site. https://neg.fm/dr-jessica-marie-johnson/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/negmawonpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/negmawonpodcast/support

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 223: Water On The Move

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 117:14


Quizmasters Lee and Marc meet with Kyle Anne and Seth for a trivia quiz with topics including Sports, Horror Movies, Deadly Storms, Fairy Tales, Epitaphs, Fruits, Chemistry, Geology, Geography and more! Round One SPORTS - What sport lasts 1 to 2 hours and is divided into four or eight seven minute long periods called 'chukkas'? HORROR FILM LOCATIONS - Camp Crystal Lake, known amongst horror fans as the home of serial killer Jason Voorhees in the Friday the 13th franchise, is said to be located in which U.S. State? DEADLY STORMS - What once-popular construction material was turned into deadly projectiles before being banned through code enforcement after the Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900? FAIRY TALES - What musical instrument did Jack steal from the Beanstalk Giant? EPITAPHS - What signature line is inscribed on the tombstone of Rod Roddy (who was the longest-serving announcer for the popular television game show The Price Is Right)? DEADLY STORMS - In 1928, a hurricane hit the Southeastern U.S. resulting in the deaths of almost 3,000 people. The people in the surrounding communities were struck unaware by its unusual storm surge developing from this body of water that also gave the storm its name. Round Two HORROR CAMEOS - Which iconic horror film character appears in six episodes of SpongeBob SquarePants as the night shift manager at the Krusty Krab? FRUITS - Biologically classified as a fruit, but treated as a vegetable in the culinary world, what are ladies fingers known as? DEADLY STORMS - What September holiday lends its name to a category 5 hurricane that hit the Florida Keys? HAUNTINGS - What legendary college football player, who died at the age of 25 from pneumonia, was played by U.S. President Ronald Reagan in the 1940 film Knute Rockne, All American and whose galloping ghost is said to haunt Notre Dame's historic Washington Hall? CHEMISTRY & GEOLOGY - A shiny gray solid number with atomic number 12, which element is the most common in the Earth? DEADLY STORMS - Category 5 Hurricane Camille hit what Gulf Coast state in 1969, the resulting storm surge of 24 feet killed over 200 Americans and put the corpses of cows in treetops? Rate My Question CITY NAMES - What international city, when broken up into three consonants sounds like two inappropriate to potentially inappropriate words and the verb to use them? Final Questions WORLD WAR II - The Battle of Britain began on January 10, 1940 and ended on October 31st, 1940, and was primarily an air battle involving Germany and Britain using the German Spitfire and the Hawker what? F1 RACING - The YAS Marina Grand Prix Circuit is located in which capital city whose name translates to "Father of Gazelle" in English? HORROR RAP - Voiced by comedian John Kassir, what iconic horror character, who was Halloween Horror Nights first official icon, plays keyboard and raps on a 1992 single that was produced by Janet Jackson collaborator and godson of Barry White Chuckii Booker? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges November 2nd, 2022 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EST November 3rd, 2022 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Ollie's Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EST You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Gil, Tim, Tommy, Adam, Brandon, Blake Thank you, Team Captains – Kristin & Fletcher, Aaron, Matthew, David Holbrook, Mo, Lydia, Rick G, Skyler Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Elyse, Kaitlynn, Frank, Trent, Nina, Justin, Katie, Ryan, Robb, Captain Nick, Grant, Ian, Tim Gomez, Rachael, Moo, Rikki, Nabeel, Jon Lewis, Adam, Lisa, Spencer, Hank, Justin P., Cooper, Sarah, Karly, Lucas, Mike K., Cole, Adam, Caitlyn H, Sam Spencer Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Mike J., Mike C., Efren, Steven, Kenya, Dallas, Issa, Paige, Allison, Kevin & Sara, Alex, Loren, MJ, HBomb, Aaron, Laurel, FoxenV, Sarah, Edsicalz, Megan, brandon, Chris, Alec, Sai, Nathan, Tim, Andrea, Ian, Aunt Kiki, Clay, Cam, Littlestoflambs If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support." Special Guests: Kyle Anne and Seth.

Gulf Coast Radio
Gulf Coast Radio Ep23- Halloween Special

Gulf Coast Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 64:48


The gang is back in the studio today to talk about recent events with Kanye, Taylor swift and Logan and Nicks recent adventure Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report
Mobile Bay, Orange Beach, Gulf Shores, and Dauphin Island Fishing Reports for October 24-30, 2022

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 88:34


On this episode, Butch and co-host Co Greg Sample, the new owner and President of Pure Flats, talks about early Fall weather Gulf Coast fishing with the best anglers in Lower Alabama waters and fisheries. Our contributing fishing experts this week are Capt. Richard Rutland of Cold Blooded Fishing, Capt. Shane Traylor Bona Fide Inshore Charters, and Dauphin Island beach phenom Tanner Deas. Enjoy the show, get out on the water weekend and be safe. GET A FREE  AFCTO SUN PROTECTION MASK ASFR has partnered with AFTCO, and they are offering all of our listeners a FREE SUN PROTECTION MASK with the purchase of any AFTCO products. All you have to do is text the word “fishing” to 6475589895 to subscribe to our email list, and we'll send you the AFTCO promo code via email. Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, just head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/asfr, and we'll send you the new show each week. Check Out The NEWEST WAY To Get Your Fishing Reports: TEXT "fishing" to 314-665-1767 Keep Whackin'em!

Houston Matters
Former VP Al Gore on how Houston contributes to and addresses climate change (Oct. 27, 2022)

Houston Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 49:33


  On Thursday's show: Former Vice President Al Gore discusses how Houston is in many ways leading the country in both contributing to and addressing climate change and how to strike the right balance between environmental and economic realities. Gore is in Houston this week to launch efforts by his Climate Reality Project to train climate activists across the Gulf Coast. Also this hour: We continue our series of interviews with candidates in some of the key races around Texas and Greater Houston that are on the ballot on Election Day. Today, we talk with Fort Bend County Judge KP George. And the new film Tár depicts the life of a fictional orchestra conductor, and, on this month's edition of The Bigger Picture, we explore the reality of that job.

The Green Divas
Nothing Natural About Natural Gas

The Green Divas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 45:04


Weren't we shocked green divas to learn that there's nothing natural about natural gas! It makes perfect sense -- duh. It's all a big marketing hoax and most of us fell for it for far too long. The true cost of natural gas is an environmental disaster. Especially fracking it and liquifying it in order to export it -- for the benefit of fossil fuel companies and executives.  We learned this and a great deal more from Kelly Sheehan, who is the Senior Director of Energy Campaigns for the Sierra Club. She's helping communities along the Gulf Coast fight against 20+ proposed LNG (Liquid Natural Gas) pipelines and distribution hubs that would devastate this beautiful coast. This episode was sponsored by The Climate Listening Project, who is working with GulfCoastMurals.com to help merge art and community to protect the Gulf Coast.Healthy Lifestyle Solutions with Maya AcostaAre you ready to upgrade your health to a new level and do so by learning from experts...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Florida Travel Pod
Best of the Gulf Coast, Florida State Parks

Florida Travel Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 31:27


**Note: this episode was recorded before Hurricane Ian. Please check with the individual state parks in regard to the current operating status.** Some of the best Florida state parks are located on the Gulf Coast of Florida. The Gulf of Mexico is on the West Coast of Florida. The Sunshine State is known for its outdoor experiences. Florida's state parks have miles of trails, historic sites, picnic areas, white sand beaches, wildlife viewing, and endless activities for the entire family. Overnight stays in a campground, swimming in the clear waters of the pristine beaches, horseback riding; pack a lunch, and grab some picnic tables. Follow us as we check out the popular activities and adventures to be found in the Gulf Coast Florida State Parks. Find links and details here https://floridatravelpod.com/?p=2279 (https://floridatravelpod.com/gulf-coast-florida-state-parks/)

Florida Travel Fanatics
8: Tampa Bay in 1 Day !

Florida Travel Fanatics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 32:53


We live in the Tampa area, and are fortunate to have friends and family visit us regularly.   We enjoy taking them on a 1 day tour of the best of the Tampa Bay region, which includes Ybor City, Sparkman Wharf, downtown Saint Petersburg, and a tour of the entire beach region from the southern tip of St Pete Beach all the way to Clearwater Beach, ending in a spectacular Gulf Coast sunset.   In this episode we'll explain how you can also go on this 1 day "sampler" of the Tampa Bay region.  Enjoy!Amazon affiliate link to the DeLorme Atlas & Gazette :  https://amzn.to/3MZdvgASparkman Wharf:  https://sparkmanwharf.com/Ybor City :  https://yborcityonline.com/Our favorite cigar shop in Ybor City :  https://tabanerocigars.com/Pass A Grille:  https://www.visitpassagrille.com/Best Maryland Crab Cakes, beachfront in Pass A Grille :  https://thebrassmonkey.net/Palm Pavilion on Clearwater Beach : https://palmpavilion.com/Pier60 at Clearwater Beach :https://www.visitstpeteclearwater.com/profile/pier-60-clearwater-beach/139755Joe's Stone Crabs in Miami Beach: https://joesstonecrab.com/ Joe's Stone Crab Claws copycat mustard sauce  recipe: https://www.food.com/recipe/joes-stone-crab-mustard-sauce-132230

Tasty Brew Music
Savraya - Watch Out! She's Just Getting Started!

Tasty Brew Music

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 35:46


Savraya is a singer-songwriter referred to me by a mutual songwriting friend from Louisiana, Tommy Ike Hailey. She's just starting her lyrical life and it's always an honor and privilege to be the first radio or podcast experience for a young artist like this. Living in places like Nashville, Ft. Worth and the Mississippi Gulf Coast near New Orleans gives her a unique perspective on Southern American music with roots, blues, jazz, country, hip hop, pop, and even Cajun in the mix. Gifted with her first guitar at 16, she started writing songs and playing open mics. Dad's job transferred the family back to Nashville and she started playing songwriter rounds and recording with Michael McAdam and great Nashville musicians including Jimmy Lester, and Dave Roe who had worked with Johnny Cash, Steve Earle, Dwight Yoakum and many more. Another transfer back to Mississippi and Savraya started to write new material and gigging all over the Gulf Coast. She claims no specific genre with an open mind to past and present influences. Her second release “Glass Ball” finished first in the 2021 Ozone Songwriting competition. She works with regional videographer Chaz Singleton (Astroclown Productions) who has shot videos for hip hop artists including Juvenile, Choppa, Young Bleu, and the Ying Yang Twins. Savraya is a unique artist with powerful vocals and meaningful lyrics for one so young! Enjoy this early morning conversation and musical performance with Savraya.

Sports Radio 105.5 WNSP
Prep Spotlight 10.20.22 - UMS Wright HC Terry Curtis, Theodore HC Eric Collier

Sports Radio 105.5 WNSP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 37:12


Get prepared for the high school football action on the Gulf Coast this week! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wnsp/support

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report
Orange Beach, Gulf Shores, Dauphin Island, and Mobile Bay Fishing Reports for October 17-23, 2022

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 63:15


On this episode, Butch talks early Fall weather Gulf Coast fishing with the best anglers in Lower Alabama waters and fisheries. Our contributing fishing experts this week are Scott Kennedy, Capt. Bobby Abruscato, and Capt. King Marchand. Enjoy the show, get out on the water weekend and be safe. GET A FREE  AFCTO SUN PROTECTION MASK ASFR has partnered with AFTCO, and they are offering all of our listeners a FREE SUN PROTECTION MASK with the purchase of any AFTCO products. All you have to do is text the word “fishing” to 6475589895 to subscribe to our email list, and we'll send you the AFTCO promo code via email. Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, just head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/asfr, and we'll send you the new show each week. Check Out The NEWEST WAY To Get Your Fishing Reports: TEXT "fishing" to 314-665-1767 Keep Whackin'em!

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron
Gulf Coast Huddle 101922

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022


Gulf Coast Huddle 101922 made possible by Citizens Medical Center as well as Fat Cow Jerky Junior's Smokehouse Camacho Tractor & Equipment Repair American Shield Roofing Stay tuned for all the great shows on the Lone Star Gridiron Sports Network. Contact the Gulf Coast Huddle Twitter @chrisdoelle, @lsgridiron Facebook ALL I NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED […]

StarShipSofa
StarShipSofa No 697 Naomi Kanakia

StarShipSofa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 39:31


Main Fiction: "The Leader Principle" by Naomi KanakiaNaomi Kanakia is the author of YA novels (HarperTeen and Little, Brown), literary short stories (West Branch, Gulf Coast), science fiction stories (Analog, Asimov's, F&SF), poetry (Cherry Tree, Vallum), essays (LitHub and the Los Angeles Review of Books) and a self-published cynical guide to the publishing industry. She lives in San Francisco with her wife and daughter.This story originally appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Jan/Feb 2020.Narrated by: Mark NelsonMark Nelson began audiobook narration in 2006, and now has over 180 titles at LibriVox, and recording as “Harry Shaw,” more than 100 for Audible. While Mark mainly records sci-fi, fantasy, and horror titles, he has also ventured into the classics, including Hugo and Dostoyevsky.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/starshipsofa. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Gulf Coast Radio
Gulf Coast Radio Ep22- Shitting in the street

Gulf Coast Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 63:52


The gang is back in the studio today to talk about the shit situation in san Francisco and all major cities and other topic such as car crashes and someone pretending to be a cop. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Wolf Connection
Episode #93 International Wolf Symposium #1 - Bridgett VonHoldt, Kristin Brzeski, Joey Hinton/Gulf Coast Canine Project

The Wolf Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 29:01


This is the first of our podcasts recorded at The International Wolf Symposium in Minneapolis, Minnesota!Bridgett VonHoldt, Kristin Brzeski, and Joey Hinton are all co-founders of the Gulf Coast Canine Project. The goals of the project are to understand the genetic ancestry of the unique wild canines persisting along the Gulf Coast of the United States and study how red wolf ancestry affects morphology and behavior.We discussed their work both individually and as colleagues, and their experiences being at The International Wolf Symposium for the first time. Gulf Coast Canine ProjectBrzeski Conservation Genetics LabJoey Hinton Website@thebeeps

The Green Divas
The Green Divas Show - Community Activism

The Green Divas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 23:15


This week, The Green Divas share some wonderful community activism success stories. Bookmark this show for when you feel like you can't make a difference, then go find your tribe and chip in to make stuff happen!We talk about some of our own experiences with protesting and participating in groups and events that actually made a difference. Then we talked to Joey Gonzales, 4th about their work to help protect the beauty and natural integrity of the Gulf Coast. This episode was sponsored by The Climate Listening Project, who is working with GulfCoastMurals.com to help merge art and community to protect the Gulf Coast.

Ron Fuller's Studcast
#271 Tanaka's Back, Ron Turns Babyface! 101822

Ron Fuller's Studcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 71:44


Tanaka, Malenko, Garvin, Sullivan in Knoxville. Stomper, Armstrong, Fullers, Assassins in Gulf Coast!

Cee U Next Tuesday
Episode 67 - Stacey Lannert

Cee U Next Tuesday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 56:24


Stacey Lannert's life got turned upside down when her grandfather died, Find out what happened to her family in this episode. And our Treasure Child Franziska Trautmann is finding a solution to coastal restoration along the Gulf Coast. Thanks for listening to us, Cunties! Check out exclusive content on our https://www.patreon.com/ceeupodcast and our https://ko-fi.com/ceeupodcast/shop, and you can find all our links on our https://www.ceeunexttuesday.com/. Follow/like/subscribe to us here: https://www.instagram.com/ceeunexttuesdaypodcast/ https://www.tiktok.com/@ceeunexttuesdaypodcast https://twitter.com/cee_podcast https://ko-fi.com/ceeupodcast

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
PLAIN GARDENING FOR THE GULF COAST OCT 16, 2022

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 87:38


wITH THE COOLEST WEATHER OF THIS FALL HEADED OUR WAY, LAWN AND GARDEN EXPERT bILL fINCH TALKS ABOUT PLANTING AND WEATHER EFFECTS ON THIS WEEK'S SHOW

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report
Gulf Shores, Orange Beach, Dauphin Island, and Mobile Bay Fishing Reports for October 10-16, 2022

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 66:38


On this episode, Butch and co-host Angelo "The Coastal Connection" DePaola talks Gulf Coast fishing with the best anglers in Lower Alabama waters and fisheries. Our contributing fishing experts this week are Capt. Patric Garmeson, Capt. Delynn Sigler, and Chris Vecsey of Sam's Bait & Tackle. Enjoy the show, get out on the water weekend and be safe. GET A FREE  AFCTO SUN PROTECTION MASK ASFR has partnered with AFTCO, and they are offering all of our listeners a FREE SUN PROTECTION MASK with the purchase of any AFTCO products. All you have to do is text the word “fishing” to 6475589895 to subscribe to our email list, and we'll send you the AFTCO promo code via email. Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, just head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/asfr, and we'll send you the new show each week. Check Out The NEWEST WAY To Get Your Fishing Reports: TEXT "fishing" to 314-665-1767 Keep Whackin'em!

Contagious Victories
Be a Confident Follow This Fall

Contagious Victories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 11:11


Click here for the full episode transcript and show notes.Visit Tori's personal blog: ToriBlackmon.comFollow the Contagious Victories instagram: @ContagiousVictoriesFollow Tori's Personal instagram: @OnceUponA_Tori

Preble Hall
Sailors, Caribbean Trade, and National Boundaries in the Late Nineteenth Century

Preble Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 32:51


Kevin Grubbs is a PhD candidate at the University of Southern Mississippi.  His dissertation, entitled “Forgotten Goods: Sailors, Caribbean Trade, and National Boundaries in the Late Nineteenth Century,” analyzes the impact of sailors on the development of community and capitalism along the Gulf Coast.  He has also been published in the Journal of Mississippi History on runaway slaves and the interstate slave trade.  Previous conference papers include “No Other Means of Prevention: Smuggling and Caribbean Relations in the Postbellum South” and “Crime on the Margin: The Limits of Authority in Caribbean Port Cities.”

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report
Orange Beach, Gulf Shores, Dauphin Island, and Mobile Bay Fishing Reports for October 3-9, 2022

Alabama Saltwater Fishing Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 62:06


On this episode, Butch talks Gulf Coast fishing with the best anglers in Lower Alabama waters and fisheries. Our contributing fishing experts this week are Jordan Gooding, Capt. Shane Traylor, and Scott Bannon. Plus, Blakley Ellis of CCA Alabama fills us in on what's up with their amazing organization and membership. Enjoy the show and be safe on the water this weekend. GET A FREE  AFCTO SUN PROTECTION MASK ASFR has partnered with AFTCO, and they are offering all of our listeners a FREE SUN PROTECTION MASK with the purchase of any AFTCO products. All you have to do is text the word “fishing” to 6475589895 to subscribe to our email list, and we'll send you the AFTCO promo code via email. Please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and if you'd like us to email you the podcast, just head over to greatdaysoutdoors.com/asfr, and we'll send you the new show each week. Check Out The NEWEST WAY To Get Your Fishing Reports: TEXT "fishing" to 314-665-1767 Keep Whackin'em!

The Takeaway
Residents of Color in Fort Myers Are Worried They'll Be Left Behind in Hurricane Recovery

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 13:26


Last Wednesday, Hurricane Ian slammed into southwest Florida and made landfall near Fort Myers as a category 4 storm, causing severe storm surge and flooding. Ian is tied for the fifth-strongest hurricane by wind speed in U.S. history. Its strength puts it alongside other recent hurricanes in the Gulf Coast like Ida and Laura. Early projections of Ian's destruction estimate that the storm has created tens of billions of dollars in damage across Florida. Although several communities were hit by the hurricane, Fort Myers and Sanibel Island in Lee County were among the hardest hit. And at a press conference on Tuesday, the Lee County Sheriff confirmed 55 deaths in the county, which is more than half of the total deaths in the state. Nearly 180,000 customers are still without power. And school is still closed in the county for the rest of the week. Now that storm waters have receded, these communities are looking ahead at recovery.  As we've learned in the past, not all communities are equally equipped to deal with the devastation after a hurricane. In a November 2020 report, FEMA's own advisors admitted that the agency wasn't  meeting requirements to provide aid without discriminating based on race and other factors. One of President Biden's first goals was to change that. Early in office, he signed an executive order that mandated federal agencies to create racial equity – both in new and existing policies. But in the community of Dunbar, a historically Black neighborhood in Fort Myers, about a quarter of its residents live below the federal poverty line, and many are concerned they won't get the recovery assistance they need. In nearby Harlem Heights, a predominantly Latino and Black neighborhood, more than a third of residents live below the federal poverty line. For more, we spoke with Florida State Representative of District 70, Michele Rayner-Goolsby.  

5 Things
Hurricane Ian death toll climbs to at least 68 as thousands rescued

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 10:46 Very Popular


The storm devastated Florida's Gulf Coast. Plus, reporter Jordan Mendoza looks at how Hurricane Ian compares with past U.S. hurricanes, reporter Cady Stanton gives an update on Hurricane Orlene, Brazil goes to a runoff election and there's a new top-ranked team in college football.(Audio: Associated Press)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Apple News Today
Why SCOTUS's new term could be more impactful than its last

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 10:38 Very Popular


The Supreme Court starts a new term today. Vox argues that it could be even more consequential than the last. As data shows that threats to Congress members are increasing, Rep. Pramila Jayapal recounts what happened when an armed man showed up at her house this summer. The Washington Post also has the story. Rescue and recovery continue to be key priorities for the Gulf Coast of Florida in the wake of Hurricane Ian. USA Today, the Miami Herald and CBS have been tracking the storm’s impact. The National Park Service’s beloved Fat Bear Week competition is back. The Wall Street Journal previews this year’s contest and explains why so many people are enamored with the reigning champ — a four-time winner.

The Lawfare Podcast
Chatter: Hurricanes and Governmental Response with Eric Jay Dolin

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 81:48 Very Popular


Every year, the eastern United States faces the prospect—and, too often, the reality—of major hurricanes that cause extensive physical and financial damage. This year is no exception; even as Hurricane Ian approaches the Gulf Coast, more storms are likely in the coming weeks.On this episode of Chatter, David Priess chatted with author Eric Jay Dolin about the history of Atlantic hurricanes, with a special focus on such storms' influence on U.S. national security. They spoke about the devastating 2017 hurricane season, how tropical systems are covered in the media, Ben Franklin's role in hurricane science, the role of Caribbean hurricanes in the American Revolution and the Spanish-American War, the evolution of the federal government's storm forecasting and crisis response efforts, hurricane hunter flights, attempts to use technology to disrupt massive storms, Hurricane Andrew (1992), the effects of climate change on tropical systems and their impact, viewing hurricanes as national security threats, how humans assess risk, and films about hurricanes.Chatter is a production of Lawfare and Goat Rodeo. This episode was produced by Cara Shillenn of Goat Rodeo. Podcast theme by David Priess, featuring music created using Groovepad.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Up First
Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 12:45 Very Popular


Hurricane Ian is making its presence known on Florida's Gulf Coast after knocking out power all over Cuba. Two and a half million people are under evacuation orders across the state. There are a lot of questions about leaks at two offshore pipelines that transport Russian gas to Europe. Several nations have called the leaks suspicious and point the finger at Moscow. And what's the Biden administration's plan to get Americans better access to healthy food?