Podcasts about Dementia

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long-term brain disorders causing impaired memory, reasoning, and normal function together with personality changes

  • 3,602PODCASTS
  • 9,872EPISODES
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  • Jun 25, 2022LATEST
Dementia

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Best podcasts about Dementia

Show all podcasts related to dementia

Latest podcast episodes about Dementia

Zorba Paster On Your Health
E-cigarette use may lead to higher use of health services, Cranberries could improve memory and ward off dementia, Coconut tofu stir-fry

Zorba Paster On Your Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022


This week the hosts look at how e-cigarette use may lead to higher use of and spending on health services, and they discuss why cranberries could improve memory and ward off dementia. Plus, they share a delicious recipe for coconut tofu stir-fry.

Two Sistas
FantabulousFriday - 06.24.22

Two Sistas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 28:41


TwoSistas and it's FantabulousFriday! Those little things that mean so much which keep us grounded; who is buying up all that land; cellular meat; someone's facial expressions and body language with 30 something percent and 1600 Dementia - oh my!! Short and sweet and as always, we would love to hear from you! Please go to our website and leave us a voice message: www.TwoSistas.online

How Do We Fix It?
Dementia: Memory and Forgetting: Nicci Gerrard

How Do We Fix It?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:02


Dementia provokes profound moral questions about our society and the meaning of life itself. How much are we connected to one another? In what ways are we distant and separated? What does it mean to have a self? How can we offer dignity to those who suffer from Alzheimer's and other forms of this terrible disease?Worldwide around 55 million people have dementia. The US Centers for Disease Control estimates that the U.S. total is nearly six million cases. The numbers are growing with the aging of the population. The incidence of Alzheimer's increased more than 50% in the past 15 years. People over the age of 85 are the largest growing share of the population.British journalist and author Nicci Gerrard is our guest. Her father's long struggle with dementia led Nicci to investigate what the disease does to those who live with it and to their caregivers. She writes with deep wisdom, kindness, and empathy in her new book, "The Last Ocean A Journey Through Memory and Forgetting."In modern, developed nations, "we so value being young, healthy, vigorous, successful, purposeful, and autonomous," says Nicci. "In dementia all these things gradually unravel."Following her father's death in 2014, Nicci Gerrard cofounded John's Campaign, which seeks to make care more compassionate for those who are vulnerable and powerless.In this episode, we discuss her journey, what's she learned, and ways to improve dementia care, including the need for open an unrestricted visiting hours at hospitals-- still a controversial topic-- and dementia villages, a fairly new way to help people with memory loss improve quality of life. Here's a link to more information about Nicci's work and her book. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Get Your Spirit in Shape - United Methodist Podcast
Navigating dementia: A guide for loved ones with Elizabeth Schulman

Get Your Spirit in Shape - United Methodist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 24:30


Loneliness, grief, anger, exhaustion and a longing for peace. United Methodist pastor and author Elizabeth Shulman says these emotions frequently surround families dealing with dementia. In her new book, Finding Sanctuary in the Midst of Alzheimer’s: A Spiritual Guide for Families Facing Dementia, Shulman offers steps for how caregivers, as well as members of the … Continue reading "Navigating dementia: A guide for loved ones with Elizabeth Schulman"

All Home Care Matters
Discovering "Motherhood: Lost and Found" with Author Ann Campanella

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 55:53


All Home Care Matters welcomes Author and Director of AlzAuthors, Ann Campanella to the show. Ann is the author of the book, "Motherhood: Lost and Found" and share her story of caring for her mother who was diagnosed with dementia. This remarkable story takes the reader through Ann and her mother's caregiving journey. Through Ann's journey and story she authored "Motherhood: Lost and Found" which would go on to be named one of the best Alzheimer's books ever.

The Daily Good
Episode 569: The EU takes a huge step in the fight against CO2 emissions, a gorgeous poem from Mary Oliver, good news in the struggle to prevent dementia, more of the beauty of Vienna, the swinging vocals of Ella Johnson, and more…

The Daily Good

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 16:42


Good News: The EU parliament has voted on legislation to ban all CO2 emissions in automobiles, beginning in 2035, Link HERE. The Good Word: Listen to the poem “The Summer Day”, by Mary Oliver. Good To Know: A classic bit of trivia about sharks and cows! Good News: Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to […]

Parenting UP! Caregiving adventures with comedian J Smiles
Why am I still sleepy after a good night's sleep?

Parenting UP! Caregiving adventures with comedian J Smiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 33:32


Sleep is bitting your favorite caregiver's butt again. This time, J Smiles is getting ample rest but not reaping the rewards. Unprepared for these moments of exhaustion, listen as J details mishaps with Zetty, work and random daily activities. Searching for answers uncovers ah-has and oh-nos galore. All genders should Snuggle Up closely!We want to hear your comments  & future topic suggestions:TEXT a purple heart   "

What The Dementia
063 | Pain and Dementia

What The Dementia

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 9:32


In this original What the Dementia episode, we provide a few insights about pain and dementia. JOIN THE BAMBU CARE CHAMPION COMMUNITY WAITLIST (OPEN TO ALL DEMENTIA CARE PARTNERS WORLDWIDE): https://www.letsbambu.com/champions/waitlist LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR BAMBU CARE CHAMPION COMMUNITY: https://www.letsbambu.com/post/bambu-care-champion-community DOWNLOAD A FREE RESOURCE: https://www.letsbambu.com/resources PRODUCTS: With Intent: A Practical Guide to Navigating Behaviors Along the Dementia Care Journey | https://letsbambu.link/with-intent-book Grow With Gratitude - 100-Day Gratitude & Self-Care Journal (specifically made for dementia care partners) | https://www.letsbambu.com/product/grow-with-gratitude LET'S CONNECT: Website | https://www.letsbambu.com Newsletter | https://www.letsbambu.com/newsletter Facebook Page | https://www.facebook.com/bambucare Main Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/letsbambu With Intent Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/carewithintent/ Grow With Gratitude Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/growwithbambu Podcast | https://anchor.fm/whatthedementia MUSIC CREDIT: Listen To SpillageVillage - Tropical Landing Pop Songs At Looperman.com DISCLAIMER: The information contained in Bambu Care LLC's website, blog, emails, programs, services and/or products is for educational and informational purposes only. While we draw on our prior professional expertise and background in other areas, you acknowledge that we are supporting you in our role exclusively as a Dementia Care Consultant. By participating in Bambu Care, LLC's website, blog, emails, programs, services and/or products, you acknowledge that we are not a licensed psychologist, professional counselor, or medical doctor. We in no way, diagnose, treat, or cure any illnesses or diseases. Dementia Care Consulting is in no way to be construed or substituted as psychological counseling or any other type of therapy or medical advice. The information provided by Bambu Care, LLC also does not constitute legal or financial advice nor is intended to be. Dementia Care Consulting is not a substitute for the services of a CPA or attorney. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatthedementia/message

Aging Angst and Alleluias
10. Ashley Bright

Aging Angst and Alleluias

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 32:16


Mary Anne's guest is Ashley Bright. She received her Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) and Master of Professional Studies (MPS) in Aging Services Leadership from Lipscomb University. She went on to use her unique skills as a Medical Social Worker in the fields of Geriatric Medicine and Long Term Care. After several years in Long Term Care, her passion for advocacy for dying people and their families led her to obtain an End of Life Doula Certificate from the Conscious Dying Institute (CDI) out of Boulder, CO. She realized there was a severe lack of education surrounding Death and Dying, and a desire to fill that void led her to accepting a role as faculty at CDI where she trains other End of Life Doulas across the globe.   In addition to her role at CDI, she also is in private practice as owner of Bright Pathway End of Life Doula Services.  She also provides consulting to healthcare workers and companies who desire to become a pioneer in quality, holistic end of life care; and she teaches community seminars for those seeking to live a more purposeful and meaningful life by starting with the end in mind. www.verandaministries.org https://www.brightpathwaydoula.com    

GenX Stories
ENCORE: Becoming a sandwich generation

GenX Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 45:21


TBDEpisode linksAging Life Care AssociationHealth Care proxy in NY State - note each state will have different laws about this so look yours up. People with estranged family should also know that a family member will be able to make decisions for them and that typically the proxy can't just unplug youWhat is a sandwich generation?GenX women facing the caregiving crisisThe Sandwich Generation: When Caregiver Seems to Be Your Only RoleWhat Is a Mother-in-Law Suite, and Should I Consider Adding One?Swedish Death CleaningI Care A Lot movie  Care Options for People with Dementia or Alzheimer's 9 ways sandwich-generation caregivers can manage stress Facing Senilicide: How do we treat our aging parents?Connect with usSubscribe to GenX Stories in your favorite podcast appBuy some kickass merchWrite us a reviewVisit our siteJoin our Facebook GroupFollow our 80's inspired InstagramSend us an email

File on 4
Dementia: The Final Indignity

File on 4

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 36:39


Around 800,000 people have dementia in the UK. For those suffering from the illness, incontinence can often be seen an inevitable consequence - but that's not always the case. Deemed as too embarrassing or taboo, it's a topic that rarely hits the spotlight. Experts say preserving someone's ability to go to the toilet is crucial to maintaining their dignity and quality of life and should be a priority in care settings. But is that always happening? A new report shown exclusively to File on 4 has looked at how continence care is being managed in hospitals – and how, in some cases, those who are continent are actively encouraged to soil themselves. Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to families who say their loved ones were ignored when it came to their continence needs in hospital and that the consequences have left them with health issues and requiring additional support. Nurses and medical staff say that continence training is often seen as a ‘Cinderella subject'. We also hear from dementia patients themselves about why maintaining your own dignity and independence is so crucial with this disease. With the government set to reveal a new dementia strategy this year, will continence care be placed higher up the agenda? Reporter: Datshiane Navanayagam Producers: Emma Forde, Annabel Deas and Scott Hesketh Production Manager: Sarah Payton Journalism Assistant: Tim Fernley Editor: Carl Johnston

Make Dementia Your B*tch!
Episode 50: Dealing with "Stubborn" and "Mean" Dementia Behaviors: Tips and Approaches

Make Dementia Your B*tch!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 26:07


Does this feel familiar: “I quit my job to care for him, but he never appreciates anything I do.” Do you find yourself thinking, “Why is she so mean to me? Can't she see I'm trying to help her?” Are you asking yourself, “How do I handle the stubbornness? It feels like I'm fighting all of the time.” You are not alone. One of my colleagues calls these behaviors “Dementia S&M”—stubborn and mean. In this podcast, I'm going to untangle these "stubborn" and "mean" behaviors and provide some approaches that you may find helpful. You are not alone on this journey! JOIN ME FOR THE ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF THE MDYB PODCAST: THURSDAY, JULY 14 2022 6 PM CENTRAL TIME Register here. See the event in your timezone. New free resource--5 ways to help people living with dementia who refuse help. Click here. Interested in my book? Get your free preview here. Have a question? Want more information about my programs? Email me: rita.jablonski@gmail.com OR leave an audio message for me here. #alzheimers #lewy body #frontotemporal #vascular #Parkinsons #dementia #caregiving #care refusal #dementiabitch #stubborn #mean --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-a-jablonski/message

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support
Montessori-Style Dementia Engagement

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 60:42


Regular listeners will remember that this podcast started because I sought better engagement methods with my Mom. Thankfully, we know better ways to help keep our loved ones active, engaged, and happy. Montessori engagement creates an environment filled with cues and memory support that is explicitly designed to enable individuals to care for themselves. Using the Montessori methods, generally associated with teaching children, people living with dementia can learn to shop and prepare their meals in a minimally controlled environment. Some residents of care homes are engaged in meaningful, daily activities based on individual capacities and choice.  In this episode, I talk to one of the leading Montessori-style dementia engagement trainers, Cameron Camp. His stories and advice will inspire you and instruct you on using these methods with your family. Applying these techniques will give you both a higher quality of life. Please follow this link to their website to learn more about the Center for Applied Research in Dementia. https://www.cen4ard.com/who/ There are three things necessary for a podcast to be successful. One, great listeners like yourself. Two, sponsors who help cover the expenses of producing the podcast. Three great listeners who help support the podcast by taking advantage of the sponsors' special offers. With that said, here are our sponsors; Pharma-C Company (previously Pharma-C Wipes) Pharma-C-Wipes, helping you care for yourself and those you love. ​Life is a journey, and at Pharma-C-Wipes, we provide products that support you at each twist and turn.  PicnicHealth: Your medical records are now in your hands. PicnicHealth collects, digitizes, and encrypts all your medical records—then arranges everything in one intuitive timeline. No need to worry about a doctor's note or the lab results. It's all there for easy reference, right when you need it. Relevate from NeuroReserve Make Your Brain Span Match Your LifeSpan With Relevate nutritional supplement, you get science-backed nutrition to help protect your brain power today and for years to come. You deserve a brain span that lasts as long as your lifespan. Join Fading Memories On Social Media! If you've enjoyed this episode, please share this podcast with other caregivers! You'll find us on social media at the following links. Instagram Twitter LinkedIn  Facebook

ACE - Aged Care Enrichment
Loneliness, Social Connections and Dementia with Dr. Snorri Bjorn Raffnson

ACE - Aged Care Enrichment

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 28:39


Today we're focussing on the importance of social connection and presenting two perspectives on how it can affect the health and well being of older adults. Our first conversation features Dr. Snorri Bjorn Rafnsson from the University of West London, who's research examines some of the determinants of dementia and how we might delay and stop it's onset. In this episode Snorri helps us take a closer look at the relationships between loneliness, internet usage and dementia play out and some potential new areas for exploration. In the second half of this episode we speak to Jamie McIntyre from the Australian Red Cross who co-ordinates around 50 volunteers up in Tweed Heads as they provide support to socially isolated older adults. Jamie and the team do great work in partnership with SilVR Adventures, together we've been bringing immersive virtual reality experiences to care facilities and Jamie shares a little bit with us about that experience and how the SilVR Adventures' solution is enriching the lives of older adults through social connection. The Aged Care Enrichment Podcast is brought to you by SilVR Adventures ⬇️

Manic Mondays
Manic Mondays Episode 782: Sweet Dad Hangover

Manic Mondays

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 18:43


Yesterday was all about Dads... and today all the dads will go about being dads as usual, just without all the fanfare and new grilling equipment! So here on Manic Mondays we're gonna serve up one more ode to fatherhood with songs about that Dad life, huge penises, and don't forget how dad used to drive you to that job at the mall! 1. €œDad Life€ by Mayor Wertz 2. €œRasputin's D!andk€ by Zoltan and the Fortune Tellers 3. News of the Stupid! 4. €œAnother Job at the Mall€ Jeff and Maya Bohnhoff Mayor Wertz is at mayorwertz.bandcamp.com, Zoltan and the Fortune Tellers are at zoltanszkly.wixsite.com, and Jeff and Maya Bohnhoff are at jeffandmayabohnhoff.bandcamp.com Thank you to our Patreon backers for helping make this show possible!!!

This Week In Wellness
TWIW 158: Low Vitamin D linked to dementia

This Week In Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 5:02


This Week In Wellness following on from last week’s research showing a link between socialising and dementia now a University of South Australia study has shown a direct link between vitamin D deficiency and dementia. https://www.unisa.edu.au/media-centre/Releases/2022/vitamin-d-deficiency-leads-to-dementia/ https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ajcn/nqac107/6572356?login=true https://fb.me/e/3rHPv1muK The post TWIW 158: Low Vitamin D linked to dementia appeared first on The Wellness Couch.

Flourish.Mom Podcast
ADHD to Dementia Drugs - Psycho-Pharma | Psych-100 | Chapter 16 | Flourish with Diane Planidin

Flourish.Mom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 24:23


Psychopharmacology is the study of how drugs affect behavior. If a drug changes your perception, or the way you feel or think, the drug exerts effects on your brain and nervous system. We call drugs that change the way you think or feel psychoactive or psychotropic drugs, and almost everyone has used a psychoactive drug at some point (yes, caffeine counts).  Understanding some of the basics about psychopharmacology can help us better understand a wide range of things that interest psychologists and others. For example, the pharmacological treatment of certain neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease tells us something about the disease itself.  The pharmacological treatments used to treat psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia or depression have undergone amazing development since the 1950s, and the drugs used to treat these disorders tell us something about what is happening in the brain of individuals with these conditions. Finally, understanding something about the actions of drugs of abuse and their routes of administration can help us understand why some psychoactive drugs are so addictive. In this module, we will provide an overview of some of these topics as well as discuss some current controversial areas in the field of psychopharmacology. Learning Objectives - How do the majority of psychoactive drugs work in the brain? - How does the route of administration affect how rewarding a drug might be? - Why is grapefruit dangerous to consume with many psychotropic medications? - Why might individualized drug doses based on genetic screening be helpful for treating conditions like depression? - Why is there controversy regarding pharmacotherapy for children, adolescents, and the elderly? Live an Inspired Life! #Psychology #QueensU #Drugs Find out more about Flourish at the links below: ➡️ https://www.Flourish.Mom ➡️ Facebook https://www.Facebook.Com/Flourish.Mom   ➡️ Twitter: https://www.Twitter.Com/FlourishMom   ➡️ Instagram: https://www.Instagram.com/FlourishMom   ➡️ Pinterest: https://www.Pinterest.ca/WowFlourishMom   ➡️ Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/DT--AJzSGuQ   PSYC 100: Principles of Psychology F21 by PSYC100 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted. Note:  I am a student and not a teacher.  This is my learning journey that I am sharing with you :)

SeniorLivingGuide.com Podcast, Sponsored by: Parrish Healthcare
Beyond the Bedside: Staying Home After a Dementia Diagnosis

SeniorLivingGuide.com Podcast, Sponsored by: Parrish Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 38:16


While most people may consider the first steps of Assisted Living or Memory Care for family members that are diagnosed with Dementia, we are joined by Janetta Clayton from Beyond the Bedside. Janetta shares different approaches allowing your loved one to "age in place" within their own home, navigate the health system and access funds in order to help pay for services. The solutions and resources we discuss in this podcast can broaden a family with different options that they may not have known existed for their loved one. SeniorLivingGuide.com Podcast sponsored by Parrish Healthcare/Parrish Medical CenterThe background music is written, performed and produced exclusively by purple-planet.com.https://www.purple-planet.com/

Dissecting Medical History
Parkinson's featuring Robin Williams relation to it

Dissecting Medical History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 79:22


Rarkinson's Disease is still around but it its  disease that has long roots.  We talk about the disease and about Lewy Bodies dementia and what it must have been like for Robin Williams in the end.  Hope you learn something new.me&my health upOur mission is to enhance and enlighten the well-being of others... welcome to 'health...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify A Little Bit of ChillFun, light-hearted Podcast full of self-help and suggestions to help you find your chillListen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Historically High History Classes from the College of Cannabis. New episodes every Wednesday. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify The Proffitt PodcastThinking about starting a podcast, YouTube channel or repurposing old blog content?Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Boomers Today
Assisted Living: Past Present and Future

Boomers Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 28:28


Ellen Belk is a Silver Living strategist, with over 20 years of operational experience in Senior housing as a holistic Dementia expert, author, trainer and influencer. She brings a unique blend of proficiency in operations, sales, team building, resident experience and innovation to her clients. A dynamic speaker and recognized expert in aging and Dementia, Ellen moves seamlessly from the C-Suite to the frontlines of care, captivating audiences with her authentic stories from personal experience in the trenches of elder care. Her TEAM™ approach to achieving Championship level outcomes resonates with both professional and family caregivers alike. Sponsor: www.SeniorCareAuthority.com

The President's Daily Brief
June 17th, 2022. Our Southern Border Continues to Worsen. A Link Between Childhood Obesity and Dementia?

The President's Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 18:40


It's June 16th. You're listening to the President's Daily Brief. Your morning intel starts now. ------ First up, America broke a record last month; it's the number of arrests of illegal migrants. We're going to talk about who these folks are, and what message this sends to our enemies around the world. As always, I'm keeping an eye out for developing stories. Put these two on your radar. First, we've got some weird weather going on, and it's all because of La Niña. I'm going to explain what that is and why it has major implications both here in the United States and abroad. Second, a study out this morning that shows a link between childhood obesity and dementia in later life. We're going to talk about that study because 20% of our kids are obese. ------ Please remember to subscribe if you enjoyed this episode of the President's Daily Brief. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Make Dementia Your B*tch!
Episode 49: Q and A with Dr. J--"Can a facility refuse to accept my loved one with dementia?" and Other Questions

Make Dementia Your B*tch!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 37:08


In today's episode, I answer listener's questions: Can a facility refuse to accept my family member with dementia who has dementia-related behaviors, like refusing medication? How do I remove incontinence briefs when my family member fights with me? What should I do when my loved one with dementia suddenly becomes more confused and combative? Click here for my monthly webinar schedule. The webinars are free...and it would be great to meet you. #alzheimers #lewy body #frontotemporal #vascular #Parkinsons #dementia #caregiving #care refusal #dementiabitch #decision-making #decisional capacity --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rita-a-jablonski/message

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Reducing the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease by Understanding Sleep and the Brain

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 8:43


Did you know that according to English scientist and professor of neuroscience and psychology, Mathew Walker, the author of Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams that current research shows “that there appears to be a causal affect between sleep and our risk for Alzheimer's Disease?”  For this week's Brain Fact Friday and Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #223 we are going to take some of the most noticeable lessons learned from our recent podcast with Dr. John Denboer, on “This is Dementia: Disrupting the Decline”[i] and see what we can learn from Mathew Walker's most current research. This way, we can take a proactive approach to our sleep, optimizing our potential for learning, memory and retention, and see what we can learn about this devastating disease that affects “6.5M Americans, and is expected to double by 2050.” This topic goes hand in hand with our theme of Season 8 of our podcast: where our focus is  on Brain Health and Learning with a look at How an Understanding of Our Brain Can Improve Learning in Ourselves (adults, teachers, workers) as well as our future generations of learners. On this episode we will cover: ✔︎What is the difference between Alzheimer's and Dementia ✔︎What the most current research says about the connection between Alzheimer's Disease and sleep. ✔︎11 risk factors that we can learn more about to mitigate Alzheimer's Disease. ✔︎A look at the 2 proteins that damage and change the brain. ✔︎What we can do right now to mitigate Alzheimer's Disease by understanding sleep and our brain.   What is Alzheimer's and What is Dementia? On our interview with Dr. Denboer, who has spent most of his career working with patients on disrupting dementia, we began our interview defining each of these terms, since many of us aren't sure exactly what they are, and if we don't know what they are, how can we be sure we are being proactive with preventing them? Dementia: is a general term for “decline in mental ability severe enough to interfere with daily life”[ii] and there's not just one form of dementia. There's Alzheimer's, Vascular Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Mixed Dementia. Alzheimer's is “a degenerative brain disease that leads to dementia symptoms and gradually worsens over time.”[iii] We opened up our interview with Dr. Denboer with a quote from Dr. Babak Nayeri, a clinical associate professor from the University of Arizona who said “Dementia is not an aging disease; however, it is the most common disease of the aging population.” (from the Netflix documentary, This is Dementia).  “Though the greatest known risk factor for Alzheimer's is increasing age, the disease is not a normal part of aging.”[iv] 11 Risk Facts of Alzheimer's Disease One of America's leading psychiatrists and brain health experts, Dr. Daniel Amen, who we've spoken often about on this podcast, believes that Alzheimer's (that damages the hippocampus or memory center of our brain) and is responsible for “the disease-memory impairment”[v] is “a lifestyle disease similar to heart disease and type 2 diabetes and that our everyday habits contribute to our everyday risk.”[vi] Dr. Amen lists 11 risk factors that increase our probability for Alzheimer's (with the acronym Bright Minds) and sleep is the S in this acronym. You can read the rest of the risk factors here[vii] but to review them quickly, they are: B: For blood flow problems R: For retirement and aging I: For inflammation G: For genetics H: For head trauma T: For toxins M: For mental health problems I: For immune system problems N: For neurohormone problems D: For diabesity (that seriously impacts brain health and memory) S: For sleep that we will dive deeper into today. Which leads us to this week's Brain Fact Friday, that we opened up this episode with. Did you know that according to English scientist and professor of neuroscience and psychology, Mathew Walker, that current research shows “that there appears to be a causal affect between sleep and our risk for Alzheimer's Disease?” I recently watched Mathew Walker's The Science of Better Sleep Masterclass[viii] and he explained that a recent study took a person who was sleep deprived (of non-rem sleep) for just one night, the next day “they saw an immediate increase in their blood of that toxic protein beta-amyloid”[ix] which shows “that there appears to be a causal affect between sleep and our risk for Alzheimer's Disease.” (Mathew Walker). What are Beta-Amyloids and Tau? These two proteins are NOT the only factors in Alzheimer's but since we now know from Mathew Walker that lack of sleep causes amyloid to increase in our blood, I think it's important to understand what this could do to our brain over time. To see a full presentation of How Alzheimer's Affects the Brain[x], I will put a link to a page to review in the show notes. In this article, with a very clear video, you will learn how these two proteins, beta amyloid and tau, become toxic in the brain. You will see how the abnormal tau protein accumulate and eventually form tangles inside neurons, and beta amyloid clumps into plaques, which slowly build up between neurons. This is how Alzheimer's begins to change the brain, and along with other changes, and inflammation, neurons begin to die, causing the brain to shrink, beginning in the hippocampus, our memory center, which is important for us all for learning. To conclude this week's Brain Fact Friday, where we looked at Mathew Walker's research that shows a causal affect between sleep and our risk for Alzheimer's Disease, I think a good action step for all of us would be to take a serious look at our sleep to be sure we are getting more than 6 hours each night. Or to at least understand what happens when we do go below 6 hours of sleep/night. I'm sure this will lead you to wonder just how much sleep we should be getting each night? Mathew Walker did cover the importance of sleep with elite athletes saying “sleep may be the greatest legal performance enhancing drug that too few athletes are abusing enough in this modern day and age” and that elite athletes like Lebron James gets 11 hours of sleep each night (a long sleep at night with 1-2 naps in the day) and tennis play Roger Federer gets in between 10-12 hours sleep/day and I'm sure if you ask a sports star with a proven track record how much sleep they get each night, they will talk of the importance of prioritizing sleep. If you are not an elite athlete, looking to improve performance, Walker recommends 7-9 hours of sleep each night. There's a lot more that we can do, but we will cover that on another episode. Until then, I hope this episode shocked you enough (like it did me) to work as hard as I can to make sure we strive for improving our sleep each night, since we know this will affect our future health as a strong Alzheimer's prevention strategy. I hope everyone sleeps well this weekend, as we prepare for our much-awaited interview with sleep and dream expert Dr. Baland Jalal[xi], from Harvard. REFERENCES: [i]Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #221 with Dr. John Denboer on “This is Dementia: Disrupting the Decline” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/dr-john-denboer-on-this-is-dementia-disrupting-the-decline/ [ii] Dementia and Alzheimer's disease: What's the Difference?  https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/difference-between-dementia-and-alzheimer-s [iii] ibid [iv] ibid [v] Why looking at the whole hippocampus is not enough by Aleksandra Maruszak March 31, 2014 https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fncel.2014.00095/full#:~:text=The%20hippocampus%20is%20one%20of,of%20the%20disease%2Dmemory%20impairment. [vi] Alzheimer's is a lifestyle disease by Dr. Daniel Amen Published Nov. 3, 2021 https://www.amenclinics.com/blog/alzheimers-is-a-lifestyle-disease/ [vii] Alzheimer's is a lifestyle disease by Dr. Daniel Amen Published Nov. 3, 2021 https://www.amenclinics.com/blog/alzheimers-is-a-lifestyle-disease/ [viii] https://www.masterclass.com/classes/matthew-walker-teaches-the-science-of-better-sleep [ix] ibid [x] What Happens to the Brain in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-happens-brain-alzheimers-disease [xi] Dr. Baland Jalal https://psychology.fas.harvard.edu/people/baland-jalal

Slam the Gavel
Rick Black Speaks Out On Guardianship Abuse And The Exploitation Of The Vulnerable

Slam the Gavel

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 60:55


     Slam the Gavel welcomes Rick Black to the show.  He and his wife established the Center for Estate Administration Reform in 2018     Their headquarters are located in Charlotte, NC and they have been advocating for seniors and dependent adults as well as those exploited by the legal community in equity court proceedings since 2014.    Rick's wife, Terri, lost her father in Las Vegas when she discovered his landlord and longtime friend had stolen $220,000 from him and was systematically exploiting and neglecting him. When confronted with this, his “friend” took him hostage and was able to completely isolate him from all family with the help of a "professional guardian" and three attorneys until he died in 2015.  Terri had all the legal authority and executed documents to protect her father and yet law enforcement negligence and the predatory legal community ensured his complete exploitation.     This experience caused Rick to leave his profession as an Engineer and begin studying guardianship files and proceedings in Nevada and nationwide. His research and work with local media and the Nevada Attorney General gained a state wide investigation into adult guardianship abuse.     As of 2020, those efforts have yielded massive statewide reforms and 10 convictions of Nevada attorneys and professional guardians who used guardianships as a cover for their criminal acts.  There were two cases in Clark County that went to trial in 2020.       Since 2014 CEAR has investigated and counseled over 5,000 cases nationwide of suspected DPOA, trust, and adult guardianship and probate frauds orchestrated by the predatory legal community.To Reach Rick Black: www.cearjustice.org                                               804-564-5330                                               Facebook: Cear Justice                                              Twitter and Instagram Support the show(https://www.buymeacoffee.com/maryannpetri)http://beentheregotout.com/https://monicaszymonik.mykajabi.com/Masterclass  USE CODE SLAM THE GAVEL PODCAST FOR 10% OFF THE COURSEhttp://www.dismantlingfamilycourtcorruption.com/Music by: mictechmusic@yahoo.comSupport the show

Neurology Today - Neurology Today Editor’s Picks
Fenfluramine for LGS, social isolation and dementia risk, neurology's status in NRMP match.

Neurology Today - Neurology Today Editor’s Picks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 4:56


In this week's podcast, Neurology Today's editor-in-chief discusses the approval of fenfluramine for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, how social isolation affects dementia risk, and the competitiveness of neurology in this year's residency match.

SAGE Nursing and Other Health Specialties
JAG Podcast 2022 - EP6: What Are the Benefits of Pet Ownership and Care Among People With Mild-to-Moderate Dementia?

SAGE Nursing and Other Health Specialties

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 7:53


This JAG student podcast interviews author Carol Opdebeeck regarding their article, "What Are the Benefits of Pet Ownership and Care Among People With Mild-to-Moderate Dementia?", currently available in Vol 40, Issue 11, 2021 of the Journal of Applied Gerontology. Click here to read the article.

Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz
DRwJL – How Do You Handle People Who Are Mean & Have A Dementia Disease?

Dementia Resilience with Jill Lorentz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 44:54


Psychology of Aging with Dr. Regina Koepp
How To Be an Ally To Transgender Older Adults with Loree Cook-Daniels

Psychology of Aging with Dr. Regina Koepp

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 63:38


#S2 E4- Service providers, including mental health professionals, may be called upon to support a transgender (“trans”) older adult. Supporting trans older adults has much in common with supporting non-trans older adults. This presentation includes general reminders --- like listen rather than give advice, empower rather than “do”, and be open to learning. It also goes into many of the areas in which trans people differ from their non-trans peers, and advises allies on how they can best support the trans older adult in each arena.In this CEU podcast episode, you'll discover: 3 ways that professionals and helpers can be an ally to transgender older adultsWhat the terms paradox meansDifferences between people who transitioned in their younger years versus people who transitioned in their older years.Today's guest, Loree Cook-Daniels, has been working on both LGBT and aging issues since 1974. She founded the Transgender Aging Network in 1998, and in 2000 became the Policy and Program Director for FORGE, a 26-year-old national transgender and SOFFA (Significant Others, Friends, Family, and Allies) and was a founding partner in the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging and remains its primary transgender expert.Click here to access the show notes of this episode and to get all the resources discussed in this episode. Attention Social Workers, Psychologists, Therapists, Aging Life Care Experts: Click here to learn more about earning CEUs for listening to this podcast.

The Heart of Hospice
How to Be the Best Caregiver for Your Loved One with Alzheimer's or Dementia, Episode 111

The Heart of Hospice

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 51:14


Caregiving for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia holds its special challenges. Jennifer Fink of the Fading Memories Podcast is with us to share her caregiving experience.  Jennifer became the caregiver for her mom after the death of her dad.  Experiencing all the frustration and challenges, Jennifer looked for podcasts that could help.  After not finding what she needed, Jennifer launched the Fading Memories podcast.  The podcast content is designed to help anyone who is providing care for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia.  According to the Fading Memories Podcast website, “Jennifer is the daughter, granddaughter & great-granddaughter of women who suffered from Alzheimer's or other cognitive impairment. Looking for answers on how not to become the fourth generation with this problem while also seeking ways to connect better with her Mom has led her on this interesting journey with her new passion, podcasting”.  The website provides support through the podcast, articles, recipes, and resources.  You can connect with Jennifer at fadingmemoriespodcast.com and on her Facebook page.  Find the podcast on Spotify and Apple Podcasts.  Don't miss this great resource for Alzheimer's and dementia caregivers! Find more podcast episodes from The Heart of Hospice here: https://theheartofhospice.libsyn.com/ The hosts of The Heart of Hospice podcast would be honored to speak at your event or conference.  Send an email to helen@theheartofhospice.com or to jerry@theheartofhospice.com.  We'd love to partner with you! Connect with podcast host Jerry Fenter at jerry@theheartofhospice.com. Connect with podcast host Helen Bauer at helen@theheartofhospice.com. Find more information about hospice philosophy, end-of-life care, and self-care for both personal and professional caregivers here. 

UF Health Podcasts
Japanese projected to live longer without dementia

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


Want to live longer, without losing your cognitive abilities? Perhaps look east. Far East.…

Shapes Of Grief
Ep. 92 Mary Kennelly on Grief & Dementia, Caring & Anticipatory Grief

Shapes Of Grief

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 94:51


Mary brings a whole other perspective to the podcast with this very tender and beautiful episode. Two ‘giants' in her life, Fr John and Brendan were more than Uncles to Mary. They were constant forces of good, founts of wisdom and a huge part of her life. When Fr John developed vascular dementia, Mary found herself in the role of carer. Shortly after his death, Brendan too was diagnosed with a different form of dementia and once again, Mary stepped in. Her collection of poems “Into the Grey” will resonate with anyone who has ever found themselves in the role of carer, or lost someone to dementia or Alzheimers. Through poetry and chat, we explore this ambiguous loss that often has loved ones on their knees with exhaustion. Mary's story resonated with me on a deep level, having lost my father in March 2021, also with dementia. Her book moved me greatly and I highly recommend getting your hands on this treasure. Please buy directly from the Nursing homes (link below) who took amazing care of Fr John and Brendan, and who need the money to fix their roof! https://arasmhuirenurs.wpengine.com/product/into-the-grey/ Mary hails originally from Ballylongford, Co.Kerry, although she's lived in Glin with Gus and their children Ruth, Matthew and Caleb for many years. She has worked in Education but also in the Arts for over thirty years. She published her first collection of poetry 25 years ago. Her previous collections include ‘Sunny Spells,Scattered Showers', ‘From the Stones', ‘Catching Bats Takes Patience' and ‘Splinters'. ‘Into the Grey' is a collection that follows her journey living with the impact of dementia on her two uncles, Fr. John Kennelly and the poet Brendan Kennelly and on the family who loved them. The book was written as a way of dealing with the grief caused by living decline but also as a thank you to the staff who cared for John and Brendan in their nursing homes. All profits from ‘Into the Grey' will be shared by Our Lady of Fatima Home, Tralee, Co. Kerry and Aras Mhuire Nursing Home, Listowel, Co Kerry. Both Nursing homes provide an exceptional standard of care to the residents who make their home with them and an exceptional standard of supports to the families of those residents. Founded by the Dominican Sisters, Our Lady of Fatima home in Tralee, currently provides a home to 66 residents, including many priests and nuns. It has recently undergone a significant expansion so all funds from the sale of the book will be gratefully received Arás Mhuire was built with a grant from the society of St Vincent De Paul in 1970 and has had to actively fundraise since it's inception. Arás Mhuire are hoping to put the funds from the sale of the book towards roof repairs and the building of a storage space. Link to purchase ‘Into the Grey' directly from the nursing home https://arasmhuirenurs.wpengine.com/product/into-the-grey/ Ships internationally #grief #loss #bereavement #dementia #anticipatorygrief #brendankennelly #maryKennelly #irishpoet #vasculardementia

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Nation's oldest uni student recognised for dementia advocacy

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 10:22


Tireless campaigner for the rights of older people, 93 year old Val Fell from Wollongong has been recognised in the Queen's Birthday Honours list. The nonagenarian, who's believed to be the oldest person studying at an Australian university, is a member of the federal government's Elder Council advising on reforms to the Aged Care Act.

The Happy Pear Podcast
Alzheimer & Dementia, How to heal your brain with Neuroscientists Dr's Sherzai

The Happy Pear Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 70:57


Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia, by 70%, and is the number one most costly disease - “It's not because its happening more often it's because of bad lifestyle and medications that prolong life but don't get rid of pathological processes that cause dementia so you have a whole lot of people living with this devastating disease.”This week we speak to THE ultimate brain-powered couple! Neuroscientists Dr Dean and Ayesha Sherzai are a phenomenal pair, aside from the impressive list of credentials after both of their names, they have dedicated their lives to behavioural change models and brain health initiatives. Co-director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Program at Loma Linda University, Dr Dean completed two fellowships at National Institutes of Health, and UC San Diego. He also has 2 masters degrees in clinical research and epidemiology, an executive leadership degree from Harvard Business School, and a PhD in Healthcare Leadership. And just when you thought that was already enough achievements for one person, in 2002, Dr Dean was asked by the World Bank to help lead their health delivery project in Afghanistan. While there, he was asked by President Karzai to become the Deputy Minister of Health and focused on bringing together all the stakeholders around the vision of rapid delivery of the basic package of health services and women's empowerment. This process was deemed by LANCET as the most successful plan in any post-conflict county. This plan also helped empower more than 20,000 Afghan women by making them the only source of health care in the most remote of communities. In 2013, he helped create the Afghan Health Initiative in order to empower the Afghan diaspora with their own health. Currently, along with his wife Dr. Ayesha, they are leading the largest community-based brain health initiative in the world through their online work in Brain Health Revolution.Dr. Ayesha, also a neurologist and co-director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Program at Loma Linda University, where she leads the Lifestyle Program for the Prevention of Neurological Diseases. Is also a trained plant-based culinary artist.She holds a master's in advanced sciences from UCSD. Subsequent to completing her residency Dr. Ayesha completed a fellowship in vascular neurology from Columbia University and is currently enrolled to finish a PhD in women's leadership.We think it's safe to say that when it comes to brains, these pair know what they are talking about!“There are good stresses and bad stresses. Bad stress is when you are involved in activities that are not driven by your purposes… you don't have a runway that is yours. Whereas good stress is based around activities that do drive your purpose… our brains are made to be active, it craves to be pushed and challenged around its purpose…”In this episode, we discuss lifestyle choices, nutrition, purpose, Alzheimers, dementia, food that fuel your brain, activities that fuel your brain and, the data to support it.It truly is an amazing episode we hope you enjoyed it as much as we did!Lots of love,Dave & SteveTo learn more about Dr's Sherzai check out their website: https://teamsherzai.com/And their latest book: The 30 Day Alzheimer's SolutionsProduced by Sara Fawsitt and Sean Cahill See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

There's A Word for That!
ALZHEIMER'S | Dr. Dung Trinh

There's A Word for That!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 30:54


The word “Alzheimer's” connotes many different meanings for us; many know someone who has or had this disease. Others are terrified of the word, not knowing anything about its treatment or habilitation process. While it is a very scary and tragic (in many ways) diagnosis, there is another side to the disease. World-renowned Dementia expert, Dr. Trinh, comes on TAWFT to share his insights, helpful methods for dealing with Alzheimer's and its ramifications, and even shares new and cutting-edge treatments that have the potential to alter the future of dementia as we know it. About the Guest:Dr. Trinh is the Chief Medical Officer for Irvine Clinical Research, Astiva Health, and Co-Founder of MdDAO. He is the host of HealthTalksOC.com which can be heard weekly on OC Talk Radio. His passion is to translate medical research into everyday language to promote preventive health and wellness. Connect with Dr. TrinhHealthTalks OC WebsiteTongue OutFacebookLinkedInYoutubeAbout the Show:There's a Word For That! is a weekly podcast that centers around a different word or expression each episode. Host Suzanne Dressler believes in pushing the envelope to explore why and how we use words and the ways this impacts our lives. With a diverse assortment of intelligent, creative, and exciting guests, TAWFT! will force you to analyze and consider words in an entirely original and eye-opening way. Even better? NOTHING is off-limits.Where to Find Me:InstagramTwitterFacebook

The Essential Oil Revolution –– Aromatherapy, DIY, and Healthy Living w/ Samantha Lee Wright

Dementia. It can be so painful to talk about this disease. Today we want to bring some encouraging tips and tools to bring joy to you and your loved ones challenged by dementia. This week, Lori Tisdale helps us understand how dementia cuts off the communication from brain to body. The brain constantly communicates to the body about how to function: when to eat, sleep, use the restroom, etc. When the brain is affected with a disease like dementia, the body doesn't have the communication it needs to function. Let's dive into how aromatherapy can help ease the burden of this disease. Learn more about Lori and grab your cheat sheet on her website HERE.Connect with her on FB HERE or on IG HERE.See full show notes for this episode HERE. Leave us a review while you're there.Lookin' for some podcast goodies? I've got ya covered! Shop our t-shirts, swag, and other popular products HERENew to essential oils? Here is my free guide to help you demystify this topic FREE Essential Oils Guide.Our website is www.RevolutionOilsPodcast.comView hundreds of Essential Oil Recipes in our DIY DugoutSign up for my PODCAST NEWSLETTER and you'll get FREE tips on how to live a healthier, more balanced life! Say hello on social. Use the Hashtag #essentialoilrevolutionpodcast so I know you're a friend!FacebookInstagramGrab yourself a freebie here! ---> https://linktr.ee/samleewrightThank you to our amazing sponsors.Heard about a product you'd like to try? View our list of sponsors HERE and help us keep this podcast 100% free!FAQs:Who is Samantha Lee Wright?Which brand of oils do you recommend and why?Is it safe to ingest essential oils? (And other safety concerns)Are essential oils safe for cats? (See safety section)Hey! Thanks for listening. Send me a message & tell me what you think about the show. Leave a review so others can find the show more easily too.xo,SamSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Fit and Fabulous at Forty and Beyond with Dr Orlena
How Healthy Living Protects You from Dementia With Dr Michael Kentris Clinical Neurologist

Fit and Fabulous at Forty and Beyond with Dr Orlena

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 24:09


Dr Orlena chats to Dr Michael Kentris clinical neurologist.We all want to avoid dementia of any type (Alzheimers or vascular dementia).What can we do to help protect us from dementia later in life?Dr Kentris talks about simple and healthy changes that will reduce your risk of dementia.Interested in Transforming Your Life with Powerful Accountability?Book a quick 15 min chat here: https://bookme.name/drorlena/dr-orlena-chat

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench
Joyce Stankiewicz on caring for a loved one with dementia and the buddy system at University Gates

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 31:29


Episode #39 - Formerly of New Hamburg now living at The Village at University Gates in Waterloo.  Doug & Erin welcome to the green bench, Joyce Stankiewicz, as they chat about the buddy system, caring for a loved one with dementia, and the importance of forgiveness, humour, and memories. Sharing marriage stories from 70 years with her husband Bill and the tough conversation when required to take away someone's car keys.  A journey through dementia as Joyce cares for her husband through this process. What is aphasia?  Aphasia is a language disorder caused by damage in a specific area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension. Aphasia leaves a person unable to communicate effectively with others. Bill was diagnised with Nonfluent Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia. People with nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) tend to come to the doctor's office with complaints about pronouncing words or increasing trouble getting words out. Their speech may sound slurred, or their voice may change. As time goes on, people with nfvPPA have more trouble putting sentences together, and they eventually begin to speak slower and slower. Doug's wife also lives with dementia sharing his experience as he noticed changes at home. "If you have a problem and cannot find out how to solve, then get someone to help you solve it." -Joyce Stankiewicz "The buddy system: to connect a person who lives at University Gates and knows the routine with someone who just moved into the Village." -Joyce Stankiewicz Joyce has published two books about her mother. 1. My Journey, by Aida Sauder 2. Famous quotes and quips from Mother Sauder and others Saying such as, "you get more flies with honey than vinegar", and more quotes shared by Joyce. Advice for someone who cares for a loved one living with dementia.  "A comfort to be able to talk about it and to know that other share your pain." -Joyce Stankiewicz "Joy shared is multiplied and pain shared is divided." -unattributed   Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast on any network and share your thoughts on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag to help others find us. ----more---- The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation, or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore them to a place of reverence. "The greatest untapped resource in Canada, if not the world, is the collective wisdom of our elders." -Ron Schlegel This podcast is brought to you by Schlegel Villages, retirement & long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench is produced by Memory Tree Productions Learn more about our host, Erin Davis, at erindavis.com Learn more about #ElderWisdom at elderwisdom.ca

Lucy's Record Shop
Unlocking Memories

Lucy's Record Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 30:11


Dr. James Noble is a BFD neurologist at Columbia in New York City. But as a college student in the 90's, Jamie Noble hung out at Lucy's Record Shop to feed the love of live music that's clearly part of his DNA. Jamie remembers a lot about Lucy's -  the bands he saw (Bugskull, Low, Blonde Redhead, Crop Circle Hoax, etc.), the 7” records he bought, the time everybody got kicked out and had to watch Doo Rag play their show on the sidewalk, and the one time he played a show there with his band, Lepus. Music and the arts have informed a lot of what Jamie does. He's been taping shows since 1998 and his recordings are housed at the University of Georgia in the archives of Henry Owings of Chunklet. With his colleague, Dr. Olajide Williams, he started what has become the Hip Hop Public Health fleet of programs, working closely with Sesame Street animators, producer Artie Green, and musicians like Doug E. Fresh, Easy A.D. of the Cold Crush Brothers, DMC, and Chuck D. He also founded a non-profit organization, Arts & Minds, which promotes well-being for dementia patients and their caregivers via art-centered, museum-based programs and experiences in upper Manhattan. As a neurologist, Dr.Noble specializes in Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and has just released a book, “Navigating Life with Dementia” (part of the Brain & Life series, Oxford University Press/American Academy of Neurology). It's a joy to listen to Jamie talk about his time at Lucy's and his love of music. SHOW NOTES So She Says - http://soshesays.net (Jamie's HS band archive) “Skin Deep,” featuring Louis Bellson on the Duke Ellington band's Hi-Fi Ellington Uptown Album Bob Nastonovich & Pavement - Unfair Brown Towel - Laura Moore Live at Lucy's Crop Circle Hoax - Warm Up Set Doo Rag - Hog Tied Lambchop - Soaky in the Pooper Henry Owings - Chunklet Hip Hop Public Health Hip Hop Stroke  Paul Burch - Wanna Jump (Let's Move) Arts and Minds Follow us / Say hello Instagram: @lucysrecordshop Twitter: @lucysrecordshop Facebook: /lucysrecordshop This show is part of We Own This Town, a podcast network of original entertainment and documentary content. You can find more info at the official site at WeOwnThisTown.Net and on Facebook, Instagram, & Twitter.

My So-Called Fabulous
Providing The Care You Need with Overture Home Care

My So-Called Fabulous

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 39:04


On today's show we are having the conversations we often delay or simply not think about. We are talking about taking care of our loved ones as the aging process starts to take over. Denise Helms and Paige Wolk with Overture Home Care share invaluable information about making you and your loved ones lives easier with home care for seniors. We discuss compassionate care services like companionship, meals, transportation, aging in place, post-hospital care and dive into Alzheimer's and Dementia. We talk about how difficult it can be to walk the line of allowing our loved ones their independence while still maintaining their health and safety. Fabulous conversations and much needed. Tune in NOW and don't forget to subscribe, listen, rate, and review! This Episode brought to you by Overture Home Care: Overture Home Care offers RN-delegated home care and companion services to seniors and other individuals requiring care. Our highly-trained caregivers are overseen by a staff RN, delivering a variety of services to enable our clients to live independently, safely and with dignity. Website: https://www.overturehomecare.com/ Instagram Handles: https://www.instagram.com/overturehomecare/ https://www.instagram.com/kwedarco/ https://www.instagram.com/paigewolk/ https://www.instagram.com/denisehelms/

A Health Podyssey
Krista Harrison Peers Into the Intersection of Hospice, Dementia & Care Quality

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 26:57


The concepts that underlie hospice were introduced a few centuries ago but, the modern hospice movement began in London in 1967.In 1982 hospice was added as a Medicare benefit. Today, half of all Medicare decedents enroll in hospice, at a total cost of $20.9 billion to Medicare in 2019.Hospice has a strong evidence base for improving end-of-life experiences for the recipient and the recipient's family. But there's limited evidence regarding the effects of hospice for people with dementia.This is a critical knowledge gap given that one in three adults aged 85 and older has dementia.Krista Harrison from University of California San Francisco joins A Health Podyssey to discuss how well hospice works for people with dementia.Harrison and coauthors published a paper in the June 2022 issue of Health Affairs assessing the relationship between hospice enrollment and last month of life care quality for Medicare enrollees living with dementia.They found that hospice-enrolled people living with dementia had higher quality last month of life care than people who are not enrolled in hospice, with quality levels similar to people without dementia.Order the June 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on costs, care delivery, COVID-19, and more.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning
Dr. John Denboer on ”This is Dementia: Disrupting the Decline”

Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 52:30


“Dementia is not an aging disease; however, it is the most common disease among the aging population.” Dr. Babak Nayeri, Clinical Associate Professor from the University of Arizona, from the Netflix Documentary, This is Dementia. Watch this interview on YouTube here https://youtu.be/-U-slBBIEIA On this episode you will learn: ✔ Who is Dr. John Denboer, what he built, and lost in his passion to help mitigate dementia. ✔ What Dr. Denboer learned raising funds for a high growth startup. ✔ What is the difference between Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia? ✔ What can we all do now to mitigate this debilitating disease. ✔ How a tattoo with personal and professional meaning motivates Dr. Denboer to keep moving forward with his work. Welcome back to The Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast, for EPISODE #221. For those who are new here, I'm Andrea Samadi, author, and educator, with a passion for learning, understanding difficult concepts, and breaking them down so that we can all use and apply the most current research to improve our productivity and results in our schools, sports environments, and workplaces. This month, we are breaking into a new season on the podcast, Season 8, where our focus will be on Brain Health and Learning with a look at How an Understanding of Our Brain Can Improve Learning in Ourselves (adults, teachers, workers) as well as our future generations of learners. If you've been following our podcast over the seasons, you will know that our content took the turn towards health and wellness around September 2020 with a BONUS EPISODE where we covered the Top 5 Brain Health and Alzheimer's Prevention Strategies[i] after watching Dr. David Perlmutter's Alzheimer's The Science of Prevention Documentary.[ii] We took a closer look at Daily Exercise, Sleep, Eating a Healthy Diet, Optimizing our Microbiome, and Intermittent Fasting) as strategies we can all use to improve our brain health with the goal of preventing one of the most devastating degenerative diseases that affects “more than 5 million Americans (that is closer to 6 million now after reading our next guest's book) and is the most common form of dementia, a term that describes a variety of diseases and conditions that develop when nerve cells in the brain die or no longer function normally.”[iii] This number has reached “over 80 million cases globally and is expected to double to be 150 million cases by 2050.”[iv] (Denboer). On today's episode #221, we will be speaking with Dr. John Denboer, a former clinical neuropsychologist who specializes in early stage preventative medicine - including cognitive, physical exercise and nutrition – with a goal of slowing down the natural decline in patients with dementia. At peak, his practice served in the range of 10,000 patients in the US supported by over 100 employees.  I listened to a recent podcast Dr. Denboer did with Graham Brown on the XL Podcast[v] and learned that while Dr. Denboer has a passion for disrupting Dementia (the umbrella for degenerative diseases likes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's) that there have been many ups and downs in his start up journey as a pioneer in this field of health and wellness, disrupting Dementia. In today's interview, I'll ask him about the lessons he's learned along the way, the importance of family, and to explain his mission to make a difference for dementia sufferers and their loved ones before the global numbers go from 55 million people living with Dementia to doubling these numbers in the next 20 years. ***Just to note that John Denboer is not a current licensed psychologist / neuropsychologist / doctor and cannot provide medical advice. While researching Dr. Denboer I did see some things online that made me wonder why he is not a current licensed psychologist, and if you know me, getting to the truth of something is important. Instead of sweeping what I saw under the rug, I will ask him directly to explain what happened, so we can cover his journey with all the facts uncovered. Let's meet Dr.John Denboer and learn what we can do to disrupt dementia, strengthen our brains, and apply some of the lessons he's learned in his journey. Welcome Dr. John Denboer.  Intro: I've got to ask you, because I did notice before you sent me the note to be sure we say that you are not a current licensed psychologist/neuropsychologist/doctor that something happened to your license. When I'm researching someone, I always say, “if it's online, I'm going to see it.” Instead of just ignoring what I saw, can I ask, what happened to your license? Intro B: Dr. Denboer, I listened to a recent podcast you did, before I read your book, This is Dementia, or watched your Netflix  This is Dementia Documentary that goes hand in hand with the book, and it was a heartbreaking episode. It hit the heart for me, as I've been working the past 25+ years to bring awareness to important strategies and skills in our educational system (hence the name of the podcast Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning) and to do this, we have relied on grant funding with our work in the schools. Some competitive grants were won, others were lost, but my dollar amounts were nowhere near your dollar amounts lost with your start up. Can we start with a quick overview of what you built, what happened, and what you learned raising funds for a high growth startup, the successes/failures? Q1: I just interviewed Hilary Decesare,[vi] who appeared on that TV show Secret Millionaire on her new book coming out Relaunch and she talked about all the people she's helped over the years to start over. We've all been there at some point of time. What are you focused on now, and what is your vision for the future? Q1B: I watched your Netflix Documentary This is Dementia last night, and I did lose an Uncle who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimers at 58, and it was a devastating experience to watch his decline. For those who don't know what Dementia is, can you explain the difference (Dementia vs Alzheimer's?) Q2: Can we mitigate dementia? What can we do right now to prevent this disease from impacting our brains? Can you explain what science knows about the brain and Alzheimer's and how Alzheimer's Disease affects the brain (our ability to think, remember and make decisions)? I do like to make sure we include the science in a way that we can all understand and learn something new. Is it just those 2 proteins Beta-Amyloid and Tao[vii] that do the damage in our brain, or is there more to it? Q1C: I did get my husband and I a brain scan[viii] to look and see what our brains looked like after I heard from Dr. Daniel Amen say that Alzheimer's can show up in the brain years before onset, but we can't all get our brains scanned and we were lucky to get his VIP rate since I did a podcast on the results. What can you share with us about early stage dementia detection since we can't all get our brains scanned until the cost comes down. What can we all look for and what prevention tip can we all implement immediately to prevent cognitive decline? Q2: When I saw your tattoo in the documentary, to motivate you personally and professionally, I related, as I recently got a tattoo for the same reason, and I draw on it daily to motivate me (it's on my ankle). You can't see your tattoo on your back though. Why did you put it there? Final Thoughts For people to reach out to you, and learn more, is the best place JohnDenboer.com? Dr. John Denboer, I want to thank you for coming on the podcast today, and being so open to share your journey with all of those who tune into the podcast. There are many lessons to learn from your experience, as well as the importance of listening to your heart and moving forward no matter what obstacles come your way. You surely have faced more obstacles than most of us, and your story shows that being a pioneer in the health care industry does take a unique and dedicated individual. I wish you all the success with your mission, and raising awareness for how we can all mitigate and slow down this devastating disease. Andrea's Final Thoughts Wow, that was a heartbreaking interview. I knew it was going to be difficult during the research phase, but knew there would be many lessons for all of us to hear. Since our focus of Season 8 is on brain health as it relates to learning, I wanted to debrief this interview, and think about everything that stood out to me. Lessons Learned from Dr. Denboer's Story Never a Lender nor a Borrower Be. The first lesson made me think of something my Dad used to say all the time, and is easy for us to see in hindsight. He would always say “Never a lender, nor a borrower be” and I know how difficult it must have been for Dr. Denboer to share the story of where borrowing money took him drastically off course. If you have ever been in a pinch financially (we all have been at some point), borrowing money to help get you past your difficult time isn't usually the best solution. Even if it's from someone you know well, and trust (like your family) it still does cause tension. The best solution, is to find another way forward (either by earning it yourself) or change the direction until you have the resources you need. I know that Dr. Denbouer wanted to share the details of his journey so that others could see where he made turns that sent him off course with his goals, so those listening can learn from his mistakes. Find a New Way Forward. We all get stuck, but when we know what we are meant to do, we must look for a new way forward. To see someone with years of work invested in his passion, lose their way, made me think of all the people who might have lost their way somehow during the Pandemic. I watched companies merge, and people being displaced, not sure of where to go next. I'm sure those of you listening could tell me a million stories, of loss and disappointment and as difficult times in our world continues, stories like John's aren't going to disappear. What I loved about this interview, is that Dr. Denboer is not giving up, and I know he will find a new way forward. He acknowledged how difficult it was, but he is clear on his direction, that his tattoo of his grandmother reminds him of daily. If you watch the interview, Dr. Denboer's face lit up when he spoke about his grandmother, and what she represents to him. If you have something important to you, like Dr. Denboer, you too will find a new way forward, if you've been taken off track. Keep Learning: We know that our brain health is crucial for all of us to live up to our full capacity, and Dr. Denboer reminded us that good cardiovascular health will get us 60% of the way, but to keep learning and doing things that stretch our brain in the process. I hope that you found Dr. Denboer's story to be helpful. If you want to reach out to him, go to JohnDenboer.com and send him a message. Like all of us, we could all use as much positive energy and love directed towards us, and our goals. I'll close with a quote from Steve Jobs, reminding us that “What we're doing here will send a giant ripple through the universe.” See you in a few days. Dr. John Denboer is a former clinical neuropsychologist specializing in the assessment and detection of early-stage dementia. He received his internship training at VA Boston Healthcare System (Boston University School of Medicine/Harvard University) and received his postdoctoral training at Barrow Neurological Institute. He has published extensively in the area of Clinical Neuropsychology and has been an expert speaker at many local, national, and international conferences. He is the Founder, CEO, and Chief Medical Officer of SMART Brain Aging, Inc., a company designed to help prevent and intervene in mild cognitive impairment and early-stage dementia. In the last 3 years, he has become a world-renown speaker in early-stage dementia detection and treatment. This has culminated in a Netflix documentary entitled “This is Dementia?!”[ix] as well as this book. REFERENCES: [i]The Top 5 Brain Health and Alzheimer's Prevention Strategies (Daily Exercise, Sleep, Eating a Healthy Diet, Optimizing our Microbiome, and intermittent Fasting). https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/do-you-know-the-top-5-brain-health-and-alzheimers-prevention-strategies-with-andrea-samadi/ [ii] Dr. David Perlmutter's “Alzheimer's: The Science of Prevention” https://scienceofprevention.com/ [iii] 10 Early Alzheimer's Symptoms That You Should Know https://www.amenclinics.com/blog/10-early-alzheimers-symptoms-that-you-should-know/ [iv] Disrupting Dementia TEDxGrandCanyonUniversity John DenBoer April 10, 2017 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0xooSv6FkY&t=13s [v] https://podcasts.apple.com/dz/podcast/xl26-dr-john-denboer-disrupting-dementia/id1471486300?i=1000560704608 [vi]Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #219 Secret Millionaire Hilary Decesare On Her New Book Relaunch. https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/secret-millionaire-hilary-decesare-on-her-new-book-coming-june-9th-relaunch-spark-your-heart-to-ignite-your-life/ [vii] What Happens to the Brain in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-happens-brain-alzheimers-disease [viii] Neuroscience Meets Social and Emotional Learning Podcast EPISODE #84 PART 3 “How a SPECT Image Brain Scan Can Change My Life: Andrea's Results” https://andreasamadi.podbean.com/e/how-a-spect-scan-can-change-your-life-part-3-with-andrea-samadi/ [ix] This is Dementia Netflix Documentary https://www.forbes.com/sites/robinseatonjefferson/2019/04/09/this-is-dementia-documentary-premiers-thursday-on-netflix/?sh=5ea60a61320c  

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
593: Governor Martin Schreiber: Advocating for Alzheimer's Caregivers

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 40:48


In this episode, 39th Governor of Wisconsin and Advocate for Alzheimer's Caregivers, Martin Schreiber, talks about the importance of advocating for Alzheimer's caregivers. Today, Martin talks about his book, My Two Elaines, and his experience as an Alzheimer's caregiver. What can the community do to support Alzheimer's caregivers? Hear about therapeutic fibbing, Elaine's own journals, and get Martin's advice to his younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways “If Alzheimer's is bad, ignorance of the disease is worse.” “You cannot do it alone.” “Alzheimer's is a tragic disease. We can't cure it, but we certainly can learn to live better with it.” “More than 6 million Americans live with Alzheimer's or Dementia, and more than 11 million people are their unpaid caregivers.” “If people can simply better understand this disease, at that point, they can be more helpful.” “Live and understand, and grasp, and appreciate, and be thankful for the moment.”   More about Martin Schreiber Martin J. Schreiber grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Inspired by his father's example as a member of the Wisconsin State Assembly and the Milwaukee Common Council, Martin ran for public office even before he had completed law school. In 1962, he was elected as the youngest-ever member of the Wisconsin State Senate. He was elected lieutenant governor in 1970 and, in 1977, became the 39th governor of Wisconsin. He recently retired from his public affairs firm in Milwaukee and now is an advocate for Alzheimer's caregivers. In addition to caring for Elaine, Martin is passionately committed to speaking out to help caregivers and their loved ones live their best lives possible. He and his wife, Elaine, have four children, 13 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.   My Two Elaines: Learning, Coping, and Surviving as an Alzheimer's Caregiver The Alzheimer's Association. 24/7 Helpline: 800-272-3900 Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Caregivers, Awareness, Grief, Advocacy, Ignorance, Support, Mental Health,   To learn more, follow Martin at: Website:          https://mytwoelaines.com Facebook:       https://www.facebook.com/MyTwoElaines   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  00:03 Hi, Governor Schreiber, thank you so much for coming on the podcast and taking the time out today to come on and talk about Alzheimer's disease, which we are in the month of June. It is Alzheimer's Awareness Month. So I thank you for coming on and sharing your story and experience.   00:22 Well, thanks, Karen, I want you to know that I'm very grateful for the opportunity to be with you. Because there's so much important information that people should be aware of relative to Alzheimer's disease, both for the person who was ill, and also for the caregiver.   00:41 Yeah, absolutely. And now many people listening to this podcast may know you for your service to the people of Wisconsin in the state senate, then you were lieutenant governor, and ultimately, the 39th, governor of Wisconsin. So like I said, Today, you're here to talk about Alzheimer's. So can you tell us a little bit more about the work you're doing as an advocate for Alzheimer's caregivers, and kind of how and why this is personal for you, and how you found yourself here?   01:11 Well, very soon. It I tell you, if if I go, my wife humane is now in our 18th year since diagnosis. And if we you and I go back 18 years, at that time, this disease could not be cured, delayed or prevented. 18 years have gone by and this disease still cannot be cured, delayed or prevented. So what happened was, because I didn't understand this disease, I made my life more miserable. For my dear wife, who was losing her memory, I made my life more difficult for myself, as well as for many other people, because I didn't understand this disease. And so I conclude now, that if Alzheimer's is bad, ignorance of the diseases worse, and when I say ignorance of the disease, I don't mean ignorance of the disease just simply by lay people, but I'm talking even the medical profession, I'm talking even caregivers themselves. I'm talking about churches and congregations and temples and so on, there is just not an awareness of this disease, as it relates to how it should be dealt with. Because you can't fight it, you can't beat it. And so if we can learn a little bit more about it, we have a better chance of having our loved one with the disease, living their best life possible. But also we had the chance of having the caregiver also receive their best opportunity of living their best life possible.   02:51 Yeah. And you wrote about this in a new book that is published this month in June, called my two lanes. So you depict your wife your wife's battle was with Alzheimer's. And you know, like you said, This disease is progressive. And the person definitely transforms from probably the person you knew into, into maybe someone else. So can you talk about how you dealt with that as, as her husband and as the main caregiver?   03:22 Well, first I dealt with it very badly, X extremely poorly. And because of that, we missed out on many moments of joy. What I tried to do in the beginning, because I didn't understand this disease, what I tried to do was to keep her in my world, knowing Lena, it didn't happen on a Wednesday, it happened on a Thursday, it wasn't the Joneses, it was finally, I got the understanding that it is important for me to join the world of the person who now is. And one of the most difficult, difficult challenges that any caregiver has, but which has to happen is what I would call the pivot. And the pivot is when the caregiver gets to the point where you let go of this person who once was. So you can now embrace and help the person who now is because if we don't, first of all, because this disease is incurable at this time, you cannot fight it. There is nothing you can do. And I found out that all of the navies, saline, and all of the armies marching and all of the liquor that's that's distilled and all of the beer that's brewed is not going to stop this disease. And so rather than how do we fight this disease, the question is how can we fight to give our loved one their best life possible? And so within that framework, then there's A number of things that is important for for us to understand about this disease and for us to understand about the challenge of, of caregivers. So as I said, one of the things I learned was to join Elaine's world. Then another thing that I learned was the importance of what I call therapeutic fitting. And again, look here, let me let me just back up before we go into therapeutic fitting, if we can envision a funnel, and if we put the small part of our funnel by your eye, and of course, because the funnel expands, as you look up, you can see the blueness of the sky in the hope of tomorrow. But what happens is, as the disease takes its course that funnel becomes inverted. And now the large part will be by your eye, and you look out and all you see is a little bit that then becomes the world and the life of the person who now is they are not aware of what happened five minutes ago, five hours ago, maybe five years ago, nor are they concerned or aware of what can happen five minutes from now, five hours from now or five years. So it's it's a different world. Now. When I wrote this book, I felt really proud of myself, that I had finally put some of this into perspective. And lo and behold, before we're ready to go on for print, I find a series of notes and diaries that Elaine had been keeping since her diagnosis. Well, I want you to know that we had prayed together. And we had cried together. But Never did I understand the courage that it takes to be diagnosed with this illness, and then that can continue forward. So as Elaine is going through this transition, and now we're here we get to therapeutic phibian. As Elaine is going through this this transition this journey, she asked me once, how are my parents? Oh, I said, Elaine, your parents are both dead. The shock on her face when she realized maybe she didn't say goodbye. The shock on her face, maybe even not attend the funeral. I promised myself I would never put her through that again. So then when she asked me the next time, she said, How are my parents? Oh, I said Elaine, I said your mom is just really doing well. She likes working at church and volunteering. Your dad likes sports. He likes it that makes me feel so happy. Well, that's therapeutic fitting, therapeutic fibbing joining the world of the person who now is now I want you to know that I tried this therapeutic good in the first year of my marriage, but it didn't work so good then, but certainly at this moment in time. But then another experience to give me a sense of this all   08:12 the feet, when he lanes still was able to be mobile. We were having lunch at the assisted living memory care. And we're talking and then she starts to cry. I said, Elaine, why are you crying? Well, she said, I am beginning to love you more than your husband. Well, I didn't ask her what's wrong with your jerky husband. I didn't do that. But I tell you what I learned. I learned that it is not necessary for her to know my name in order for our hearts to touch. And so many times, as I talked with caregivers, they become initially so distraught about the fact that their loved one may be married for 5060 years, children so forth. That person with Alzheimer's does not remember their knees. I would tell them understand that your loved ones mine is broken. And sometimes there's no more of a chance to have our loved one remember our names and a person with a broken leg winning an Olympic championship, a gold medal. And so we we just simply have to understand the importance of joining the world of this person who now is one one of the challenges of caregiving, and there are a number of them. But one of the challenges of caregiving is that you work so hard to try and help your loved one but here let me let me just back up a little bit here. So we go back 18 years. The First Tee lane. That was the girl I met when I was a freshman in high school. School, I fell in love right away. We dated and we went steady and we got engaged, and we got married and four children, and 13 grandchildren, now seven great grandchildren. That was the first Delaine, I would run for public office, you will be the hardest working campaigner. If I would lose, she would never let me feel defeated. She was everything in the world. To me as it relates to any good thing that happened. The second lane began to appear. As I said, some 1819 years ago, when she would get lost driving to and from places she had been going to and from for the past 10 years, the second Elaine began to appear when as a great cook, she messed up her recipe so bad that she would cry, she would be so embarrassed. So that was the beginning of the second lane. So now we get this diagnosis. And I took a marriage route to death to as part I'm going to do all these things. And when Elaine was first diagnosed, she was given the mental mini test. And basically the mantium. The mental mini tests is a simple test asking for example, what day it is. When is your birthday? so forth? Very simple questions. And if you scored 30 or above you would be considered Okay, pretty normal. If you scored 30 or below, what the situation would be is that maybe at signs of early onset, well, Elaine's test score at that point was 28. They say that the average person loses four to five points going down almost every year. And it doesn't happen, you know, arithmetic Li from 20 820-726-2524, it may stay at 28 for a while, then maybe drop down to a 25 and then stay at that point, then maybe jump down to 21 and so forth. Well, what is important here is that you then test it out first at one year, you lose four to five points every year 18 years ago, it gives you a sense of where Elaine's life now is. But with that understanding with the understanding that the mentee meant a mental mini test   12:42 goes down. What what happens to the caregiver is you devote your time and your talent and your energy and your love to this person. And you just step out thank you have this answer. And then what happens is you wake up the next morning, and it's a new challenge. Well, what am I doing wrong? So what happens then is you devote more time and more talent and more energy. And you Okay, flow and all of a sudden, no. So what am I doing wrong? And so I have seen many instances where caregivers develop this so significant guilt, that they're not able to to help their loved one no matter how hard they work, what are they doing wrong? But here's the other aspect that comes along with it not only the self questioning about what am I doing wrong, but the caregiver is also going through a type of depression, and also what I would call an unacknowledged meeting. So I had a dear friend who retired and enjoying retirement, had dinner one night, laid down on the couch to watch the baseball game. Tragically, he died massive heart attack, just gone. Well, there was a funeral. And friends stopped by to express their sympathy to acknowledge the passing of this of this wonderful person. And there was closure. So what happens in the life of care giver is that there never is closure. You see your loved one dying a little bit every day. You begin to feel just so horrible about your guilt not being able to do anything but you're also getting to the point where you're saying, My my my loved one is is leaving me and then that that grieving, you know, just does it's not acknowledged and that's really one of the challenges that caregivers have to face. And that is to face up to the fact that yes, you are going to be grieving. And you should acknowledge the fact that you're going through this grieving at this moment in time, then there's also the depression that comes with it. And knowing what is the future and worrying about that also breeds anxiety. And so you take the guilt, you're not doing enough, you're not maybe getting enough sleep, you're not necessarily going for the walk, you're not getting any visit with friends, because you're focusing and focusing and focusing? Well, I try and have caregivers understand one of the most important facts about this disease, and that is you cannot do it alone. I do not believe, well, first of all, we men are sometimes really stupid. You know, we're not going to ask for directions, because we know it all, you know, I was going to take care of Elaine and so forth. And I let my ego, my own self centered. passion to do Z to defeat this disease, I let that take control over what was really best for Elaine. Because I did that we really missed out some, some great moments of joy. And   16:34 at the time of diagnosis, the doctor said there were four things that we should be doing one of the two drugs, drugs called the Menda and erysiphe. They do not stop the disease, they just simply delay the symptoms. So that was point number one, point number two socialization, you do show to socialization continuing, and then also getting exercise going for a walk, for example, and then also a glass of red wine every evening. Well, you then got three weeks ahead and the glass of red wine every evening and four weeks behind and in the walking. But here, here's the the situation about not joining the life and the world of this person who now is. So I knew we should go for a walk. So in my mind, half an hour walk is sufficient. So we started walking the lane with say, all look at that flower Kimani lane, you gotta get this throw, you know, our look at the bird, no, come on Elaine. And so my focus was not on the here. And the now my focus was getting this work done. So I could go about some other type of, of activity, whether it's trying to work with my business at the same time, and so forth. And the lesson here is Alzheimer's is a tragic disease. We can't cure it. But we certainly can learn to live better with it. And so had I known, then what I know now, I would have stopped with the lane. And we would, we would have admired that flower, watch the bird, we would have even maybe even just stood in the sunshine for a while and felt the warmth of the day. So the life of a caregiver is extremely challenging. We have to know that we can't do it alone. We have to understand that if we if you want to show real courage and real manliness that is shown by asking for help. So gosh, I think you asked a question a while back and I think that that was about maybe three days ago and I still?   19:03 Well, I think I think what you have done is your as you were speaking I said okay, I was gonna ask that I was I wanted to talk about that. But I think what you did you do is you really clearly laid out some real big challenges that caregivers have to face and some really great lessons that you've learned that you've passed along and I know that those lessons are some practical takeaways in the book in sections called kind of what you said what I wish I'd known or what I would have done differently. But it sounds to me like if you're a caregiver, you need to check your ego at the door. You need to be present with the person you need to join their world. And and it may perhaps be a more pleasant or at ties would be a happier existence for not only the caregiver, but for the person living with Alzheimer's as well. And, you know, as someone who like we'd spoken before went on the air Mike grandmother had Alzheimer's. And I can only assume my parents feel the same way that you're feeling now that we used to always Correct, correct, correct her, when in fact, we just should have said, Where's where's your grandfather? Oh, he'll be home in a little while, instead of saying no, he died 15 years ago. And then, like you said, it just can make the patient agitated and confused. And if you want to continue to have those happy times, it's best to be in their world. So I think you really outline that very, very well. And I do want to go back to something that you touched upon, but didn't go into great detail, and that is Elaine's journal. Now you, you put this into the book, some of her excerpts where she detailed her feelings and emotions as she was struggling with this diagnosis. So why was that important to include those? And were there anything in those journals that surprised you?   21:09 There were a number of things. First of all, I wanted to put Elaine's words into the book. I wanted to do that. So. So caregivers and their families would understand this. Great in internal turmoil, being diagnosed with it, but still knowing your mind, then having my your mind sort of slip as I said, you go from a 28 score, maybe down to a 26 score, but you still think you're sort of all right. But then some days, you're not all right. But with her journals. As I said, I learned the courage that it takes to be diagnosed with this disease and continue forward. But I also learned, we talked about the pivot, where the caregiver gets to the point of letting go of this person who wants was to join the world with a person who now is the person with Alzheimer's also has a pivot. And it's almost by the grace of God. And that pivot is when the person with Alzheimer's finally leaves the real world and enters their own world. And I've got, well, let me just read one or one or two of her of her excerpts, of course, in the book, but I wanted to make sure that the reader would understand that the challenge is that that a person has with Alzheimer's, but also how important I was in her life as her lifeline. And I really didn't know that. And I think that if a caregiver understands how important they are as a lifeline to their loved one, they will take better care of themselves. I was lacking sleep, I was lacking exercise. I wasn't eating well, I was like, My daughter, Christine, gave me an article on moderate drinking. And it wasn't because she thought I was drinking too little. That's for sure. So but anyway, so with her excerpts, I want to give you just just a few examples of, of what what she's going on. So she starts off at when she was sort of diagnosed, she wrote a letter to her to your loved ones. And she writes, it wasn't until a few weeks ago that I really had to say, Yes, I do have Alzheimer's, I read up signs that indicate Alzheimer's, like getting overly upset for no reason, and having trouble with names and directions. But I still didn't think it was a problem for me. But in hindsight, for too long, I've been getting lost driving, having trouble keeping days straight, and difficulties with names and schedules. Still, I still felt like I could handle it, it won't get worse. But this morning, I started reading about the mid stage of Alzheimer's, in hopes of preparing myself better and realize I'm not very far away, that is most scary, but I have to accept it. And so also in some of these pages, she talks about how important I was to her life. She said, Please take care of yourself, for me as well as for you. So then, you know and again she is in a process of, of of losing her memory. And she's in the process of getting to this pivot where she loses the reality of life and goes into her world. But to give you a sense of, of the tugging that's going on within in her she writes this, she writes, I am not enjoying my role anymore as Marty's wife because of his Hammond concerns about My Alzheimer's, he doesn't let me be me. He doesn't let me go for a walk if I want to, or the other store loans, I used to appreciate him what I thought was concerned, but he holds me captive much too much, I'm going to try to have a second opinion because I really don't think I have any problem. I know how to drive or walk anyplace I want to, but he doesn't believe me. And I hate the control he has placed on me, I don't even think I have Alzheimer's, per se. And so we see that, and again, my my, we see a human being going through that kind of turmoil. And we think we could have done a better job, or I think I know I could have done a better job. And because of that I wanted to write the book, so that I could help caregivers learn, cope, and survive. Just I want to just read one, one more here than   26:01 that. I don't have the exact date on this one here. But she writes, I wish my Alzheimer's would dissipate. I'd like to be the smart wife and mother I used to be. Now I have to waste so much time just trying to figure out what I should be doing. without seeming as smart as I used to be. I need to rely on Marty for everything. And I'm very lucky, he continues to keep me life gets more difficult every day. So it's it's a bummer of a disease. And again, we can't beat it, we can't fight it. It's not curable at this moment in time, it can be delayed can be prevented. And so what we want to do is fight was our best weapons possible and that is to better understand the disease and better understand the world to which our loved one is passing into. So we can help them on their journey as much as possible.   27:02 And you know, According to the Alzheimer's Association, more than 6 million Americans live with Alzheimer's or dementia. And more than 11 people are their unpaid caregivers. So how can people listening right now support those who are caring for Alzheimer's patients and support the patients as well.   27:23 One of the best things and most important things I think a friend or family member or neighbor can do for a caregiver. Number one, simply acknowledge what they're going through. And that acknowledgement in and of itself is so important. Because people really don't understand one. And because people don't understand Alzheimer's, they they shy away from it. Now. I call Alzheimer's, not a chicken casserole disease. So hypothetically, I get an operation of my, you know, maybe a higher operation. And so I come home, and I'm laid up people will bring me a chicken casserole, I've fallen I break a hip, I'm recovering, they'll bring me a chicken casserole. Alzheimer's, people don't bring chicken casserole, we a person, a caregiver and their spouse may have had friends that they did many things over a period of 3040 years together as the children would grow up. And let's just assume hypothetically, that it would be camping and canoeing. So for 3040 years, they, the families did this together and the children grew up and so forth. And that was the bind holding them. That was the binding thing for them. So what happens is now the spouse gets Alzheimer's. And because the friends don't know about the disease, they don't know how to handle it, and they withdraw as they withdraw. The caregiver not only is trying to deal with this depression, this anxiety, they are grieving the guilt. Now, the caregiver is also feeling abandoned, abandoned by friends at one of the most challenging times. So if you want to help any caregiver, or even work on creating a dementia friendly community, we have to understand this disease and have to understand how we can best deal with the disease. But then, rather than saying, call me if you need help, because we caregivers won't do that. What we will do however is respond by someone saying oh maybe I could pick up medicines from the drugstore. Maybe I could go shopping for you or maybe in other words specific kinds kinds of things, or maybe even taking the person who was ill for a walk so that the caregiver can get some, some respite. But as I said, if Alzheimer's is bad ignorance of the diseases worse and ignorance of the disease by the medical profession, caregivers, as well as family, friends and neighbors, and if people can just simply, hopefully better understand this disease, I think at that point, they can be more helpful in people living their best lives possible.   30:32 Yeah, and thank you for that advice. I think that's wonderful advice for people that are, you know, in the community and in this fear of people living with Alzheimer's. And I also want to mention that there is support online@alz.org, and that's provided to the Alzheimer's Association, or by phone at 800-272-3900. So if people are looking for more resources, they can find them there as well. And of course, your book. Let's talk about that. My two Elaine's, learning, coping and surviving as an Alzheimer's caregiver release is June 13. So we're perfectly within that Alzheimer's Awareness Month and people can get the book, I'm assuming wherever books are sold. That's my understanding. I would assume that wherever books are sold, it's printed through Harper horizon, which is an imprint within HarperCollins. And one last question regarding the book. And this is a more personal question for you. Is it upon writing the book? Did it give you time to reflect? And did it feel cathartic for you? Did it give you any sense of closure around your living with a person living with the disease?   31:51 It certainly was cathartic with without a question. But I think that one, one of the main things I got from this book is much I wanted to do something to help other people not both through what I as ignorant caregiver went through, and also what I might be able to do to help caregivers help their loved one with with dementia live their best lives possible. And the because I think back again, on our past 18 years, and I think how it could have been easier, as difficult as it was, it could have been easier. And it's not a matter of getting enough money to fly to the moon and back. It's it's a matter of just simply understand some some some basic factors and, and dealing with some unknown quantities, but no, it was it was quite an experience to write that book. And I'm glad that we were able to do it. And I want to tell you that I'm grateful for for being able to talk about this. And and also grateful that I think, hopefully we're going to be able to help some more caregivers learn cope and survive.   33:16 Perfect. And where can people find you? Let's say they have questions they want to talk to you they want to get in touch with with you, what is the best way to do that?   33:26 We have a website. That's right, my two Elaine's all one word.com And guys should anything and I have been up until COVID giving talks around the country learning and really everything that I shared with you about what caregivers go through, I can tell you, whether it's it's Newmark, Minnesota, Florida. St. Louis, I don't care where it is, that is simply an overlay of almost every single caregiver as how they're trying to cope with this disease. So but I also wanted to mention you gave the 800 number for the Alzheimer's Association. That's a 24/7 number. And so there are going to be some moments where you're just not going to be able to figure out how am I going to cope with this? Well, if you give them a number, I mean, give them a call, they will be able to help either give you an answer or point you in the right direction.   34:32 Perfect. And before we wrap things up. I have one last question. It's a question I asked everyone who comes on the show. And that is knowing where you are now in your life and given your illustrious career. What advice would you give to your younger self, and that may be that younger self was that freshman in high school when you met your wife or maybe it was in the midst of your being the governor? What advice knowing where you are in Now would you give to yourself as a younger man?   35:05 Live in the moment. And we, you know, it's not only the fact that I didn't enjoy looking at the bird with the lane, it's probably the fact that I was too busy to take time to enjoy playing ball with my sons are too busy to take time to go to the museum with my daughters, and, you know, just, you know, being with them. But really my mind is someplace else worried about some other kind of thing over which I probably had no control over anyway. But I think to, to, to live in and understand and grasp and appreciate, and be thankful for the moment.   35:52 I think that was wonderful advice. Well, Marty, thank you so much for coming on the podcast and sharing, sharing this book with us. And so everyone, again, the book is called my two lanes, it is sold everywhere where books are sold. So I highly encourage you, especially and I'm gonna say this, especially for people in the health care profession. I'm a physical therapist, a lot of physical therapists listening to this, I think, especially for those people, because oftentimes we're with the patient, but we're not with the caregiver. And I think it's really important to get a full view of what the what life is like for everyone surrounding this patient. So I highly encourage you to go out and get this book and read this book. So Marty, thank you so much for coming on.   36:42 There. And I'm very grateful. One one thing, as as we, as we sort of parted company here, when I talk about joining the world of this person who now is to make sure that caregivers as well as healthcare professionals know and understand truly that you cannot argue with this disease. If when I took Elaine to daycare, and we would drive up to the door, and she said that she's not going in, there was no way that I would be able to with wild horses drag her out of that car so she could go into, you know, the daycare. And so it's a matter of redirection. So we would drive around a little bit. Some of the neighborhoods come back, here we are, and she would do that. Sometimes we would be at dinner, and she would reach across the table and grab someone else's wineglass. That's not yours. Put it down. No, it's Elaine. Thanks for finding that wineglass. If you wouldn't have grabbed it, it would have fallen off. And now we're able to give you Lena good feeling about being helpful, but at the same time, not creating an awkward situation. No, you can have that scarf. It's not yours. Well, thanks for finding the scarf, and so on. So, anyway, carry on. I'm grateful to you for what you do. I know that you help out people and that's really special and an honor for me to be with you. Thank you.   38:10 Well, thank you and everyone. Thanks so much for listening, have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart

Manic Mondays
Manic Mondays Episode 781: Nutritional, Suspicional and Sexsational

Manic Mondays

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 13:49


On this week's episode we'll fill you full of calories, tell you how unhealthy we all are and then we'll work it off, ancient-style! 1. €œSpaghetti in a Can€ by Zamuel 2. €œThe Phony and Fraudulent Oz€ by Lauren Mayer 3. News of the Stupid! 4. €œLet€s Do the Sex€ by Psychostick Zamuel is at SoundCloud.com/iamzamuel Lauren Mayer is on YouTube at Psychosupermom and Psychostick is at Psychostick.com Thank you to our Patreon backers for helping make this show possible!!!

Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast
4 Points to Address Resident Engagement and Staff Education with Dementia Care Trainer Dr. Jennifer Stelter

Bridge the Gap: The Senior Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 27:57


Learn about simple resident engagement techniques for those with dementia and the power of educating caregivers from Clinical Psychologist, certified Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia care trainer, and co-owner of NeuroEssence, Dr. Jennifer Stelter.Author of The Busy Caregiver's Guide to Advanced Alzheimer Disease through Johns Hopkins Press can be ordered today.Listen to Dr. Stelter on Ep. 175.Request an Invite for the VIP Ignite Experience, August 28-30, 2022.Listen to the Activities Strong series, powered by Linked Senior. Sponsored by Accushield, Connected Living, Hamilton CapTel, Enquire, LTC REIT, OneDay, Meridian Capital, iN2L, Solinity, and The Bridge Group Construction.Connect with BTG on social media:YouTubeInstagramFacebookTwitterLinkedInMeet the Hosts:Lucas McCurdy, @SeniorLivingFan Owner, The Bridge Group Construction; Senior Living Construction Renovation - CapEx - Reposition   Joshua Crisp, Founder and CEO, Solinity; Senior Living Development - Management - Consulting - MarketingProduced by Solinity Marketing.

This Week In Wellness
TWIW 157: Social isolation linked to dementia

This Week In Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 5:12


And this week I have a favour to ask. If you like this show and would like more people to be exposed to this kind of wellness research I would LOVE it if you could hit pause now and head to iTunes to leave me a 5 star review. Now onto the news… And This Listen In The post TWIW 157: Social isolation linked to dementia appeared first on The Wellness Couch.

Dementia Care Partner Talk Show with Teepa Snow
151: Grieving the Loss of Someone Who is Still on Their Journey Through Dementia

Dementia Care Partner Talk Show with Teepa Snow

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 10:53


How can you process your grief for a loved one that is living with dementia as they transition from one GEMS State to another, multiple times a day? Meaning, they can hold a conversation one minute, and not remember where they are shortly afterwards. Join us this week as Teepa and Greg discuss what strategies care partners can take, and what we need to keep in mind. To learn more about Positive Approach to Care, please visit us at www.teepasnow.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dementiacaregivertalkshow/message

All Home Care Matters
Discover the California Caregiver Resource Centers

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 47:42


All Home Care Matters was honored to welcome two executive directors from the California Caregiver Resource Centers to share and discuss the tremendous work that the California Caregiver Resource Centers are doing to help support families and caregivers. The California Caregiver Resource Centers (CRCs) are a network of 11 centers throughout California which annually serve over 18,000 family caregivers, who are caring for adults affected by chronic and debilitating health conditions, degenerative diseases, or traumatic brain injury. Combined, the CRCs serve every county in California. Each CRC tailors its services to its geographic area, and offers family caregivers a range of core programs from counseling and care planning, to legal/financial consulting and respite, at low to no cost. John Beleutz, Executive Director of Del Mar Caregiver Resource Center and Michelle DiBuduo, Executive Director of Valley Caregiver Resource Center, are here to represent the CRCs. John, Executive Director of Del Mar CRC since 2006, has dedicated his career to delivering quality health and social services for vulnerable people. His work experience includes: Director of the Health Education and Training Center for the Community Health Partnership, Director of US Programs and Romania Country Representative for Population Services International, and Executive Director of the Pitt County AIDS Service Organization. Michelle, Executive Director of Valley CRC since 2011, has been involved with Valley CRC in many various capacities. In 2000, Michelle was introduced to Valley CRC through her mother's illness, and then she became a volunteer. From 2000-2011 she was involved in caregiver education, outreach and fundraising. Her background includes accounting for her families' companies for over 35 years.

The President's Daily Brief
June 10th, 2022. American Leadership is Failing in South America. China Initiates Another Lockdown. Direct Connection Between Lockdowns and Dementia.

The President's Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 21:24


It's June 10th. You're listening to the President's Daily Brief. I'm your host and former CIA Officer Bryan Dean Wright. Your morning intel starts now. First, Joe Biden is hosting leaders from North and South America this week. Well actually, not all of them. And that's a problem. I'm going to explain why their absence was a dangerous failure of American leadership. As always, I'm keeping an eye out for developing stories. Put these two on your radar. First, more COVID lockdowns to report this morning, but not in America. It's China this time — again — just days after they opened back up. I'll explain what's going on and why this is more bad news for your pocket book. Finally, all these COVID lockdowns — in China, here in America — well they have taken a toll. I've got a study out this morning that proves it: there's a direct connection between lockdowns and the risk of dementia. And, one last thing: I've got a very special weekend request. All up next on the President's Daily Brief. ------ Please remember to subscribe if you enjoyed this episode of the President's Daily Brief. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Parenting UP! Caregiving adventures with comedian J Smiles

Zetty, the co-star of the podcast, attempts to lead several groundbreaking conversations but the "N" word continues to arise leaving J Smiles stymied. Snuggle Up to hear another saga of ALZ's favorite DUO. We want to hear your comments  & future topic suggestions:TEXT a purple heart   "

All Home Care Matters
An Interview with Marie Vaudry, Founder of Gleam in Your Eye

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 51:02


All Home Care Matters is excited to welcome Marie Vaudry the founder of Gleam in Your Eye. Gleam in Your Eye is a dementia activity and resource that is helping families with loved ones with dementia stay active and engaged. In 2021, Marie set out to create a more comprehensive experience that includes logical activities, while also addressing the sensory and physical needs of patients. Surrounded by a passionate team, she founded Gleam in Your Eye and developed an innovative product offering a monthly subscription box filled with fun and stimulating activities. The boxes are delivered directly to the homes of patients, making life easier for caregivers. Each box includes five different games, designed to engage the senses, provoke logical thinking, invite play with words, stimulate artistic expression and encourage light physical moves. Gleam in Your Eye is a monthly subscription box of games adapted for people with moderate dementia. Like everyone, these persons deserve a positive environment and interactions in their day-to-day lives. That's why all the games have been designed to keep them entertained and stimulated.