Podcasts about Dementia

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long-term brain disorders causing impaired memory, reasoning, and normal function together with personality changes

  • 3,181PODCASTS
  • 8,674EPISODES
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  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
Dementia

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Best podcasts about Dementia

Show all podcasts related to dementia

Latest podcast episodes about Dementia

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Erick Erickson Show: S11 EP13: Hour 1 – One Year of Grandpa Dementia

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022


Biden has a disastrous press conference and a review of his first year in office.

The Erick Erickson Show
S11 EP13: Hour 1 - One Year of Grandpa Dementia

The Erick Erickson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 40:03


Biden has a disastrous press conference and a review of his first year in office.

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio
Dementia Spotlight Foundation Offers Care, Personal Connection

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 21:00


Dementia Spotlight Foundation Co-Founder and Executive Director Whitney DeMarlo Oeltmann joins the Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio podcast to share the Foundation's story. Oeltmann joins host Carol Morgan for the Around Atlanta segment. At 68 years old, Oeltmann's father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Following his diagnosis, the family struggled to find resources and support to cope and move forward. In response to the lack of resources, Oeltmann and her mother founded the Dementia Spotlight Foundation, a nonprofit to support dementia patients and their families. Modeled after Oeltmann's experience, the Foundation fills a lot of gaps that are missing for them. Through her journey, Oeltmann noticed a lack of knowledge surrounding dementia and its most common form, Alzheimer's disease. Dementia is a terminal brain illness that results in the loss of memory and often leads to further complications. With other terminal diagnoses, patients receive a path forward to cope with what lies ahead. Unfortunately, this is not the case with dementia patients. Oeltmann said, “Our vision was to wrap people from that moment of diagnosis…to have someone to talk to, move forward and really focus on care.” People often assume dementia solely affects memory loss, but the disease reaches much further. Brain disease also affects cognition – how a person thinks and approaches things as well as physical capabilities. Oeltmann shared that it is crucial to understand the disease and its signs first and foremost in order to move forward. Oeltmann said, “It changes everything…Financially, it is devastating what it has done to families.” The pandemic was notably isolating for dementia patients and their families. Through the Foundation's Care Partner Program as well as virtual and in-person support groups, there is a strong focus on maintaining social connections. To have that personal link through volunteering and support groups has an incredible impact as many dementia patients are forced to part ways with their careers and commitments upon diagnosis. Dementia Mentors is a mentoring program that matches participants with a mentor based on the diagnosis. An international program, Dementia Mentors offers support through shared experiences and 48 virtual “Connection Cafes” monthly. The Respite Care Program offers caregivers relief and personal time to focus on themselves and complete tasks with the confident knowledge that their loved one is in safe hands. Tune in to the full interview above for more information on the Dementia Spotlight Foundation or visit www.DementiaSpotlightFoundation.org. Never miss an episode of Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio! Subscribe to the podcast here. You can also get a recap of any past episode on the Radio page. Listen to the full interview above! Georgia Residential Mortgage Licensee, License #22564. NMLS ID #6606. Subject to borrower and property qualifications. Not all applicants will qualify. Click here to view the terms and conditions of products mentioned during the show. Corporate office 14511 Myford Rd., Suite 100, Tustin, CA 92780. Phone: (800) 450-2010. (January/2022) New American Funding is a family-owned mortgage lender with a servicing portfolio of over 216,000+ loans for $56.8 billion, 171 branches and about 4,500+ employees. The company offers several niche loan products and has made Inc. 5000's list of Fastest-Growing Companies in America seven times. For more information, call 678-898-3540 or visit https://branch.newamericanfunding.com/Atlanta. The Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio “All About Real Estate” segment, presented by Denim Marketing, highlights the movers and shakers in the Atlanta real estate industry – the home builders, developers, Realtors and suppliers working to provide the American dream for Atlantans. For more information on how you can be featured as a guest, contact Denim Marketing at 770-383-3360 or fill out the Atlanta Real Estate...

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show: 01.19.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 60:33


5G's Crimes Against Humanity   Richard Gale and Gary Null PhD Progressive Radio Network, January 19, 2022     The roll out of the new C-Band 5G service by AT&T and Verizon scheduled for January 19, has raised alarms for major airline executives who have warned that it will create “catastrophic” interference with flight navigation systems and pilot safety during take off and landing.  The risks will be greater during bad weather. Among the warnings are major disruptions in commerce and supply chain, the overriding of aircrafts' electronic safety systems and radio altimeters, and the grounding of flights that will leave “tens of thousands of Americans grounded.” According to CNN, the airlines estimate that upwards to 1,000 flights will be disrupted daily. The 5G threat is particularly heightened in low-visibility conditions. Chief executives from American Airlines, United, Delta, Southwest and Jet Blue have demanded that 5G be blocked within a two-mile radius of major US airports. FedEx and UPS have also joined the airlines' complaints. Foreign airlines such as Dubai's Emirates, Air India, Japan Air, Lufthansa and British Airways have already changed or canceled flights to the US. Two of the world's largest plane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing, have also issued warnings.    This has become an ongoing battle between the Federal Aviation Administration and the private telecomm industry and its Washington lobbyists. The FAA has been warning about 5G interruption of planes' navigation systems for quite some time.  The telecomm industry's unwillingness to budge is most disturbing because the Biden administration has already permitted 90 percent of wireless tower deployment to roll out as scheduled.  It is only in the vicinity of major airports where the FAA and airlines demand restrictions due to safety concerns. However, as we have reported for the past several years, the telecomm giants, notably AT&T and Verizon, and its leading media spokespersons at CNN and the New York Times, have undermined and denied 5G's risks, especially to human health and the environment, ever since wireless technologies were first commercialized.   5G is destined to be a permanent fixture across the nation. There is barely a chance to prevent it. The thousands of medical and environmental studies confirming high EMF's dangers and the petitions signed by thousands of international scientists to halt its deployment are unequivocally ignored or worse ostracized and canceled.  It is estimated that there are over 10,000 peer-reviewed clinical studies mentioning serious molecular biological injury and defects to organs, neurons, cells and cellular function, and DNA damage to plants, animals and humans alike.  Between August 2016 and September 2018 alone, over 400 new studies on electromagnetic radiation risks were compiled by public health Professor Joel Moskowitz at the University of California at Berkeley.   Despite the pandemic, lockdowns and social distancing have not hindered 5G's progress to connect every American into its spider's web.  In December 2019, T-Mobile reached its goal of nationwide 5G coverage of over 1.3 million square miles (34 percent of the US) and AT&T reached its milestone to reach 179 million people. The 5G roll out is also crucial for international globalists to usher in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.  The World Economic Forum's presentation, “Why is 5G Important for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” outlines the multi-trillion dollar impact advanced connectivity will have on manufacturing, wholesale and resale, smart cities and homes, public services, transportation, real time banking, finance and insurance, agriculture and forestry, micro chip surveillance, real estate, education, mining, health and medicine.   We must not hold any false hopes that the Biden administration will ultimately side with the airlines' safety concerns. During the 2020 election, the Biden campaign received $97 million from the Communications/Tech sector versus Trump's $18 million.  Alphabet (Google), Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, AT&T and Comcast overwhelmingly contributed to Biden's war chest.   The American public is being bamboozled with blatant falsehoods to embrace 5G as a necessary and innovative technology that will benefit and improve our lives. But the real truth is the exact opposite.    The following information has been abbreviated from scientific literature that is fully validated and has been stated by international experts such as Drs. Devra Davis and Martin Pall about EMF's adverse effects to government leaders and national legislators repeatedly. This outline was presented by Dr. Martin Pall, a Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Medical Sciences at Washington State University to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Pall is recognized worldwide as an expert in EMF and 5G's detrimental effects on biological systems and the diseases associated with wireless technologies.   Lower Fertility:  Alters the structure of the testes and ovaries, lowers sperm count and the number of egg follicles, increases spontaneous abortion and lowers the levels of three sex hormones. Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Effects:  There has been a dramatic increase in the following conditions since the advent of mobile phones, the internet, and wireless technologies:  insomnia, fatigue, depression, headaches and cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, and loss of memory. Animal studies have shown that EMFs produce major changes in brain structure, which is likely happening to everyone who has extensive daily exposure to EMFs Cellular DNA Damage:  There are three types of DNA damage observed in EMF exposure:  single and double DNA breaks and oxidized DNA bases.  These can cause cancer and mutations in the sexual germ lines. Apoptosis:  EMFs contribute to programmed cell death that in turn leads to reproductive and neurodegenerative disorders. Oxidative Stress:  Free radical damage that has been associated with numerous health conditions including cancer, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic inflammation, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, cellular death and aging Endocrine Effects: According Dr. Pall, every hormonal system in the body is adversely affected by EMF exposure. Excessive Intracellular Calcium:  Ca2+ is critical for cellular activity Cancer:  There are 35 separate scientific reviews of the body of peer-reviewed literature providing evidence that EMFs increase carcinogenesis, promote and progress tumor development and contribute to metastasis.   There are also other medical conditions that have been shown to be associated likely with EMF exposure:   Cardiac Effects.  EMFs interfere with the electrical control of the heart that can produce tachycardia, bradycadia, arrhythmia and abnormal heart palpitations. Early Onset of Alzheimer's and Dementia:  In recent years and in parallel with increased EMF exposure, signs of symptoms associated with Alzheimer's are being observed in people age 30 and younger. Dr. Pall has called this "digital dementias." ADHD and Autism:  The epidemic in ADHD and autism witnessed in each younger generation may be caused by late prenatal and early post-natal EMF exposure. Each of these neurological conditions is associated with the increase of calcium over-penetrating cell linings due to EMF pulsations and disrupting synapse formations.   Everyone will be affected by 5G's radiation. But it will not require three decades to observe its injurious effects. Unlike cigarettes, nobody has a choice whether you wish to be exposed to 5G or not. 5G's EMF radiation is all-pervasive.    The mainstream media, in particular the New York Times, which has a collaborative agreement with the leading 5G provider Verizon, have no intention to warn the public about any of the scientific findings mentioned above. There is a growing consensus in the scientific and medical community that 5G will usher an epidemic of disease never before witnessed in human history. It is too difficult to make forecasts. Nevertheless, if the past and current research on EMF's adverse effects on health and the environment during the past 50 years are any indication, we are entering a new epoch of disease and neurological disorders that humanity is completely unprepared to handle.    This is a consequence of what happens when an entire nation is trapped into carelessly trusting elected presidents and legislators whose campaigns are bankrolled by the Telecomm giants and Silicon Valley, and a media empire ruled by serial liars and masters of disinformation campaigns for private corporate interests. This is vulture capitalism at is worse.  

Reading With Your Kids Podcast
Reading With Your Kids - PJ's Perplexing Predicament

Reading With Your Kids Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:02


Author D C Spaar is on the #ReadingWithYourKids #Podcast to celebrate her new #PictureBook PJ's Perplexing Predicament. D C tells us she wrote this book in the hopes that it will help families have important conversations about Alzheimer's and Dementia Click here to visit D C's website - https://dcspaarbooks.com/ Click here to visit our website - www.readingwithyourkids.com

All Home Care Matters
An Interview with Dr. James Vickers - Director of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Center

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 39:04


Today on All Home Care Matters we are privileged to welcome a very special guest, Dr. James Vickers. Dr. Vickers is the Director of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Center at the University of Tasmania.   Furthermore, Dr. Vickers has published over 180 research papers and was awarded a DSc from the University of Tasmania in 2005 in recognition of his contribution to neuroscience research. Professor Vickers has been involved in developing a range of health courses at the University of Tasmania, including Massive Open Online Courses on dementia. He developed the ISLAND Project which seeks to understand who is the Tasmanian population is most at risk of dementia and how our population can self-manage modifiable risk behaviors to build resilience to dementia.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Links: Masters course (https://www.utas.edu.au/wicking/mdem). This is a modularised program based around four thematic areas relevant to dementia – Health and Social Care, Neurobiology, Policies and Systems and Public Health. There is also substantial content around understanding research related to dementia.   Other educational offerings are the MOOCs. The next course, Understanding Dementia, is available to start in February. https://www.utas.edu.au/wicking/understanding-dementia.  

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support
Slow Puncture – Destigmatizing Dementia

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:50


Peter Berry uses cycling as a way to remove the stigma from a dementia diagnosis. Deb Bunt's life changed when she meet cyclist, Peter Berry (who had an early-onset dementia diagnosis at age 50). As she and Peter cycled together, their friendship grew and he started to share the story of his dementia diagnosis. When he said, “I fear I am just going to forget who I am,” Deb offered to keep a note of his thoughts for him. Thus the beginnings of the book Slow Puncture, Living Well With Dementia was born. “Dementia is a diagnosis for the whole family,” Peter says, “but don't keep it secret because it will eat away at the whole family.” Since that day, he has learned to live with his very own dementia monster. From depression and suicide attempts through to his determination to confront his dementia, Peter has embarked on a series of challenges to show that life isn't over with dementia. Looking at Peter when he is cycling, you would never know that this fit, healthy man is living with dementia. His goal now is to do what he can to erase the stigma of his diagnosis. He does this by raising money for dementia charities, cycling hundreds of miles in his quest to show that life is always worth living. Peter's Blog   Related Episodes: Alzheimer's Trippin' With George Bonus – Alzheimer's Cruising Access all your medical records in one place & opt into research with PicnicHealth  PicnicHealth (Our Sponsor)   Be sure to check out our website for more resources, partners, recipes, and more.  www.fadingmemoriespodcast.com Join Fading Memories On Social Media! If you've enjoyed this episode, please share this podcast with other caregivers!  Choose your favorite platform and follow us for more advice, motivation, recipes, and cute dog photos. Facebook    InstagramTwitter Subscribe to our YouTube channel. There you can see me in "action" and watch the bonus videos I share. Want to learn from Jennifer in person (or virtually)? Wherever you'd like a training session, Jen is available. Contact her at fadingmemoriespodcast@gmail.com   NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
The 5 Main Ways To Prevent Alzheimer's & Dementia

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 71:19


This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Paleovalley. Protecting your brain and cognitive function is not just for the elderly. It's never too early to start protecting your brain, which is something we should all think more about as Alzheimer's and dementia rates continue to rise. We can start with healthy lifestyle choices that affect diet, sleep, stress management, and more. The bonus of brain-healthy lifestyle choices like these is that they protect the health of your entire body as well. In this episode of my new Masterclass series, I am interviewed by my good friend and podcast host, Dhru Purohit, about Alzheimer's and dementia. We talk about early detection, contributors to cognitive dysfunction, foods that fuel the brain, and so much more. We also discuss how other factors, such as toxicity, sleep apnea, and even lack of community, affect brain health.Dhru Purohit is a podcast host, serial entrepreneur, and investor in the health and wellness industry. His podcast, The Dhru Purohit Podcast, is a top 50 global health podcast with over 30+ million unique downloads. His interviews focus on the inner workings of the brain and the body and feature the brightest minds in wellness, medicine, and mindset.This episode is brought to you by Rupa Health and Paleovalley. Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. You can check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account at RupaHealth.com. Right now, Paleovalley is offering my listeners 15% off their entire first order. Just go to paleovalley.com/hyman to check out all their clean Paleo products and take advantage of this deal. In this episode, we discuss (audio version / Apple Subscriber version): Things to do in your 20s, 30s, and 40s to reduce your risk of cognitive decline (4:23 / 1:15)Using brain scans to detect Alzheimer's and dementia (10:37 / 7:26) Contributors to cognitive dysfunction (13:30 / 10:00) Fueling your brain with a healthy diet (18:16 / 15:07) The importance of movement to reduce your risk of cognitive decline (28:34 / 25:10) Ineffective pharmaceutical interventions for Alzheimer's (31:51 / 28:08) Why sleep apnea increases your risk of cognitive decline (38:24 / 34:48) The effects of chronic toxicity on the brain (49:34 / 46:14) 5 things everyone can do to improve brain health (54:01 / 50:24) Significant signs of cognitive decline (1:05:57 / 1:02:49) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

All Home Care Matters
Quick Tips: When to Be Concerned

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 11:19


Today's episode will explore the signs and symptoms that can tell us when to be concerned about a loved one. We will also talk about the first steps you should take when you are concerned about a loved one. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   We are all constantly experiencing change in our lives. As we age, we watch our loved ones age, as well. According to the Caregiver Resource Center, every six seconds, a person in the US turns 50 years old. The rapidly increasing aging population is creating a care crisis in the United States, and all over the world. In the next four years, there is expected to be over two million people that reach the age of 100. As life expectancy increases, so do the number of families that are taking on responsibilities for aging loved ones.   If you are anticipating helping or providing care for a loved one in the future, you may be wondering what signs and symptoms you should be looking for in your loved one, as well as what the aging process generally looks like. According to the Merck Manual of Geriatrics, aging is a process of gradual and spontaneous change, resulting in maturation through childhood, puberty, and young adulthood, and then decline through middle and late age. Healthy aging refers to a process by which deleterious effects are minimized, preserving function until senescence (a productive form of aging leading to organ death), makes continued life impossible.   According to the Caregiver Resource Center, studies conducted by The MacArthur Foundation have shed new light on the concept of aging. Findings show only 5.2% of all older persons end up in nursing homes, 89% of persons aged 65 to 74 - reported no disability whatsoever, 73% of persons aged 75 to 84 - still reported no disability, 25% of persons aged 85+ - reported being fully functional, and 70% of the aging process is controllable - only 30% is stamped in our genetic code.   The last statistic, 70% of the aging process is controllable, is something we should be focusing on when we are younger. Creating healthy habits, like eating right and exercising regularly, can all lead to longer and healthier lives. Some things are totally out of our control, though, like dementia and other diseases, but even so, taking good care of ourselves can help diminish the risks and symptoms of the unavoidable aspects of aging.   The Caregiver Resource Center says that everyone experiences aging differently. Some individuals may experience mental and physical limitations that limit their level of functioning, while others will remain relatively high functioning. In looking at the process of aging, it is important to understand the difference between "normal aging", and that of illness and disease. Usually, people think of aging as beginning around the age of 65, when the changes to the human body actually begin as early as age 30. Research shows that the human body loses about 1% of functioning per year starting at age 30, but the human body is able to adapt to the changes unless some form of illness is present.   It is important to note that fundamental changes to a person's physical and mental abilities are a normal part of aging, but disease is not. All too often, an elder is forced to suffer unnecessary pain and discomfort, because their doctor or loved one, has chalked their aches and pains, incontinence, confusion, or depression up to "normal" aging; when many of these problems could be reversed or at least medically controlled.   During the normal aging process, changes occur to your cardiovascular system, your bones, joints, and muscles, your digestive system, your bladder and urinary tract, your memory and thinking skills, your eyes, ears and teeth, your skin, and your weight.   According to the Mayo Clinic, the most common change in the cardiovascular system is stiffening of the blood vessels and arteries, causing your heart to work harder to pump blood through them. The heart muscles change to adjust to the increased workload. Your heart rate at rest will stay about the same, but it won't increase during activities as much as it used to. These changes increase the risk of high blood pressure (hypertension) and other cardiovascular problems.   To promote heart health, you should include physical activity in your daily routine, eat a healthy diet, quit smoking, manage stress, and get enough sleep.   With age, bones tend to shrink in size and density, weakening them and making them more susceptible to fracture. You might even become a bit shorter. Muscles generally lose strength, endurance, and flexibility — factors that can affect your coordination, stability, and balance. To promote bone, joint, and muscle health, you should get adequate amounts of calcium and Vitamin D, include physical activity in your daily routine, and avoid substance abuse.   Age-related structural changes in the large intestine, as well other contributing factors like medications and lack of exercise, can result in more constipation in older adults. Eating a healthy diet, including physical activity in your daily routine, and not ignoring the urge to have a bowel movement can all help prevent constipation with age.   Mayo Clinic also says that your bladder may become less elastic as you age, resulting in the need to urinate more often. Weakening of bladder muscles and pelvic floor muscles may make it difficult for you to empty your bladder completely or cause you to lose bladder control known as - urinary incontinence. In men, an enlarged or inflamed prostate also can cause difficulty emptying the bladder and incontinence. You can promote bladder and urinary tract health by going to the bathroom regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, not smoking, doing kegel exercises, and avoiding bladder irritants and constipation.   We've discussed at length changes that happen during aging that relate to memory and thinking skills. We recently released a series on the Seven Stages of Alzheimer's that discuss the differences between age-related memory issues and dementia-related memory issues. Visit our website or YouTube channel to find these episodes and more, or listen to them wherever you get your podcasts.   According to the Mayo Clinic, your brain undergoes changes as you age that may have minor effects on your memory or thinking skills. For example, healthy older adults might forget familiar names or words, or they may find it more difficult to multitask. You can promote cognitive health by taking the following steps: including physical activity in your daily routine, eating a healthy diet, staying mentally active, being social, treating cardiovascular disease, and quitting smoking. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about any mental changes you may notice.   With age, you might have difficulty focusing on objects that are close up. You might become more sensitive to glare and have trouble adapting to different levels of light. Aging also can affect your eye's lens, causing clouded vision, or cataracts. For more information on vision problems and cataracts, listen to our episode on Understanding Cataracts.   Your hearing also might diminish. You might have difficulty hearing high frequencies or following a conversation in a crowded room. To promote eye and ear health, schedule regular check-ups and take the necessary precautions to protect your vision and hearing.   Age-related changes also occur to your teeth and gums. Mayo Clinic says that your gums might pull back from your teeth. Certain medications, such as those that treat allergies, asthma, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol, also can cause dry mouth. As a result, your teeth and gums might become slightly more vulnerable to decay and infection. To promote oral health, schedule regular check-ups and brush and floss regularly.   With age, your skin thins and becomes less elastic and more fragile, and fatty tissue just below the skin decreases. You might notice that you bruise more easily. Decreased production of natural oils might make your skin drier. Wrinkles, age spots and small growths called skin tags are more common. To promote healthy skin, be gentle, take precautions, and don't smoke.   Lastly, how your body burns calories (metabolism) slows down as you age. If you decrease activities as you age, but continue to eat the same as usual, you'll gain weight. To maintain a healthy weight, stay active and eat healthily, and watch portion sizes.   Now that we know what the normal signs of aging are and a few ways you can help your body age healthily, let's move on to some of the signs that you are not aging in a normal way.   According to the Caregiver Resource Center, depression to the degree that it interferes with usual daily functioning, confusion, delusions or hallucinations, changes in personality, and changes in basic intelligence are all functions that are not a part of the normal aging process. If you notice any of these things happening to a loved one, it may be time to have a conversation with them about their health and stress the importance of scheduling a doctor's appointment. Go with them to the doctor so you can express your concerns, as well.   You know your loved one better than their doctor does. You are able to see more about your loved one's daily behavior than their doctor is able to observe in a thirty-minute appointment. Keep a record of changes and behaviors you notice that concern you so you can present them to the doctor or other family members.   Talk to your loved one's other family and friends and see what others have noticed, as well. Most importantly, let your loved one know that they have a support system. Aging can be scary and your loved one will worry about what will happen to them. Your love and support can make all the difference.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: http://www.caregiverresourcecenter.com/the_elder.htm#when_to_be_concerned   https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/aging/art-20046070  

The Chiropractic Forward Podcast: Evidence-based Chiropractic Advocacy
Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity

The Chiropractic Forward Podcast: Evidence-based Chiropractic Advocacy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 87:38


CF 212: Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity Today we're going to talk about Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity But first, here's that sweet sweet bumper music     Purchase Dr. Williams's book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon... The post Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity appeared first on Chiropractic Forward.

Rodger That
EP 113 :: Advocating for Dementia Policy & Legislation :: Ian Kremer

Rodger That

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 38:24


In this episode Bobbi  & Mike talk with Ian Kremer, JD, of the LEAD Coalition, whose dedication to dementia policy has helped pass legislation at the federal, state and local levels for over 25 years. In this conversation we focus on the importance of dementia friendly communities as well as de-escalation training for police officers when working with people suffering from dementia. Don't forget to subscribe, download, and review to share your thoughts about the show! To find out more about Bobbi and Mike or the inspiration behind this podcast, Rodger That, head over to rodgerthat.show. ***************************************** Rodger That is produced by Missing Link—a podcast media company that is dedicated to connecting people to intelligent, engaging and informative content. Also in the Missing Link line-up of podcasts, is The Designated Drinker Show —a high-spirited show featuring craft cocktails and lively banter with the people who create (and quaff) them. Now, if you are looking for a whole new way to enjoy the theatre, check out Between Acts—an immersive audio theatre podcast experience. Each episode takes you on a spellbinding journey through the works of newfound playwrights—from dramas to comedies and everything in between.

PVRoundup Podcast
Cataract extraction reduces risk for dementia

PVRoundup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 3:02


Does cataract extraction reduce the risk of developing dementia? Find out about this and more in today's PV Roundup podcast.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Cognitive Decline Is Reversible For Most Patients With Early Alzheimer's Disease - Dale Bredesen

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 12:54


Cognitive Decline Is Reversible For Most Patients With Early Alzheimer's Disease -  Dale Bredesen, MD Dale Bredesen, M.D • https://www.ahnphealth.com/dr-bredesen.html• Book - End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline An internationally-recognized expert in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, Dr. Dale Bredesen's career has been guided by a simple idea: that Alzheimer's as we know it is not just preventable, but reversible. Thanks to a dedicated pursuit of finding the science that makes this a reality, his idea has placed Dr. Bredesen at the vanguard of neurological research, and led to the discoveries that today underlie the ReCode Report. Dr. Bredesen earned his MD from Duke University Medical Center and served as Chief Resident in Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) before joining Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner's laboratory at UCSF as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow. He held faculty positions at UCSF, UCLA and the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Bredesen also directed the Program on Aging at the Burnham Institute before joining the Buck Institute in 1998 as founding President and CEO. #DaleBredesen #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #AlzheimerDisease #Dementia   CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272  • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealth BitChute:https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support
Oral Care for People With Dementia

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 52:40


Oral Care & Dementia has their own challenges and rewards. Oral care for people living with dementia presents unique challenges to their care partners. Imagine, arranging for a dental house call because Mom's breath is horrible, only to discover she has dentures!  This is just one of many fascinating stories today's guest, Dr. Joy V. Poskozim shares with us. We discussed many practical tips for assisting our loved ones in oral care, dental appointments, and more. There's an old saying about the eyes being windows to the soul. But the latest medical and dental research shows that the mouth truly is a window into one's overall health. Looking out for a loved one's health means not only keeping an eye on their nutritional intake and physical capabilities, but also on their teeth and gums. This episode is full of laughs and great information you won't want to miss! After you tune in, check out Dr. Joys website. Good info there too! Related Episodes: Health Care Advocacy Tips & Advice Telehealth VS In-Office Visits with Roz Jones Access all your medical records in one place & opt into research with PicnicHealth  PicnicHealth (Our Sponsor)   Be sure to check out our website for more resources, partners, recipes, and more.  www.fadingmemoriespodcast.com Join Fading Memories On Social Media! If you've enjoyed this episode, please share this podcast with other caregivers!  Choose your favorite platform and follow us for more advice, motivation, recipes, and cute dog photos. Facebook    InstagramTwitter Subscribe to our YouTube channel. There you can see me in "action" and watch the bonus videos I share. Want to learn from Jennifer in person (or virtually)? Wherever you'd like a training session, Jen is available. Contact her at fadingmemoriespodcast@gmail.com   NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan

YAP - Young and Profiting
#149: The Business of Biohacking with Dave Asprey

YAP - Young and Profiting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 66:19


Learn how Dave Asprey went from hacking computers to hacking his body! Dave is the Founder of Bulletproof, a wildly successful coffee, diet, and lifestyle brand.  He is also a four-time New York Times bestselling author, host of the Webby award-winning podcast Bulletproof Radio, and has been featured on the Today Show, CNN, The New York Times, Dr. Oz, and more. Over the last two decades, Dave has worked with world-renowned doctors, researchers, and scientists to uncover the most innovative methods for enhancing mental and physical performance. And this leads right into what David is so famous for: being the father of biohacking. Dave has spent millions of dollars to take control of his own biology with the goal of living to be at least 180 years old--- pushing the bounds of human possibility all in the name of science and evolution. In today's episode, we cover Dave's journey to becoming one of the world's most famous biohackers and how he went from hacking the internet to hacking his body. We'll learn why Dave thinks humans will start to live well into their hundreds and why he thinks it's ageist to ask people how old they are. Lastly, we'll go through the health benefits of fasting and learn Dave's thoughts on the most common fasts out there, like the 16:8 fast and the OMAD (One Meal A Day) fast.  If you want to learn about biohacking straight from the source of where it all started - you've got to tune into this one. Sponsored by -  Lendable - Sign up for Lendtable at Lendtable.com with promo code YAP for an extra $50 added to your Lendtable balance Hubspot -  Athletic Greens - Visit athleticgreens.com/YAP and get FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase.  Social Media:  Follow YAP on IG: www.instagram.com/youngandprofiting Reach out to Hala directly at Hala@YoungandProfiting.com Follow Hala on Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/htaha/ Follow Hala on Instagram: www.instagram.com/yapwithhala Follow Hala on Clubhouse: @halataha Check out our website to meet the team, view show notes and transcripts: www.youngandprofiting.com Timestamps: 5:12 - Intro 5:56 - Childhood 7:20 - Career Before BulletProof 12:43 - Shifting From Computer Science to Health 18:30 - Not Being Motivated By Money 21:40 - Why We're Going To Live Longer 26:53 - What Humans Will Look Like in The Future 29:55 - Dementia & Alzheimer's  33:00 - Aging and the Biology Behind It 37:00 - Strategies for Anti-Aging 39:44 - Fast This Way 42:20 - Skipping Breakfast/Fasting 46:30 - Diets 50:25 - Religious Fasting 53:30 - Fasting Speed Round 55:25 - How Women and Men Fast Differently 57:55 - Secret To Profiting In Life Mentioned In The Episode:   Dave's Company https://www.bulletproof.com  Dave's Newest Book https://fastthisway.com  The Diet Dave Pioneered https://shop.bulletproof.com/products/bulletproof-diet-book-paperback  Dave's Website https://daveasprey.com/about/#

All Home Care Matters
Respecting a Senior's Independence while Providing Care

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 17:41


Today we are going to be talking about how you can respect a senior's independence and help them maintain their dignity while providing care. We will cover ways you can help your loved one without doing everything for them, as well as ideas on how you can make your loved one's space safer so that they can do more on their own. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   As we age, things that we used to do without giving it a second thought, like moving something out of the way or opening a door, become more and more difficult. If you are watching your loved one beginning to struggle with simple tasks, you may feel the urge to rush in and help, but that is the opposite of what you should do. As long as they are not going to injure themselves, let them do it on their own unless they ask for your help. If you are worried that they may be straining themselves too hard, ask for permission to help them.   Linda Ziac, founder of The Caregiver Resource Center, remembers a time when her elderly neighbor was emptying groceries from the trunk of her car. Linda says she rushed over to help but stopped dead in her tracks when her neighbor said to her, “You can't do that. You need to let us do things for ourselves. We'll ask for help if we need it.” Linda then asked her neighbor if she could help her with her groceries. With a big smile, her neighbor said “of course you can help.”   This story illustrates the importance of finding a balance between helping a senior and allowing them to maintain their independence and dignity. Helping is okay, it is encouraged, but you need to ask for permission first. Helping a senior do something they want to do on their own will only embarrass them and lead to resenting you, which we know is not at all what your goal was.   According to Home Care Angels, when your loved one starts to slow down, it can be tempting to take over and do too much for them. But for seniors, staying independent is an important part of maintaining dignity and respect—and it can contribute to physical, mental, and emotional well-being.   Your job is to support their wishes and involve them in as much as they want and are able to do. Talk with your loved one about their interests and give them control over their activities whenever possible. Let them take the lead and then work out the logistics with, or for, them as needed.   An active lifestyle and social life can help your loved one maintain their independence, too. Home Care Angels says to help your loved one continue their regular activities like attending church, visiting with relatives, and reconnecting with old friends or groups they were involved in. If they are able to manage it, take them to library lectures, local theater, or any community event they're interested in.   According to Walden University, independence is not solitude. And loneliness can be fatal, with one recent study showing that feeling extreme loneliness can raise an older adult's chances of premature death by 14%. That's why, when caring for your loved one, you should encourage them to remain socially active. Maintaining old friendships and cultivating new ones not only helps ward off loneliness but can also help older adults retain a sense of importance and independence.   If your loved one has trouble getting out of the house and attending social events, you can help them use a computer, tablet, or cellphone to have video calls with their friends and loved ones. Technology is a great way to bring people together when they are unable to be together physically. If your loved one has any interest in learning about technology, you can find senior-specific technology classes in your area. They can learn how to use their own devices with their friends and others their age and it can also save you time and sanity.   Teaching a parent can be difficult. It can take longer than you expect and remaining calm can be hard at times. It requires a lot of patience. For some people, teaching and learning together with a parent is a great way to spend quality time with them, but if that isn't for you, that's okay. A class tailored to seniors is a great solution to helping your loved one learn more about using technology and helping them socialize. Plus, once they understand how to work their devices, they won't need you to help them call their friends and they will be able to talk to them any time they want.   Providing care for a loved one is a rewarding job and you get to spend more time with them. It can also be stressful and tiring. Helping your loved one be more independent, not only helps them but it helps yourself, as well. No matter what level of care your loved one needs, allowing them to participate in their care and make choices can help both of you maintain a stronger relationship with less bickering and fighting.   Smart home devices can also help your loved one have more control over their environment. According to Home Care Assistance, there are several voice-activated home devices on the market, made by companies like Amazon and Google. These devices are a great resource for people with disabilities. They're great for those with low vision, difficulty with fine motor tasks, or mobility challenges. Voice-activated devices can do a lot of things, including play music, operate the television, lock and unlock doors, control the thermostat, control lights, tell the time, date, and weather, and make phone calls. You can even order a pizza.   Smart devices empower some people to live independently for longer. They allow people who can't use smartphones or computers to access information. Plus, new uses for these technologies come out all the time.   Does your loved one often worry whether or not they locked the door when they are away from home? Another smart device that can be helpful for them is automated door locks controlled from your phone. With smart locks, your loved one will be able to open the app and immediately see if they locked the door, and lock it from wherever they are if they didn't.   Many home security systems offer smart locks, as well as surveillance systems that can notify you and emergency response teams if your loved one has an accident. Make sure you talk to your loved one before having any cameras installed in the home. If they are uncomfortable with cameras, things like life alert necklaces and smartwatches can also be used to notify others in case of an emergency. Some smartwatches now have fall detections that will automatically call first responders if your loved one falls and doesn't get up.   Don't be surprised if your loved one is resistant to trying new things, even if it can help them do more on their own. Linda Ziac from the Caregiver Resource Center says that family caregivers often tell her that they feel frustrated and guilty when they try to help, but their loved one repeatedly tells them “I don't need anything.”   One suggestion Linda often makes is that after learning your loved one's wishes, it may be possible to give a gift to your loved one. You can give them a gift for no reason at all, or for a special occasion, such as a birthday, mother's or father's day, or during the holidays. These gifts can help improve your loved one's quality of life in many ways.   Linda recalls one evening when she had a blackout in her area. She went next door to check on her elderly neighbor, only to find her walking around in the dark, searching for her flashlight. Once the power came back on, Linda decided to do some research to find a way to help prevent her neighbor from a potential fall during a blackout.   She knew that office buildings have emergency lighting systems and researched similar systems for personal use. She found a very reasonably priced product for home use, that didn't require any installation. Linda purchased two emergency lights for her neighbor to be placed on an end table on each floor of her home.   These particular emergency lights lasted an hour before they needed to be recharged and allowed her neighbor time to move safely throughout her home and get settled to wait out the power outage.   Linda has a few other gift ideas she's found over the years to be useful to other caregivers. She suggests creating a gift certificate for rides to the doctor's office so that your loved one can redeem them with you or someone else and still feel like they aren't taking advantage of you or being a burden, even after you have told them you are happy to take them.   If your loved one has pets, you can walk their dog, or come play with their animals, especially in inclement weather. If you don't live nearby, ask someone in their neighborhood if they would be willing to walk your loved one's dog. Even just once a week can be a welcome relief to your loved one.   Hiring someone to clean their house, put things away, and do laundry is a great gift for special occasions. Check your local senior center and see if they know of any cleaning services for seniors. Some companies offer free or discounted cleaning sessions.   A variety coupon book that includes services you or someone help provide is something else that Linda suggests. Cooking a meal, grocery shopping, and medication pick-up are all things you can include. You can also include going out to lunch and going to a museum or another activity that they enjoy.   Other gifts that can help your loved one at home can include, a LifeLine necklace, replacing doorknobs with doorknob levers so that they are easier to open, raised toilet seat with handles, and a phone or tablet specifically made for seniors and those with memory loss issues.   Whenever your loved one mentions something that they are struggling with, like turning the faucet on or off, try to make a note of it. If your loved one doesn't want you to go out and fix everything they mention right away, you can give them items off the list you make as gifts. You can also talk to their friends and anyone they talk to regularly and have them give you gift ideas. Their friends may also be willing to help you give your loved one these gifts, as well.   Regular exercise is not only important for maintaining independence, but it's important for a healthy lifestyle. You can help your loved one find an exercise class they enjoy, like yoga or water aerobics. Going to a class can also be something for your loved one to look forward to and is a lot of fun when taken with friends. Virtual exercise classes can be a good way to keep moving while at home.   Whatever your loved one likes to do to stay active, help them continue to do it and make it part of their routine. Even going on walks around the neighborhood can be enough exercise for your loved one to stay healthy. Home Care Angels says that if your loved one has exercises recommended by a physical therapist, remind them and encourage them to do them regularly. According to Home Care Assistance, regular physical activity can help prevent Alzheimer's and dementia plus improve strength and mobility, so make sure your loved one is getting the exercise they need.   According to Walden University, physical ailment and/or injury can significantly impact an elderly person's ability to remain independent. While some of the degenerative aspects of aging are hard to prevent, accidents are not—it just takes an awareness of how accidents happen and how they can be prevented.   One of the most common accidents suffered by the elderly is falling. In fact, each year, one in every four people over the age of 65 will fall. However, by helping the elderly take simple safety measures—like securing rugs, installing handrails in bathrooms, repairing uneven flooring, and using a cane or walker—you can help them significantly reduce the risk of falling. Other safety measures you should encourage the elderly to take include maintaining smoke and fire alarms, keeping medications properly sorted, and outfitting stovetops and ovens with nobs that are easy to use and displays that are easy to see.   No matter what level of care your loved one needs, allowing them the opportunity to make their own choices is necessary for them to maintain their independence, and for you to have less on your plate. According to Walden University, if we feel powerless we cannot feel independent. That's why it's vital for you to ensure any senior you're working with has a significant say in the choices affecting their lives.   From matters of health to living arrangements to diet to exercise, the elderly deserve the right to decide what they want. When you work with seniors, remember your job isn't to coerce. It's to empower. And that begins by treating the elderly with the same level of respect—and affording them the same amount of autonomy—you would give to any other adult.   Similarly, Home Care Assistance says seniors have their own opinions and preferences. Encourage your loved one to voice these opinions by making his or her own choices. For example, offer several options for what to eat, wear, and do every day, and allow your loved one to choose. Doing so helps your loved one maintain independence while still staying within reasonable, healthy limits.   Home Care Angels says that you should also involve your loved one in a day-to-day plan. Ask them to plan meals, fold the laundry and participate in the shopping, cooking, and cleaning where possible. Bake cookies together, even if they can only help stir the dough. Let them decide what TV shows, radio programs, and music they want to listen to.   Even if you know your loved one's favorite shows and programs, they will appreciate you giving them the chance to tell you what they like or what they want to do, even if their answer is exactly what you thought it would be. And you never know when the time may come that they pick something that surprises you. If you don't ask, you will never get a different answer.   We touched on this earlier when talking about gifts, but according to Home Care Assistance, age-friendly home improvements can enable older adults to be independent for longer. In the bathroom, you can install grab bars in the shower and near the toilet. You can add a shower chair and an elevated toilet seat. In the kitchen, you can store items on the counter or at eye level so your loved one doesn't have to bend or reach. You can also buy weighted utensils to make mealtimes easier.   As you make changes to your loved one's home, think through their daily routine. What challenges are they facing throughout the day? What tasks do they receive support with? Is there any equipment that would make things easier? Are there changes that you could make that would empower them to need less direct support? If you don't know where to start, you may want to consult an occupational therapist. They can offer ideas of changes you can make to the home.   The Caregiver Resource Center also suggests arranging for a home safety audit to identify any areas of concern in your loved one's home, along with a corrective action plan. A home safety audit can identify areas of risk in your loved one's home that you may not have thought of on your own. You can also listen to our episode on Aging in Place for more information on ways you can help make your loved one's home safer.   There will be many times where you and your loved one disagree over things as small as what to eat for dinner or as big as where your loved one should live. According to Home Care Assistance, as family caregivers, we want to protect our loved ones from everything that might harm them. From an unhealthy meal to a decision to keep living alone, our loved ones often make decisions that worry us. If we want to empower those we care for, we need to allow them the space to make decisions that we disagree with. Nobody can be safe all the time.   Caregivers must balance safety with autonomy. For example, maybe your mother is adamant about living at home. She might also be willing to allow a paid caregiver to come each evening for a few hours to prepare dinner and clean. While this may not be your preferred solution, it empowers your mom to live the way she wants to live. It can bring you peace of mind knowing that someone is checking on her each day. A caregiver can keep your parent safe at home by making sure she gets any assistance she might need.   Communication is key in helping your loved one maintain their independence. Sit down and have a conversation with them about things you both can do differently in order for them to do more for themselves. Your loved one may not want to bring up any issues to you on their own, but if you ask them specifically what they want and ways that you could help them achieve this goal, they will be much more willing to divulge the information you need. During this conversation, you should also bring any safety concerns you have to their attention. If you worry about them falling in the shower, let them know and work on a solution together.   According to the Caregiver Resource Center, all too often, a senior wants to retain their independence and doesn't want to become a burden to their loved ones. In order to maintain their independence, the senior may attempt to hide the fact that they are struggling, and are in need of some assistance.   One way that you may learn of a problem, is when you receive a phone call in the middle of the night. When you answer the phone you hear your mother is in the emergency room, she's fallen and broken her hip. As the closest living relative, you receive the call, and within minutes you are being faced with new responsibilities as your mother's caregiver.   Not all problems occur as a crisis like this but instead evolve in a gradual series of warning signs spanning weeks, months, or even years. Look for those signs that your loved one needs help and is not voicing this need to you or anyone else. With open communication, your loved one will be able to safely maintain their independence and you will have peace of mind knowing that they will tell you if they are having trouble.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them. Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: http://www.caregiverresourcecenter.com/Respecting%20Seniors.pdf   https://www.homecareangelsinc.com/caring-for-aging-parents/5-ways-to-help-seniors-remain-independent/   https://www.waldenu.edu/online-doctoral-programs/phd-in-human-services/resource/helping-the-elderly-maintain-independence   https://homecareassistance.com/blog/supporting-seniors-promoting-independence          

Make Dementia Your B*tch!
Episode 28: Third part of free workshop, "Helping People Living with Dementia Who Refuse Care."

Make Dementia Your B*tch!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 23:12


This one is the effing bomb, people! I put all of the stuff together and give you a blueprint for handling all sorts of care refusals. But you know what? These 3 podcasts are just the tip of the iceberg!! In my Dementia Behavior MasterClass, which I deliver LIVE for 1 hour each week for 4 weeks, I pack in soooo much more content. Plus...you and I are live, so I answer YOUR questions and help YOU with YOUR own situation!! How awesome is that???? I will be sending out info after this episode so you may want to make sure you are on THE LIST. I will be opening up sales on Sunday, January 9 2022. I am limiting the webinar to 10 people because I want to give everyone the attention they deserve. So...be ready! HINT: The Dementia Behavior Master Class registration and sales will open up this site: www.dementiacentricsolutions.com on Sunday, January 9 2022. Only my loyal podcasters have this deet. The people subscribing to the newsletter won't find out until after this podcast is released. This is my "thank you" for the awesome listeners who also read the show notes!!! In this podcast, I referenced a video. Go here to see the video https://wp.me/p951Pg-12M Loved the podcast? Want to stay in the loop and snag information about free stuff and other offers in my podcast? Subscribe here: https://7ba411eb.sibforms.com/serve/MUIEAGRihMp3YCvMGUbK7usRQOWj7sPJgtULa2BGKd-Bz1zXOobcRoK_BmpIZ7tO_89zC37s-VQ-feGgjL1d18zXNJ7dJ4XCHO-kv2jkm0MNDnKX8yMHEPAp3Am0I5qef9EfoowOWKB-VuqT8Z8BgoVR8GUG0iU-qSsq2blFfDHufPg3DanXuySfS4XEyz4NqtRFOdMbUMF1zk4U You can confidently manage dementia behaviors so that your life and the life of your loved one with dementia become easier and calmer. Check out different ways to learn how to handle many common (and not so common) dementia behaviors: https://dementiacentricsolutions.com Frustrated with care refusals? Go to https://makedmentiayourbitch.com for a free copy of my checklist, “15 Ways to Manage Dementia Care Refusals.” Have a dementia question? Want to hear it answered on a future podcast? Email me: info@makedementiayourbitch.com. Are you a visual learning? Check out my YouTube channel, where I demonstrate strategies like bridging and chaining Looking for a community? I have my own Facebook page for dementia caregivers: Make Dementia Your B! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-a-jablonski/message

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
243 - Autophagy & Proteostasis in Alzheimer's Disease: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 34:18


New year, new papers! Join Kate for your monthly update on all things proteostasis and autophagy as they relate to both AD pathology and potential new therapeutic interventions. In today's papers, we'll journey through the endolysosomal system, say "Hi" to some new chaperone families, and even discuss the interplay between AD and other distinct neurodegenerative diseases. Enjoy!  Sections in this episode:  Autophagy & Proteostasis Pathology (4:42)  Targeting Proteostasis/Autophagy Machinery (28:48) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below: https://drive.google.com/file/d/135C2fAXAPF4-_c4huLXuhj59VW1SDeN-/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 papers so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Kate Van Pelt, edited by Michelle Grover, and reviewed by Marcia Jude and Anusha Kamesh. The bibliography was generated by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!"  

What The Dementia
049 | Realistic Self-care for the Busy Dementia Care Partner

What The Dementia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 17:06


In this original What the Dementia episode, we will discuss realistic self-care for the busy dementia care partner. SUBMIT YOUR QUESTION: www.letsbambu.link/qa PRODUCTS: Grow With Gratitude - 100-Day Gratitude & Self-Care Journal specifically made for dementia care partners. Get yours today! :) | https://www.letsbambu.link/growwithgratitude LETS CONNECT: Website | https://www.letsbambu.com Facebook Page | https://www.facebook.com/bambucare Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/letsbambu/ Podcast | https://anchor.fm/whatthedementia MUSIC CREDIT: Listen To SpillageVillage - Tropical Landing Pop Songs At Looperman.com DISCLAIMER: The information contained in Bambu Care LLC's website, blog, emails, programs, services and/or products is for educational and informational purposes only. While we draw on our prior professional expertise and background in other areas, you acknowledge that we are supporting you in our role exclusively as a Dementia Care Consultant. By participating in Bambu Care, LLC's website, blog, emails, programs, services and/or products, you acknowledge that we are not a licensed psychologist, professional counselor, or medical doctor. We in no way, diagnose, treat, or cure any illnesses or diseases. Dementia Care Consulting is in no way to be construed or substituted as psychological counseling or any other type of therapy or medical advice. The information provided by Bambu Care, LLC also does not constitute legal or financial advice nor is intended to be. Dementia Care Consulting is not a substitute for the services of a CPA or attorney. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatthedementia/message

Inside Out Smile
79, Podanuary Day 5, Hey Sugar!

Inside Out Smile

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 7:16


I'm rambling on today about my thoughts (and new research) on sugar! It's in everything and it's sooo deadly!! Questions? Advice? Want to share your story? Want a shout-out?  Please write in,  at amber@dramberq.com.  If you like what you hear, please subscribe, rate and share : ) Support the podcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/dramberq  Thank you for your support xoxo

Chicken Soup for the Soul with Amy Newmark
Self-Care Isn't Selfish for the Family Caregiver

Chicken Soup for the Soul with Amy Newmark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 16:26


Hey, it's Amy Newmark with your Chicken Soup for the Soul and today's inspiration and advice comes from Chicken Soup for the Soul: Navigating Eldercare & Dementia. This new collection of stories contains the emotional support and practical tips that you need as you navigate the world of eldercare, especially when Alzheimer's or other dementias are part of it. You'll feel less alone and more empowered in your new role after you read these stories. And today I want to talk about something that every family caregiver needs to work on, and that is self-care. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!
TMBDOS! Episode 248: Best and Worst First-Time Watches of 2021.

They Must Be Destroyed On Sight!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 140:35


2021 has come and gone and Lee and Leah have watched a staggering amount of films in the past year. Thus come the time for the usual best and worst lists to be talked about on the podcast. In this 2hrs+ episode the hosts list their 20 best first-time watches, their 10 worst first-time watches, and their best honourable mentions. Come help us shovel the last bit of dirt on 2021's grave. Lee's Best and Worst of 2021: Honourable Mentions: "Viy" (1967) "The Sicilian Connection" (1972) "The Laughing Policeman" (1973) "Malignant" (2021) "Mad Dog Morgan" (1976) Best of: 20. "Arctic" (2018) 19. "They Remain" (2018) 18. "Candyman" (2021) 17. "Repulsion" (1965) 16. "In the Earth" (2021) 15. "Last Night in Soho" (2021) 14. "The Last Duel" (2021) 13. "Some Like It Hot" (1959) 12. "The Stepford Wives" (1975) 11. "The Whip and the Body" (1963) 10. "Dogs Don't Wear Pants" (2019) 9. "Sitting Target" (1972) 8. "Cisco Pike" (1972) 7. "The Muppets Take Manhattan" (1984) 6. "Multiple Maniacs" (1970) 5. "Charley Varrick" (1973) 4. "Siege" (1983) 3. "Psycho Goreman" (2020) 2. "The Astrologer" (1975) 1. "Female Trouble" (1974) Worst of: 10. "Alligator 2: The Mutation" (1991) 9. "Death Valley" (2021) 8. "Great White" (2021) 7. "The Law in Her Hands" (1936) 6. "The Dead Pit" (1989) 5. "Jiu Jitsu" (2020) 4. "Pacific Banana" (1981) 3. "Stay Out of the Attic" (2021) 2. "Shadow in the Cloud" (2020) 1. "Night of the Animated Dead" (2021) Leah's Best and Worst of 2021: Honourable Mentions: "Just Before Dawn" (1981) "Pan's Labyrinth" (2006) "Chopping Mall" (1986) Best of: 20. "Watch Out, We're Mad" (1974) 19. "Psycho Goreman" (2020) 18. "Tower" (2016) 17. "The Act of Killing" (2012) 16. "Dance Charlie Dance" (1937) 15. "The Thing" (1982) 14. "The Fly" (1986) 13. "Dogs Don't Wear Pants" (2019) 12. "Beast of War" (1988) 11. "Black Sunday" (1960) 10. "Singin' in the Rain" (1952) 9. "May" (2002) 8. "Dementia" (1955) 7. "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" (1920) 6. "City of God" (2002) 5. "Parasite" (2019) 4. "Hereditary" (2018) 3. "No Time to Die" (2021) 2. "Promising Young Woman" (2020) 1. "Turbo Kid" (2015) Worst of: 10. "Haunt" (2019) 9. "The Craft: Legacy" (2021) 8. "Beautiful" (2000) 7. "Fly Me" (1973) 6. "Dark Shadows" (2012) 5. "Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-O-Rama" (1988) 4. "Bride and Prejudice" (2004) 3. "From Prada to Nada" (2011) 2. "The Exorcist" (1973) 1. "The Law in Her Hands" (1936) Featured Music: "Triumph" by Lou Reed.

Make Dementia Your B*tch!
Episode 27: Second part of free workshop, "Helping People Living with Dementia Who Refuse Care"

Make Dementia Your B*tch!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 23:18


Woohoo! Yes, awesome caregivers. Here is part 2 of my free and fantastic workshop. If you want to catch the full experience, video and all, go here: https://wp.me/p951Pg-12J Loved the podcast? Want to stay in the loop and snag information about free stuff and other offers in my podcast? Subscribe here: https://7ba411eb.sibforms.com/serve/MUIEAGRihMp3YCvMGUbK7usRQOWj7sPJgtULa2BGKd-Bz1zXOobcRoK_BmpIZ7tO_89zC37s-VQ-feGgjL1d18zXNJ7dJ4XCHO-kv2jkm0MNDnKX8yMHEPAp3Am0I5qef9EfoowOWKB-VuqT8Z8BgoVR8GUG0iU-qSsq2blFfDHufPg3DanXuySfS4XEyz4NqtRFOdMbUMF1zk4U You can confidently manage dementia behaviors so that your life and the life of your loved one with dementia become easier and calmer. Check out different ways to learn how to handle many common (and not so common) dementia behaviors: https://dementiacentricsolutions.com Frustrated with care refusals? Go to https://makedmentiayourbitch.com for a free copy of my checklist, “15 Ways to Manage Dementia Care Refusals.” Have a dementia question? Want to hear it answered on a future podcast? Email me: info@makedementiayourbitch.com. Are you a visual learning? Check out my YouTube channel, where I demonstrate strategies like bridging and chaining Looking for a community? I have my own Facebook page for dementia caregivers: Make Dementia Your B! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-a-jablonski/message

UBC News World
Giant Builders Covers Proven Memory Training Strategies For Dementia Sufferers

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 2:11


If you want to learn expert strategies for reducing memory loss, improving focus, and warding off dementia, you're in the right place. Check out this interview today! Find out more at https://youtu.be/nVqRbPj5BKc (https://youtu.be/nVqRbPj5BKc) or https://podcasts.bcast.fm/e/p8lp4k18 (https://podcasts.bcast.fm/e/p8lp4k18)

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research
242 - New Variants & Genetic Insights Part 2: October 2021

AMiNDR: A Month in Neurodegenerative Disease Research

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 27:35


Welcome to our first episode of 2022! Marcia will bring you 13 genetics papers from October 2021. We will talk about all kinds of topics - right from AD-associated loci to polygenetic risk stratification, all of which can contribute to planning effective treatment strategies. Tune in!  Sections in this episode:  Transcriptomics/Gene Expression Changes (2:33)  Genetic Variants (6:16)  Genetic Risk (13:14)  MicroRNA (20:10)  Other Topics (22:52) -------------------------------------------------------------- You can find the numbered bibliography for this episode by clicking here, or the link below: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZmtkgGyheSdJreRmjXy6GIkSmoUdMQTP/view?usp=sharingTo access the folder with all the bibliographies for 2021 papers so far, follow this link (it will be updated as we publish episodes and process bibliographies), or click the following link below:https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1N1zx_itPkCDNYE1yFGZzQxDDR-NiRx3p?usp=sharingYou can also join our mailing list to receive a newsletter by filling this form. Or tweet at us: @AMiNDR_podcast  --------------------------------------------------------------Follow-up on social media for more updates!Facebook:  AMiNDR  Twitter: @AMiNDR_podcastInstagram: @AMiNDR.podcastYoutube: AMiNDR PodcastLinkedIn: AMiNDR PodcastEmail: amindrpodcast@gmail.com  -------------------------------------------------------------- Please help us by spreading the word about AMiNDR to your friends, colleagues, and networks! Another way you can help us reach more listeners who would benefit from the show is by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. It helps us a lot and we thank you in advance for leaving a review! Our team of volunteers works tirelessly each month to bring you every episode of AMiNDR. This episode was scripted and hosted by Marcia Jude, edited by Chihiro Abe, and reviewed by Anusha Kamesh and Ellen Koch. The bibliography was generated by Anjana Rajendran and the wordcloud was created by Sarah Louadi (www.wordart.com). Big thanks to the sorting team for taking on the enormous task of sorting all of the Alzheimer's Disease papers into episodes each month. For October 2021, the sorters were Jacques Ferreira, Christy Yu, Kate Van Pelt, Eden Dubchak, Kira Tosefsky, Dana Clausen, Ellen Koch and Elyn Rowe.Also, props to our management team, which includes Sarah Louadi, Ellen Koch, Naila Kuhlmann, Elyn Rowe, Anusha Kamesh, Jacques Ferreira, and Shruti Kocchar for keeping everything running smoothly.Our music is from "Journey of a Neurotransmitter" by musician and fellow neuroscientist Anusha Kamesh; you can find the original piece and her other music on soundcloud under Anusha Kamesh or on her YouTube channel, AKMusic.   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMH7chrAdtCUZuGia16FR4w   -------------------------------------------------------------- If you are interested in joining the team, send us your CV by email. We are specifically looking for help with sorting abstracts by topic, abstract summaries and hosting, audio editing, creating bibliographies, and outreach/marketing. However, if you are interested in helping in other ways, don't hesitate to apply anyways.  --------------------------------------------------------------*About AMiNDR: *  Learn more about this project and the team behind it by listening to our first episode: "Welcome to AMiNDR!" 

Recharge
Viagra and Dementia?

Recharge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 3:05


Recently published data on the potential link between Alzheimers and Viagra   https://www.nature.com/articles/s43587-021-00138-z

Evolving Past Alzheimer's
Our Sense of Smell - Brainwaves of COVID and Alzheimer's with Thom Cleland PhD

Evolving Past Alzheimer's

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 54:39


This is a more theoretical episode that gives us some idea about what might be happening with the rhythms of an Alzheimer's or POST-COVID brain.  Our guest, Dr Thom Cleland, is a professor of theoretical and systems neuroscience at Cornell University.  His research is particularly focused on the mammalian olfactory system and on the emergent dynamical networks that govern communication and information transfer among brain areas.   We talk about brain circuits, neuronetworks and how this relates to our sense of smell and Alzheimer's in general. For more information on how you can prevent or push back against Alzheimer's and other dementias visit Kemperwellness.com or call (216) 337-1400.  We have support programs, virtual classes, and many other options. Consider supporting the Evolving Past Alzheimer's podcast at patreon.com/evolvingpast so we can continue to bring you the information most helpful to you.   1:42 - What we can learn from looking at brain waves  8:58 - The olfactory system and how it works  13:57 - What happens to people's brain waves when they are experiencing dementia processes  24:43 - How the olfactory system connects to the memory and can help with dementia intervention  36:18 - Is losing the sense of smell a sign of neurodegeneration? 

Manic Mondays
Manic Mondays Episode 758: Never Fear 2022 Is Here

Manic Mondays

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 20:44


Happy new year!! Can't be any worse than the last... can it? Oh god... that felt like the Anakin and Padme meme. Moving on... this first show of 2022 will take your mind off of all those pesky concerns of 2021 with laughter, including a review of Insane Ian's newest album, "Illinoise". So sit back, have some coffee in your fave Harry Potter mug and don't worry about a thing... until the final song. 1. €œSounds of Starbucks€ by Tim Hawkins 2. Devo Spice reviews "Illinoise" by Insane Ian 3. €œHufflepuffs€ by Insane Ian 4. News of the Stupid! 5. €œJust Look Up€ by Ariana Grande and Kid Cudi Tim Hawkins is at TimHawkins.net Insane Ian is at InsaneIan.com and his new album Illinoise is available at InsaneIan.bandcamp.com and Don€t Look Up is now available on Netflix Thank you to our Patreon backers for helping make this show possible!!!

Aging in the Willamette Valley
1/1/22: Nikki Jardin with Mirador Magazine and Tavé Fascé Drake with | Have You Heard About the Magazine for People with Dementia?

Aging in the Willamette Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 29:10


This week, our guests Nikki Jardin Co-Founder & Editor from Mirador Magazine, and Tavé Fascé Drake, Co-Founder, Editor & Art Director join us to talk about the magazine for people with dementia and cognitive impairments. YES, our guests created a magazine for people with cognitive impairment and their care partners as well. Each issue offers stories on a variety of topics loosely related to that volume's theme as well as puzzles and other activities that can be enjoyed independently or with others. Special attention has been given to optimizing the magazine's layout, fonts, etc. for people with dementia. Don't miss this show! #Salem

Make Dementia Your B*tch!
Episode 26: Free Workshop Part 1 Helping People Living with Dementia Who Refuse Care

Make Dementia Your B*tch!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 29:19


Happy New Year, awesome listeners! I created a free workshop for dementia caregivers. The focus is on handling care refusals and the dreaded "NO!" but I also tackle other behaviors. As an added bonus, I skipped the commercials AND you will get all 3 parts this week. So stay tuned! 3 FUCKING EPISODES IN ONE WEEK! Hell, yeah, peeps!! In this podcast, I referenced a video. Go here to see the video and get the research articles I talked about: https://wp.me/p951Pg-12D Loved the podcast? Want to stay in the loop and snag information about free stuff and other offers in my podcast? Subscribe here: https://7ba411eb.sibforms.com/serve/MUIEAGRihMp3YCvMGUbK7usRQOWj7sPJgtULa2BGKd-Bz1zXOobcRoK_BmpIZ7tO_89zC37s-VQ-feGgjL1d18zXNJ7dJ4XCHO-kv2jkm0MNDnKX8yMHEPAp3Am0I5qef9EfoowOWKB-VuqT8Z8BgoVR8GUG0iU-qSsq2blFfDHufPg3DanXuySfS4XEyz4NqtRFOdMbUMF1zk4U You can confidently manage dementia behaviors so that your life and the life of your loved one with dementia become easier and calmer. Check out different ways to learn how to handle many common (and not so common) dementia behaviors: https://dementiacentricsolutions.com Frustrated with care refusals? Go to https://makedmentiayourbitch.com for a free copy of my checklist, “15 Ways to Manage Dementia Care Refusals.” Have a dementia question? Want to hear it answered on a future podcast? Email me: info@makedementiayourbitch.com. Are you a visual learning? Check out my YouTube channel, where I demonstrate strategies like bridging and chaining Looking for a community? I have my own Facebook page for dementia caregivers: Make Dementia Your B! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-a-jablonski/message

All Home Care Matters
Alzheimer's Disease vs. Dementia

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 19:54


Today's episode has been handpicked by our listeners. We have gotten quite a few comments on our videos wanting to know the difference between Alzheimer's and Dementia and we are going to be talking about the differences between the two and clearing up any confusion you may have. First, we are going to discuss what Alzheimer's is and how it differs from Dementia before moving on to what dementia is and what it can look like. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   According to the CDC, Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia. It is a progressive disease beginning with mild memory loss and possibly leading to loss of the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to the environment. Alzheimer's disease involves parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language and can seriously affect a person's ability to carry out daily activities. Age is the best-known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.   Alzheimer's disease accounts for somewhere between 60 and 80 percent of all dementia cases. As the aging population rises, more and more people are being diagnosed with Alzheimer's. The CDC says that in 2020, as many as 5.8 million Americans were living with Alzheimer's disease and this number is projected to nearly triple to 14 million people in the next forty years.   Individuals with Alzheimer's can live for many years with the disease, but it does ultimately end with death, often due to the loss of the ability to swallow. On average, after a diagnosis is made, a person with Alzheimer's usually lives for 4-8 years. However, someone with Alzheimer's can live longer than that. Some have lived nearly 20 years after receiving a diagnosis.   Early diagnosis is key for this disease. The sooner a treatment plan can be started, the better. According to the CDC, researchers believe that genetics may play a role in developing Alzheimer's disease. However, genes do not equal destiny. A healthy lifestyle may help reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. If you have a family history of Alzheimer's, make sure you inform your doctor. There are a few tests they can perform that may result in early detection.   According to the Alzheimer's Association, Alzheimer's is a degenerative brain disease that is caused by complex brain changes following cell damage. It leads to dementia symptoms that gradually worsen over time. The most common early symptom of Alzheimer's is trouble remembering new information because the disease typically impacts the part of the brain associated with learning first.   As Alzheimer's advances, symptoms get more severe and include disorientation, confusion, and behavioral changes. Eventually, speaking, swallowing, and walking become difficult. Currently, there is no cure for this disease, but there are a few ways to treat it. If you suspect that a loved one or yourself may have Alzheimer's, speak with a doctor. They will be able to determine if you have the disease, what stage you are in, and the best course of action for you to take.   This episode is closely related to our recent mini-series on the Seven Stages of Alzheimer's disease. We won't be talking about Alzheimer's nearly as in-depth as we have in our mini-series, so if you would like to learn more about Alzheimer's, listen to the series on our website, our YouTube channel, or wherever you get your podcasts.   Now that we've covered Alzheimer's disease, let's move on to dementia.   According to Forbes, dementia is the umbrella term used to describe several diseases that cause changes in the brain that lead to memory loss and language and reasoning difficulties, ultimately disrupting everyday functioning.   The National Institute on Aging says that Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning — thinking, remembering, and reasoning — to such an extent that it interferes with a person's daily life and activities. Some people with dementia cannot control their emotions, and their personalities may change. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a person's functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for basic activities of living.   Dementia is more common as people grow older (about one-third of all people aged 85 or older may have some form of dementia) but it is not a normal part of aging. Many people live into their 90s and beyond without any signs of dementia.   There are several different forms of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and a person's symptoms can vary depending on the type. Let's take a closer look at the 5 most common forms of dementia. As you already know, the most common form of dementia is Alzheimer's.   According to Mayo Clinic, Lewy body dementia, also known as dementia with Lewy bodies, is the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Protein deposits, called Lewy bodies, develop in nerve cells in the brain regions involved in thinking, memory, and movement (motor control).   Lewy body dementia causes a progressive decline in mental abilities. People with Lewy body dementia might have visual hallucinations and changes in alertness and attention. Other effects include Parkinson's disease signs and symptoms such as rigid muscles, slow movement, walking difficulty, and tremors.   The third most common type is Frontotemporal dementia. According to Mayo Clinic, frontotemporal dementia is an umbrella term for a group of brain disorders that primarily affect the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. These areas of the brain are generally associated with personality, behavior, and language.   In frontotemporal dementia, portions of these lobes shrink, or atrophy. Signs and symptoms vary, depending on which part of the brain is affected. Some people with frontotemporal dementia have dramatic changes in their personalities and become socially inappropriate, impulsive, or emotionally indifferent, while others lose the ability to use language properly.   Frontotemporal dementia can be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric problem or as Alzheimer's disease. But frontotemporal dementia tends to occur at a younger age than does Alzheimer's disease. Frontotemporal dementia often begins between the ages of 40 and 65 but occurs later in life as well. FTD is the cause of approximately 10% to 20% of dementia cases.   The next form of dementia is vascular dementia. According to Mayo Clinic, Vascular dementia is a general term describing problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, memory, and other thought processes caused by brain damage from impaired blood flow to your brain.   You can develop vascular dementia after a stroke blocks an artery in your brain, but strokes don't always cause vascular dementia. Whether a stroke affects your thinking and reasoning depends on your stroke's severity and location. Vascular dementia can also result from other conditions that damage blood vessels and reduce circulation, depriving your brain of vital oxygen and nutrients.   Factors that increase your risk of heart disease and stroke — including diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking — also raise your vascular dementia risk. Controlling these factors may help lower your chances of developing vascular dementia.   The final common form of dementia is Mixed dementia, a combination of two or more types of dementia. According to the Alzheimer's Association, In the most common form of mixed dementia, the abnormal protein deposits associated with Alzheimer's disease coexist with blood vessel problems linked to vascular dementia. Alzheimer's brain changes also often coexist with Lewy bodies. In some cases, a person may have brain changes linked to all three conditions — Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and Lewy body dementia.   Researchers don't know exactly how many older adults currently diagnosed with a specific type of dementia actually have mixed dementia, but autopsies indicate that the condition may be significantly more common than previously realized.   Autopsy studies play a key role in shedding light on mixed dementia because scientists can't yet measure most dementia-related brain changes in living individuals. In the most informative studies, researchers correlate each participant's cognitive health and any diagnosed problems during life with analysis of the brain after death.   According to the National Institute on Aging, researchers have also identified many other conditions that can cause dementia or dementia-like symptoms. These conditions include Argyrophilic grain disease, a common, late-onset degenerative disease. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a rare brain disorder. Huntington's disease, an inherited, progressive brain disease. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, caused by repeated traumatic brain injury. And HIV-associated dementia, a rare disease that occurs when the HIV virus spreads to the brain.   The overlap in symptoms of various dementias can make it difficult to get an accurate diagnosis. But a proper diagnosis is important to get the best treatment.   Now that you know the difference between Alzheimer's and Dementia, let's move on to some of the causes, risk factors, and prevention methods of dementia.   According to Forbes, one common myth many people tend to believe is that you can't reduce your risk of getting Alzheimer's disease or other kinds of dementia—you either get it or you don't. In reality, adopting healthy habits can lower your risk of developing dementia, or at least delay the onset. “Healthy body, healthy mind,” says Dr. Richard Caselli, associate director and clinical core director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “What we can control, we should control.” Though he adds that even a lifetime of healthy habits is no guarantee of protection.   Among the 12 factors that increase a person's risk of dementia outlined in the 2020 report from the Lancet Commission on dementia prevention, most are within one's control. These include hypertension, smoking, obesity, diabetes, low social contact, excessive alcohol consumption, and being physically inactive. Risk factors that we cannot control include lack of education, traumatic brain injury, depression, hearing impairment, and exposure to air pollution.   According to the Alzheimer's Association, dementia is caused by damage to brain cells. This damage interferes with the ability of brain cells to communicate with each other. When brain cells cannot communicate normally, thinking, behavior, and feelings can be affected.   The brain has many distinct regions, each of which is responsible for different functions (for example, memory, judgment, and movement). When cells in a particular region are damaged, that region cannot carry out its functions normally.   Different types of dementia are associated with particular types of brain cell damage in particular regions of the brain. For example, in Alzheimer's disease, high levels of certain proteins inside and outside brain cells make it hard for brain cells to stay healthy and to communicate with each other. The brain region called the hippocampus is the center of learning and memory in the brain, and the brain cells in this region are often the first to be damaged. That's why memory loss is often one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer's.   While most changes in the brain that cause dementia are permanent and worsen over time, thinking and memory problems caused by the following conditions may improve when the condition is treated or addressed: depression, medication side effects, excess use of alcohol, thyroid problems, and vitamin deficiencies.   In most people, the cause of dementia is unknown, but that doesn't mean there aren't ways you can lower your risk of developing dementia. Knowing what risk factors, you have can aid in lowering your chances of developing dementia, as well.   According to the NHS, some dementia risk factors are difficult or impossible to change, like your age, genes, and level of education. The older you are, the more likely you are to develop dementia. However, dementia is not a natural part of aging and isn't something that you should be expecting to develop. In general, genes alone are not thought to cause dementia. However, certain genetic factors are involved with some of the less common types. Dementia usually develops because of a combination of genetic and "environmental" factors, such as smoking and a lack of regular exercise. Other risk factors such as hearing loss, untreated depression, loneliness, or social isolation, and sitting for most of the day may also contribute to your likelihood of developing dementia.   Currently, there are no proven ways to prevent dementia, but doctors have a few suggestions for prevention methods. Even though you may not be able to alter your chances of developing dementia, following these suggestions can lead to an overall healthy lifestyle and can prevent many other illnesses and health issues. According to the NHS, you may reduce your risk of dementia by eating a healthy, balanced diet, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, keeping alcohol within recommended limits, stopping smoking, and keeping your blood pressure at a healthy level.   Keeping your body healthy may help reduce your risk of dementia, but you also need to keep your brain active and engaged. According to Danone Nutricia Research, the brain communicates through a vast network of billions of nerve cells. These nerve cells or neurons connect with each other via junctions called ‘synapses. Synapses allow communication between neurons and make it possible to create and recall memories.   Throughout our lives, we continually lose and re-grow these important brain connections. In a healthy brain, the number of new synapses balances the loss of old ones, allowing for a sustained net number of synapses. In a brain affected by injury or illness, such as dementia, synapses die off faster than they are created. When this happens, it becomes difficult to create and recall memories. Regularly engaging your mind may help your brain create more synapses longer. Activities like crosswords, word searches, and reading are all great ways to engage your mind. Learning new skills can also help your brain create more synapses and the repetitive information you use while learning can double as a recall exercise.   Regular physical exercise can also help you keep your mind active. Going for a few 10-minute walks a day can help increase the blood flow in your brain and in the rest of your body. Participating in social activities and maintaining regular social interaction can lower stress and depression, which can affect one's memory. Getting enough sleep and drinking enough water can both help your ability to focus and your memory.   Mayo Clinic says that doing things like playing bridge, taking alternate routes when driving, learning to play a musical instrument, and volunteering at a local school or community organization are all great ways to help keep your brain in shape and keep memory loss at bay.   Now that we have covered the causes, risk factors, and prevention methods for dementia, last move on to the last part of today's episode, the importance of early detection and diagnosis.   Early diagnosis of dementia is key because it allows a person with dementia to begin treatment right away and preserve their memory and overall function longer than they would be able to without early detection of the disease. Not only does early detection allows someone to start a treatment plan right away, but it also allows them the opportunity to plan for the future.   According to Queensland Health, being familiar with the signs of dementia can help people receive a diagnosis as early as possible. Early signs that a person might have dementia can include: being vague in everyday conversations, memory loss that affects day-to-day function, short term memory loss, difficulty performing everyday tasks and taking longer to do routine tasks, losing enthusiasm or interest in regular activities, difficulties in thinking or saying the right words, changes in personality or behavior, finding it difficult to follow instructions, finding it difficult to follow stories, and increased emotional unpredictability.   If you have noticed any of these signs in yourself or a loved one, schedule an appointment with your doctor. Since many of these signs are also signs of normal aging, it's important to talk to your doctor if you think you may be experiencing the early stages of dementia. As we've already mentioned today, it's better to rule out dementia now than wait for a diagnosis later in life.   If you or your loved one are having memory troubles, consider keeping a journal. Your doctor may not be able to see any issues occurring during a short visit and it can be hard to remember everything you have experienced. Keeping a journal can help you remember what you need to talk to the doctor. It can also measure the progression of any potential memory loss.   While dementia can be scary, getting a diagnosis doesn't mean your life stops. People with dementia are still able to take care of themselves, do their jobs, and most importantly, spend time with the people they love doing things they enjoy.   Having a support group can make all the difference when living with dementia. Reach out to friends and family when you need help and accept help when offered. Keeping connected can be difficult after a diagnosis. Many people turn away from their friends and family because they are embarrassed but isolating yourself will only make things worse.    Currently, there is no cure for dementia, but there are a few treatment options that can help preserve someone's memory and ability to function. More research is always being done on the subject. In the next few years, there very well could be a better way to treat or even stop the progression of memory loss.   The population of people living with dementia is rising and as more and more people are diagnosed, communities are coming together to support those with dementia. Communities all over the world are coming up with ways to include those with dementia and make sure they are not left out after a diagnosis. A dementia-friendly community offers residents with dementia a safe place to engage in social activities and more even into the late stages of the disease. To learn more about dementia-friendly communities and to learn how you can help make your community dementia-friendly, listen to our episode on Dementia-Friendly Communities.   Before we end the episode, let's have a quick recap of what we've covered today. Alzheimer's Disease is the most common form of dementia, and they both result in changes in the brain that lead to memory loss and language and reasoning difficulties, ultimately disrupting everyday functioning. In both Alzheimer's and dementia, early detection is key. Knowing the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's and dementia can help you get an early diagnosis and in turn, an early start at treating the disease and planning for the future.    We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: https://www.forbes.com/health/healthy-aging/dementia-vs-alzheimers/   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/difference-between-dementia-and-alzheimer-s   https://www.cdc.gov/aging/aginginfo/alzheimers.htm   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-alzheimers   https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-is-dementia   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/frontotemporal-dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20354737   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352013   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lewy-body-dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352025   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-dementia/types-of-dementia/mixed-dementia   https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/vascular-dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20378793   https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-dementia   https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/dementia/dementia-prevention/   https://www.nutriciaresearch.com/alzheimers-disease/synapses-the-building-blocks-of-memory/   https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/memory-loss/art-20046518   https://www.health.qld.gov.au/news-events/news/dementia-signs-symptoms-recognise-what-to-do    

Parenting UP! Caregiving adventures with comedian J Smiles

Do you own being a Caregiver Out LOUD? J Smiles pull apart why many caregivers do not include their CG title in the list of "What I do" in conversations, on social media or resumés. Perplexed, she reflected and found pain as a possible source of hesitance. Listen for her take on how to overcome this avoidance.  J gives a handful of easy examples to celebrate your caregiver status. Smiles pushes a theory that Family CGs need to "pop their collar" a bit --- walk tall --- shout it sooner and even acknowledge their CG anniversary.PODCAST SHOW NOTES:Sponsor:CircleOf (Caregiver App)https://www.circleof.com/downloadParentingUp! Weekly LIVE TV/Internet INTERACTIVE Show on GetVokl.com:https://getvokl.com/channel/parenting-up

Aging in Style with Lori Williams
068. How the Alzheimer's Association Safe Return Program is a lifeline for seniors with Dementia

Aging in Style with Lori Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 14:12


70% of people with Alzheimer's or another type of dementia will wander at some point in time due to poor short-term memory. ‘Wandering' means getting lost by moving away from where they're typically located, whether it's driving or walking. This can be dangerous when they're unable to find their way back and risk their safety or being taken advantage of. This is where the Safe Return MedicAlert® program comes in. Tanesha Tyler-Carr of the Alzheimer's Association rejoins Senior Living Expert Lori Williams for the final installment of the 3-part Alzheimer's series in 2021. She explains the role of Safe Return in reuniting families with their wandering loved one - continuing to draw from her experience with one-on-one care planning, crisis management and referral for families affected by Alzheimer's and other types of dementia. Takeaways from this episode: - The Safe Return Medic Alert Program is through the Medic Alert Foundation. It supplies medical ID bracelets for those who unsafely wander and provides a 24-hour emergency response. - Once a senior becomes a member, they get an ID card with their number that connects to a database with their name, emergency contact, physical description and more. - Some chapters of the Alzheimer's Association offer a scholarship program for the initiation and annual renewal fee costs. Resources mentioned: Learn more about the 24/7 wandering response program: Alz.org/medicalert Call the Alzheimer's Association: 1-800-272-3900 MedicAlert Foundation: https://www.medicalert.org To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter, please visit: https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/ https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/ https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/ Topics discussed: - Senior wandering - Alzheimer's and other dementia - Safe Return Program - MedicAlert® Foundation - Safe Return Medic Alert Advantage Program - When it's time to consider memory care

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe
The Heading Debate | Dementia in Football

Messi Ronaldo Neymar and Mbappe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 5:22


Finally the discussion of Dementia in football is growing; and becoming mainstream. Dementia is a group of thinking and social symptoms that interferes with daily functioning. Not a specific disease, dementia is a group of conditions characterised by impairment of at least two brain functions, such as memory loss and judgement. Symptoms include forgetfulness, limited social skills and thinking abilities so impaired that it interferes with daily functioning. Medication and therapies may help manage symptoms. Some causes are reversible. The UEFA Champions League is an annual club football competition organised by the Union of European Football Associations and contested by top-division European clubs, deciding the competition winners through a round robin group stage to qualify for a double-legged knockout format, and a single leg final.

News Updates from The Oregonian
Portland man with dementia dies of hypothermia Christmas Day

News Updates from The Oregonian

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 4:53


ODOT worker recounts close call with falling tree amid Oregon spike in holiday crashes. Dutch Bros founder's horse racing business sues state to compel ruling on gambling center. Oregon records 1st cases of rare, serious fungal infection Candida auris in 3 Salem patients See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Devo Spice's The Insider Podcast - Public Feed
Devo Spice's The Insider Podcast - Episode 176

Devo Spice's The Insider Podcast - Public Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 64:30


Sound Booth Results, FuMP Updates, Film Class, "Tom Rockwell Voice Reel," Sound Booth Error, Blood Guts and Guns, Video Plans, "Dryer Portal," I'm Sick, New Ridiculous Rap, WorldCon Planning, "Odor in the Fridge," FuMPCast Episode 600, WorldCon Report, "Snack Bar (Live at WorldCon)," Christmas and New Years, Running, The Logan Awards, Tour Dates, Sign Off

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
APOE Gene, Alzheimer's & Dementia Disease Risk: Must Know New Details

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 27:15


Alzheimer's disease and dementia prevalence and deaths are on the rise, claiming over 6,000 lives in the USA every week! Yet many people don't even know their APOE genotype, which arguably has the biggest impact on future Alzheimer's disease and dementia as well as cardiovascular disease risk. In this show we dive deeper into what the APOE gene does and how knowing this info can help tweak your nutrition and lifestyle helping to reduce risk of future disease—especially if you have one or two copies of the APOE ε4 gene. Save on your Omega-3 Index Test by MYOXCIENCE Nutrition: http://bit.ly/omega-3-index Use code Podcast at checkout Link to Video + Show Notes: https://bit.ly/apoe-gene-alzheimers Eat Like Your Life Depends on it Tee Shirt: http://bit.ly/myoxcience Enroll in the Blood Work MasterClass: https://bit.ly/blood-work-masterclass Time Stamps: 0:00 Intro 00:53 APOE is a gene that makes proteins that are involved in lipid binding. 01:10 APOE and Immunity 01:39 APOE 4 alleles and Alzheimer's disease risk 03:13 3 different APOE isoforms: APOE2, APOE3, APOE4 allele. 03:44 Having the gene does not mean that you will get the disease. 04:35 APOE is involved in lipid metabolism 05:30 Lipoproteins and lipids transport 06:05 APOE can redistribute lipids across tissues and cell types. 07:40 APOE is secreted by the liver with VLDL and bile acids 08:00 Lipoprotein lipase facilitates your metabolic deposits. Hormone sensitive lipase facilitates your metabolic withdrawals. 09:42 Your omega 3 index and APE 4 isoform. 11:35 APOE4 and cholesterol 11:45 ApoB VS ApoE 12:09 APOE2 carriers tend to have a less atherogenic lipid profile. 12:15 APOE4 carriers are associated with decreased levels of APOE triglycerides and increased levels of APOB in lipoproteins 13:12 APOE4 puts genotype carriers at increased risk for heart disease. This is likely due to the association with APOE4 and elevated LDL and Apolipoprotein B. 14:07 APOE4 primes your microglia to be more inflammatory. Microglia are brain immune cells. They are involved in synaptic processing, pruning of cells, shaping neurons, and removing inflammatory debris. APOE4 carriers have decreased cerebral glucose metabolism and increased levels of beta amyloid and tau protein. 15:50 With APOE4, there are changes and increase of tau protein within the neurons. There are also alterations in the blood brain barrier integrity. 16:00 To preserve the integrity of the brain, moderate alcohol consumption, increase exercise, incorporate sauna therapy and sauna bathing, as it effects cerebral blood flow. 16:45 APOE is expressed in astrocytes, microglia and other vascular cells within the brain. Blood brain barrier prevents toxins and metabolic waste from going into your brain. Increased expression of APOE is detected in stressed neurons. 17:42 APOE isoforms affect lipid transport, glucose metabolism, mitochondrial function, synaptic plasticity, beta amyloid protein expression, tau protein and cerebral vascular function within the brain. 18:18 Ratio of APOE4 allele correlates with loss of gray matter volume and abnormal glucose metabolism, a hallmark of Alzheimer's and dementia. 19:00 APOE4 is the greatest genetic risk factor for late onset Alzheimer's disease. It also influences the risk and outcomes for stroke, MS, Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal dementia. 22:11 A low carb diet, high in wild caught fish, is protective for APOE4 carriers. It impacts brain metabolism and lipid levels favorably. Drive your glycemic load down. 24:05 If you are over the age of 50 and have one or two copies of the APOE4 allele, consider microdosing with rapamycin. Rapamycin is an mTOR inhibitor. It may delay the onset of Alzheimer's and dementia.

Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz
DRwJL – Understanding Dementia/ What it is & Is Not

Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 41:28


Make Dementia Your B*tch!
Episode 25: What to do When a Person Living with Dementia Won't Take Their Medications

Make Dementia Your B*tch!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 17:32


It is frustrating when a person living with dementia won't take their medications. Learn three approaches to handle this problem. You can confidently manage dementia behaviors so that your life and the life of your loved one with dementia become easier and calmer. Check out different ways to learn how to handle many common (and not so common) dementia behaviors: https://dementiacentricsolutions.com Frustrated with care refusals? Go to https://makedmentiayourbitch.com for a free copy of my checklist, “15 Ways to Manage Dementia Care Refusals.” Have a dementia question? Want to hear it answered on a future podcast? Email me: info@makedementiayourbitch.com. Are you a visual learning? Check out my YouTube channel, where I demonstrate strategies like bridging and chaining Looking for a community? I have my own Facebook page for dementia caregivers: Make Dementia Your B! #alzheimers #lewy body #frontotemporal #dementia #caregiving #care refusal #caregiving #dementiabitch #medication --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-a-jablonski/message

All Home Care Matters
What Type of Caregiver are You?

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 19:57


Finding a caregiver for a loved one can be stressful. There are several different types of caregivers to choose from that all provide different levels of care at different price points. Today we are going to be talking about the many types of caregivers and the differences between the types of care they provide. We'll begin with the 5 types of in-home caregivers before moving on to the other 5 types of caregivers. Now let's move on to the rest of the show.   Before we jump into the types of caregivers, let's briefly talk about what a caregiver is. Hopkins Medicine tells us, in simple terms, a caregiver is a person who tends to the needs or concerns of a person with short- or long-term limitations due to illness, injury or disability. The term “family caregiver” describes individuals who care for members of their family of origin, but also refers to those who care for their family of choice. This could be members of their congregation, neighbors, or close friends. Family caregivers play a significant role in health care, as they are often the main source of valuable information about the patient.   Most people will either be caregivers or need care at some point in their lives, and oftentimes they will experience both sides. According to Family Caregiver Alliance, family caregivers, particularly women, provide over 75% of caregiving support in the United States. In 2007, the estimated economic value of family caregivers' unpaid contributions was at least $375 billion dollars, which is how much it would cost to replace that care with paid services.   Family Caregiver Alliance says that caregivers tackle a wide range of tasks. They may do household chores like buy groceries, cook, clean the house, and do laundry. They may also help with personal care, like helping a family member get dressed, take a shower, and take medicine. They can provide medical-related assistance, like helping transfer someone in and out of bed, help with physical therapy, injections, feeding tubes, and other medical procedures. They can also help a loved one make medical appointments and drive to the doctor and drugstore. Many caregivers are the go-between for their loved one and are the ones that talk with the doctors, care managers, and others to understand what needs to be done. They also spend time at work handling a crisis or making plans to help a family member who is sick and is often the designated “on-call” family member for problems.   Now that we've had a refresher on what a caregiver is and the importance of a caregiver, let's move on to the types of caregivers.   There are 5 types of in-home caregivers: family caregivers, informal caregivers, independent caregivers, private duty caregivers, and professional caregivers. Each of these types provide in-home care, but the way they provide care differs.   Caregiving can be expensive and many families are more comfortable doing at least a portion of the caregiving their loved one needs themselves. According to Jevs Care at Home, family caregivers are usually unpaid family members who take care of a spouse or loved one. These caregivers are almost always related to the person receiving care in some way. We are often asked if it is possible to have some of your caregiving expenses reimbursed and it is, but on average, about 21% of all caregivers work is unpaid.   That said, you may become a paid family caregiver by working with a home care agency. You may also find local resources to help with the cost of caregiving. According to Family Caregiver Alliance, sometimes, caregiving families may obtain financial relief for specific purposes, such as for respite care or to purchase goods and services, and in some cases, pay for caregiving. In some states, there are programs that pay family members to provide care to those receiving Medicaid and in very few states there are programs available to those who do not qualify for Medicaid. It is important to note, however, that these programs vary widely, often with complicated criteria for eligibility.   The second type of in-home caregivers are informal caregivers. According to Jevs Care at Home, informal caregivers provide similar services to those of family caregivers, but in most cases, they aren't related to the person receiving care. Usually, these caregivers have some connection or relation to their clients, which is helpful for creating the companionship many seniors seek.   According to Family Caregiver Alliance, about 44 million Americans provide 37 billion hours of unpaid, “informal” care each year for adult family members and friends with chronic illnesses or conditions that prevent them from handling daily activities such as bathing, managing medications, or preparing meals on their own.   Many people act as informal caregivers without even realizing that's what they are doing. Neighbors, friends, and family members provide informal care through tasks like meal prep, transportation to appointments, and errand assistance. They may see these tasks as just helping out when they are really providing care.   The third type of in-home caregiver is an independent caregiver. According to Jevs Care at Home, an independent caregiver gets hired directly by the person's family needing care and is not affiliated with a home care company. They provide all of the necessary caregiving services and work with the family to determine their loved one's care needs. This also means there are higher risks and liabilities when choosing this route.   Independent caregivers can often be 30 to 40 percent cheaper than a home care company and have fewer restrictions than a professional caregiver does. Paying for Senior Care says that as of 2019 if an independent caregiver is paid more than $2,100 per year, they are considered a household employee, and not an independent contractor. Thus, the family hiring the independent caregiver takes on all the responsibilities of being an employer, which includes payroll and taxes and all other requirements.   As the employer, you would write a job description for a potential independent caregiver that covers the level of care and all care tasks they will be expected to perform. Paying for Senior Care suggests listing tasks such as driving or accompanying the senior to and from appointments, running errands, providing supervision and companionship, managing medication, assisting with bathing and grooming, preparing meals, and housecleaning.   The personal qualities one is seeking in a caregiver should also be covered, such as a patient individual with a cheerful, upbeat personality. Independent caregivers can provide medical care, but they often only provide personal care.   The fourth in-home caregiver, a private duty caregiver, is similar to an independent caregiver. According to Jevs Care at Home, Private Duty Caregivers typically work for a home care company or independently and alleviate the difficulties of everyday life for a senior to allow them to continue living independently in their home. Depending on their level of training, a private duty caregiver is able to provide medical, nursing, cleaning, personal, domestic, and transportation services.   The last type of in-home caregiver is a professional caregiver. According to Jevs Care at Home, professional caregivers are career caregivers, so their primary occupation is caregiving. These caregivers work with a care recipient either in their home or in a facility to ensure they receive proper care. Professional caregivers work for professional home care companies, so they are typically assigned when you hire the company. They provide everything from homemaker services to medical care if necessary.   Professional caregivers work through licensed companies and oftentimes provide more care than the other four types of in-home caregivers. Because of this, a professional caregiver costs more than other caregivers do, roughly 30 to 40 percent more. Using a home care company means that you would not have to take responsibility as the employer like you would for an independent caregiver.   Now that we've covered in-home caregivers, let's move on to the other types of caregivers you should know.   Hospice caregivers are up first on our list. Hospice caregivers can provide care both at home and in a facility. Hospice caregivers can be family members or professional caregivers. According to the National Institute on Aging, hospice care focuses on the care, comfort, and quality of life of a person with a serious illness who is approaching the end of life. A hospice caregiver provides the necessary care for your loved one, while also making sure they are as comfortable as they can be.   A hospice caregiver is often part of a team. Compassus says that the hospice team arranges for the delivery of medical equipment and medications. They work with you on a schedule for visits from nurses, therapists, chaplains, social workers, and volunteers. The schedule adapts to your needs.   According to Compassus, the responsibilities of a hospice caregiver include helping patients with the activities of daily living, including bathing, dressing, feeding, and going to the bathroom. Ensuring your loved one has their prescriptions and that all medicines are given at the correct dose and time. Hospice nurses and aides can also teach proper techniques and provide basic medical care, including changing dressing, taking temperatures, and blood pressure readings. Hospice caregivers also understand how to use medical equipment, which may include oxygen machines, wheelchairs, lifts, and hospital beds. However, depending on the hospice provider and even state that you reside in – most hospice caregiver's will visit 1-2 times a week and for a short duration of time. Many times, for families receiving hospice at home the hospice provider will recommend hiring a home care company to help with a loved one's care needs.   If your loved one is receiving hospice care at home and needs to be transferred to a facility for pain management or any other reason, the hospice team will schedule transportation to the facility and will continue to provide care for your loved one and your family.   There may be times when your loved one is home alone and needs care and it may be unsafe for a caregiver to come to the home or a caregiver may be unable to visit. According to Jevs Care at Home, that's where virtual caregivers come in. By using a tablet or other type of screen, caregivers interact with their clients through Skype or another form of video call to ensure their health is monitored. This type of caregiving should be supplemental to in-home caregiving but still, help in caregiving like with medication reminders or health screenings. It's also helpful for companionship.   There are also technologies available that allow a virtual caregiver system to monitor your loved one in their home, like Addison Care. According to Addison Care, Addison, the virtual caregiver, is a state-of-the-art, 3D animated, connected caregiver designed to transform a residence into a digital Smart Health Home, providing chronic care management, rehabilitation, aging in place, behavioral health, and care coordination, for patients of all ages.   With a virtual caregiver system, you can connect devices, such as glucose monitors, blood pressure cuffs, and thermometers. The system can send alerts to you and your loved one and provides 24/7 support. Similar to life alert, if your loved one falls, a virtual caregiver system will notify emergency services. Virtual caregiving, even a system such as Addison Care, should still only be used as supplemental care and should not replace an in-person caregiver. Companionship is an important aspect of the caregiving relationship and it can be supplemented with virtual visits, but cannot be replaced by it.   Another caregiving option for your loved one that cannot be home alone is adult daycare. According to Jevs Care at Home, Adult Daycare offers the opportunity for seniors to have stimulating social, cognitive, and physical activity outside of the home for a portion of the day. If it's possible your loved one may be unsafe alone, can't perform daily activities, and is alone for most of the day, adult daycare may be a good option. These programs typically supplement an in-home caregiver, usually in situations where a family member, who is also the caregiver, has another job.   Not all daycare centers are the same. According to AARP, most offer therapeutic exercise, mental interaction for participants, social activities appropriate for their condition, and help with personal care such as grooming and using the toilet. Adult daycare centers differ in the specific areas of care they offer. Social centers concentrate on meals and recreation while providing some health-related services. Medical and health programs provide more intensive health and therapeutic services in addition to social activities. And specialized centers take participants who have only a particular condition, such as those diagnosed with dementia.   Depending on the type of care you are looking for and the length of time your loved one will be staying at a center, prices can vary. On average, adult daycare costs $70 a day. Medicare does not normally cover the costs of Adult Daycare, but you may find financial assistance in your area. Some veteran services may help cover the costs and local and state programs may also help pay for adult daycare.   AARP suggests looking into daycare when you start seeing signs that an older loved one is unable to structure their own daily activities when a loved one feels isolated and lonely and wishes for interaction with other older people, or experiences anxiety or depression and needs social and emotional support. You may also want to seek daycare services when your loved one has difficulty starting and focusing on an activity whether it's conversation, reading, or watching TV when they seem to be no longer safe on their own or feel uncertain and anxious about being alone.   Family caregivers also might consider adult daycare services when they need to work or be away from home for most of the day or if they are themselves experiencing ill effects such as anxiety, frustration, depression, or health problems.   Your loved one may be mostly independent and able to live alone, but still, need a caregiver to stop by for things like medication assistance. Assisted Living may be a good choice if this is true for your loved one. According to Jevs Care at Home, Assisted Living Facilities come in all shapes and sizes but are typically designed to provide a very basic level of care and assistance to their residents. These facilities offer social activities, a community setting, and other services to enrich the lives of those living there. Outside of these services, care is provided periodically and as needed, like in the case of administering medication. The assisted living staff provides care as needed and not constantly like in the case of a caregiver.   In addition to standard assisted living facilities, there are also specialized facilities, or sections of the facility, that work primarily with those who need more care. These sections are typically for those with injuries, chronic conditions, or diseases like Alzheimer's or Dementia.   Many families choose assisted living facilities in order to help with daily living activities. Daily living activities are things that you do every day, like eating, bathing, and walking. For elderly loved ones that need help with a few of these activities every day, but do not need help with the rest of their activities, assisted living would be the perfect option. For example, if your loved one needs help walking around and getting in and out of the tub, but they can make their own meals, eat alone, and dress themselves, assisted living would allow them to maintain their independence while still having a caregiver's help.   Medicare doesn't usually cover any of the costs with assisted living, but just with the other types of caregiving we've talked about today, local agencies and services may be able to help cover some of the costs of care. Visit your local senior center to find out what programs are available in your area.   Assisted living facilities do not provide full-time care for your loved one. If your loved one needs full-time care outside of the home, a nursing home, or a skilled nursing facility, may be the type of care your loved one requires.   According to Where You Live Matters, in a skilled nursing facility, residents receive full-time care by a specially trained medical staff. People who require a higher level of medical care, either short-term or long-term, need what's known as skilled nursing care, extended care, or long-term care. These facilities are licensed by Medicare and/or Medicaid and are focused on short-term rehabilitation and long-term medical care.   According to the National Institute on Aging, nursing homes focus on medical care more than most assisted living facilities. These services typically include nursing care, 24-hour supervision, three meals a day, and assistance with everyday activities. Rehabilitation services, such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy, are also available.   Some people stay at a nursing home for a short time after being in the hospital. After they recover, they go home. However, most nursing home residents live there permanently because they have ongoing physical or mental conditions that require constant care and supervision.   When choosing a nursing home, make sure you know what type of care your loved one needs and find a place that specializes in that care. Nursing home staff have many patients they are taking care of and, especially with the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, it's important to make sure your loved one is getting the care they need. We've talked about the importance of advocating for your loved one before, and that still remains here.   When your loved one is receiving care, not at home, there is always the possibility that their care needs are not being 100 percent met. Being an advocate for your loved one in a facility means regularly visiting your loved one and staying updated on their care plan. Having a relationship with their care team can also make it easier to stay up to date on any changes that happen with your loved one while they are in the facility.   When choosing a nursing home, you should look at reviews, talk to friends and family members that have experience with the nursing home, take a tour of the facility, and ask about waitlists for the facilities in your area. Nursing homes can be difficult to get into, especially with the continuing rise in the aging population. When touring nursing facilities, the National Institute on Aging suggests looking for Medicare and Medicaid certification, handicap access, residents who look well cared for, and warm interaction between staff and residents. They also suggest visiting a facility a second time without calling ahead. Try another day of the week or time of day so you will meet other staff members and see different activities. Stop by at mealtime. While you are there for this second visit, you should see if the dining room is attractive and clean and if the food looks tempting.   We've now covered all the various types of caregivers. Choosing the right caregiver for your loved one is an important task that shouldn't be taken lightly. If someone you know is currently looking into types of care for their loved one, share this episode with them. Knowing what types of caregivers are available can help you make a more informed decision when it comes to the type of care your loved one needs.   If you or someone you know is a caregiver, visit our YouTube channel and our dedicated Caregiver Support playlist for episodes to help the caregiver.   We want to say thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate these long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them.   Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. We look forward to seeing you next time on All Home Care Matters, thank you.   Sources: https://jevsathome.org/types-of-caregivers/   https://www.caregiver.org/resource/caregiving/   https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/about/community_health/johns-hopkins-bayview/services/called_to_care/what_is_a_caregiver.html   https://www.caregiver.org/faq/can-i-get-paid-to-care-for-a-family-member/   https://www.payingforseniorcare.com/homecare/hiring-independent-caregivers   https://www.payingforseniorcare.com/homecare/agency-or-independent-caregiver   https://addison.care/   https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/home-care/info-2017/adult-day-care.html   https://www.whereyoulivematters.org/assisted-living-defined/   https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/how-choose-nursing-home      

Chicken Soup for the Soul with Amy Newmark
Re-energizing the Life of an Elderly Family Member

Chicken Soup for the Soul with Amy Newmark

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 9:29


Hey, it's Amy Newmark with your Chicken Soup for the Soul and today's inspiration comes from Chicken Soup for the Soul: Navigating Eldercare & Dementia, which contains the emotional support and practical tips that you need as you navigate the world of eldercare, especially when Alzheimer's or other dementias are part of it. You'll feel less alone and more empowered in your new role after you read these stories. And it's not all about dementia either. Today I'm sharing two stories about elderly family members who just needed a purpose and were completely re-energized when, by accident, that purpose came along. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Manic Mondays
Manic Mondays Episode 757: Post Apochristmalypse

Manic Mondays

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 23:01


We know you're in that exhausted lull between post-Christmas and per-New-Year. We know because we're here too! But fear not, because this is that time of year when Devo Spice has a little too much eggnog and gets all nostalgic for News of the Stupid, so not only is there a CURRENT stupid news segment, you get to hear Devo's Top Three of 2021!! So relax and enjoy your late present. 1. "Resolution" by Steve Goodie 2. News of the Stupid 3. "When I Grow Up, I Wanna Be a Teen Titan" by Knuckleheadz 4. News of the Stupid Year-End Countdown! 5. "Cam Girls Live" by Taylor Bernstein Steve Goodie is at SteveGoodie.com Knuckleheadz are at Knuckleheadz.bandcamp.com, and Taylor Bernstein, aka The Bear Dude is at TaylorBernstein.com Thank you to our Patreon backers for helping make this show possible!!! See you next year!!!

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
We Need To Treat Alzheimer's As A Systems Disorder - Dale Bredesen, MD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 19:04


We Need To Treat Alzheimer's As A Systems Disorder -  Dale Bredesen, MDDale Bredesen, M.D•           https://www.ahnphealth.com/dr-bredesen.html•           Book - End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline An internationally-recognized expert in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, Dr. Dale Bredesen's career has been guided by a simple idea: that Alzheimer's as we know it is not just preventable, but reversible. Thanks to a dedicated pursuit of finding the science that makes this a reality, his idea has placed Dr. Bredesen at the vanguard of neurological research, and led to the discoveries that today underlie the ReCode Report. Dr. Bredesen earned his MD from Duke University Medical Center and served as Chief Resident in Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) before joining Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner's laboratory at UCSF as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow. He held faculty positions at UCSF, UCLA and the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Bredesen also directed the Program on Aging at the Burnham Institute before joining the Buck Institute in 1998 as founding President and CEO. #DaleBredesen #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #AlzheimerDisease #Dementia  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ 

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

If you notice these early signs of dementia, you need to act now. FREE COURSE ➜ ➜ https://courses.drberg.com/product/how-to-bulletproof-your-immune-system/ FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey (free consultation). Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting, or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 10 PM EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 AM to 6 PM EST. USA Only. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

Vitality Radio Podcast with Jared St. Clair
#192. VR Vintage: Be PROactive In Preventing Alzheimer's and Other Forms of Dementia

Vitality Radio Podcast with Jared St. Clair

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 58:16


(originally aired 1.16.21)This week on Vitality Radio Podcast Jared rants about giving yourself a mental and emotional break from the overwhelming state that we are currently experiencing.  Be mindful of your nervous system's parasympathetic state. Jared encourages you to relisten to Episode 39- Breaking Harmful Brain Patterns to Design the Life You Want with LaMonte Wilcox so that you can find balance instead of overwhelm. Jared has Sarah Burden from LifeSeasons to discuss Dr. Dale Bredesen's groundbreaking and game-changing research into ways you can be proactive in preventing and even reversing Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Jared and Sarah discuss the “Bredesen Seven” and Dr. Bredesen's book “The End Of Alzheimer's” to give you vital tips on what important supplementation and lifestyle changes you can integrate to help build your brain health.You can follow us at @vitalityradio on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Check us out online at vitalitynutrition.com. Let us know your thoughts about this episode by using the hashtag #vitalityradio and please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. Just a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes only. The podcast has not been evaluated by the FDA. The information within is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Advice given is not intended to replace the advice of your medical professional.

Dementia Care Partner Talk Show with Teepa Snow
127: Holidays and People Living with Dementia

Dementia Care Partner Talk Show with Teepa Snow

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 8:43


What are some key things you should keep in mind when it comes to celebrating the holidays with a loved one that is living with dementia? Tune in this week to hear Teepa's tips and insights on this timely topic. To learn more about Positive Approach to Care, please visit us at www.teepasnow.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dementiacaregivertalkshow/message

Tales to Inspire
Learning about Life through adventure on the ocean with Billy Taylor

Tales to Inspire

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 60:36


Billy Taylor is a 49 years old man who is working as a contract firefighter and is an ocean rower. Billy's upbringing is one in which he was very active and in his teenage years suffered some family struggles after his Father and Mother both passed away. In his teenage years Billy had already sailed from Australia back to the UK and had lived a life full of adventure, but life took a few twists and turns when he fell in love with a person from Denmark and had a child. The relationship did not last and Billy turned to drinking and drugs with the money that his parents had left behind. However things began to change when,Billy started ocean rowing challenges in 2014 after finding out his childhood friend had been diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson's Disease. He has now rowed across the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the Mediterranean and the English Channel, all of which have been to raise awareness of YOPD. Billy has transformed his life around and is now a shining light of how each of us can add a little more adventure into our lives and stand up for those who may be less fortunate than ourselves. Get ready for a incredible Tale to Inspire: Resources:  

Books on Pod
#201 - Uma Naidoo, MD on THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON FOOD

Books on Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 32:50


Nutritional psychiatrist, professional chef, and nutritional specialist Dr. Uma Naidoo chats with Trey Elling about THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON FOOD: AN INDISPENSABLE GUIDE TO THE SURPRISING FOODS THAT FIGHT DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, PTSD, OCD, ADHD, AND MORE. Learn all about the foods and beverages that can have a positive or negative impact on mental health issues such as: Depression (05:06) Anxiety (12:31) PTSD (18:08) ADHD (20:29) Dementia & brain fog (21:20) OCD (24:35) Bipolar disorder & schizophrenia (26:50)

Evolving Past Alzheimer's
Our Brains Need Meditation - Here's Why with Hemal Patel PhD

Evolving Past Alzheimer's

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 58:17


In this episode, we go deep into the potential benefits of specialized meditation for our immune systems, brain-related proteins, Alzheimer's, cellular energy, and much more. Our guest, Dr Hemal Patel - is a full professor and serves as the Vice-Chair for Research in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of California, San Diego. If you are skeptical about meditation I urge you to check out this episode so that you Click here is a link to Dr. Patel's talk at a recent Joe Dispenza conference. For more information on how you can prevent or push back against Alzheimer's and other dementias visit Kemperwellness.com or call (216) 337-1400.  We have support programs, virtual classes, and many other options. Consider supporting the Evolving Past Alzheimer's podcast at patreon.com/evolvingpast so we can continue to bring you the information most helpful to you.   12:47 - how cell membranes can cause or prevent Alzheimer's  15:52 - using meditation and other methods to strengthen cell membranes  28:31 - how you affect people around you by practicing meditation  37:23 - can meditation prevent you from contracting COVID-19?  44:16 - getting started with meditation 

Bulletproof Radio
Mini Episode: Cool Facts Friday #18

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 10:05


In this Episode of The Human Upgrade™...Cool Facts are quick hits of new human and world science curated into short bursts of information just for you. This fun compilation publishes one Friday a month.Beer & blue cheese found in ancient fecesBlood marker detects dementia earlyTeam flow shows up as a unique brain stateTrauma-focused psychotherapy works for PTSDMDMA improves PTSD symptoms EPISODE SPONSOR: All your cells require minerals to function. Fulvic and humic complexes provide cellular nutrition to support detoxification. Go to https://www.beamminerals.com and use code DAVE20 to get 20% offLISTEN: "Follow" or "subscribe" to The Human Upgrade™ with Dave Asprey on your favorite podcast platform.REVIEW: Go to Apple Podcasts at daveasprey.com/apple and leave a (hopefully) 5-star rating and a creative review.FEEDBACK: Got a comment, idea or question for the podcast? Submit via this form!SOCIAL: Follow @thehumanupgradepodcast on Instagram and Facebook.JOIN: Learn directly from Dave Asprey alongside others in a membership group: ourupgradecollective.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.